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Crossword clues for run

run
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
run
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a ditch runs along/down etc sth
▪ A muddy ditch ran along the side of the field.
a lease runs out (also a lease expiresformal) (= it stops)
▪ Their lease runs out in June.
a lease runs (=continues for a period of time)
▪ The lease will run for 21 years.
a licence runs out (also a licence expiresformal) (= it ends)
▪ Her driver’s license had expired.
a morning coffee/run/swim (=that someone does, drinks etc in the morning)
▪ She read the paper while drinking her morning coffee.
a play runs (=it continues to be performed)
▪ The play ran for five months.
a river runs (=it flows in a particular direction )
▪ the place where the river runs into the sea
a road leads/goes/runs somewhere
▪ We turned into the road leading to the village.
a run of good/bad luck (=a series of good or bad things)
▪ The team has had a run of bad luck lately, losing their last five games.
a running commentary (=continuous commentary while an event is happening)
▪ The coach driver gave us a running commentary on where we were going.
a running joke (=in which people always laugh when the same situation happens, or when someone says something)
▪ It’s a running joke in our house that my husband can never find his keys.
a running tap
▪ Wash the cut under a running tap.
a scar runs somewhere
▪ A scar ran from the corner of his eye to under his jawbone.
a shudder ran/passed/went through sb
▪ A shudder ran through him at the touch of her fingers.
a tap is running (=water is flowing out of it)
▪ I think you must have left the tap running.
an engine runs
▪ He parked outside the bank and kept the engine running.
be running scared (=feel scared, especially because someone might catch you or defeat you)
▪ The opposition were running scared.
be worth it in the long run
▪ All our hard work will be worth it in the long run.
be/get/run low (on sth)
▪ We’re running low on gas.
▪ Stocks are getting low.
buses run (=go at regular times)
▪ The buses run less frequently on a Sunday.
cheap to run/use/maintain etc
▪ Gas appliances are usually cheaper to run than electric ones.
▪ For the employer, a part-time workforce means a cheap labour supply.
chicken run
come running/flying/speeding etc
▪ Jess came flying round the corner and banged straight into me.
day-to-day running
▪ The manager is responsible for the day-to-day running of the hotel.
doing the school run
▪ We hope to increase the safety of children who walk to school and cut the number of cars doing the school run.
do/run/swim a lap
▪ Every morning she swims 50 laps in the pool.
dry run
▪ Both the parties are treating the local elections as a dry run.
dummy run
▪ Do a dummy run to see how long it will take.
feelings are running high (=people have strong feelings, especially of anger)
▪ It was the last game of the season, and feelings were running high.
fun run
go/run through a checklist (=read it to see what still needs doing)
▪ I’ll just run through the checklist one more time.
hit...home run
▪ I didn’t think I could hit a home run.
hit/run into a snag
▪ The grand opening hit a snag when no one could find the key.
home run
▪ I didn’t think I could hit a home run.
imagination...run wild
▪ Be creative – allow your imagination to run wild.
inflation is running at 3%/4% etc (also inflation stands at 3%/4% etc) (= used to talk about the present rate of inflation)
▪ Inflation currently stands at 3.2%.
laugh till you cry/laugh till the tears run down your face
▪ He leaned back in his chair and laughed till the tears ran down his face.
lay/run a cable (=put one in position somewhere)
▪ In the 1860s the first cables were laid under the oceans.
let your imagination run wild (also let your imagination run riot British English) (= allow yourself to imagine many strange or wonderful things)
▪ He uses painting as a way of letting his imagination run riot.
manage/run a farm
▪ He manages a large dairy farm.
meet (with) opposition/run into opposition (=face opposition)
▪ A new tax would meet a lot of opposition.
▪ The Bill ran into opposition in the House of Lords.
milk run
passions run high (=people are very excited, angry, or upset)
▪ The judge's decision is expected today and passions are running high.
print run
publish/carry/run an article (=print it in a newspaper or magazine)
▪ The magazine carried an article on the dangers of being overweight.
ran full tilt
▪ She ran full tilt into his arms.
ran headlong into
▪ Mortimer almost ran headlong into a patrol.
ran the gamut (=included all the possibilities between two extremes)
▪ Her feelings that day ran the gamut of emotions .
ran up a...tab
▪ He ran up a $4000 tab in long-distance calls.
ran...marathon
▪ Garcia ran the marathon in just under three hours.
ran...ragged (=made them do a lot of work)
▪ He ran United’s defence ragged .
rat run
▪ The road has become a rat run for traffic avoiding the town centre.
run a business (=manage it)
▪ There’s plenty of advice available on how to run your own business.
run a café (=be in charge of a café)
▪ His father ran a café in Lerwick.
run a car (=have a car and pay for the petrol, repairs etc it needs)
▪ People on low incomes can’t afford to run a car.
run a check (=especially on something that is strange or suspicious)
▪ You should run a virus check before downloading from the Internet.
run a club (=organize one)
▪ My Dad helps to run the rowing club.
run a competition (=organize it)
▪ The company is running an inventions competition with a first prize of £1,000.
run a course
▪ The course is run by the British Council.
run a headline (=use a headline)
▪ One tabloid paper ran the headline: ‘Disney Theme Park Found On Mars’.
run a program
▪ You have to input this information every time you run the program.
run a race
▪ I thought I ran a good race.
run a story (=print it or broadcast it)
▪ There wasn't enough definite information to run the story.
run a tap (=make water flow out of it)
▪ She stood at the sink, running the tap to get a glass of cold water.
run an empire (=be in charge of it)
▪ She now runs a whole media empire.
run concurrently
▪ Because his prison sentences run concurrently, he could be free in two years.
run for election (also stand for election British English) (= try to become elected)
▪ If you plan to stand for election to the committee, you must be nominated by three members.
run for shelter
▪ The residents were running for shelter from the bombing.
run free
▪ The animals are allowed to run free in the park.
run into six figures (=be over £100,000 or $100,000)
▪ The final cost of the project will easily run into six figures.
run into/get into difficulties (=find yourself in a difficult situation)
▪ Three people were rescued from a boat that had got into difficulties.
run on fuel (=use fuel as the source of power)
▪ Will this engine run on unleaded fuel?
run on petrol
▪ Many older vehicles have been converted to run on unleaded petrol.
run out into a road
▪ He had to swerve when a child ran out into the road.
run out of energy (=have no more energy)
▪ The players seemed to be running out of energy.
run out of fuel (=use all the fuel available and have none left)
▪ The ship ran out of fuel and drifted helplessly.
run out of patience (with sb)
▪ She was wonderful with the children, and never ran out of patience.
run out of petrol
▪ They ran out of petrol some miles from their destination.
run rate
run software
▪ To run the software, you will need the latest version of Windows.
run the length of sth (=exist along the whole length of something)
▪ A long corridor ran the length of the building.
run track
▪ The next year he didn’t run track or play football.
run up a bill (=use a lot of something so that you have a big bill to pay)
▪ It’s easy to run up a big bill on your mobile phone.
run up debts (also amass debtsformal) (= borrow more and more money)
▪ At that time he was drinking a lot and running up debts.
run your fingers through sb’s hair (=touch someone’s hair in a loving way)
▪ He ran his fingers through her smooth silky hair.
run your fingers through/over/along etc sth
▪ She ran her fingers through his hair.
run/carry an advertisement (=print or broadcast an advertisement)
▪ Broadcasters are no longer allowed to run cigarette advertisements.
run/govern the country (=officially control a country)
▪ The government has the job of running the country.
run/keep a tight ship (=manage a company, organization etc strictly and effectively)
run...macro
▪ You can run a macro to change to US spelling.
run/manage a company
▪ Nick runs a property company.
run/manage a hotel
▪ They run a small hotel in Cornwall.
running a fever (=has a fever)
▪ She’s running a fever.
running costs
running errands
▪ I seemed to spend my life running errands for people.
running gag (=a joke which is repeated)
▪ It was a bit of a running gag in the show.
running mate
running parallel
▪ Take the road running parallel to the main road just after the village.
running repairs (=small things that you do to something to keep it working properly)
▪ Farm workers made their own tools and carried out their own running repairs.
running repairs
running smoothly
▪ Donna keeps the office running smoothly.
running time
running water (=water that comes out of a system of pipes into buildings)
▪ Only half the city’s houses had running water.
running/jogging/training etc shoes
▪ Get yourself a good pair of running shoes if you want to take up running.
running/operating costs (=the amount it costs to run a business, a machine etc)
▪ The new technology is cheaper and the running costs are lower.
run/operate a scheme
▪ Parent volunteers help run the scheme.
run/operate etc at a loss (=to earn less money from something you sell than it costs you to produce it)
▪ Two of the mines are running at a loss.
run/operate/do sth on a shoestring
▪ The program was run on a shoestring.
run/wage/conduct a campaign (=carry out a campaign)
▪ He ran an aggressive campaign.
sb's nose is running (=liquid is coming out)
▪ She was crying hard and her nose was running.
sb's visa expires/runs out (=it ends)
▪ I had 14 days to leave the country because my visa had expired.
sb’s luck runs out (=they stop having good luck)
▪ Finally my luck ran out and they caught me.
sb’s watch is fast/runs fast (=it shows a later time)
▪ No, it’s only 12.15 – your watch must be fast.
sb’s watch is slow/runs slow (=it shows an earlier time)
▪ 'He’s late.' 'Maybe his watch is running slow.'
school run
▪ We hope to increase the safety of children who walk to school and cut the number of cars doing the school run.
score a goal/point/run etc
▪ He has scored 12 goals so far this season.
shiver ran through (=went through)
▪ A shiver ran through me.
ski run
smooth running/operation
▪ Sarah is responsible for the smooth running of the sales department.
software/a program runs on a computer
▪ You’ll need the appropriate software running on your computer.
sth is running low on fuel (=it does not have much fuel left)
▪ The plane was running low on fuel.
sth takes/runs its course (=develops in the usual or natural way)
▪ There was nothing we could do except watch the illness run its course.
sweat runs/pours somewhere
▪ My hand was shaking and sweat was pouring off my forehead.
tears run/roll/stream down sb’s face
▪ Oliver laughed until tears ran down his face.
test run
the school runBritish English (= the journey taking children to and from school each day)
▪ She had to be back in time for the school run.
thread running through
▪ a thread running through the film
time is running out (=there is not much time left to do something)
▪ Doctors are looking for a suitable donor, but time is running out.
time’s running short
▪ Come on, time’s running short!
trains run (=take people from one place to another at fixed times)
▪ Trains run from two main London stations, Victoria and Charing Cross, every hour.
trial run
▪ This year is something of a trial run for the new service.
up and running
▪ There could well be a few problems before your new computer is up and running properly.
use/run/operate a system
▪ They use a system of grades to evaluate each hospital’s performance.
▪ We operate a booking system.
water runs
▪ I let the cool water run down my back.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
off
▪ There were some heart-stopping moments in the Town goalmouth, but they survived and nearly ran off with a win.
▪ He ran off, shouting his news.
▪ The cabby refused and grabbed him by the arm, at which point the robber pulled free and ran off.
▪ George and Russell were talking about a white-face year-ling that had run off earlier in the summer.
▪ Water running off the maize fields is contaminated with dieldrin, then drunk by cattle.
▪ Cowher was screaming at him and backpedaling as the official tried to run off the field.
▪ They ran off as fast as their legs would carry them.
▪ Trying to run off left tackle, he collided with his own lineman.
smoothly
▪ Once the engine is running smoothly, a backfire can be dramatic.
▪ Tiny, energetic, imaginative, she drove advertising sales to ever-new heights and kept the business departments running smoothly.
▪ My job as duty officer involves keeping Teesside Airport running smoothly at all times.
▪ I am here to see that this runs smoothly for New York and New York delegation.
▪ Yes, things were running smoothly once more.
▪ Though they seemed to have refined the outward form of marriage, I suspected that underneath not everything ran smoothly.
▪ Remember how the cool salad dressing ran smoothly over the crunchy lettuce.
▪ Like every other business, it needs good management to keep it running smoothly, especially during times of change.
up
▪ Every major road out of the centre had its tramway running up the centre of a dual carriageway.
▪ Then the boy ran up the stairs and slammed his bedroom door.
▪ The rat turned, ran up the rope again and disappeared.
▪ Band members sing spontaneous and insulting ditties, needling the girls as they run up the court or in-bound the ball.
▪ Without the enormous costs run up by the Royal Navy vessel, the Yard would have made profits of £6.5m.
▪ Without even realizing, it runs up a payroll tax bill of $ 85, 000.
▪ Owls were hooting in the forest when some one came running up the path and hammered on the door.
▪ A grunt ran up and told us to crank.
■ NOUN
business
▪ You simply buy the rights to run a known-name business.
▪ Their entire squad consists of Mario, who runs a linen business.
▪ A remarkable 40 percent wanted to run their own business and a quarter expected to do so.
▪ He ran the business part time until last January.
▪ James Stavanger, the father of the present chairman, Andrew Stavanger, ran the business between the wars.
▪ So all I could do was try to get the property back, and with the license try to run a business.
▪ She runs a natural therapy business in nearby Brereton Heath.
▪ Liz decided she would work part-time in a bookstore on weekends and attend some seminars on starting and running a business.
campaign
▪ But it's also true that opponents will be free to run and campaign.
▪ Four years ago Mr Nader, now 66, was accused of running a lacklustre campaign.
▪ He is seen as having run a vigorous campaign, despite a lack of resources.
▪ The two joked about running a joint write-in campaign, then started to take the joke seriously.
▪ He runs a clever grassroots campaign based on small contributors and free radio time.
▪ The option of private employment aside, Vargas has been acting like some one running a campaign.
▪ A concatenation of events particularly damaging Mrs Thatcher was subsequently compounded by errors of tactics and organisation by those running her campaign.
▪ He ran a lackluster campaign for president in the 1992 primaries.
course
▪ Target business to be run in ordinary course up to completion with no material changes in trading performance or net assets.
▪ For nearly three weeks, doctors whittled at his body as the last of the burns ran their course.
▪ Regular times or meetings on the timetable ... It should be very clear who is running the course and the methods.
▪ A bitter national depression, born of the panic of 1893, was near to running its course.
▪ Another attempt is being made to run an assertiveness course in the North-East.
▪ Yet no one wanted to commit troops until ethnic cleansing and exhaustion had run their course.
▪ The aim was to provide users with information on Microsoft Corp products and to run graduate and Masters courses in Microsoft technology.
▪ Instead, recessions will be allowed to run their course and governments will simply wait for a recovery.
engine
▪ To avoid this and also to facilitate starting, engines are set to run about fifteen percent rich on the ground.
▪ A jet turbine engine may run for 40, 000 hours before being rebuilt.
▪ Once the engine is running smoothly, a backfire can be dramatic.
▪ By adjusting the governor, Watt could vary the steam engine to run at any rate.
▪ The car engine continued to run despite my having the ignition key in my pocket!
▪ If it isn't mixed properly it won't burn and the engine won't run.
▪ Next to it stood the engine which ran it, and the engineer.
finger
▪ Then he ran his finger round his neck and held up three fingers of his left hand.
▪ He pushed more hair aside, ran his fingers down above his ear.
▪ Droplets of blood ran over his fingers and dripped on to the floor.
▪ More girls were chosen, grabbed their evening bags, ran quick fingers through their hair.
▪ I put my hand in and tapped the rear of the little compartment, running my fingers over the surface.
▪ He ran a mental finger down an imaginary list.
▪ He ran his fingers over the wall.
hand
▪ She ran a hand through her hair and glanced up at the fighters again, one arm linked through Plummer's.
▪ When he ran his hand over it, a sprinkle of grit fell to the floor.
▪ He ran a skeletal hand over the bristles of his hair.
▪ Here, touch this surface while running your other hand up the inside of your thigh.
▪ Clutching himself he crawled back to the cabinet and ran a tentative hand over the woodwork.
▪ I took a deep breath and ran my hands along my body.
▪ He tested the tension of each wire, and ran his hand over the timber to ensure the joinery was perfect.
▪ Sarah touched every wall, ran her hand over the woodwork, examined the closets and looked out the windows.
length
▪ A prickling sensation running the length of her spine told her that Rourke had made an appearance.
▪ The loft ran the length of the house from front to back, and it was lit by two unshaded forty-watt bulbs.
▪ The flexible rod in its back which runs the entire length of its body carries transverse bands of muscles.
▪ A verandah ran the length of the front of the house.
▪ Then winger Crawford Dobbin ran half the length of the pitch for the final score at the corner flag.
▪ A long corridor ran down the length of the building with doors leading off on both sides.
▪ I looked up and saw him clinging to a pipe that ran the length of one wall, high up.
▪ There were four steps at each end of a loading-bay which ran the full length of the house.
mile
▪ Aragorn can run 135 miles in three days; he lives in full vigour for 210 years, dying on his birthday.
▪ Mike Mussina looks like an athlete, lean and fit, ready to run the mile or pitch a no-hitter.
▪ Some of the tunnels must have run for miles, winding in and out of the channels of water that threaded everywhere.
▪ The road runs for another mile and then terminates, at the top of a hill.
▪ His pole was impaling her to the absolute limit, and she began panting as if she'd just run the four-minute mile.
▪ Owen Anderson kicks off by telling you the physical changes that occur when you run 26.2 miles.
office
▪ When the time came, one or other of the sons would come ashore to run the shipping offices.
▪ The hand workers I know, running for union office, are being bred out of existence, even as crypto-yuppies.
▪ The party was short of funds; and it was still being run from a tiny office with just four paid staff.
▪ If Chicago was bombed, people would all run out of their offices to drive home.
▪ He ran the office in Nice.
▪ Being the manager means running my own office, using my ideas and thoughts.
▪ Although more women than ever ran for office, there was no net change in the level of female representation.
▪ The citizens who stepped out of the crowd and ran for office Tuesday showed they had that trait.
risk
▪ Knowledge of a risk does not equal consent to run that risk.
▪ He did not want to run the risk of being brushed off.
▪ Anyone who after time purchases goods from the defendant therefore runs the risk of having them seized by the sheriff.
▪ A girl ran every risk of being killed if she confessed.
▪ If a council crossed an upper threshold implied by them it ran the risk of being capped.
▪ You always run the risk that your complaints get back to your boss, but you also might get some relief.
▪ To do so would run the risk of compromising the most vulnerable part of the operation.
▪ In less dramatic contexts many of us already run such risks.
road
▪ He turned into the main road that ran parallel with the unseen river.
▪ He cycled out of 3-Wing on to the Hay-on-Wye road that ran through the camp.
▪ It has several deep canyons incising into its southern flank, and an old road running within a few miles of it.
▪ Oliver, who had a natural distaste for policemen, crossed the road and ran home, on the other side.
▪ The empty road ran through thick jungle.
▪ The road, running for much of the time parallel to the river Wharfe, was almost deserted.
▪ The road runs for another mile and then terminates, at the top of a hill.
shop
▪ Mary Lowther, a fruiterer who runs a shop in Skinnergate.
▪ Soo ran out of the shop to buy food.
▪ Probably running a repair shop by now Or somebody's fleet.
▪ Have you noticed how every bookstore seems to run a coffee shop?
▪ His wife still runs a sweet shop in Buckinghamshire.
▪ She ran the village shop, and hers was a busy life indeed.
▪ Miss Asher also runs her own cake shop, which she opened three years ago in Chelsea.
▪ Significantly, Chipie has run its own shops, as well as wholesaling its clothes, almost from the start.
show
▪ Lord Hesketh had poured his own fortune into the team and it was in his nature to run the whole show.
▪ Besides, he was running the show.
▪ Who are we to tell them that sovereignty is an illusion and to deny them the opportunity to run their own show?
▪ We love the people who run the show.
▪ In the meantime she had a business to run and a show to prepare.
▪ Mary Ann Grabavoy and Cynthia Potter, a 1976 bronze medalist, will run the show.
▪ The charitable organisation, the trust I am talking about happens to have four Eastern Board managers running the show.
▪ Holzman says in a 1992 Nicholas Spark video that runs with the show.
steam
▪ M Mitterrand, in short, has run out of steam.
▪ The market rallied early in 1995, but then ran out of steam.
▪ My great-grandmother preferred to begin a meal with pudding in case she ran out of steam before the last course.
▪ His passion is to say if the constitutional model has run out of steam, change it.
▪ They have now run out of steam.
▪ Mr Chuan was perceived to have run out of steam.
tear
▪ It's true when they say the tears eventually run out.
▪ I cried till the tears all run down in my ears.
▪ I felt tears running down my cheeks.
▪ She hit the other one, and then sat stock-still; tears ran from her closed eyes.
▪ When she blinked, the tears overflowed and ran back along her cheekbones to her ears, where the swaddling absorbed them.
▪ These tears ran slowly down his face and over the hinges of his jaw, and there they rusted.
▪ Fighting back shocked tears, she ran to the front door.
▪ She burst into tears and ran down the hall to the kitchen.
trouble
▪ Mr Murdoch, like Mr Gower, has a way of playing that was bound to run into trouble.
▪ But Netanyahu could run into trouble with his Cabinet and top advisers, or other disagreements could break out among the negotiators.
▪ It depended for its prosperity on the local slate quarries and when these ran into trouble so did the railway.
▪ But they run into trouble when Maj.
▪ The women's union quickly ran into trouble though.
▪ Societies that treat their constituent members as identical pawns soon run into trouble.
▪ Some heavily-indebted developers have run into trouble, causing problems for the finance companies that back them.
▪ The firm ran into trouble last year after evidence of fraud was found at some of its sites.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a close run thing
▪ Exciting Ormskirk made it two wins out of three but it was a close run thing against New Brighton.
▪ It was a close run thing.
be firing/running on all cylinders
▪ The latter is a book in which the author is firing on all cylinders.
▪ This company is firing on all cylinders.
▪ Your Reticular Activating System is firing on all cylinders, your cortex is turning somersaults.
be in (good) working/running order
▪ Hall of Power - a range of engines and heavy machinery, most of which are in working order and operated daily.
▪ The locomotive was in working order at the time and negotiations proceeded which resulted in transportation to Swanage as described above.
▪ To this day the milling machinery is in working order.
▪ Two isn't multiplicity and Castelfonte never was in running order, and now they were living in hotels.
be in the running/out of the running
be running on empty
be running short (of/on sth)
▪ Let's go - time's running short.
▪ Many stores are running short on bottled water.
▪ Our supply of firewood was running short.
▪ As we are running short of time, let me end with one area where there is a clear divide.
▪ He was running short of petrol and that route offered him the chance to capture replenishments along the way.
▪ He was running short of time.
▪ Nevertheless, Baldwin felt his time was running short.
▪ San Francisco may be running short of characters, but new communities pop up every day.
▪ Still, time is running short.
▪ Time was running short for Lievin.
be rushed/run off your feet
▪ All the sales assistants are run off their feet. The shop ought to take on more staff.
▪ It's my son's birthday party tomorrow. I've been absolutely rushed off my feet getting ready for it.
▪ Bus managers were expecting to be rushed off their feet.
▪ He was in livery, and told me he was rushed off his feet.
▪ Obviously, the emergency services are run off their feet.
▪ There had been lots of problems, and they were rushed off their feet.
▪ We were rushed off our feet yesterday.
be/run in sb's blood
▪ It seemed to be in his blood.
▪ It would be in his blood in minutes.
▪ Psychic awareness ran in my blood.
be/run/go counter to sth
▪ A recipe would be counter to its nature.
▪ It ran counter to the ideas most Christians had held for well over a thousand years.
▪ It runs counter to his career-long concern with budget deficits.
▪ They operate in a way which runs counter to the original purpose of creation.
▪ This can apply to moral issues and anything which runs counter to the Bible's teaching.
▪ This would run counter to the very informal information exchange that gives it meaning in this internal context.
▪ While I did this, I was encouraging her to talk through opinions of her own that ran counter to these discussions.
get/go/run through sth
go/run around in circles
▪ We've got to solve the problem instead of running around in circles, writing letters that never get answered.
▪ I had a tendency to run around in circles getting more and more worked up.
▪ She jumps up and down and runs around in circles.
▪ That's why there are no solutions and the characters endlessly go around in circles in discussions.
go/run like clockwork
▪ A universe that ran like clockwork also evinced design.
▪ And if Lais and Leonore created the promised diversion the plan would go like clockwork.
▪ Sometimes it ran like clockwork, sometimes-as I wrote at the time-it ran like the movie Clockwise.
▪ Then we had been surprised when our ascent of the nearby Jankopiti had gone like clockwork.
▪ Whereas Prost had been delayed as the Ferrari mechanics fiddled with the right-rear wheel, Senna's stop went like clockwork.
go/run to seed
▪ And a production should not just be a matter of getting a good notice and leaving it to go to seed slowly.
▪ At the same time, a drought affected the area, and heliotrope had time to grow and go to seed.
▪ Formerly owned by Arthur Siegel, it had since gone to seed.
▪ Mark knows he has allowed himself to go to seed a bit.
▪ She looked middle-aged, overdressed, a show-girl gone to seed.
▪ The rest of the College, like the theatre, seems in Paul Pry's day to have run to seed.
▪ Their skin was as smooth as warm water, their hair as soft as a dandelion crown gone to seed.
go/run/flash etc through sb's mind
▪ I began to wonder what might be going through her mind.
▪ Over and over it ran through his mind.
▪ Perhaps more mundane thoughts went through her mind.
▪ The one occasion which was flashing through Yanto's mind at this moment involved just three of the local water babies.
▪ The past twenty-two months flashed through my mind like film run at high speed, and suddenly I felt rather tired.
▪ The thought ran through my mind I heard chaos outside.
▪ This was staggering new information, and all kinds of ideas were flashing through our minds.
▪ Who lived there and what was going through their minds?
in running order
▪ A nightly news programme, involving late inclusions and enforced changes in running order, is bound to be frenetic.
▪ Keep the battery fully charged and the engine in running order.
▪ Two isn't multiplicity and Castelfonte never was in running order, and now they were living in hotels.
in the long run/term
▪ Arguably, however, the implications of the Manchester North-West result were to become more apparent in the long term.
▪ But in the long run, it has proved impossible to continue down this path.
▪ However limited its immediate effects, the ideology of Enlightened Despotism was important in the long term.
▪ I don't know what good it did David in the long run because what it did was cost a lot of money.
▪ It invites us to reflect on history with a slower pulse-rate, history in the longer term.
▪ The consequences of violating this rule had always been unhappy in the long run and not infrequently in the short.
▪ The funding to do anything, however, must in the long run derive from national resources.
▪ Yet the saving of money, in the long run, was more important to Mowat than the saving of scenery.
in the short term/run
▪ These measures may save some money in the short term, but we'll just end up spending more later.
▪ Although those measures would cost money in the short term, Rep.
▪ Even marriage into the royal family only assured such support in the short term.
▪ Evidently not, in the short term, but in the long term Fangorn knows his race and story are sterile.
▪ Giving sanctuary to political asylum-seekers is seldom rewarded on earth, at least in the short term.
▪ He predicted more volatile dealings in the short run.
▪ The vocabulary of every language is so vast that there is no way to eliminate all such hazards in the short run.
▪ Which are the campaign promises that you believe you can deliver on in the short term?
make (all) the running
▪ As the race started, Dettori decided to make the running.
▪ Busy Martin Ling made the running.
▪ Collins made the running down the left and found Slater at the back-post.
▪ Hodkinson, encouraged by his corner, was now making all the running.
▪ Painfully and in the open she had to make all the running.
▪ That was precisely what women had done in the past - sit back and wait for men to make the running.
▪ The wary fighter backs off from you and so must be encouraged to make all the running.
▪ When this is so, a visit will always go well if they are allowed to make the running.
make sb's blood run cold
▪ But whenever she passed the wood the tales rushed back into her mind and made her blood run cold.
▪ Ex-inmate Tony Cohla told yesterday how the thought of ever returning to Ashworth makes his blood run cold.
▪ He said their evidence had made his blood run cold.
run a risk
▪ If your body temperature rises above 106 degrees, you run a great risk of getting heat stroke.
▪ Men run a greater risk of dying from heart disease than women.
▪ Rather than running the risks of using harmful pesticides in your garden, try using natural or organic methods of pest control.
▪ The people who use these drugs are often unaware of the risks they are running.
▪ As an outsider, Zhou could run a risk.
run afoul of sb/sth
▪ Burgess' illegal use of alcohol ran afoul of the code, a point the righteous Karnaugh was quite eager to make.
▪ Here I simply introduce them to you and describe how Iberian managers ran afoul of them. 1.
▪ The bill signed by Leavitt attempts to ban gay student groups without running afoul of this statute.
▪ Two men died and two boys were seriously injured as vehicles ran afoul of washed-out roads.
run amok
▪ Troops were allowed to run amok in the villages.
▪ But speculation about whether he had accomplices has run amok.
▪ Don't let him go running amok, Bill.
▪ Double-entendre lyrics run amok at this sonic strip club from hell.
▪ I think Mum worried that I might run amok and stick my penknife straight into Katie.
▪ No, our kids are not running amok.
▪ The Zekes come in against the line of P-40s, one runs amok as others erupt in flames.
▪ There were Peace Rallies in the 1960s, with stone-throwing anarchists running amok.
▪ With Thatcher running amok through the welfare state, lobby groups are preoccupied defending what was once thought unassailable.
run around like a headless chicken
▪ The arcade section is hideous, featuring computer-controlled players running around like headless chickens and never attempting a tackle.
run interference
▪ Truscati's job is to run interference for troubled kids with their parents, schools, and the courts.
▪ Even with Hilton Railey running interference, the first twenty-four hours in London were rocky indeed.
run into/hit the buffers
run out of steam
▪ Fuel protest runs out of steam A national protest by truckers demanding cheaper fuel turned out to be a low-key affair.
▪ His passion is to say if the constitutional model has run out of steam, change it.
▪ Mr Chuan was perceived to have run out of steam.
▪ The Damascus government has run out of steam after 30 years in power.
▪ The market rallied early in 1995, but then ran out of steam.
run out the clock/kill the clock
run rife
run rings around sb
▪ Each time the Congress met, which was roughly every six months, Boris Yeltsin ran rings around it.
▪ For sheer cleverness she could run rings around them all.
run riot
▪ Ann let her imagination run riot as she wrote.
▪ Roses ran riot up the wall.
▪ All kinds of wild ideas ran riot in my brain.
▪ Because of her weakened state her imagination had run riot.
▪ Boro threatened to run riot but could not provide the finishing touch.
▪ Confusion ran riot in Ruth's heart.
▪ In the Pilkington final two years ago, they ran riot over the Cherry and Whites.
▪ Now, when far greater things were at stake, she had allowed her emotions to run riot.
▪ The objects left in the churchyard were open to all manner of interpretation and imagination could run riot.
▪ When Coleridge got on one and let his imagination run riot, he came up with Kubla Khan.
run roughshod over sb/sth
run sb close
run sb/sth to earth
▪ He hadn't been there that morning and now she had run him to earth in the café.
run sb/sth to ground
▪ Badminton: Hall runs Baddeley to ground.
run the gauntlet
▪ A defendant should be required to run the gauntlet of the criminal court system only once.
▪ As they left afterwards, they had to run the gauntlet of television cameras and reporters.
▪ But in announcing the move Chris Dean had to run the gauntlet of press more interested in his private life.
▪ John and all the celebrities had to run the gauntlet of gun muzzles.
▪ So it was rather a question of running the gauntlet when passing over the Sayers' land.
▪ Their budgets are closely controlled by Congress and any departmental legislative proposals will have to run the gauntlet of Congressional scrutiny.
▪ They recognized that some of their objectives could be reached by administrative action without running the gauntlet of the legislative process.
▪ Yet neither of them had to run the gauntlet of hate that Barmby has experienced.
run to fat
run wild
▪ Football fans ran wild through the city.
▪ Organized crime has been running wild since the collapse of the old regime.
▪ Pam just lets here kids run wild.
▪ She allowed her imagination to run wild.
▪ At first they were probably running wild, with panic and fear uppermost!
▪ Because now the workers could run wild.
▪ Central bankers are allowing global capital to run wild.
▪ I tell ya, our kids are running wild.
▪ In the absence of brakes, the system runs wild.
▪ The children run wild, in shirts and jeans.
▪ They ran wild, but he was sure a father could correct their ways.
▪ They run wild into the woods, filthy, skeletal and naked.
run/cast your eye over sth
▪ A note from Mellowes instructed me to cast my eye over the draft, pronto, for inaccuracies.
▪ Above him Cornelius ran his eye over a box of ancient cane carpet beaters.
▪ And of course Prince also casts his eye over rock too.
▪ He also casts his eye over the proposed law changes.
▪ I cast my eye over the front page of the Telegraph while Anne poured the coffee.
▪ The customs officers run their eyes over us as if we weren't there.
▪ They've even invited Michael Heseltine, care of Spitting Image, to cast his eyes over the exhibition.
run/extend the (full) width of sth
▪ Even the view from the big window that runs the width of her office is unadorned.
▪ It ran the width of the ship and was full of machinery.
▪ She led them on to a small covered terrace running the full width of the house.
▪ The room she entered ran the width of the house, with windows at both ends.
run/go aground
▪ More than 72,000 tonnes of crude oil spilled into the estuary after the tanker ran aground in 1996.
▪ The beach was long, flat and shelved so gently that no normal vessel could have come ashore without running aground.
▪ The Ecuadorean tanker Jessica started leaking diesel oil after running aground last week.
▪ The pirate station, which ran aground last November, is using equipment and records donated by listeners.
▪ The prosecution's case had turned primarily on the allegation that he was drunk when his ship ran aground.
▪ Y., to Providence, ran aground Friday afternoon after the tugboat pushing it was disabled by an unexplained explosion.
run/go deep
▪ But the main problem goes deeper and will take longer to solve.
▪ Maude, on the other hand, had gone deep into the pluperfect, eleven generations of it.
▪ So did it go deeper than that?
▪ The debt goes deeper than money.
▪ The play goes deep and inspires all sorts of questions.
▪ The tradition of dressing up a corporate image in print runs deep at Investor Insight and its affiliates.
▪ They can play at being still waters that run deep.
run/go dry
▪ The reservoir ran dry during the drought.
▪ Every available hotel room was rented out and, on some weekends, county gasoline pumps ran dry.
▪ If the trend continues, he said, the springs will go dry.
▪ If the valve has jammed shut, causing the feed-and-expansion tank to run dry, again turn off the water supply.
▪ Laura McCaffrey went dry slope skiing at Calshot Activities Centre,.
▪ Stock tanks normally brimming with water have gone dry.
▪ The rivers, too, are beginning to run dry.
▪ Time allowed 00:06 Read in studio A soft drinks company says its could run dry if it doesn't get enough elderflowers.
▪ With this agreement, our families are for ever linked, even if the rivers run dry and the oceans become deserts.
run/go hell for leather
run/go/drive etc like the clappers
▪ Little legs going like the clappers.
▪ Male speaker Inside you are going like the clappers because you are nervous and the tension is building up.
run/hurt/fight etc like hell
▪ I know he lost his legs first, and then his fingers-he died alone and it hurt like hell.
▪ I remember running like hell, knowing I was being pursued and looking back for Sarah, who didn't join me.
▪ I was able to breathe only with the utmost difficulty, and my arm hurt like hell.
▪ Must have fought like hell to find its niche within the forest, to distinguish itself within the pack.
▪ My forehead hurt like hell and my body was bruised all over, but no bones were broken.
▪ Run, North, run; just run like hell.
▪ Spring sauntered north, but he had to run like hell to keep it as his traveling companion.
▪ We fought like hell for most of the time.
run/stretch/walk etc the (full) length of sth
▪ A faint scar ran the length of his left cheek.
▪ I always enjoyed walking the full length of the street to check how the other shops were faring.
▪ I would have to walk the length of the shed to reach him.
▪ Next door, the living room is large and beautifully proportioned, running the length of the house.
▪ The loft ran the length of the house from front to back, and it was lit by two unshaded forty-watt bulbs.
▪ Then Red runs the length of the court, grabs a pass, drives to the basket and sinks one.
running battle/joke
▪ A man whose name is so synonymous with a suntan that it is a running joke in Doonesbury?
▪ An even longer running battle was fought in the royal dockyards.
▪ As well as his running battle with Monkou, he left stud marks on defender Richard Hall.
▪ I was not told, when we left, that I should have to fight a running battle with four hundred horsemen.
▪ In the resulting confrontation several hundred Mohawks armed with clubs and guns fought running battles with police.
▪ Police and demonstrators regularly engage in running battles near Mr Suharto's home in central Jakarta.
▪ The fighters quickly pursued them and eventually shot down every one in a running battle.
▪ They saw graffiti on important public memorials and they saw running battles with the police.
running commentary
▪ Attending is simply describing what the child is doing, rather like a running commentary on the activity.
▪ Don't keep up a running commentary.
▪ Hearing voices that keep up a running commentary in the head.
▪ His running commentary was oft-repeated, I guess.
▪ It becomes a running commentary from navigator to driver.
▪ Photos of Jack were shown, each thrown up on a large screen with a running commentary.
▪ This man provided a running commentary on the events on the screen, which were otherwise a fabulous mystery.
running sore
▪ And Nat was like a running sore, crabby, miserable.
▪ But finally, she would make of it an ulcer, a running sore that would never heal.
▪ For Horace it might have been a short madness; in Frere it threatened to become a running sore.
▪ In fact Meadowell is an Elastoplast name like Sizewell, invented in the 1970s to disguise what was already a running sore.
▪ Such protestations ferment a running sore which breeds contempt for the authorities.
running total
▪ Keep a running total of your expenses.
▪ And you told me you've kept a running total in your head all the year.
▪ The cost will simply be kept for each project as a running total entered by hand in a cost ledger.
running water
▪ The sound of running water could be heard like faint background music.
▪ They lived in a one-room trailer with no running water.
▪ A sophisticated technology brought running water into private homes, public bathhouses and imperial palaces.
▪ Although during the winter there had been no running water this had been restored at least in the centre of the town.
▪ In addition Drake set up artificial ecologies in aquaria and in running water for artificial stream ecologies.
▪ Somehow, over the running water, she finally heard the loud knocking on the cabin door.
▪ The village and ashram had no running water, electricity, fans, radio, or telephone.
▪ They have no electricity, running water or school; their church collapsed years ago.
▪ We hike up a little more than a mile and find running water.
▪ We were looked at with the same sense of distrust that must have greeted the first plumber who installed running water there.
still waters run deep
take a running jump
▪ Or, as the Palace will no doubt be recommending to the duchess in due course ... take a running jump.
the running of sth
▪ Maria helped her mother with the running of the household.
▪ At first all criticism of the running of the war was muted and was aimed at measures rather than men.
▪ Changez didn't seem ready to take over the running of Paradise Stores.
▪ Chapman's revolutionary ideas extended also to the running of the national team.
▪ Even doing the housework with Aunt Margaret satisfied her; she had a part to play in the running of the home.
▪ Packers' shareholders have no say in the running of their team.
▪ Relocation is bound to cause a certain amount of disruption in the running of the business.
▪ Since Father died and Mam walked out I've had the running of this house on my shoulders.
▪ The government mobilized troops, ostensibly to maintain order and the running of public services.
the running order
▪ There are a few changes in the running order for the teachers' conference.
▪ So Jonathan set the running order up and I was really pleased.
three years/five times etc running
work/drive/run yourself into the ground
▪ But don't drive yourself into the ground.
▪ I've already explained to you how I've worked myself into the ground setting up the interview.
▪ I tried working myself into the ground, but I could be totally exhausted and still remember.
▪ Mitchell and White ran themselves into the ground and Nicky Summerbee tried everything he could to get a goal.
▪ They ran themselves into the ground, ran Chesterfield off the pitch, but they couldn't get another goal.
work/run/go like stink
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A dog ran straight out in front of my car.
▪ a drug counselling service that is run by ex-addicts
▪ A stream runs along the bottom of the field.
▪ Barkley's contract only runs through next season.
▪ Caltrain runs commuter trains to San Jose.
▪ Christina runs a restaurant in Houston.
▪ Dorothy was reunited with her family after the newspaper ran her story.
▪ Ellis has not yet announced whether or not he will run.
▪ He kept on running until he was out in the open country.
▪ Her dog was running after a rabbit and did not hear her calling.
▪ How has your car been running lately?
▪ I'm afraid the colors ran when I washed your shirt.
▪ I've never run a marathon before.
▪ I ran four miles Saturday, and I can tell you I was exhausted after it.
▪ I ran screaming out of the house.
▪ I hope these jeans don't run when I wash them.
▪ I think I'll probably run for about 40 minutes, then come back for a shower.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As they ran on together across the flat open plateau, Yanto explained breathlessly what he had done.
▪ Most of the former inmates sought refuge in his abbey, and many stayed on to help run it.
▪ Mr Elliott suffered both internal and external injuries when he was allegedly run down twice by a car at the weekend.
▪ On my daily mail run to the Chautauqua office I feel the mountains over my shoulder stalking me.
▪ Sedentary men, particularly those over 40, should not start a running program without a physical exam, he said.
▪ The servant was frightened and ran away.
▪ They ran back and found Alice had been struck dead by lighting.
▪ We run into this problem here in Congress.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
free
▪ He's allowed the free run of the house.
▪ For a week, producer Robert Kemp had free run of the camp, interviewing whoever he chose for as long as he chose.
general
▪ What should we do when confronted with claims which are conspicuously at odds with the general run of experience?
▪ Credit taken by the general run of consumers - those not in an extremity of financial need - was not specially regulated.
▪ But the whole day had, thus far, been outside the general run, so laws no longer applied here.
▪ The general run of shoppers would not believe that the two girls came from the same family.
good
▪ Investors have also had a good run for their money.
▪ This sort of angle gives an arcade machine a good run for its money!
long
▪ In the long run, the outcome of the Delphi Chassis strike could be less important than the walkout itself.
▪ This could clearly, however, not be sufficient in the long run.
▪ In the long run, Begin could join forces with others in the far-right to challenge Likud.
▪ The truth may be that in the long run, as Lincoln thought, people are not fooled.
▪ Though the central banks wield enormous power, we should not overstate their ability to shape the economy in the long run.
short
▪ It showed the company that Orrick was willing to make a commitment to them by losing some money in the short run.
▪ However, in the short run, numerous factors may operate to cause changes in supply.
▪ In the short run this approach costs more.
▪ The problem worsens with the relentless financial pressures for immediate performance in the short run.
unbeaten
▪ United's 3-3 draw with Luton on Tuesday stretched their unbeaten run to four games since John Beck was sacked.
▪ The comment concerned the standard of opposition Leeds have been facing during this unbeaten run and in particular the last match.
▪ The 24-year-old turned on the style to stretch the Crues' unbeaten run and book a Gold Cup quarter-final spot.
▪ The scene looked set for another Bangor triumph, to continue their unbeaten run in domestic football.
▪ Ants U/16s continued their unbeaten run with a massive 42-0 victory over Bishop Challoner.
usual
▪ Anything of quality was exciting in those days, for the usual run of food was of a dullness today hardly comprehensible.
■ VERB
allow
▪ Jason Boyd allowed three runs in two innings.
▪ He has allowed two or fewer runs in seven of his last 11 starts.
▪ Had three unsuccessful starts in the postseason, allowing 11 runs in seven innings.
▪ He pitched the third inning and allowed two runs on four hits.
break
▪ Dhani and Ian broke into a run, taking the high altar steps three at a time.
▪ It was all I could do to stop myself breaking into a run.
▪ Thorfinn spurred, and the wedge of men behind him and behind Cormac and behind Ferteth broke into a pounding run.
▪ Bigwig turned into it and broke into a run.
end
▪ Barnet ended a run of four straight defeats by taking a point from their home game with Plymouth.
▪ The stalemate enabled the fallen champions to end a nine-match run of away defeats and extended Arsenal's poor home run.
▪ Skipper Colin Jeffrey, another talented batsmen, is hoping Brigade can end their recent run of disappointing batting displays.
make
▪ It was nice to be part of a winning side and even better to have made a few runs.
▪ As a batsman he made 3,882 runs at a modest average, but showed himself a robust tail-ender when it mattered.
score
▪ To score runs they had to put bat to ball - a realisation which came all too late.
▪ He drove the third ball of the match for three and took another 41 deliveries to score his next run.
▪ Florida scored its final two runs in the third after Sheffield led off with a high drive to deep right-center.
▪ It took them five overs to score their first run and they were only saved from disaster by captain Allan Lamb.
▪ After that hit by Daulton, they scored three more runs.
▪ Rookie shortstop Jimmy Rollins, the only regular to play, tripled, singled, stole a base and scored two runs.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a close run thing
▪ Exciting Ormskirk made it two wins out of three but it was a close run thing against New Brighton.
▪ It was a close run thing.
be in the running/out of the running
be running on empty
be running short (of/on sth)
▪ Let's go - time's running short.
▪ Many stores are running short on bottled water.
▪ Our supply of firewood was running short.
▪ As we are running short of time, let me end with one area where there is a clear divide.
▪ He was running short of petrol and that route offered him the chance to capture replenishments along the way.
▪ He was running short of time.
▪ Nevertheless, Baldwin felt his time was running short.
▪ San Francisco may be running short of characters, but new communities pop up every day.
▪ Still, time is running short.
▪ Time was running short for Lievin.
be rushed/run off your feet
▪ All the sales assistants are run off their feet. The shop ought to take on more staff.
▪ It's my son's birthday party tomorrow. I've been absolutely rushed off my feet getting ready for it.
▪ Bus managers were expecting to be rushed off their feet.
▪ He was in livery, and told me he was rushed off his feet.
▪ Obviously, the emergency services are run off their feet.
▪ There had been lots of problems, and they were rushed off their feet.
▪ We were rushed off our feet yesterday.
be/run in sb's blood
▪ It seemed to be in his blood.
▪ It would be in his blood in minutes.
▪ Psychic awareness ran in my blood.
be/run/go counter to sth
▪ A recipe would be counter to its nature.
▪ It ran counter to the ideas most Christians had held for well over a thousand years.
▪ It runs counter to his career-long concern with budget deficits.
▪ They operate in a way which runs counter to the original purpose of creation.
▪ This can apply to moral issues and anything which runs counter to the Bible's teaching.
▪ This would run counter to the very informal information exchange that gives it meaning in this internal context.
▪ While I did this, I was encouraging her to talk through opinions of her own that ran counter to these discussions.
break into a run/trot etc
▪ Dhani and Ian broke into a run, taking the high altar steps three at a time.
▪ He broke into a trot and the three surprised young men did likewise, aware that something must have gone wrong.
▪ He broke into a trot as he headed up the path to the staff-cabins.
▪ I walked briskly one block over to Cabana, the wide boulevard that parallels the beach, and broke into a trot.
▪ It was all I could do to stop myself breaking into a run.
▪ The animal was struggling with a loose shoe and was in no mood to break into a trot.
▪ Without waiting to find out what it meant, she broke into a trot and hurried on round the next corner.
cut and run
▪ We sensed that Borden could cut and run at any moment.
▪ Its three big domestic rivals do not intend to cut and run either.
▪ My hands felt clammy, the usual signs of old Shallot beginning to wonder whether it is time to cut and run.
▪ No way do you feel the urge to cut and run before suffering the onslaught of hypothermia.
▪ Potential victims never cut and run.
▪ So they cut and run, on matters of supposed high principle.
▪ Walker Stamp & Seal was one of the companies forced to decide whether it would cut and run or stay the course.
get/go/run through sth
go/run around in circles
▪ We've got to solve the problem instead of running around in circles, writing letters that never get answered.
▪ I had a tendency to run around in circles getting more and more worked up.
▪ She jumps up and down and runs around in circles.
▪ That's why there are no solutions and the characters endlessly go around in circles in discussions.
go/run like clockwork
▪ A universe that ran like clockwork also evinced design.
▪ And if Lais and Leonore created the promised diversion the plan would go like clockwork.
▪ Sometimes it ran like clockwork, sometimes-as I wrote at the time-it ran like the movie Clockwise.
▪ Then we had been surprised when our ascent of the nearby Jankopiti had gone like clockwork.
▪ Whereas Prost had been delayed as the Ferrari mechanics fiddled with the right-rear wheel, Senna's stop went like clockwork.
go/run to seed
▪ And a production should not just be a matter of getting a good notice and leaving it to go to seed slowly.
▪ At the same time, a drought affected the area, and heliotrope had time to grow and go to seed.
▪ Formerly owned by Arthur Siegel, it had since gone to seed.
▪ Mark knows he has allowed himself to go to seed a bit.
▪ She looked middle-aged, overdressed, a show-girl gone to seed.
▪ The rest of the College, like the theatre, seems in Paul Pry's day to have run to seed.
▪ Their skin was as smooth as warm water, their hair as soft as a dandelion crown gone to seed.
go/run/flash etc through sb's mind
▪ I began to wonder what might be going through her mind.
▪ Over and over it ran through his mind.
▪ Perhaps more mundane thoughts went through her mind.
▪ The one occasion which was flashing through Yanto's mind at this moment involved just three of the local water babies.
▪ The past twenty-two months flashed through my mind like film run at high speed, and suddenly I felt rather tired.
▪ The thought ran through my mind I heard chaos outside.
▪ This was staggering new information, and all kinds of ideas were flashing through our minds.
▪ Who lived there and what was going through their minds?
hit the ground running
▪ If we can hit the ground running, we'll stay ahead of the competition.
▪ Graduates of law school hit the ground running, you see, as soon as they enter practice.
▪ He said his Navy experience prepared him to jump into new jobs in new places and hit the ground running.
▪ The company also could shape a well-educated, flexible pool of employment candidates who could hit the ground running.
▪ The pressures to perform were immense and their careers were on the line: They expect me to hit the ground running.
▪ They either hit the ground running, or the ground hits them standing still.
in running order
▪ A nightly news programme, involving late inclusions and enforced changes in running order, is bound to be frenetic.
▪ Keep the battery fully charged and the engine in running order.
▪ Two isn't multiplicity and Castelfonte never was in running order, and now they were living in hotels.
in the long run/term
▪ Arguably, however, the implications of the Manchester North-West result were to become more apparent in the long term.
▪ But in the long run, it has proved impossible to continue down this path.
▪ However limited its immediate effects, the ideology of Enlightened Despotism was important in the long term.
▪ I don't know what good it did David in the long run because what it did was cost a lot of money.
▪ It invites us to reflect on history with a slower pulse-rate, history in the longer term.
▪ The consequences of violating this rule had always been unhappy in the long run and not infrequently in the short.
▪ The funding to do anything, however, must in the long run derive from national resources.
▪ Yet the saving of money, in the long run, was more important to Mowat than the saving of scenery.
in the short term/run
▪ These measures may save some money in the short term, but we'll just end up spending more later.
▪ Although those measures would cost money in the short term, Rep.
▪ Even marriage into the royal family only assured such support in the short term.
▪ Evidently not, in the short term, but in the long term Fangorn knows his race and story are sterile.
▪ Giving sanctuary to political asylum-seekers is seldom rewarded on earth, at least in the short term.
▪ He predicted more volatile dealings in the short run.
▪ The vocabulary of every language is so vast that there is no way to eliminate all such hazards in the short run.
▪ Which are the campaign promises that you believe you can deliver on in the short term?
make sb's blood run cold
▪ But whenever she passed the wood the tales rushed back into her mind and made her blood run cold.
▪ Ex-inmate Tony Cohla told yesterday how the thought of ever returning to Ashworth makes his blood run cold.
▪ He said their evidence had made his blood run cold.
run afoul of sb/sth
▪ Burgess' illegal use of alcohol ran afoul of the code, a point the righteous Karnaugh was quite eager to make.
▪ Here I simply introduce them to you and describe how Iberian managers ran afoul of them. 1.
▪ The bill signed by Leavitt attempts to ban gay student groups without running afoul of this statute.
▪ Two men died and two boys were seriously injured as vehicles ran afoul of washed-out roads.
run amok
▪ Troops were allowed to run amok in the villages.
▪ But speculation about whether he had accomplices has run amok.
▪ Don't let him go running amok, Bill.
▪ Double-entendre lyrics run amok at this sonic strip club from hell.
▪ I think Mum worried that I might run amok and stick my penknife straight into Katie.
▪ No, our kids are not running amok.
▪ The Zekes come in against the line of P-40s, one runs amok as others erupt in flames.
▪ There were Peace Rallies in the 1960s, with stone-throwing anarchists running amok.
▪ With Thatcher running amok through the welfare state, lobby groups are preoccupied defending what was once thought unassailable.
run around like a headless chicken
▪ The arcade section is hideous, featuring computer-controlled players running around like headless chickens and never attempting a tackle.
run interference
▪ Truscati's job is to run interference for troubled kids with their parents, schools, and the courts.
▪ Even with Hilton Railey running interference, the first twenty-four hours in London were rocky indeed.
run into/hit the buffers
run out of steam
▪ Fuel protest runs out of steam A national protest by truckers demanding cheaper fuel turned out to be a low-key affair.
▪ His passion is to say if the constitutional model has run out of steam, change it.
▪ Mr Chuan was perceived to have run out of steam.
▪ The Damascus government has run out of steam after 30 years in power.
▪ The market rallied early in 1995, but then ran out of steam.
run out the clock/kill the clock
run rife
run rings around sb
▪ Each time the Congress met, which was roughly every six months, Boris Yeltsin ran rings around it.
▪ For sheer cleverness she could run rings around them all.
run riot
▪ Ann let her imagination run riot as she wrote.
▪ Roses ran riot up the wall.
▪ All kinds of wild ideas ran riot in my brain.
▪ Because of her weakened state her imagination had run riot.
▪ Boro threatened to run riot but could not provide the finishing touch.
▪ Confusion ran riot in Ruth's heart.
▪ In the Pilkington final two years ago, they ran riot over the Cherry and Whites.
▪ Now, when far greater things were at stake, she had allowed her emotions to run riot.
▪ The objects left in the churchyard were open to all manner of interpretation and imagination could run riot.
▪ When Coleridge got on one and let his imagination run riot, he came up with Kubla Khan.
run roughshod over sb/sth
run sb close
run sb/sth to earth
▪ He hadn't been there that morning and now she had run him to earth in the café.
run sb/sth to ground
▪ Badminton: Hall runs Baddeley to ground.
run to fat
run wild
▪ Football fans ran wild through the city.
▪ Organized crime has been running wild since the collapse of the old regime.
▪ Pam just lets here kids run wild.
▪ She allowed her imagination to run wild.
▪ At first they were probably running wild, with panic and fear uppermost!
▪ Because now the workers could run wild.
▪ Central bankers are allowing global capital to run wild.
▪ I tell ya, our kids are running wild.
▪ In the absence of brakes, the system runs wild.
▪ The children run wild, in shirts and jeans.
▪ They ran wild, but he was sure a father could correct their ways.
▪ They run wild into the woods, filthy, skeletal and naked.
run/cast your eye over sth
▪ A note from Mellowes instructed me to cast my eye over the draft, pronto, for inaccuracies.
▪ Above him Cornelius ran his eye over a box of ancient cane carpet beaters.
▪ And of course Prince also casts his eye over rock too.
▪ He also casts his eye over the proposed law changes.
▪ I cast my eye over the front page of the Telegraph while Anne poured the coffee.
▪ The customs officers run their eyes over us as if we weren't there.
▪ They've even invited Michael Heseltine, care of Spitting Image, to cast his eyes over the exhibition.
run/extend the (full) width of sth
▪ Even the view from the big window that runs the width of her office is unadorned.
▪ It ran the width of the ship and was full of machinery.
▪ She led them on to a small covered terrace running the full width of the house.
▪ The room she entered ran the width of the house, with windows at both ends.
run/go aground
▪ More than 72,000 tonnes of crude oil spilled into the estuary after the tanker ran aground in 1996.
▪ The beach was long, flat and shelved so gently that no normal vessel could have come ashore without running aground.
▪ The Ecuadorean tanker Jessica started leaking diesel oil after running aground last week.
▪ The pirate station, which ran aground last November, is using equipment and records donated by listeners.
▪ The prosecution's case had turned primarily on the allegation that he was drunk when his ship ran aground.
▪ Y., to Providence, ran aground Friday afternoon after the tugboat pushing it was disabled by an unexplained explosion.
run/go deep
▪ But the main problem goes deeper and will take longer to solve.
▪ Maude, on the other hand, had gone deep into the pluperfect, eleven generations of it.
▪ So did it go deeper than that?
▪ The debt goes deeper than money.
▪ The play goes deep and inspires all sorts of questions.
▪ The tradition of dressing up a corporate image in print runs deep at Investor Insight and its affiliates.
▪ They can play at being still waters that run deep.
run/go dry
▪ The reservoir ran dry during the drought.
▪ Every available hotel room was rented out and, on some weekends, county gasoline pumps ran dry.
▪ If the trend continues, he said, the springs will go dry.
▪ If the valve has jammed shut, causing the feed-and-expansion tank to run dry, again turn off the water supply.
▪ Laura McCaffrey went dry slope skiing at Calshot Activities Centre,.
▪ Stock tanks normally brimming with water have gone dry.
▪ The rivers, too, are beginning to run dry.
▪ Time allowed 00:06 Read in studio A soft drinks company says its could run dry if it doesn't get enough elderflowers.
▪ With this agreement, our families are for ever linked, even if the rivers run dry and the oceans become deserts.
run/go hell for leather
run/go/drive etc like the clappers
▪ Little legs going like the clappers.
▪ Male speaker Inside you are going like the clappers because you are nervous and the tension is building up.
run/hurt/fight etc like hell
▪ I know he lost his legs first, and then his fingers-he died alone and it hurt like hell.
▪ I remember running like hell, knowing I was being pursued and looking back for Sarah, who didn't join me.
▪ I was able to breathe only with the utmost difficulty, and my arm hurt like hell.
▪ Must have fought like hell to find its niche within the forest, to distinguish itself within the pack.
▪ My forehead hurt like hell and my body was bruised all over, but no bones were broken.
▪ Run, North, run; just run like hell.
▪ Spring sauntered north, but he had to run like hell to keep it as his traveling companion.
▪ We fought like hell for most of the time.
run/stretch/walk etc the (full) length of sth
▪ A faint scar ran the length of his left cheek.
▪ I always enjoyed walking the full length of the street to check how the other shops were faring.
▪ I would have to walk the length of the shed to reach him.
▪ Next door, the living room is large and beautifully proportioned, running the length of the house.
▪ The loft ran the length of the house from front to back, and it was lit by two unshaded forty-watt bulbs.
▪ Then Red runs the length of the court, grabs a pass, drives to the basket and sinks one.
running battle/joke
▪ A man whose name is so synonymous with a suntan that it is a running joke in Doonesbury?
▪ An even longer running battle was fought in the royal dockyards.
▪ As well as his running battle with Monkou, he left stud marks on defender Richard Hall.
▪ I was not told, when we left, that I should have to fight a running battle with four hundred horsemen.
▪ In the resulting confrontation several hundred Mohawks armed with clubs and guns fought running battles with police.
▪ Police and demonstrators regularly engage in running battles near Mr Suharto's home in central Jakarta.
▪ The fighters quickly pursued them and eventually shot down every one in a running battle.
▪ They saw graffiti on important public memorials and they saw running battles with the police.
running commentary
▪ Attending is simply describing what the child is doing, rather like a running commentary on the activity.
▪ Don't keep up a running commentary.
▪ Hearing voices that keep up a running commentary in the head.
▪ His running commentary was oft-repeated, I guess.
▪ It becomes a running commentary from navigator to driver.
▪ Photos of Jack were shown, each thrown up on a large screen with a running commentary.
▪ This man provided a running commentary on the events on the screen, which were otherwise a fabulous mystery.
running sore
▪ And Nat was like a running sore, crabby, miserable.
▪ But finally, she would make of it an ulcer, a running sore that would never heal.
▪ For Horace it might have been a short madness; in Frere it threatened to become a running sore.
▪ In fact Meadowell is an Elastoplast name like Sizewell, invented in the 1970s to disguise what was already a running sore.
▪ Such protestations ferment a running sore which breeds contempt for the authorities.
running total
▪ Keep a running total of your expenses.
▪ And you told me you've kept a running total in your head all the year.
▪ The cost will simply be kept for each project as a running total entered by hand in a cost ledger.
running water
▪ The sound of running water could be heard like faint background music.
▪ They lived in a one-room trailer with no running water.
▪ A sophisticated technology brought running water into private homes, public bathhouses and imperial palaces.
▪ Although during the winter there had been no running water this had been restored at least in the centre of the town.
▪ In addition Drake set up artificial ecologies in aquaria and in running water for artificial stream ecologies.
▪ Somehow, over the running water, she finally heard the loud knocking on the cabin door.
▪ The village and ashram had no running water, electricity, fans, radio, or telephone.
▪ They have no electricity, running water or school; their church collapsed years ago.
▪ We hike up a little more than a mile and find running water.
▪ We were looked at with the same sense of distrust that must have greeted the first plumber who installed running water there.
still waters run deep
take a running jump
▪ Or, as the Palace will no doubt be recommending to the duchess in due course ... take a running jump.
the running of sth
▪ Maria helped her mother with the running of the household.
▪ At first all criticism of the running of the war was muted and was aimed at measures rather than men.
▪ Changez didn't seem ready to take over the running of Paradise Stores.
▪ Chapman's revolutionary ideas extended also to the running of the national team.
▪ Even doing the housework with Aunt Margaret satisfied her; she had a part to play in the running of the home.
▪ Packers' shareholders have no say in the running of their team.
▪ Relocation is bound to cause a certain amount of disruption in the running of the business.
▪ Since Father died and Mam walked out I've had the running of this house on my shoulders.
▪ The government mobilized troops, ostensibly to maintain order and the running of public services.
the running order
▪ There are a few changes in the running order for the teachers' conference.
▪ So Jonathan set the running order up and I was really pleased.
three years/five times etc running
work/drive/run yourself into the ground
▪ But don't drive yourself into the ground.
▪ I've already explained to you how I've worked myself into the ground setting up the interview.
▪ I tried working myself into the ground, but I could be totally exhausted and still remember.
▪ Mitchell and White ran themselves into the ground and Nicky Summerbee tried everything he could to get a goal.
▪ They ran themselves into the ground, ran Chesterfield off the pitch, but they couldn't get another goal.
work/run/go like stink
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a 5-mile run
▪ After his run, he took a long shower.
▪ Both resorts offer beginner to expert runs.
▪ Camilli scored 936 runs in 12 major-league seasons.
▪ Dunaway is starring in a six-week run of "Master Class" in Los Angeles.
▪ Long distance runners follow a different training programme from other athletes.
▪ The show moves to London's West End after a month's run in Leicester's Gala Theatre.
▪ The West Indies beat Australia by 273 runs.
▪ They left Anchorage at nine for the forty-mile run to Matanuska.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As a narrator, Stella gives James Joyce a run for his stream-of-consciousness money.
▪ But in the long run the outcome of the race between food production and population growth remains too hard to call.
▪ Cher wins the prize for longest run of success.
▪ Countess Maud was set for a record run.
▪ Your educated boys went at it a little more privately and gracefully, but sometimes destroyed more people in the long run.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Run

Run \Run\, v. i. [imp. Ranor Run; p. p. Run; p. pr. & vb. n. Running.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin to D. runnen, rennen, OS. & OHG. rinnan, G. rinnen, rennen, Icel. renna, rinna, Sw. rinna, r["a]nna, Dan. rinde, rende, Goth. rinnan, and perh. to L. oriri to rise, Gr. ? to stir up, rouse, Skr. ? (cf. Origin), or perh. to L. rivus brook (cf. Rival). [root]1

  1. Cf. Ember, a., Rennet.] 1. To move, proceed, advance, pass, go, come, etc., swiftly, smoothly, or with quick action; -- said of things animate or inanimate. Hence, to flow, glide, or roll onward, as a stream, a snake, a wagon, etc.; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a dog. Specifically:

  2. Of voluntary or personal action:

    1. To go swiftly; to pass at a swift pace; to hasten.

      ``Ha, ha, the fox!'' and after him they ran.
      --Chaucer.

    2. To flee, as from fear or danger.

      As from a bear a man would run for life.
      --Shak.

    3. To steal off; to depart secretly.

    4. To contend in a race; hence, to enter into a contest; to become a candidate; as, to run for Congress.

      Know ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run, that ye may obtain.
      --1 Cor. ix. 24.

    5. To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; -- often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in debt.

      Have I not cause to rave and beat my breast, to rend my heart with grief and run distracted?
      --Addison.

    6. To exert continuous activity; to proceed; as, to run through life; to run in a circle.

    7. To pass or go quickly in thought or conversation; as, to run from one subject to another.

      Virgil, in his first Georgic, has run into a set of precepts foreign to his subject.
      --Addison.

    8. To discuss; to continue to think or speak about something; -- with on.

    9. To make numerous drafts or demands for payment, as upon a bank; -- with on.

    10. To creep, as serpents.

  3. Of involuntary motion:

    1. To flow, as a liquid; to ascend or descend; to course; as, rivers run to the sea; sap runs up in the spring; her blood ran cold.

    2. To proceed along a surface; to extend; to spread.

      The fire ran along upon the ground.
      --Ex. ix. 23.

    3. To become fluid; to melt; to fuse.

      As wax dissolves, as ice begins to run.
      --Addison.

      Sussex iron ores run freely in the fire.
      --Woodward.

    4. To turn, as a wheel; to revolve on an axis or pivot; as, a wheel runs swiftly round.

    5. To travel; to make progress; to be moved by mechanical means; to go; as, the steamboat runs regularly to Albany; the train runs to Chicago.

    6. To extend; to reach; as, the road runs from Philadelphia to New York; the memory of man runneth not to the contrary.

      She saw with joy the line immortal run, Each sire impressed, and glaring in his son.
      --Pope.

    7. To go back and forth from place to place; to ply; as, the stage runs between the hotel and the station.

    8. To make progress; to proceed; to pass.

      As fast as our time runs, we should be very glad in most part of our lives that it ran much faster.
      --Addison.

    9. To continue in operation; to be kept in action or motion; as, this engine runs night and day; the mill runs six days in the week.

      When we desire anything, our minds run wholly on the good circumstances of it; when it is obtained, our minds run wholly on the bad ones.
      --Swift.

    10. To have a course or direction; as, a line runs east and west.

      Where the generally allowed practice runs counter to it.
      --Locke.

      Little is the wisdom, where the flight So runs against all reason.
      --Shak.

    11. To be in form thus, as a combination of words.

      The king's ordinary style runneth, ``Our sovereign lord the king.''
      --Bp. Sanderson.

    12. To be popularly known; to be generally received.

      Men gave them their own names, by which they run a great while in Rome.
      --Sir W. Temple.

      Neither was he ignorant what report ran of himself.
      --Knolles.

    13. To have growth or development; as, boys and girls run up rapidly.

      If the richness of the ground cause turnips to run to leaves.
      --Mortimer.

    14. To tend, as to an effect or consequence; to incline.

      A man's nature runs either to herbs or weeds.
      --Bacon.

      Temperate climates run into moderate governments.
      --Swift.

    15. To spread and blend together; to unite; as, colors run in washing.

      In the middle of a rainbow the colors are . . . distinguished, but near the borders they run into one another.
      --I. Watts.

    16. To have a legal course; to be attached; to continue in force, effect, or operation; to follow; to go in company; as, certain covenants run with the land.

      Customs run only upon our goods imported or exported, and that but once for all; whereas interest runs as well upon our ships as goods, and must be yearly paid.
      --Sir J. Child.

    17. To continue without falling due; to hold good; as, a note has thirty days to run.

    18. To discharge pus or other matter; as, an ulcer runs.

    19. To be played on the stage a number of successive days or nights; as, the piece ran for six months.

    20. (Naut.) To sail before the wind, in distinction from reaching or sailing closehauled; -- said of vessels.

  4. Specifically, of a horse: To move rapidly in a gait in which each leg acts in turn as a propeller and a supporter, and in which for an instant all the limbs are gathered in the air under the body.
    --Stillman (The Horse in Motion).

  5. (Athletics) To move rapidly by springing steps so that there is an instant in each step when neither foot touches the ground; -- so distinguished from walking in athletic competition. As things run, according to the usual order, conditions, quality, etc.; on the average; without selection or specification. To let run (Naut.), to allow to pass or move freely; to slacken or loosen. To run after, to pursue or follow; to search for; to endeavor to find or obtain; as, to run after similes. --Locke. To run away, to flee; to escape; to elope; to run without control or guidance. To run away with.

    1. To convey away hurriedly; to accompany in escape or elopement.

    2. To drag rapidly and with violence; as, a horse runs away with a carriage. To run down.

      1. To cease to work or operate on account of the exhaustion of the motive power; -- said of clocks, watches, etc.

      2. To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or To run into.

        1. To enter; to step in.

        2. To come in collision with. To run into To meet, by chance; as, I ran into my brother at the grocery store. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with.

          1. To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.]
            --T. Baker.

          2. (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or To run mad on. See under Mad. To run on.

            1. To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement.

            2. To talk incessantly.

    3. To continue a course.

    4. To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on.

    5. (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out.

      1. To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas.

      2. To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.''
        --Hammond.

      3. To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions.

      4. To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over.

        1. To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over.

        2. To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily.

        3. To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through.

          1. To go through hastily; as to run through a book.

          2. To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with.

            1. To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood.

            2. To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.''
              --J. H. Newman.

Run

Run \Run\, v. i. [imp. Ranor Run; p. p. Run; p. pr. & vb. n. Running.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin to D. runnen, rennen, OS. & OHG. rinnan, G. rinnen, rennen, Icel. renna, rinna, Sw. rinna, r["a]nna, Dan. rinde, rende, Goth. rinnan, and perh. to L. oriri to rise, Gr. ? to stir up, rouse, Skr. ? (cf. Origin), or perh. to L. rivus brook (cf. Rival). [root]1

  1. Cf. Ember, a., Rennet.] 1. To move, proceed, advance, pass, go, come, etc., swiftly, smoothly, or with quick action; -- said of things animate or inanimate. Hence, to flow, glide, or roll onward, as a stream, a snake, a wagon, etc.; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a dog. Specifically:

  2. Of voluntary or personal action:

    1. To go swiftly; to pass at a swift pace; to hasten.

      ``Ha, ha, the fox!'' and after him they ran.
      --Chaucer.

    2. To flee, as from fear or danger.

      As from a bear a man would run for life.
      --Shak.

    3. To steal off; to depart secretly.

    4. To contend in a race; hence, to enter into a contest; to become a candidate; as, to run for Congress.

      Know ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run, that ye may obtain.
      --1 Cor. ix. 24.

    5. To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; -- often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in debt.

      Have I not cause to rave and beat my breast, to rend my heart with grief and run distracted?
      --Addison.

    6. To exert continuous activity; to proceed; as, to run through life; to run in a circle.

    7. To pass or go quickly in thought or conversation; as, to run from one subject to another.

      Virgil, in his first Georgic, has run into a set of precepts foreign to his subject.
      --Addison.

    8. To discuss; to continue to think or speak about something; -- with on.

    9. To make numerous drafts or demands for payment, as upon a bank; -- with on.

    10. To creep, as serpents.

  3. Of involuntary motion:

    1. To flow, as a liquid; to ascend or descend; to course; as, rivers run to the sea; sap runs up in the spring; her blood ran cold.

    2. To proceed along a surface; to extend; to spread.

      The fire ran along upon the ground.
      --Ex. ix. 23.

    3. To become fluid; to melt; to fuse.

      As wax dissolves, as ice begins to run.
      --Addison.

      Sussex iron ores run freely in the fire.
      --Woodward.

    4. To turn, as a wheel; to revolve on an axis or pivot; as, a wheel runs swiftly round.

    5. To travel; to make progress; to be moved by mechanical means; to go; as, the steamboat runs regularly to Albany; the train runs to Chicago.

    6. To extend; to reach; as, the road runs from Philadelphia to New York; the memory of man runneth not to the contrary.

      She saw with joy the line immortal run, Each sire impressed, and glaring in his son.
      --Pope.

    7. To go back and forth from place to place; to ply; as, the stage runs between the hotel and the station.

    8. To make progress; to proceed; to pass.

      As fast as our time runs, we should be very glad in most part of our lives that it ran much faster.
      --Addison.

    9. To continue in operation; to be kept in action or motion; as, this engine runs night and day; the mill runs six days in the week.

      When we desire anything, our minds run wholly on the good circumstances of it; when it is obtained, our minds run wholly on the bad ones.
      --Swift.

    10. To have a course or direction; as, a line runs east and west.

      Where the generally allowed practice runs counter to it.
      --Locke.

      Little is the wisdom, where the flight So runs against all reason.
      --Shak.

    11. To be in form thus, as a combination of words.

      The king's ordinary style runneth, ``Our sovereign lord the king.''
      --Bp. Sanderson.

    12. To be popularly known; to be generally received.

      Men gave them their own names, by which they run a great while in Rome.
      --Sir W. Temple.

      Neither was he ignorant what report ran of himself.
      --Knolles.

    13. To have growth or development; as, boys and girls run up rapidly.

      If the richness of the ground cause turnips to run to leaves.
      --Mortimer.

    14. To tend, as to an effect or consequence; to incline.

      A man's nature runs either to herbs or weeds.
      --Bacon.

      Temperate climates run into moderate governments.
      --Swift.

    15. To spread and blend together; to unite; as, colors run in washing.

      In the middle of a rainbow the colors are . . . distinguished, but near the borders they run into one another.
      --I. Watts.

    16. To have a legal course; to be attached; to continue in force, effect, or operation; to follow; to go in company; as, certain covenants run with the land.

      Customs run only upon our goods imported or exported, and that but once for all; whereas interest runs as well upon our ships as goods, and must be yearly paid.
      --Sir J. Child.

    17. To continue without falling due; to hold good; as, a note has thirty days to run.

    18. To discharge pus or other matter; as, an ulcer runs.

    19. To be played on the stage a number of successive days or nights; as, the piece ran for six months.

    20. (Naut.) To sail before the wind, in distinction from reaching or sailing closehauled; -- said of vessels.

  4. Specifically, of a horse: To move rapidly in a gait in which each leg acts in turn as a propeller and a supporter, and in which for an instant all the limbs are gathered in the air under the body.
    --Stillman (The Horse in Motion).

  5. (Athletics) To move rapidly by springing steps so that there is an instant in each step when neither foot touches the ground; -- so distinguished from walking in athletic competition. As things run, according to the usual order, conditions, quality, etc.; on the average; without selection or specification. To let run (Naut.), to allow to pass or move freely; to slacken or loosen. To run after, to pursue or follow; to search for; to endeavor to find or obtain; as, to run after similes. --Locke. To run away, to flee; to escape; to elope; to run without control or guidance. To run away with.

    1. To convey away hurriedly; to accompany in escape or elopement.

    2. To drag rapidly and with violence; as, a horse runs away with a carriage. To run down.

      1. To cease to work or operate on account of the exhaustion of the motive power; -- said of clocks, watches, etc.

      2. To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or To run into.

        1. To enter; to step in.

        2. To come in collision with. To run into To meet, by chance; as, I ran into my brother at the grocery store. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with.

          1. To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.]
            --T. Baker.

          2. (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or To run mad on. See under Mad. To run on.

            1. To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement.

            2. To talk incessantly.

    3. To continue a course.

    4. To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on.

    5. (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out.

      1. To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas.

      2. To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.''
        --Hammond.

      3. To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions.

      4. To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over.

        1. To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over.

        2. To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily.

        3. To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through.

          1. To go through hastily; as to run through a book.

          2. To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with.

            1. To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood.

            2. To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.''
              --J. H. Newman.

Run

Run \Run\, v. i. [imp. Ranor Run; p. p. Run; p. pr. & vb. n. Running.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin to D. runnen, rennen, OS. & OHG. rinnan, G. rinnen, rennen, Icel. renna, rinna, Sw. rinna, r["a]nna, Dan. rinde, rende, Goth. rinnan, and perh. to L. oriri to rise, Gr. ? to stir up, rouse, Skr. ? (cf. Origin), or perh. to L. rivus brook (cf. Rival). [root]1

  1. Cf. Ember, a., Rennet.] 1. To move, proceed, advance, pass, go, come, etc., swiftly, smoothly, or with quick action; -- said of things animate or inanimate. Hence, to flow, glide, or roll onward, as a stream, a snake, a wagon, etc.; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a dog. Specifically:

  2. Of voluntary or personal action:

    1. To go swiftly; to pass at a swift pace; to hasten.

      ``Ha, ha, the fox!'' and after him they ran.
      --Chaucer.

    2. To flee, as from fear or danger.

      As from a bear a man would run for life.
      --Shak.

    3. To steal off; to depart secretly.

    4. To contend in a race; hence, to enter into a contest; to become a candidate; as, to run for Congress.

      Know ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run, that ye may obtain.
      --1 Cor. ix. 24.

    5. To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; -- often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in debt.

      Have I not cause to rave and beat my breast, to rend my heart with grief and run distracted?
      --Addison.

    6. To exert continuous activity; to proceed; as, to run through life; to run in a circle.

    7. To pass or go quickly in thought or conversation; as, to run from one subject to another.

      Virgil, in his first Georgic, has run into a set of precepts foreign to his subject.
      --Addison.

    8. To discuss; to continue to think or speak about something; -- with on.

    9. To make numerous drafts or demands for payment, as upon a bank; -- with on.

    10. To creep, as serpents.

  3. Of involuntary motion:

    1. To flow, as a liquid; to ascend or descend; to course; as, rivers run to the sea; sap runs up in the spring; her blood ran cold.

    2. To proceed along a surface; to extend; to spread.

      The fire ran along upon the ground.
      --Ex. ix. 23.

    3. To become fluid; to melt; to fuse.

      As wax dissolves, as ice begins to run.
      --Addison.

      Sussex iron ores run freely in the fire.
      --Woodward.

    4. To turn, as a wheel; to revolve on an axis or pivot; as, a wheel runs swiftly round.

    5. To travel; to make progress; to be moved by mechanical means; to go; as, the steamboat runs regularly to Albany; the train runs to Chicago.

    6. To extend; to reach; as, the road runs from Philadelphia to New York; the memory of man runneth not to the contrary.

      She saw with joy the line immortal run, Each sire impressed, and glaring in his son.
      --Pope.

    7. To go back and forth from place to place; to ply; as, the stage runs between the hotel and the station.

    8. To make progress; to proceed; to pass.

      As fast as our time runs, we should be very glad in most part of our lives that it ran much faster.
      --Addison.

    9. To continue in operation; to be kept in action or motion; as, this engine runs night and day; the mill runs six days in the week.

      When we desire anything, our minds run wholly on the good circumstances of it; when it is obtained, our minds run wholly on the bad ones.
      --Swift.

    10. To have a course or direction; as, a line runs east and west.

      Where the generally allowed practice runs counter to it.
      --Locke.

      Little is the wisdom, where the flight So runs against all reason.
      --Shak.

    11. To be in form thus, as a combination of words.

      The king's ordinary style runneth, ``Our sovereign lord the king.''
      --Bp. Sanderson.

    12. To be popularly known; to be generally received.

      Men gave them their own names, by which they run a great while in Rome.
      --Sir W. Temple.

      Neither was he ignorant what report ran of himself.
      --Knolles.

    13. To have growth or development; as, boys and girls run up rapidly.

      If the richness of the ground cause turnips to run to leaves.
      --Mortimer.

    14. To tend, as to an effect or consequence; to incline.

      A man's nature runs either to herbs or weeds.
      --Bacon.

      Temperate climates run into moderate governments.
      --Swift.

    15. To spread and blend together; to unite; as, colors run in washing.

      In the middle of a rainbow the colors are . . . distinguished, but near the borders they run into one another.
      --I. Watts.

    16. To have a legal course; to be attached; to continue in force, effect, or operation; to follow; to go in company; as, certain covenants run with the land.

      Customs run only upon our goods imported or exported, and that but once for all; whereas interest runs as well upon our ships as goods, and must be yearly paid.
      --Sir J. Child.

    17. To continue without falling due; to hold good; as, a note has thirty days to run.

    18. To discharge pus or other matter; as, an ulcer runs.

    19. To be played on the stage a number of successive days or nights; as, the piece ran for six months.

    20. (Naut.) To sail before the wind, in distinction from reaching or sailing closehauled; -- said of vessels.

  4. Specifically, of a horse: To move rapidly in a gait in which each leg acts in turn as a propeller and a supporter, and in which for an instant all the limbs are gathered in the air under the body.
    --Stillman (The Horse in Motion).

  5. (Athletics) To move rapidly by springing steps so that there is an instant in each step when neither foot touches the ground; -- so distinguished from walking in athletic competition. As things run, according to the usual order, conditions, quality, etc.; on the average; without selection or specification. To let run (Naut.), to allow to pass or move freely; to slacken or loosen. To run after, to pursue or follow; to search for; to endeavor to find or obtain; as, to run after similes. --Locke. To run away, to flee; to escape; to elope; to run without control or guidance. To run away with.

    1. To convey away hurriedly; to accompany in escape or elopement.

    2. To drag rapidly and with violence; as, a horse runs away with a carriage. To run down.

      1. To cease to work or operate on account of the exhaustion of the motive power; -- said of clocks, watches, etc.

      2. To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or To run into.

        1. To enter; to step in.

        2. To come in collision with. To run into To meet, by chance; as, I ran into my brother at the grocery store. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with.

          1. To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.]
            --T. Baker.

          2. (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or To run mad on. See under Mad. To run on.

            1. To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement.

            2. To talk incessantly.

    3. To continue a course.

    4. To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on.

    5. (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out.

      1. To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas.

      2. To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.''
        --Hammond.

      3. To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions.

      4. To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over.

        1. To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over.

        2. To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily.

        3. To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through.

          1. To go through hastily; as to run through a book.

          2. To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with.

            1. To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood.

            2. To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.''
              --J. H. Newman.

Run

Run \Run\, v. t.

  1. To cause to run (in the various senses of Run, v. i.); as, to run a horse; to run a stage; to run a machine; to run a rope through a block.

  2. To pursue in thought; to carry in contemplation.

    To run the world back to its first original.
    --South.

    I would gladly understand the formation of a soul, and run it up to its ``punctum saliens.''
    --Collier.

  3. To cause to enter; to thrust; as, to run a sword into or through the body; to run a nail into the foot.

    You run your head into the lion's mouth.
    --Sir W. Scott.

    Having run his fingers through his hair.
    --Dickens.

  4. To drive or force; to cause, or permit, to be driven.

    They ran the ship aground.
    --Acts xxvii. 41.

    A talkative person runs himself upon great inconveniences by blabbing out his own or other's secrets.
    --Ray.

    Others, accustomed to retired speculations, run natural philosophy into metaphysical notions.
    --Locke.

  5. To fuse; to shape; to mold; to cast; as, to run bullets, and the like.

    The purest gold must be run and washed.
    --Felton.

  6. To cause to be drawn; to mark out; to indicate; to determine; as, to run a line.

  7. To cause to pass, or evade, offical restrictions; to smuggle; -- said of contraband or dutiable goods.

    Heavy impositions . . . are a strong temptation of running goods.
    --Swift.

  8. To go through or accomplish by running; as, to run a race; to run a certain career.

  9. To cause to stand as a candidate for office; to support for office; as, to run some one for Congress. [Colloq. U.S.]

  10. To encounter or incur, as a danger or risk; as, to run the risk of losing one's life. See To run the chances, below. ``He runneth two dangers.''
    --Bacon.

    If we don't succeed, we run the risk of failure.
    --Dan Quail .

  11. To put at hazard; to venture; to risk.

    He would himself be in the Highlands to receive them, and run his fortune with them.
    --Clarendon.

  12. To discharge; to emit; to give forth copiously; to be bathed with; as, the pipe or faucet runs hot water.

    At the base of Pompey's statua, Which all the while ran blood, great C[ae]sar fell.
    --Shak.

  13. To be charged with, or to contain much of, while flowing; as, the rivers ran blood.

  14. To conduct; to manage; to carry on; as, to run a factory or a hotel. [Colloq. U.S.]

  15. To tease with sarcasms and ridicule. [Colloq.]

  16. To sew, as a seam, by passing the needle through material in a continuous line, generally taking a series of stitches on the needle at the same time.

  17. To migrate or move in schools; -- said of fish; esp., to ascend a river in order to spawn.

  18. (Golf) To strike (the ball) in such a way as to cause it to run along the ground, as when approaching a hole. To run a blockade, to get to, or away from, a blockaded port in safety. To run down.

    1. (Hunting) To chase till the object pursued is captured or exhausted; as, to run down a stag.

    2. (Naut.) To run against and sink, as a vessel.

    3. To crush; to overthrow; to overbear. ``Religion is run down by the license of these times.''
      --Berkeley.

    4. To disparage; to traduce. --F. W. Newman. To run hard.

      1. To press in competition; as, to run one hard in a race.

      2. To urge or press importunately.

      3. To banter severely.

        To run into the ground, to carry to an absurd extreme; to overdo. [Slang, U.S.] (c) To erect hastily, as a building.

Run

Run \Run\, n.

  1. The act of running; as, a long run; a good run; a quick run; to go on the run.

  2. A small stream; a brook; a creek.

  3. That which runs or flows in the course of a certain operation, or during a certain time; as, a run of must in wine making; the first run of sap in a maple orchard.

  4. A course; a series; that which continues in a certain course or series; as, a run of good or bad luck.

    They who made their arrangements in the first run of misadventure . . . put a seal on their calamities.
    --Burke.

  5. State of being current; currency; popularity.

    It is impossible for detached papers to have a general run, or long continuance, if not diversified with humor.
    --Addison.

  6. Continued repetition on the stage; -- said of a play; as, to have a run of a hundred successive nights.

    A canting, mawkish play . . . had an immense run.
    --Macaulay.

  7. A continuing urgent demand; especially, a pressure on a bank or treasury for payment of its notes.

  8. A range or extent of ground for feeding stock; as, a sheep run.
    --Howitt.

  9. (Naut.)

    1. The aftermost part of a vessel's hull where it narrows toward the stern, under the quarter.

    2. The distance sailed by a ship; as, a good run; a run of fifty miles.

    3. A voyage; as, a run to China.

  10. A pleasure excursion; a trip. [Colloq.]

    I think of giving her a run in London.
    --Dickens.

  11. (Mining) The horizontal distance to which a drift may be carried, either by license of the proprietor of a mine or by the nature of the formation; also, the direction which a vein of ore or other substance takes.

  12. (Mus.) A roulade, or series of running tones.

  13. (Mil.) The greatest degree of swiftness in marching. It is executed upon the same principles as the double-quick, but with greater speed.

  14. The act of migrating, or ascending a river to spawn; -- said of fish; also, an assemblage or school of fishes which migrate, or ascend a river for the purpose of spawning.

  15. (Sport) In baseball, a complete circuit of the bases made by a player, which enables him to score one point; also, the point thus scored; in cricket, a passing from one wicket to the other, by which one point is scored; as, a player made three runs; the side went out with two hundred runs; the Yankees scored three runs in the seventh inning.

    The ``runs'' are made from wicket to wicket, the batsmen interchanging ends at each run.
    --R. A. Proctor.

  16. A pair or set of millstones.

  17. (Piquet, Cribbage, etc.) A number of cards of the same suit in sequence; as, a run of four in hearts.

  18. (Golf)

    1. The movement communicated to a golf ball by running.

    2. The distance a ball travels after touching the ground from a stroke. At the long run, now, commonly, In the long run, in or during the whole process or course of things taken together; in the final result; in the end; finally. [Man] starts the inferior of the brute animals, but he surpasses them in the long run. --J. H. Newman. Home run.

      1. A running or returning toward home, or to the point from which the start was made. Cf. Home stretch.

      2. (Baseball) See under Home.

        The run, or The common run, or The run of the mill etc., ordinary persons; the generality or average of people or things; also, that which ordinarily occurs; ordinary current, course, or kind.

        I saw nothing else that is superior to the common run of parks.
        --Walpole.

        Burns never dreamed of looking down on others as beneath him, merely because he was conscious of his own vast superiority to the common run of men.
        --Prof. Wilson.

        His whole appearance was something out of the common run.
        --W. Irving.

        To let go by the run (Naut.), to loosen and let run freely, as lines; to let fall without restraint, as a sail.

Run

Run \Run\, a.

  1. Melted, or made from molten material; cast in a mold; as, run butter; run iron or lead.

  2. Smuggled; as, run goods. [Colloq.]
    --Miss Edgeworth.

    Run steel, malleable iron castings. See under Malleable.
    --Raymond.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
run

the modern verb is a merger of two related Old English words, in both of which the first letters sometimes switched places. The first is intransitive rinnan, irnan "to run, flow, run together" (past tense ran, past participle runnen), cognate with Middle Dutch runnen, Old Saxon, Old High German, Gothic rinnan, German rinnen "to flow, run."\n

\nThe second is Old English transitive weak verb ærnan, earnan "ride, run to, reach, gain by running" (probably a metathesis of *rennan), from Proto-Germanic *rannjanan, causative of the root *ren- "to run." This is cognate with Old Saxon renian, Old High German rennen, German rennen, Gothic rannjan.\n

\nBoth are from PIE *ri-ne-a-, nasalized form of root *reie- "to flow, run" (see Rhine).\n

\nOf streams, etc., from c.1200; of machinery, from 1560s. Meaning "be in charge of" is first attested 1861, originally American English. Meaning "seek office in an election" is from 1826, American English. Phrase run for it "take flight" is attested from 1640s. Many figurative uses are from horseracing or hunting (such as to run (something) into the ground, 1836, American English).\n

\nTo run across "meet" is attested from 1855, American English. To run short "exhaust one's supply" is from 1752; to run out of in the same sense is from 1713. To run around with "consort with" is from 1887. Run away "flee in the face of danger" is from late 14c. To run late is from 1954.

run

"a spell of running," mid-15c. (earlier ren, late 14c.), from run (v.). The Old English noun ryne meant "a flowing, a course, a watercourse." Modern sense of "small stream" first recorded 1580s, mostly Northern English dialect and American English.\n

\nMeaning "continuous stretch" (of something) is from 1670s. Meaning "series or rush of demands on a bank, etc." is first recorded 1690s. Meaning "the privilege of going through or over" is from 1755. Baseball sense is from 1856. Meaning "single trip by a railroad train" is from 1857. Military aircraft sense is from 1916. Meaning "total number of copies printed" is from 1909. Meaning "tear in a knitted garment" is from 1922. Phrase a run for one's money is from 1872 in a figurative sense, originally from horse racing, implying competition (1841).

Wiktionary
run
  1. 1 In a liquid state; melted or molten. 2 cast in a mould. 3 exhaust; depleted (qualifier: especially with "down" or "out"). 4 (context of a fish English) travelled, migrated; having made a migration or a spawning #Noun. n. Act or instance of running, of moving rapidly using the feet. v

  2. 1 (lb en heading vertebrates) ''To move swiftly.'' 2 # (lb en intransitive) To move forward quickly upon two feet by alternately making a short jump off either foot. (qualifier: Compare ''walk''.) 3 # (label en intransitive) To go at a fast pace, to move quickly. 4 # (lb en transitive) To cause to move quickly; to make move lightly. 5 # (lb en transitive or intransitive) To compete in a race. 6 # (lb en intransitive) Of fish, to migrate for spawning. 7 # (lb en intransitive soccer) To carry a football down the field. 8 # (lb en transitive) To achieve or perform by running or as if by running. 9 # (lb en intransitive) To flee away from a danger or towards help. 10 # (lb en transitive juggling colloquial) To juggle a pattern continuously, as opposed to starting and stopping quickly. 11 (lb en heading fluids) ''To flow.'' 12 # (lb en intransitive figuratively) To move or spread quickly. 13 # (lb en intransitive) Of a liquid, to flow. 14 # (lb en intransitive) Of an object, to have a liquid flowing from it. 15 # (lb en transitive) To make a liquid flow; to make liquid flow from an object. 16 # (lb en intransitive) To become liquid; to melt. 17 # (lb en intransitive) To leak or spread in an undesirable fashion; to bleed (especially used of dye or paint). 18 # To fuse; to shape; to mould; to cast. 19 # (lb en figurative transitive) To go through without stopping, usually illegally. 20 (lb en nautical of a vessel) To sail before the wind, in distinction from reaching or sailing close-hauled. 21 (lb en heading social) ''To carry out an activity.'' 22 # (lb en transitive) To control or manage, be in charge of.

WordNet
run
  1. n. a score in baseball made by a runner touching all four bases safely; "the Yankees scored 3 runs in the bottom of the 9th"; "their first tally came in the 3rd inning" [syn: tally]

  2. the act of testing something; "in the experimental trials the amount of carbon was measured separately"; "he called each flip of the coin a new trial" [syn: test, trial]

  3. a race run on foot; "she broke the record for the half-mile run" [syn: footrace, foot race]

  4. an unbroken series of events; "had a streak of bad luck"; "Nicklaus had a run of birdies" [syn: streak]

  5. (American football) a play in which a player runs with the ball; "the defensive line braced to stop the run"; "the coach put great emphasis on running" [syn: running, running play, running game]

  6. a regular trip; "the ship made its run in record time"

  7. the act of running; traveling on foot at a fast pace; "he broke into a run"; "his daily run keeps him fit" [syn: running]

  8. the continuous period of time during which something (a machine or a factory) operates or continues in operation; "the assembly line was on a 12-hour run"

  9. unrestricted freedom to use; "he has the run of the house"

  10. the production achieved during a continuous period of operation (of a machine or factory etc.); "a daily run of 100,000 gallons of paint"

  11. a small stream [syn: rivulet, rill, runnel, streamlet]

  12. a race between candidates for elective office; "I managed his campaign for governor"; "he is raising money for a Senate run" [syn: political campaign, campaign]

  13. a row of unravelled stitches; "she got a run in her stocking" [syn: ladder, ravel]

  14. the pouring forth of a fluid [syn: discharge, outpouring]

  15. an unbroken chronological sequence; "the play had a long run on Broadway"; "the team enjoyed a brief run of victories"

  16. a short trip; "take a run into town"

  17. [also: running, ran]

run
  1. v. move fast by using one's feet, with one foot off the ground at any given time; "Don't run--you'll be out of breath"; "The children ran to the store"

  2. flee; take to one's heels; cut and run; "If you see this man, run!"; "The burglars escaped before the police showed up" [syn: scarper, turn tail, lam, run away, hightail it, bunk, head for the hills, take to the woods, escape, fly the coop, break away]

  3. stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point; "Service runs all the way to Cranbury"; "His knowledge doesn't go very far"; "My memory extends back to my fourth year of life"; "The facts extend beyond a consideration of her personal assets" [syn: go, pass, lead, extend]

  4. direct or control; projects, businesses, etc.; "She is running a relief operation in the Sudan" [syn: operate]

  5. have a particular form; "the story or argument runs as follows"; "as the saying goes..." [syn: go]

  6. move along, of liquids; "Water flowed into the cave"; "the Missouri feeds into the Mississippi" [syn: flow, feed, course]

  7. perform as expected when applied; "The washing machine won't go unless it's plugged in"; "Does this old car still run well?"; "This old radio doesn't work anymore" [syn: function, work, operate, go] [ant: malfunction]

  8. change or be different within limits; "Estimates for the losses in the earthquake range as high as $2 billion"; "Interest rates run from 5 to 10 percent"; "The instruments ranged from tuba to cymbals"; "My students range from very bright to dull" [syn: range]

  9. run, stand, or compete for an office or a position; "Who's running for treasurer this year?" [syn: campaign]

  10. cause to emit recorded sounds; "They ran the tapes over and over again"; "Can you play my favorite record?" [syn: play]

  11. move about freely and without restraint, or act as if running around in an uncontrolled way; "who are these people running around in the building?"; "She runs around telling everyone of her troubles"; "let the dogs run free"

  12. have a tendency or disposition to do or be something; be inclined; "She tends to be nervous before her lectures"; "These dresses run small"; "He inclined to corpulence" [syn: tend, be given, lean, incline]

  13. carry out a process or program, as on a computer or a machine; "Run the dishwasher"; "run a new program on the Mac"; "the computer executed the instruction" [syn: execute]

  14. be operating, running or functioning; "The car is still running--turn it off!" [ant: idle]

  15. change from one state to another; "run amok"; "run rogue"; "run riot"

  16. cause to perform; "run a subject"; "run a process"

  17. be affected by; be subjected to; "run a temperature"; "run a risk"

  18. continue to exist; "These stories die hard"; "The legend of Elvis endures" [syn: prevail, persist, die hard, endure]

  19. occur persistently; "Musical talent runs in the family"

  20. include as the content; broadcast or publicize; "We ran the ad three times"; "This paper carries a restaurant review"; "All major networks carried the press conference" [syn: carry]

  21. carry out; "run an errand"

  22. guide or pass over something; "He ran his eyes over her body"; "She ran her fingers along the carved figurine"; "He drew her hair through his fingers" [syn: guide, draw, pass]

  23. cause something to pass or lead somewhere; "Run the wire behind the cabinet" [syn: lead]

  24. make without a miss

  25. deal in illegally, such as arms or liquor [syn: black market]

  26. cause an animal to move fast; "run the dogs"

  27. be diffused; "These dyes and colors are guaranteed not to run" [syn: bleed]

  28. sail before the wind

  29. cover by running; run a certain distance; "She ran 10 miles that day"

  30. extend or continue for a certain period of time; "The film runs 5 hours" [syn: run for]

  31. set animals loose to graze

  32. keep company; "the heifers run with the bulls ot produce offspring" [syn: consort]

  33. run with the ball; in such sports as football

  34. travel rapidly, by any (unspecified) means; "Run to the store!"; "She always runs to Italy, because she has a lover there"

  35. travel a route regularly; "Ships ply the waters near the coast" [syn: ply]

  36. pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals); "Goering often hunted wild boars in Poland"; "The dogs are running deer"; "The Duke hunted in these woods" [syn: hunt, hunt down, track down]

  37. compete in a race; "he is running the Marathon this year"; "let's race and see who gets there first" [syn: race]

  38. progress by being changed; "The speech has to go through several more drafts"; "run through your presentation before the meeting" [syn: move, go]

  39. reduce or cause to be reduced from a solid to a liquid state, usually by heating; "melt butter"; "melt down gold"; "The wax melted in the sun" [syn: melt, melt down]

  40. come unraveled or undone as if by snagging; "Her nylons were running" [syn: ladder]

  41. become undone; "the sweater unraveled" [syn: unravel]

  42. [also: running, ran]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Run

Run(s) or RUN may refer to:

Run (2002 film)

Run is a 2002 Indian Tamil action film directed by N. Linguswamy starring R. Madhavan and Meera Jasmine in the lead roles. The film also features Vivek, Atul Kulkarni, Raghuvaran and Anu Hasan in supporting roles, while Vidyasagar composed the film's music. The film won positive reviews from critics and performed well at the box office, prompting the film to be partially re-shot in Telugu and remade in Hindi under the same name.

Run (island)

Run (also known as Pulau Run, Pulo Run, Puloroon, or Rhun) is one of the smallest islands of the Banda Islands, which are a part of Indonesia. It is about long and less than wide. According to historian John Keay, Run is comparable in its significance in the history of the British Empire as Runnymede is to British constitutional history.

Run (Snow Patrol song)

"Run" is a song by Northern Irish/Scottish alternative rock band Snow Patrol from their third studio album, Final Straw (2003). It was released in the United Kingdom on 26 February 2004 as the second single from the album. The song, described as a post-Britpop power ballad, was received with positive reviews by music critics. It reached the top five on the UK Singles Chart. The song was covered by multiple artists, including Tre Lux, Three Graces, Damian McGinty, and Leona Lewis, the last of whom released it as single on 30 November 2008.

Run (Cog song)

"Run" is a single released by the Australian rock band Cog in August 2005. It is the only CD single to be lifted from the album The New Normal. It contains a radio edit of "Run", an edited live version of "Run", a live version of "Silence is Violence" both recorded at Canberra's ANU Bar on 28 April 2005 and the "My Enemy" video clip. The single peaked at #5 in the Australian Independent Recordings singles/EPs chart.

Run (1991 film)

Run is a 1991 film, directed by Geoff Burrowes. The movie stars Patrick Dempsey and Kelly Preston.

Run (2004 film)

Run is a Hindi film released in 2004. It stars Vijay Raaz, Abhishek Bachchan and Bhumika Chawla in the lead roles. It is directed by Jeeva and is a remake of the Tamil blockbuster of the same name starring Madhavan and Meera Jasmine. The film was produced by Boney Kapoor and Sridevi. The major portion of the film was shot at Marwah Studios in Noida. The film is remembered only for its comedy sequences featuring Vijay Raaz.

Run (Lighthouse Family song)

"Run" is a song by British duo Lighthouse Family, released as the second single from their third album Whatever Gets You Through the Day (2001). The song is produced by Kevin Bacon and Jonathan Quarmby. It was released in March 2002 and reached the top 30 in the United Kingdom as well as being in the top 80 in Austria and Switzerland.

Run (B'z album)

Run is the sixth studio album by Japanese rock band B'z. Run debuted with 1,190,380 copies sold in its first week and over 2,196,660 copies sold in total.

The album continues the band's change in direction from a synthesizer-heavy band to a more guitar-oriented band. A full horn section replaced the synth brass backing, and electric organ was used more extensively. The resulting sound was not unlike many American bands, particularly Aerosmith, one of lead singer Koshi Inaba's inspirations.

Only one single, " Zero," was released.

Run (Amy Macdonald song)

"Run" is the fifth single to be released from Amy Macdonald's debut album, This Is the Life. The single was released in the UK on 3 March 2008 and peaked at #75 in the United Kingdom for 1 week. Macdonald stated on stage at T in the Park 2008 that the song was inspired by a gig by The Killers in her hometown of Glasgow.

Run (cards)

A run is a combination of playing cards where cards have consecutive rank values. Some games, such as cribbage, specify that an ace counts as one ("ace low"); others specify that an ace counts above a King ("ace high"); yet others, such as poker, allow an ace to count either high or low.

Run (novel)

Run is a 2007 novel by American author Ann Patchett. It was her first novel after the widely successful Bel Canto (2001).

Run (waterfalls)

In waterfalls, the run (also known as the runout) is the linear distance the stream flows from the brink of the waterfall to its base. Therefore, a steeper waterfall would have a shorter run, and a less inclined waterfall would have a longer run. As an example, rapids typically have longer runs, as their actual drop is usually much shorter than the distance they flow. Vertical waterfalls, such as Yosemite Falls, have short runs.

Run (baseball)

In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances around first, second and third base and returns safely to home plate, touching the bases in that order, before three outs are recorded and all obligations to reach base safely on batted balls are met or assured. A player may score by hitting a home run or by any combination of plays that puts him safely "on base" (that is, on first, second, or third) as a runner and subsequently brings him home. The object of the game is for a team to score more runs than its opponent.

The Official Baseball Rules hold that if the third out of an inning is a force out of a runner advancing to any base then, even if another baserunner crosses home plate before that force out is made, his run does not count. But if the third out is not a force out, but a tag out, then if that other baserunner crosses home plate before that tag out is made, his run will count.

Example 1: With a runner on third and two outs, batter hits a ground ball to the second baseman. The runner on third races home. The second baseman fields the ball and throws on to the first baseman in time to get the batter on the force out at first for the third out of the inning. Even if the runner on third had touched home plate before that force out was made at first, his run would not count.

Example 2: With a runner on third and two outs, batter hits a fly ball over centerfielder's head. It bounces several times as it rolls to the wall. The runner on third runs safely home and easily scores a run. Meanwhile, the batter safely reaches first, then tries to advance to second. The centerfielder, having retrieved the ball, throws the ball to the second baseman and the runner is tagged out as he slides into second. Since the runner stepped on home plate before the batter was tagged out at second for the third out of the inning, his run will count.

In baseball statistics, a player who advances around all the bases to score is credited with a run (R), sometimes referred to as a "run scored". While runs scored is considered an important individual batting statistic, it is regarded as less significant than runs batted in (RBIs). Both individual runs scored and runs batted in are heavily context-dependent; for a more sophisticated assessment of a player's contribution toward producing runs for his team, see runs created.

A pitcher is likewise assessed runs surrendered in his statistics, which differentiate between standard earned runs (for which the pitcher is statistically assigned full responsibility) and unearned runs scored due to fielding errors, which do not count in his personal statistics. Specifically, if a fielding error occurs which affects the amount of runs scored in an inning, the Official Scorer – the official in-game statistician – in order to determine how many of the runs should be classified as earned, will reconstruct the inning as if the error had not occurred. For example, with two outs, suppose a runner reaches base because of a fielding error, and then the next batter hits a two-run home run, and then the following batter then makes the third out, ending the inning. If the inning is reconstructed without the error, and if that third batter, instead of reaching on an error, registered an out, the inning would have ended there without any runs scoring. Thus, the two runs that did score will be classified as unearned, and will not count in the pitcher's personal statistics.

Be advised though that unearned runs are a statistical animal only. All runs count the same in the score, whether they are earned or unearned.

If a pitching substitution occurs while a runner is on base, and that runner eventually scores a run, the pitcher who allowed the player to get on base is charged with the run even though he was no longer pitching when the run scored.

Run (cricket)

Run is a term used in cricket for the basic means of scoring. A single run (known as a "single") is scored when a batsman (known as the "striker") has hit the ball with his/her bat and directed it away from the fielders so that he/she and his/her partner (the "non-striker") are able to run the length (22 yards) of the pitch. Depending on how long it takes the fielding team to recover the ball, the batsmen may run more than once. Each completed run increments the scores of both the team and the striker. The team's total score in the innings is the aggregate of all its batsmen's individual scores plus any extras. To complete a run, both batsmen must ground their bats behind the popping crease at the other end of the pitch. Attempting a run carries a risk factor because either batsman can be run out, and thereby dismissed, if the fielding side can break the wicket with the ball before the batsman has completed the run.

Run (Red Flag song)

"Run" is a song by the American synthpop band Red Flag. It was released as a single in 2009.

Run (Vampire Weekend song)

"Run" is a single released by Indie band Vampire Weekend. It is the sixth and final single from their second album Contra, and was released in the United Kingdom on December 13, 2010. There was no music video produced. Lead singer Ezra Koenig said that the song was based on the Bruce Springsteen song, " Born to Run". The single failed to chart.

Run (TV series)

Run is a British miniseries created by Jonathan Pearson, Marlon Smith, and Daniel Fajemisin-Duncan, and written by Marlon Smith and Daniel Fajemisin-Duncan for Channel 4. The series premiered on 15 July 2013 and ended on 18 July 2013, and was broadcast on Hulu on 20 August 2013. The series comprises four episodes, each focused on one character among the four leads - Carol ( Olivia Colman), Ying ( Katie Leung), Richard ( Lennie James), and Tara ( Jaime Winstone) - and shows how each character's decisions affect that character and the others.

Run (2014 film)

Run is a 2014 French-Ivorian drama film directed by Philippe Lacôte. It was screened in the Un Certain Regard section at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival. The film was selected as the Ivorian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 88th Academy Awards but it was not nominated. It received 12 nominations at the 11th Africa Movie Academy Awards but did not win any award.

Run (magazine)

Run was an American computer magazine published monthly by IDG Communications with its first issue debuting in January 1984. Bi-monthly publishing began in June/July 1990 (issue #78, volume 7 number 6), and went on until the magazine folded in November/December 1992 (issue #94, volume 9 number 6). In its heyday, Runs monthly circulation was in the 200,000–300,000 range. Folio, the trade journal of the magazine industry, rated it as the second fastest-growing U.S. magazine of 1985.

The magazine contained articles about Commodore 8-bit home computers and peripherals, as well as reviews on available software packages for the computers. In addition, every issue featured several type-in programs written in BASIC and/or machine language. The magazine's name came from the BASIC command "RUN", which started execution of the computer's program, presumably typed in from the magazine.

Major Run columns included the following:

  • Magic, perhaps the magazine's most distinctive feature, was a collection of short programs, programming tips, and tricks, mostly submitted by readers. Several dozen were published each month, and they were all numbered in hexadecimal, with each issue's numbering taking over where the last one had left off. Readers could write to Magic at P.O. Box 101011, a box number chosen for its binary appearance. Often, a "special issue" published at the end of the year would collect the year's Magic entries and augment them with many unpublished ones. This column, created and compiled by Louis F. Sander, debuted in the first issue and was run during the entire life of the magazine.
  • Mega-Magic was a monthly column that included type-in programming utilities larger and more powerful than those in the standard Magic columns.
  • Commodore Clinic, a letters column, allowed users to write in with questions about hardware and software issues, which would then be answered in the magazine.
  • Run Amok was an errata column that published corrections to previous type-in programs and articles.
  • Software Gallery reviewed various commercial software packages.
  • 128 Mode, taken over from Commodore's own magazine when it was purchased by Run, included programming advice and short type-ins for the Commodore 128.
  • Gold Mine was another Louis F. Sander column taken over from Commodore's magazine. It featured tips and tricks for commercial games.

Mike Konshak, a BASIC software developer and mechanical engineer contributed the popular DataFile database management program and many other utilities for the Commodore 64 to Run. The code was first published in the back of the November 1984 issue. A small note, written by Mike at the end of the article, stated "If you don't want to type this in, send me $6.00 and I'll send you a disk". 1500 ''Run subscribers sent Mike money in the first month, which prompted the editors to create the "Re-Run" disk to generate more revenue for the publisher. A series of a dozen follow-on article by Mike were published in the ensuing two years, and the programs were exclusively sold on Runs Re-Run disk, as the editors restricted authors from soliciting for disks in the magazine from then on. (Datafile then evolved into dFile64, dFile128, dFcalc, DFword, etc., and sold by Mike Konshak through his small company, MichaelSoft "A cottage Industry of Home-Spun Software").

The demise of the magazine was due to the public's dwindling interest in 8-bit machines as the computer world evolved to 16-bit and standardized on the IBM PC compatible platform for both business and home use. The front cover was originally accented by a logotype reading "RUN", with each letter placed on a key button resembling those used on the C-64. In June 1987 the keys were removed and the font became italicized with rounded letters.

Run (George Strait song)

"Run" is a song written by Anthony Smith and Tony Lane, and recorded by American country music artist George Strait. It was released in September 2001 as the lead single from Strait's album The Road Less Traveled. The song reached number 2 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts in December 2001, where it was blocked by Toby Keith's song, " I Wanna Talk About Me". It then reached number 2 again in early January 2002, where it was blocked by Alan Jackson's " Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)". It also peaked at number 34 on the Billboard Hot 100, making it a minor crossover hit.

Run (Sash! song)

"Run" is a song by German production group Sash!. The record was released on October 28, 2002 via Virgin Records as the second single from their fourth studio album S4!Sash!. The record features vocal parts by British artist Boy George.

Run (Awolnation album)

Run is the second studio album by American electronic rock band Awolnation, released on March 17, 2015 through Red Bull Records.

The album was announced on January 25, 2015 along with a music video of their new song " Hollow Moon (Bad Wolf)". The album, unlike it's predecessor Megalithic Symphony, is darker and ultimately diverse. The genre's range from straight down electronic rock to dance-punk.

Run (Alison Wonderland album)

Run is the debut studio album from Australian DJ and cellist Alison Wonderland. It was released on March 20, 2015 via EMI Music Australia. It features 4 singles; "U Don't Know" featuring Wayne Coyne, "Run", "Take It to Reality" featuring SAFIA, and "Games". The two singles from her debut EP Calm Down, "I Want U" and "Cold", appeared on the album. A deluxe edition of the album featuring remixes of the four singles and one of "Get Ready", her debut single was released on 30 October 2015.

Run (2016 film)

Run is a 2016 Indian Telugu-language film directed by Anil Kanneganti. Produced by Ajay Sunkara, Kishore Garikipati and Sudhakar Cherukuri. It features Sundeep Kishan and Anisha Ambrose in the lead roles while Bobby Simha and Brahmaji appear in crucial supporting roles. It is the remake of Malayalam and Tamil bilingual Neram. The film was released worldwide on 23 March 2016 to positive critical acclaim.

Run (I'm a Natural Disaster)

"Run (I'm a Natural Disaster)", also known more commonly as "Run", is a song written and recorded by Gnarls Barkley. It is the first single to be released from the band's second album The Odd Couple. Released in February 2008 as a digital download in the UK and the US via the iTunes Store, a physical release of the single followed in the UK on March 31. The song features a sample from Keith Mansfield's "Junior Jet Set" from the KPM LP Flamboyant Themes and "Starting Out the Day" by Strawberry Alarm Clock. The song is featured in the film X-Men: First Class, as a playable song in the video game Dance Central 2, and is heard in promos for Disney- Pixar's Cars 2. This song was number 34 on Rolling Stones list of the 100 Best Songs of 2008.

Run (stream)

The Run is a stream in the Dutch province of Noord-Brabant. It is a left tributary of the Dommel and part of the Meuse River basin.

The Run originates near the town of Weebosch and flows in a general northeast direction towards Veldhoven. South of Eersel it flows near the hamlets of Stokkelen, Schadewijk and Stevert.

Near the hamlet Stevert used to be a watermill in the Run, which became obsolete in 1969 due to the channelization of the stream. Further downstream the Run passes the hamlet of Heers until it discharges into the Dommel, just south of Veldhoven.

Run (Sanctus Real album)

Run is the sixth studio album from contemporary Christian music band Sanctus Real. It was released on February 5, 2013 via Sparrow Records. In addition, the album producers are Jason Ingram, Seth Mosley and Christopher Stevens. The album has already garnered acclaim from the reviewers and has already achieved success from the lead single " Promises" on the charts. Furthermore, the album charted on the Billboard 200 and Billboard Christian Albums charts at Nos. 112 and 6 respectively in the debut week of February 23, 2013.

Run (Matt Nathanson and Sugarland song)

"Run" is a song written by American singer-songwriter Matt Nathanson with Jennifer Nettles and Kristian Bush of country duo Sugarland, and recorded for Nathanson's seventh studio album, Modern Love (2011). The song is performed as a duet between Nathanson and Nettles, with Bush contributing backing vocals as well as the acoustic and electric guitar accompaniments. It made its debut at the 2010 CMA Awards on November 9, 2011. A remastered country version was released to digital retailers via Vanguard Records the same day as the third single from Modern Love.

Run (Nicole Scherzinger song)

"Run" is a song recorded by American singer-songwriter Nicole Scherzinger for her second studio album, Big Fat Lie (2014). It was written by Justin Tranter, Julia Michaels and Felix Snow of which the latter produced it alongside Chris "Tek" O'Ryan. "Run" is set across dramatic strings and a solemn piano melody where Scherzinger offers advice to the next broken heart. The track garnered a positive response from music critics who praised Scherzinger's strong and emotive vocal performance and highlighted it as an album stand-out. Commercially, "Run" failed to chart in the United States but charted on the Irish Singles Chart and UK Singles Chart at number 63 and 46 respectively.

Run (Scandal)

"Run" is the tenth episode, serving as a mid-season premiere of the fourth season of the American political thriller television series Scandal, and is the 57th overall episode, which aired on ABC on January 29, 2015. The episode was written by showrunner Shonda Rhimes and directed by executive producer Tom Verica. The episode serves as a bottle episode, in which the episode focuses solely on Olivia's kidnapping and her captivity in a jail cell, which she shares with a cellmate named Ian McLeod. The episode features the fewest series regulars of any episode of the series, with only four regulars appearing: Olivia Pope, Jake Ballard, President Fitzgerald "Fitz" Grant lll and Abby Whelan.

Shonda Rhimes praised the episode in an interview in which she named it the best episode of Scandal. She praised the writing, saying, "It is probably my favorite episode that we’ve done, ever. It’s my favorite episode that I’ve written, of anything that I’ve written. But it’s probably our favorite episode that we’ve done ever.”

Run (George song)

"Run" is a song from Australian alternative rock group, George. It was released as the second single taken from their debut studio album Polyserena (2002).

Usage examples of "run".

Then the witch with her abhominable science, began to conjure and to make her Ceremonies, to turne the heart of the Baker to his wife, but all was in vaine, wherefore considering on the one side that she could not bring her purpose to passe, and on the other side the losse of her gaine, she ran hastily to the Baker, threatning to send an evill spirit to kill him, by meane of her conjurations.

And the thought of Abie Singleton taking chances at the Adonis Club made his blood run cold.

I just sat back on my heels and let her tongue lash over me, until at last it dawned on me that the old abo must have gone running to her and she thought we were responsible for scaring him out of what wits he had.

Ann they had both been aboad a bus cruising at eighteen miles an hour along the sixty-lane freeway that ran from Bear Canyon to Pasadena, near the middle of Los Angeles.

All the talk aboard was of booty and a run ashore with some money to spend.

Rumor ran through the station corridors, aboil with the confusion and anger of residents and companies that had been turned out with all their property.

She knew she could not scale a blank seven-foot wall fast enough to save herself, especially not with one stingingly abraded hand, so she studied the trees as she ran.

He felt in no mood for conversation, and as he sipped his absinth he let his mind run rather sorrowfully over the past few weeks of his life.

Here he reared a continuous rampart with a ditch in front of it, fair-sized forts, probably a dozen in number, built either close behind it or actually abutting on it, and a connecting road running from end to end.

Lord knew she ached to, with her insides abuzz and his warmth running up her side.

When we run the cosmic film in reverse, rapid accelerating expansion turns into rapid decelerating contraction.

Kelly was busy running an acceleration recompute when the update for this particular maneuver came in, so I took over the computer and input the change.

Men and women bright enough to run a particle accelerator the size of a small planet likewise had to be at least somewhat aware that they were being manipulated, even as they let it happen.

I now had access to one computer, which turned out to be running an older version of the UNIX operating system.

So he ran a program to see if he could connect to any of the services running on that computer, and found an open port with a Telnet service running, which allows one computer to connect remotely to another computer and access it as if directly connected using a dumb terminal.