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Crossword clues for point

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
point
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a crucial point
▪ This was a crucial point in our relationship.
a departure point (=the place where you leave from)
▪ Luxor is one departure point for boat trips down the Nile.
a key issue/question/point
▪ The environment became a key issue during the election.
a matter/point/question of honour (=something you feel you must do because of your moral beliefs)
▪ To my mum, paying bills on time is a point of honour.
a one-shot/two-goal/three point etc lead (=a lead of a specific amount)
▪ Goals by Keane and Lennon gave Tottenham a two-goal lead.
a percentage point (=one percent)
▪ The party increased its share of the vote by almost 4 percentage points.
a point of disagreement (=a particular thing that people disagree about)
▪ A point of disagreement between the two parties concerns the future of nuclear power.
a pointed chin
▪ She had a narrow face and a pointed chin.
access point
action point
an entry point (=a place where people can enter a country)
▪ The 2,000 mile border is the main entry point into the country for illegal aliens.
an observation post/point (=a place from where you can observe something)
▪ The peak of the mountain was a natural location for an observation post.
argued the point (=discussed it)
▪ They argued the point for hours without reaching a conclusion.
assembly point (=a place where people go in a particular situation)
▪ an assembly point
boiling point
▪ Relations between the two countries have almost reached boiling point.
brownie points
▪ I’m not doing it just to get brownie points.
bullet point
can’t see the point of (=I do not understand the reason for)
▪ I can’t see the point of spending so much money on a car.
cardinal point
crisis point (=the point at which a problem becomes a crisis)
▪ Events were now reaching crisis point.
cut-off date/point/score etc (=the date etc when you stop doing something)
▪ The cut-off date for registration is July 2.
debatable point
▪ a debatable point
decimal point
Do you see the point (=do you understand what I’m trying to say)
Do you see the point I’m making ?
finer points
▪ We stayed up discussing the finer points of Marxist theory.
focal point
▪ The pool is the focal point of the hotel.
freezing point
▪ Alcohol has a lower freezing point than water.
from a legal point of view
▪ It's a fascinating case, from a legal point of view.
from a political point of view
▪ From the political point of view, it was important that the country showed it was adhering to the treaty.
from a practical point of view
▪ Saving energy in your home is fairly easy from a practical point of view.
from a scientific/technical point of view
▪ This book was the first to study language from a scientific point of view.
from a security point of view
▪ The system is seriously flawed from a security point of view.
from an economic/financial/business point of view
▪ From a financial point of view, the concert was a disaster.
game point
get straight to the point
▪ I think I should get straight to the point.
grade point average
I take your point/point taken (=used to say that you accept someone’s opinion)
I take your point/point taken (=used to say that you accept someone’s opinion)
illustrate...point
▪ Let me give an example to illustrate the point.
jumping-off point
lead by ten points/two goals etc
▪ Nadal was leading by two sets.
lead to/point to a conclusion (=make you decide that something is true)
▪ All the data led to only one conclusion.
lose (sth) by 1 goal/10 votes/20 points etc
▪ The government lost by one vote.
▪ The Communist candidate lost by a whisker a very small amount.
low point
▪ The low point in my life was when I was hit by a drunk driver.
match point
melting point
minus points
▪ ‘Any minus points?’ ‘Well, the engine is rather noisy.’
nought point one/two/three etc (=0.1, 0.2 etc)
penalty point
pick-up point
▪ The price includes travel from your local pick-up point in the UK to your hotel in Paris.
plus points
▪ Another of the Beach Club’s plus points is that it’s right in the middle of town.
point a camera at sb/sth
▪ A group of Japanese tourists were pointing their cameras at the cathedral.
point man
▪ the administration’s point man on health care
point of order
▪ One MP raised an objection on a point of order.
point of reference
point of sale
▪ Under the new law, cigarette advertising will only be allowed at the point of sale.
point the finger of blame at sb (=say that someone is responsible for something bad)
▪ I couldn’t believe it when they started pointing the finger of blame at me.
point
▪ I think that's a valid point.
pointing...gun
▪ Jake was pointing a gun at the door.
pointy/pointed
▪ The dog has short pointy ears.
power point
press...point
▪ He decided it was time to press his point home.
pressure point
▪ a pressure point for racial tension
prove your point
▪ To prove her point, Dr Hurdal showed her audience a scan of a patient's brain.
put a point to sb
▪ You should put that point to the Chancellor.
rallying point
▪ a rallying point for the struggle against apartheid
reach a point/stage
▪ I’ve reached the point in my life where I need a new challenge.
reached boiling point
▪ Relations between the two countries have almost reached boiling point.
reached saturation point
▪ The number of summer tourists in the area has reached saturation point.
rightly pointed out
▪ As you so rightly pointed out, things are getting worse.
saturation point
▪ The number of summer tourists in the area has reached saturation point.
sb's nerves are stretched (to breaking point) (=they feel very nervous or worried)
▪ Her nerves were stretched almost to breaking point as she waited.
score a goal/point/run etc
▪ He has scored 12 goals so far this season.
selling point
▪ Small classes are a selling point for private schools.
signposts pointing
▪ As yet, there are few signposts pointing to success.
source/area/point of contention
▪ The issue of hunting is a source of contention.
starting point
▪ The article provides a starting point for discussion.
sticking point
▪ North Korea’s refusal had long been a sticking point.
stray from the point
▪ This meeting is beginning to stray from the point.
stress a point
▪ This point needs to be stressed.
stretch a point (=allow a rule to be broken)
▪ We’ll stretch a point and let the baby travel free this time.
talking point
(the) breakeven point/level
▪ The firm should reach breakeven point after one year.
the essential point
▪ The essential point is that all children should have an equal opportunity to study.
the halfway stage/mark/point
▪ They’ve just reached the halfway stage of the project.
the points of the compass/compass points (=the marks that show you north, south, east etc)
▪ She was teaching the children the points of the compass.
the points of the compass/compass points (=the marks that show you north, south, east etc)
▪ She was teaching the children the points of the compass.
tipping point
to the point of obsession (=used to say that something has stopped being a normal interest and become an extreme one)
▪ She was protective of her children, to the point of obsession.
turning point
▪ Meeting her was the turning point in my life.
two goals down/three points down etc
▪ Swindon were six points down at one stage.
two goals up/three points up etc
▪ United were a goal up at half time.
vanishing point
vantage point
▪ From my vantage point on the hill, I could see the whole procession.
weak points (=your faults or the things you do not do well)
▪ Be honest about your weak points.
weak points
▪ There are some weak points in her argument.
win by 10 points/ten metres etc
▪ We won by 23 points.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
fine
▪ They're just the people to spot the finer points of ornithology, are they?
▪ The Puritans had no more interest in astronomy or physics than in the fine points of Catholic theology.
▪ Sources say most things work but hundreds of fine points have to be checked.
▪ Perhaps then they can take in the fine points the lessons of our own lives offer.
▪ Sometimes they were right, news crews rarely had the time or the inclination to pursue the finer points.
▪ However, such fine points of genealogical accuracy are never what matter to the family members who tell such stories.
▪ His elucidation of the finer points of betting is also excellent.
▪ At least he would understand the fine points of its design.
focal
▪ The effect of reinstatement would be dramatic, bringing back numerous fine buildings as focal points in the street scene.
▪ Eight lesbians who gather at a local bar are the focal point of this comedy, directed by Marita Giovani.
▪ The municipal gallery, though, likely will become the focal point for local artists from now on.
▪ A focal point is the inviting, good-sized pool where you can cool off from the heat of the sun.
▪ Neither was society the focal point of the Orphic mysteries.
▪ It is the focal point of a permanent campaign to give independence through personal transport to as many people as possible.
high
▪ That is just the intensification, the high point of an ongoing process.
▪ Despite this tragedy, she graduated with the second highest grade point average in her high school.
▪ Continued from page 6 Olympia is also the high point for twenty of our leading young riders.
▪ His engagement to Nora Cushing had been the high point of her life.
▪ Collectively, they were worth over £2.8 billion at their high point.
▪ When your body temperature reaches its highest point, your inner clock reads 12: 00 biological time.
▪ The number fell from the high point of 516 in 1985 to 409 in 1986.
▪ Even if the infectivity is as high as point nine nine, any pocket of infection will die out quite fast.
important
▪ The prime minister: My hon. Friend has put his finger on an important point.
▪ In the early stages, the baby's mouth is an important point of contact with the world.
▪ The important point is to adopt a system and then stick to it, applying it consistently.
▪ An important point is that these large-scale convection cells fit in with the dimensions of plates.
▪ The important point to note as you follow my progress is just how easy it is and how flexible.
▪ But the important point about this manoeuvring is how essentially low-key it was.
▪ The reality was that provincial reformers generally took the ideological initiative away from London on this important point.
key
▪ Combinations of wool and nylon are usual, with loop-stitching at key points.
▪ One solution is for Dorman Oil to summarize key points in employee training sessions that incorporate multimedia and other technologies.
▪ The main key points are the patient's head, shoulder girdle, spine and pelvis.
▪ And she found herself at key points in her relationship yelling at her financially ambitious partner because they had such different aspirations.
▪ What are the key points in the extract?
▪ Even within areas of consensus, there are key points of roiling partisan controversy.
▪ Are you a fast reader with the ability to retain the key points?
▪ The key point of contention is how much change is prudent in the military, and how rapid that change should be.
low
▪ And the lowest of low points was the use of five captains in seven Tests in 1988-89.
▪ From that low point, Mitterrand started his long climb to power.
▪ In particular, the high and low points on the line should be noted and investigated for possible sighting markers.
▪ From this low point, things got worse.
▪ In large organizations, the number of roadblocks and low points can seem infinite, particularly when something new is being tried.
▪ The index is now at its lowest point since June, when it was a negative 17. 4.
▪ The market is likely to continue drifting down and may reach a low point on Friday.
▪ The lowest point came a year ago, when the staff graduated and the magazine disappeared.
main
▪ The main points for debate could then be circulated to panel members and the course team before the event.
▪ Reports and proposals of 2-5 pages: List the main points for the entire document.
▪ However, the main point of interest is the unintended learning outcomes of such questions as these.
▪ The main point is that we can do nothing to change matters.
▪ The main point of contention now is not whether, but how long a scaled-down force should remain.
▪ Perhaps such arguments are beside the main point, which is to cover the natural monopoly case.
▪ Although we can look at expenditure patterns in a number of different ways three main points are evident.
strong
▪ And as was evident early on in the match, she relied on her strong points to get into a rhythm.
▪ One additional device is a spectrometer to study the infrared spectra of strong point sources.
▪ Very generous pupil - teacher ratios is a feature that prep schools use as a strong selling point to parents.
▪ For one thing, woodwork was not his strong point.
▪ Nearly every organization requires accounts or finance clerks, so if mathematics is your strong point it is something to think about.
▪ A short summary of what you regard as your strong points makes an excellent final paragraph to distinguish you from other candidates.
▪ Animation Shop isn't this package's strong point and Photoshop's ImageReady application is a whole lot more powerful.
▪ On balance, however, the predator/prey theory of dinosaur endothermy does seem to be one of Bakker's stronger points.
turning
▪ It proved a turning point in the war leading to Lincoln emancipation proclamation liberating the slaves.
▪ At every turning point they put a greater distance between each other.
▪ These turning points apart, he was also an addictive non-political speaker.
▪ Crises often mark turning points in overall patterns of policy development, because the consequences of alternative decisions can be momentous.
▪ For Brailsford, who had a tendency to overstate his case, this marked a decisive turning point in world history.
▪ As with many other issues, the 1940s marked a turning point in food production.
▪ The battle was a turning point in Northumbrian fortunes.
whole
▪ The whole point of the legal process is to get a decisive determination which will end the dispute in question.
▪ The round slices were much easier to use in a toaster, which was the whole point of the exercise.
▪ Now the whole point of this raid is speed.
▪ His real name is Markham-or, as Blue sounds it out to himself, mark him-and that is the whole point.
▪ The whole point of radio communications is the very versatility and freedom associated with its use.
▪ I mean, that was, in a way, the whole point.
▪ The whole point about chaos is that it roars down on you when you least expect it, like a motorcycle messenger.
▪ As if the whole point of the Salomon system were simply to see who wilted under the pressure and who did not.
■ NOUN
basis
▪ The yield on the five-year 5. 875 percent note rose 7 basis points to 4. 64 percent.
▪ The yield on the two-year gilt fell 2 basis points to 6. 30 percent.
▪ The notes, which are noncallable for one year, were priced to yield 69 basis points above comparable Treasurys.
▪ The bonds will be priced to yield 75 basis points above the 7 percent gilt due 2001.
▪ The bonds, which are noncallable for three months, were priced at a spread of 59 basis points above Treasurys.
percentage
▪ Finally, in the election itself Reagan led Carter by ten percentage points.
▪ The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus five percentage points.
▪ Sept. 14: The Bundesbank cuts the Lombard rate by 0.25 percentage points and the discount rate by 0.5 percentage points.
▪ Polls show his lead over Dole ranging from 5 to 20 percentage points.
▪ In relation to the rest of the country, however, the share of the top six cities fell by 2.5 percentage points.
▪ In January, polls showed Dole was leading his nearest rival by 23 percentage points.
▪ Polls show Peres leading by about 5 percentage points.
power
▪ Carrying spare batteries could be a cheaper option to fast charging and all chargers rely on a power point anyway.
▪ Radiator. Power point. access to insulated roof space with light.
▪ But it is not to this distinction that the theory of the separation of powers points.
▪ Copper had to then come out of his box to be near to a power point.
▪ Secondary double glazed windows with lovely open outlook over the golf course. power points.
▪ Tiled feature fireplace. Power points.
▪ Vinyl clad floor. Power points.
▪ Beware of anything that looks like a do-it-yourself job - crooked power points, for example.
reference
▪ It is equally correct and sometimes more useful to view demand from the reference point of quantity.
▪ This was done by using the pylorus and the anatomical antrum-corpus boundary as reference points.
▪ I concentrated on the reference points and on keeping one or two rotor diameters away from the other ship.
▪ But he remained a constant reference point among those concerned about the course the nation was taking.
▪ They establish reference points and reference lines.
▪ We are left with a play on signs which has no ultimate reference point other than the commodity.
▪ This team has a reference point.
starting
▪ The starting point is those aims which depend heavily on the particular contribution of DHAs.
▪ This requires a re-examination of such chairs as please my eye and try to come with a starting point.
▪ The truth was somewhere at the end of the line and the first facts were a kind of starting point.
▪ For obvious reasons she has chosen Stamford Hill as her starting point.
▪ Adorno offers one starting point for such a history.
▪ It was a fairly preposterous starting point, but there was nothing else to go on.
▪ That is the starting point for existentialism.
▪ The analogy has its limitations, but is a valuable starting point.
vantage
▪ She took refuge behind an angel's wings and, from this vantage point, spied upon her family.
▪ And I know, from the sobering vantage point of midlife, that she will never recover.
▪ Skarsnik, watching from his vantage point on the mountain slopes, saw his army waver.
▪ What from the harbor looks solemn takes on a carnivalesque air when seen from a closer vantage point.
▪ Our vantage point provided a proper perspective of the immense scale of this Himalayan giant.
▪ He painted the gorge; he painted the rapids; he painted the Whirlpool from every vantage point.
▪ From my second-floor vantage point I could see my classmates as they tumbled out into the quad playing catch with my shoes.
▪ From your current vantage point, you are well positioned to see how alcohol can get at these pain fibers.
■ VERB
average
▪ Last year, Harris averaged 16 points in 31 starts after Jackson was lost for the season.
▪ In 1995-96, he averaged seven points over 51 games, missing 23 games with a sprained ankle.
▪ Davis averaged 14. 2 points and 9. 5 rebounds as a senior and made 55 percent of his shots.
▪ Last year, he averaged 14. 2 points in March and 9. 4 the rest of the year.
▪ The strongest choice appeared to be Ceballos, averaging 23. 4 points and 7. 3 rebounds per game.
▪ He has played in only 53 games this season and is averaging 9. 8 points and 3. 2 rebounds.
▪ The former Temple star averaged 14 points and nearly 4 rebounds a game while leading the club with 2. 5 steals.
▪ He was averaging 6. 4 points per game and his 30 of 83 3-pointers ranked second on the team.
close
▪ Sydney: Continued activity in the banking sector helped the All Ordinaries index to close 7.4 points higher at 1,743.4.
▪ The benchmark 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average closed the session 201.88 points down, or 1.51 percent, at 12,681.66.
▪ But dealers' nerves soon failed and the index fell back to close 9.5 points lower at 2719.7.
▪ The 225-share Nikkei index, meanwhile, continued its recent slide, closing down 122 points at 17, 358. 16.
▪ The Footsie closed just 2.3 points higher at 2,840.0.
▪ It closed 30.5 points lower at 2,247.0.
▪ It closed 30.5 points down at 2,281.6, its lowest level for ten weeks.
▪ Finally, in transition to the next chapter, we close with an awkward point about truth.
drop
▪ One of the fastest ways to list is simply to drop your points on the page, numbering as you go.
▪ After 10 days and three predictable victories they were promoted, thanks to Woking dropping a point.
▪ For every day I stayed in Rochester, my intelligence quotient dropped another ten points.
▪ The Conservatives are down one point to 34 %, and the Liberal Democrats have dropped three points to 13 %.
▪ If the trough is 25 percent below that, the Dow will drop 1, 721 points.
▪ The party's share of vote was squeezed, dropping five points from 1987 to 18 percent.
▪ The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 67. 55 points to 5130. 13 yesterday.
illustrate
▪ Andy Marsh's Zambezi article illustrates this point well.
▪ Both Kemp and Gore referred to real life people to illustrate their points.
▪ Significantly, your photograph alongside Coun Williams' letter, illustrates this point more eloquently than words.
▪ To illustrate the point, I call it the Aeroflot Syndrome.
▪ A few examples will suffice to illustrate the point.
▪ The story may have been to illustrate her point.
▪ The development of the gut illustrates the point.
▪ The diagram below illustrates this point.
make
▪ A recent report by borough councillor and community health council chairwoman Eleanor Young made the point clearly.
▪ We have referred to Piaget to make or reinforce a point about teaching.
▪ It is perhaps important to redress the rather gloomy tone which has crept into this section, by making two points.
▪ Today the manager of personnel makes a point of sitting next to his old friend on the daily commuter train.
▪ It could make that the central point of its election manifesto if it is so profoundly excited by it.
▪ He cited their new-found authority to do their own work scheduling to make his point.
▪ Mr. Redwood My hon. Friend makes his point extremely well.
▪ She said she always made a point to stay above the fray and concentrate on her work.
miss
▪ Alas, the critics were liable to miss the point or deliberately find fault with it.
▪ We had missed the release point because of the cloud and would have to try again.
▪ Both these reactions miss the point.
▪ And so on and so on, the critiques having merit but missing the point.
▪ Yet to focus on the facts is to miss the point.
▪ The sad fact is that we are amazingly persistent at missing the point.
▪ This, however, rather missed the point, since even cheap fares serve little purpose if there are no trains.
▪ But they were missing the entire point.
prove
▪ It proved a turning point in the war leading to Lincoln emancipation proclamation liberating the slaves.
▪ So I think I proved my point.
▪ He does not try to prove points one way or the other, but he does ask meaningful and relevant questions.
▪ If this is the case, you should be prepared to prove your point and present a cost-effective alternative.
▪ A mixture of consultation and internal management control might well prove a better starting point.
▪ We know of no surveys that either prove or disprove this point.
▪ The event was to prove the turning point of the battle.
▪ The many examples of that provided in these pages help to prove the point.
reach
▪ We may reach a point where the public costs of city life have to be greater than the private.
▪ Few sites that I visited had reached a point where they clearly would survive if these extra start-up funds disappeared.
▪ Can they reach point B, thereby preserving their privileged position as insiders?
▪ Many organizations may never reach this point, and certainly no date can be fixed in its regard.
▪ Now 25, Jane does not pretend to have reached the point where she is back enjoying her golf.
▪ This convinced him he had to reach the point where there was no turning back.
▪ But before we reached that point, we might have other problems.
▪ Significant excretion of solute-free water can not occur unless significant amounts of solute and water reach this point.
score
▪ He scored just 10 points but had only two assists, being ineffective as a shooter and playmaker.
▪ Duncan fouled out with 1: 51 left after scoring eight points and grabbing 13 rebounds.
▪ The Lakers shot 53 percent, scored 29 points off turnovers and took an embarrassingly easy 124-107 decision.
▪ Some pundits argued that he was simply trying to score points against the outgoing government.
▪ At halftime, B has scored thirteen points and is 100 per-cent from the floor.
▪ He had scored four points until he made successive three-point baskets late in the game.
▪ Payton scored six straight points as Seattle overcame a 99-93 deficit.
start
▪ Training from starting points which are different towards an end which is uniform is not a unique aspect of voluntary partnership.
▪ The paradox was that Ryan's starting point was no different from that of coaches in the prosperous days of the Seventies.
▪ These recipes are simply a starting point and provide the fundamentals.
▪ So the pattern will start at the right point cam with stitch number 18 of the pattern.
▪ Mason, focused on convincing potential business users to consider Explorer as a starting point for connecting to the Internet.
▪ Should I pay for the starting point?
▪ A monistic starting point for the cosmos requires an explanation to account for the variety and multiplicity in the cosmos.
turn
▪ Supreme Court, was a turning point for Mrs Graham and the newspaper.
▪ The question is whether it is a turning point and the down-slide of Peres.
▪ It was to be something of a turning point.
▪ It was a historic turning point.
▪ The year 1949 was his turning point.
▪ And both became the turning points of the games.
▪ Denis Healey's acceptance of International Monetary Fund-imposed cuts in public expenditure in 1976 was the turning point.
▪ Still turning this last point over in his mind, Blue decides to buy the book.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(that's a) good idea/point/question
a moot point/question
▪ It's a moot point whether this is censorship.
▪ It is a moot point whether hierarchies exist outside our own thought processes.
▪ Quite how long Lord Young was proposing to delay publication is a moot point.
▪ This, of course, is a moot point.
▪ When you go to a place called Texas Bone, deciding what to order becomes a moot point.
▪ Whether the law should be this is a moot point.
▪ Whether they have appeared as part of the C. and A.G.'s audit is a moot point.
▪ Whether this input has made a significant impact on the pattern of activity is a moot point.
a pointed question/look/remark
▪ As he left the office he locked it behind him, with a pointed look at Bob.
be beside the point
▪ It's unrealistic, but that's beside the point - it's just good entertainment.
▪ But the pedigree of this idea is beside the point.
▪ But to criticize Mr Hall's production as an exercise in fuddy-duddy Shakespeare is beside the point.
▪ He may manufacture these life units as required and he may simply have a given supply: that is beside the point.
▪ She had come to no harm, but that was beside the point.
▪ This semantic distinction is beside the point; the special admissions program is undeniably a classification based on race and ethnic back-ground.
▪ What the outcome of seeing him might be is beside the point.
be the trigger (point) (for sth)
▪ All we had to experience was the trigger and off we went into a state of fear.
▪ And the loss of the ally may be the trigger which will start chain fission.
▪ Could either or both factors be the trigger?
▪ I had provided the direction in my lecture, and Our discussion was the trigger.
▪ That was the trigger that started the weeping.
▪ The new stand was the trigger for the layout.
▪ Your saying the work is urgent is the trigger, the result is lateness.
belabour the point
▪ There is no need to belabour the point here.
concede a goal/point/penalty
▪ Barthez escaped with a yellow card despite clearly kicking Ian Harte to concede a penalty.
▪ But as Saracens consistently conceded penalties, Humphreys accepted the points on offer.
▪ Chiddingfold should have taken the lead after five minutes when Rob Madgwick conceded a penalty for a trip.
▪ Hitchcock has yet to concede a goal since stepping in for Dave Beasant.
▪ Liverpool can not afford to concede a goal tonight-and James has yet to keep a clean sheet.
drop a point
▪ After 10 days and three predictable victories they were promoted, thanks to Woking dropping a point.
▪ But if they drop points, Leicester City or Derby County could triumph in a nail-biting finish.
get/score/earn Brownie points
get/win/score brownie points
high point
▪ As the pedal is pressed downward from its highest point, it also moves forward.
▪ At the top of the theater steps, the highest point, all four forms appear.
▪ Christmas and New Year have long been the high point for visitor and Madeiran alike.
▪ His engagement to Nora Cushing had been the high point of her life.
▪ Political repression and racial discrimination were at a high point.
▪ That is just the intensification, the high point of an ongoing process.
▪ They were at the highest point for twenty li about.
▪ We are now reaching the high point of the truly happy life.
keep to the point/subject etc
▪ Come straight to the point and keep to the point are the golden rules of letter writing.
▪ De Quincey was no master of keeping to the point.
▪ Nothing is more irritating than people who do not keep to the point and talk for too long.
labour the point
▪ I understand what you're saying -- there's no need to labour the point.
▪ Enough has been said, and there is no need to labour the point.
▪ United were too liberal with their marking and Lee Clark laboured the point. 7 minutes later, they took overall control.
miss the point
▪ He's so caught up in the rules that he's missing the point of the game, which is just to have fun.
▪ I soon realised that he had completely missed the point.
▪ You're both missing the point, which is to get more people to use public transportation.
▪ Alas, the critics were liable to miss the point or deliberately find fault with it.
▪ As usual, the Treasury misses the point entirely.
▪ Both these reactions miss the point.
▪ But that completely misses the point about the way the academic mind works.
▪ It's always easier for some one else to see where you've missed the point.
▪ It should be obvious, however, that he is here simply missing the point of theism.
▪ More importantly, it misses the point.
▪ She paused at the door so I would not miss the point.
not to put too fine a point on it
▪ Everyone there - not to put too fine a point on it - was crazy.
▪ The dishes we tried tasted, not to put too fine a point on it, like gasoline.
point of contact
▪ It's difficult to find a point of contact between theory and practice.
▪ The new service center will serve as the single point of contact for general customer inquiries.
▪ I have spoken of the point of contact but with the proper grip it will be much easier.
▪ If you bought mail order, then the first point of contact is the software house or importer concerned.
▪ In the early stages, the baby's mouth is an important point of contact with the world.
▪ It also reduced friction at the point of contact.
▪ The parties are no longer the chief point of contact between the electorate and the politicians.
▪ These are the solid points of contact that they keep with the rock, which enable them to move safely.
▪ This chapter explores the points of contact between the theory of social representations and the rhetorical approach.
▪ Your family doctor is always your first point of contact.
prove a point
▪ I'm not going to run the marathon just to prove a point. I know I could do it if I wanted to.
▪ As others may have different theories a genuine desire to prove a point of view leads to some lively debate.
▪ But the Razor wanted to prove a point and demanded a return.
▪ He does not try to prove points one way or the other, but he does ask meaningful and relevant questions.
▪ Is Wilko trying to prove a point or does he just want rid of Rocky???
▪ That proves a point, doesn't it?
▪ That he didn't seemed to prove a point.
▪ They rose to the bait and decided they needed to prove a point, putting together their nine-piece Bootsy Collins-featuring live band.
▪ To prove a point I smashed a piece open and applied the magnets.
push the point
▪ Even she could not push the point any farther.
▪ If the customer pushes the point, he fights back.
▪ She decided not to push the point any further, could see he had switched off.
reference point
▪ Fitzgerald's case will be the reference point for lawyers in tomorrow's trial.
▪ The time he spent in prison serves as a point of reference for Bowden - the lessons are worth remembering.
▪ Align to line up typeset or other graphic material as specified, using a base or vertical line as the reference point.
▪ But he remained a constant reference point among those concerned about the course the nation was taking.
▪ I concentrated on the reference points and on keeping one or two rotor diameters away from the other ship.
▪ It is equally correct and sometimes more useful to view demand from the reference point of quantity.
▪ It was a reference point without which the tragedy could not be expressed.
▪ They establish reference points and reference lines.
▪ This team has a reference point.
▪ We are left with a play on signs which has no ultimate reference point other than the commodity.
score points
▪ Even when scoring points at an astonishing pace, no opponent has been knocked out of a game.
▪ How well she could keep control and use words and manipulate their meanings and score points.
▪ National parks is a gold mine for scoring points with constituents, while anything in Commerce is a gold mine, period.
▪ Of course, PeÜek's collection automatically scores points over the competition by virtue of its uniqueness.
▪ People didn't try and score points off each other - contributions were acknowledged and applauded, rather than criticized or tested to destruction.
▪ Reagan had already scored points by crossing the stage before the debate to shake hands with the startled Carter.
▪ When he is good, like he was against Detroit, their offense can score points.
▪ When that gap is found, the attacker exploits it by unleashing a rapid barrage of kicks and punches to score points.
sore point/spot/subject (with sb)
▪ And now she had pierced her again in this sore spot.
▪ Finally, there are plans to provide custodians a sore point to enable the churches to open for two hours a day.
▪ Graduate entry with resultant opportunities for promotion was then - as now - an especially sore point.
▪ It is still a sore point with both grandparents that neither Alice nor Henry have been baptized.
▪ The potential restriction of physician income is a major sore point.
▪ This is a sore spot with me.
▪ Tom gently washed Willie's body again and smoothed witch-hazel on to the sore spots.
stick to the point/subject/facts
▪ "Please stick to the facts," said the judge.
▪ But caution is required where miracles come into play; let us stick to the facts.
▪ Try to stick to the subject of the row rather than bringing up 25 years' worth of misdemeanours.
the whole point (of sth)
▪ The whole point of coming here was to visit the cathedral.
▪ As the sperm penetrates the egg it obviously adds more genetic material, which of course is the whole point.
▪ His real name is Markham-or, as Blue sounds it out to himself, mark him-and that is the whole point.
▪ I mean, that was, in a way, the whole point.
▪ Not to know that is to be ignorant of the whole point of the affirmation.
▪ Since the whole point of belief is to be true, logical inconsistency in belief defeats the aim of belief.
▪ That, remember, is the whole point of female choosiness at leks.
▪ Well, that was the whole point.
two points/five seconds etc adrift (of sb)
weak points/spots
▪ Are you naturally more cautious, preferring to test the strength of your enemy before striking at his weak points?
▪ He had not dealt with the bishop's weak points nor, according to Hooker, had he carried the audience with him.
▪ However, in most of these, effusive approval is showered upon her, and her weak points are minimized.
▪ Positive interpretation of weaknesses Be honest about assessing your weak points as well.
▪ Scattered in pursuit, they provided perfect weak points for our counterattack.
▪ That is why molecular studies designed to find the weak points in the viral attack must continue, Trono said.
▪ We examined our weak points, and turned them into strengths.
▪ What are his strong and weak points?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "I'll come straight to the point," said the doctor. "I think you are suffering from depression."
▪ a pencil point
▪ Almost everything has been agreed. There is just one final point that needs to be settled.
▪ Ben carved his name in the tree trunk, using the point of his knife.
▪ By mixing metals it is possible to make alloys which are tougher and have a lower melting point than the individual metals.
▪ Damon Hill leads the Formula 1 Championship, with 58 points from 6 races.
▪ Exactly what point are you trying to make, Nick?
▪ His plan has both good and bad points.
▪ I can't see the point of travelling all that way and then only staying for one day.
▪ In darts, you get 50 points for hitting the bullseye.
▪ In his speech, Marks made the point that far more people died from smoking tobacco than from taking drugs.
▪ It has small white flowers, and leaves that taper to a sharp point.
▪ Line A crosses line B at point C.
▪ Make a list of the main points in the article.
▪ Michael's point about training is an interesting one.
▪ one point nine percent
▪ Reeves scored 23 points for Arizona.
▪ Soon they came to a point where the road divided.
▪ Steve Jones is 15 points ahead.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Cicely makes six points, grabs four rebounds and finally seems to know what plays are being run.
▪ Each point in the ratio meant 100, 000 tons of capital ships, or the equivalent of about three battleships.
▪ From this point on, to stop short will be difficult and frustrating.
▪ How it got to this point is there was an investigation of a staff member abusing a child.
▪ In other words, an increase in expected inflation of 5 percentage points shifts the Phillips curve upwards by 5 percentage points.
▪ The market place was the growing point of most towns, and they have taken their shape around it.
▪ They are now 0-6 in games decided by six points or fewer.
▪ This survey data is cross-section data taken from a sample of households at a particular point in time.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
also
▪ They also point out that the excessive amounts of sugar in some brands could also be harmful to older babies' teeth.
▪ But they also point to the benefits of meaningful work in building self-esteem.
▪ It also points out that Corus would not have to intend this outcome for there to be an action under the treaty.
▪ They also point to cost savings for employers and patients alike.
▪ Coverage of the Henan scandal also points the finger at inaction by the provincial authorities.
▪ She also points to a 1989-90 grand jury report that alleged widespread police misconduct while Kolender was chief.
▪ Hicks also points out that mis-spelt names may account for 20-50% of all errors in citations.
▪ As they state, Piven and Cloward also point out the frequently racist aspects of states' policies toward the poor.
out
▪ Guide writers have a traditional obligation to honour the historical record, alongside their duty to point out present circumstances.
▪ The speaker pointed out, quite correctly, that this concept includes two separate types of therapy.
▪ After defence lawyers pointed out the flats had not yet been built, they changed to an unspecified date in 1993.
▪ Furthermore, the agent pointed out, he was not dead.
▪ Many do not even see the business benefits of their ideas until these are pointed out to them.
▪ Should it be pointed out all three winners were males?
▪ It should be pointed out that despite increasing income concentration, there has been a general improvement in the quality of life.
▪ But please remember what Doctor Barton has pointed out - you are not being judged twice for the same crime.
straight
▪ He took an involuntary pace forward and raised the shotgun to point straight at Angel One's face.
▪ Her doll sits stiffly, pointed straight ahead at the fixtures that emerge from the wall.
▪ Then the rod-man screamed, arm pointing straight ahead at the surf.
▪ It was pointing straight at him now.
▪ I purchased a dedicated Pentax flashgun with an adjustable flash head which could be adjusted to point straight ahead or angled upwards.
▪ He is pointing straight at William, who has his hand up.
▪ Now keep it there and bend your body gradually sideways to the right, keeping your right arm pointing straight down.
▪ Its barrel was pointing straight at her.
to
▪ But the new-look candidates he pointed to are virtual unknowns.
▪ For we concentrated entirely on resources internal to the individual rule-follower, on things which a solipsist could point to.
▪ Is it possible, however, to point to even earlier examples of boundaries?
▪ A final qualification is that the issues we are pointing to here are thoroughly debatable.
▪ The first thing I would point to is that our training costs for last year averaged out at £5,100 per trainee.
▪ Why, that must be where the signpost wass pointing to!
▪ What could we point to if some one chose the latter continuation, to show that he was wrong?
▪ It might also point to more appropriate ways of re-classifying subject areas so that the perspectives of both genders are represented.
■ NOUN
basis
▪ Reoffered at 99. 5 to yield 485 basis points above the 7. 125 % Bund due 2003.
▪ Two-year note yields tumbled 12 basis points to 5. 04, the lowest since March 1994.
▪ August 1998 bonds rose 5 basis points to 7. 47 percent.
▪ Reoffered at 99. 845 to yield a spread at the launch of three basis points above U. S. Treasurys.
▪ The spread between the two-year and 10-year gilt was 133 basis points, unchanged from yesterday.
▪ Mortgageto-Treasury spreads were seen tightening, but not by much more than a couple basis points.
▪ Yields a spread of 34 basis points above the 10-year Treasury note.
▪ The benchmark 5-year sterling swap spread was unchanged at 34 basis points.
direction
▪ With a certain amount of ingenuity she can even use the balloon to steer herself by pointing it in various directions.
▪ He raised his arm and pointed in no particular direction.
▪ Apparently, one out of every 16 signposts at crossroads in the region are pointing in the wrong direction.
▪ The main point: determine a direction in your list and follow it.
▪ The same ideas apply in digraphs, except that all the edges must point in the same direction.
▪ The circle is actually a large microwave tower with nine cones pointing in five directions.
▪ However, he still managed to keep the weapon pointing loosely in his direction.
▪ The old woman points south in the direction of the big house.
fact
▪ One thing that must be pointed out is the fact that these remarks, however romantic-sounding, are all self-centred.
▪ Other experts point to the fact that even specialists are losing jobs.
▪ I pointed to the fact that I was younger than when he took over.
▪ Manchester executives are not shy about pointing out that fact.
▪ Rather it points to the fact that there has been a subtle change in the composition of the teaching force.
▪ I can summarize the preceding by pointing to the fact that there is actually a dual metaphor being employed.
▪ All the evidence would seem to point to the fact that this is the case.
finger
▪ Squeezing To boost circulation in the thighs and calves, place your hands on the skin, fingers pointing away from you.
▪ Her outstretched finger pointed to the window behind Dove.
▪ Now the Collector's finger was pointing at other objects, including even those belonging to himself.
▪ Because now the finger was pointed at managers: everyone knew if their office had a high rate.
▪ With your fingers pointing downwards, gently pull each hand alternately straight up from the floor or table.
▪ Dark fingers pointed at his wedding ring.
▪ Bridget looked at where the small pink finger was pointing, she could see nothing.
▪ Pointing, and tapping the button with the finger they were pointing with.
gun
▪ They looked at the passports and then started to walk down the aisle, pointing their guns at the passengers.
▪ Deering, whom Warren Cokley knew, entered pointing a gun at him.
▪ He snapped off a shot, hardly even bothering to point the gun before he squeezed the trigger.
▪ If Jack let his men point a gun at his own club, what other club could be safe?
▪ Two men in their late teens or early twenties came into the office and pointed their guns at the cashiers face.
▪ I turned around and saw a man pointing a gun at me.
▪ Facing that wall was a picture of a huge hand pointing a gun directly at you.
▪ I can close my eyes and point the gun and hit whatever it is.
percentage
▪ The gender gap is the difference between these two margins: 16 percentage points.
▪ Today, the prime rate is 2. 83 percentage points higher than the yield on a 10-year government note.
▪ The poll, conducted by telephone Jan. 2-7, has a margin of error of 5. 5 percentage points.
▪ It has a margin of error of plus or minus 3. 5 percentage points.
▪ The finding carries a margin of error of 3. 5 percentage points.
▪ So the female preference for Clinton was 5 percentage points higher than the male preference.
▪ It would also raise the payroll tax 1. 52 percentage points.
▪ By fifth grade, the difference had grown to 10. 8 percentage points.
way
▪ It points the way to new directions for the late 1980s and 1990s.
▪ The stark resonance of this solo piano album pointed the way.
▪ Here, we can but point the way to the reader.
▪ Suman Fernando points the way to a view of mental health that would be worthy of our rich and diverse world.
▪ But without critics to point the way, that money might as well be tossed into the wind.
▪ This may point the way in regard to the original problem.
▪ Everything seemed to point that way.
■ VERB
score
▪ Isaac Hawkins and Julius Page scored 10 points each.
▪ Except for the time I scored 84 points in a backyard basketball game.
▪ The Matadors scored the first five points of the match and won the first game without much drama.
▪ The only starter to emerge with a decent game was rookie Brent Barry, who scored a career-high 22 points.
▪ I like scoring the quiet points.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(that's a) good idea/point/question
a moot point/question
▪ It's a moot point whether this is censorship.
▪ It is a moot point whether hierarchies exist outside our own thought processes.
▪ Quite how long Lord Young was proposing to delay publication is a moot point.
▪ This, of course, is a moot point.
▪ When you go to a place called Texas Bone, deciding what to order becomes a moot point.
▪ Whether the law should be this is a moot point.
▪ Whether they have appeared as part of the C. and A.G.'s audit is a moot point.
▪ Whether this input has made a significant impact on the pattern of activity is a moot point.
a pointed question/look/remark
▪ As he left the office he locked it behind him, with a pointed look at Bob.
be beside the point
▪ It's unrealistic, but that's beside the point - it's just good entertainment.
▪ But the pedigree of this idea is beside the point.
▪ But to criticize Mr Hall's production as an exercise in fuddy-duddy Shakespeare is beside the point.
▪ He may manufacture these life units as required and he may simply have a given supply: that is beside the point.
▪ She had come to no harm, but that was beside the point.
▪ This semantic distinction is beside the point; the special admissions program is undeniably a classification based on race and ethnic back-ground.
▪ What the outcome of seeing him might be is beside the point.
be the trigger (point) (for sth)
▪ All we had to experience was the trigger and off we went into a state of fear.
▪ And the loss of the ally may be the trigger which will start chain fission.
▪ Could either or both factors be the trigger?
▪ I had provided the direction in my lecture, and Our discussion was the trigger.
▪ That was the trigger that started the weeping.
▪ The new stand was the trigger for the layout.
▪ Your saying the work is urgent is the trigger, the result is lateness.
get/score/earn Brownie points
get/win/score brownie points
high point
▪ As the pedal is pressed downward from its highest point, it also moves forward.
▪ At the top of the theater steps, the highest point, all four forms appear.
▪ Christmas and New Year have long been the high point for visitor and Madeiran alike.
▪ His engagement to Nora Cushing had been the high point of her life.
▪ Political repression and racial discrimination were at a high point.
▪ That is just the intensification, the high point of an ongoing process.
▪ They were at the highest point for twenty li about.
▪ We are now reaching the high point of the truly happy life.
not to put too fine a point on it
▪ Everyone there - not to put too fine a point on it - was crazy.
▪ The dishes we tried tasted, not to put too fine a point on it, like gasoline.
point of contact
▪ It's difficult to find a point of contact between theory and practice.
▪ The new service center will serve as the single point of contact for general customer inquiries.
▪ I have spoken of the point of contact but with the proper grip it will be much easier.
▪ If you bought mail order, then the first point of contact is the software house or importer concerned.
▪ In the early stages, the baby's mouth is an important point of contact with the world.
▪ It also reduced friction at the point of contact.
▪ The parties are no longer the chief point of contact between the electorate and the politicians.
▪ These are the solid points of contact that they keep with the rock, which enable them to move safely.
▪ This chapter explores the points of contact between the theory of social representations and the rhetorical approach.
▪ Your family doctor is always your first point of contact.
reference point
▪ Fitzgerald's case will be the reference point for lawyers in tomorrow's trial.
▪ The time he spent in prison serves as a point of reference for Bowden - the lessons are worth remembering.
▪ Align to line up typeset or other graphic material as specified, using a base or vertical line as the reference point.
▪ But he remained a constant reference point among those concerned about the course the nation was taking.
▪ I concentrated on the reference points and on keeping one or two rotor diameters away from the other ship.
▪ It is equally correct and sometimes more useful to view demand from the reference point of quantity.
▪ It was a reference point without which the tragedy could not be expressed.
▪ They establish reference points and reference lines.
▪ This team has a reference point.
▪ We are left with a play on signs which has no ultimate reference point other than the commodity.
sore point/spot/subject (with sb)
▪ And now she had pierced her again in this sore spot.
▪ Finally, there are plans to provide custodians a sore point to enable the churches to open for two hours a day.
▪ Graduate entry with resultant opportunities for promotion was then - as now - an especially sore point.
▪ It is still a sore point with both grandparents that neither Alice nor Henry have been baptized.
▪ The potential restriction of physician income is a major sore point.
▪ This is a sore spot with me.
▪ Tom gently washed Willie's body again and smoothed witch-hazel on to the sore spots.
the whole point (of sth)
▪ The whole point of coming here was to visit the cathedral.
▪ As the sperm penetrates the egg it obviously adds more genetic material, which of course is the whole point.
▪ His real name is Markham-or, as Blue sounds it out to himself, mark him-and that is the whole point.
▪ I mean, that was, in a way, the whole point.
▪ Not to know that is to be ignorant of the whole point of the affirmation.
▪ Since the whole point of belief is to be true, logical inconsistency in belief defeats the aim of belief.
▪ That, remember, is the whole point of female choosiness at leks.
▪ Well, that was the whole point.
two points/five seconds etc adrift (of sb)
weak points/spots
▪ Are you naturally more cautious, preferring to test the strength of your enemy before striking at his weak points?
▪ He had not dealt with the bishop's weak points nor, according to Hooker, had he carried the audience with him.
▪ However, in most of these, effusive approval is showered upon her, and her weak points are minimized.
▪ Positive interpretation of weaknesses Be honest about assessing your weak points as well.
▪ Scattered in pursuit, they provided perfect weak points for our counterattack.
▪ That is why molecular studies designed to find the weak points in the viral attack must continue, Trono said.
▪ We examined our weak points, and turned them into strengths.
▪ What are his strong and weak points?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Look,'' she said, pointing at a vase in a shop window.
▪ "That's Margo's bouquet, on the table.'' Mother pointed to a massive bunch of spring flowers.
▪ A handmade sign for the party pointed down a dirt road.
▪ Babies learn to point before they learn to talk.
▪ Children are taught that it's rude to point.
▪ Could you point me in the right direction?
▪ Don't point your finger at me.
▪ It will be time to go when the big hand points to 12 and the little hand points to 8.
▪ The teacher pointed at Marcus and told him to come to the front of the class.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He rested the handle on the hair between her legs, the blade pointing up towards her abdomen.
▪ So when he followed up by pointing us towards the touchline, I got the shock of my life.
▪ The comment was pointed at du Cann.
▪ Then the rod-man screamed, arm pointing straight ahead at the surf.
▪ They were crowded together in a corner, their tails pointing the same way.
▪ Winston points to airline deregulation as case in point.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Point

Point \Point\ (point), v. t. & i. To appoint. [Obs.]
--Spenser.

Point

Point \Point\, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See Pungent, and cf. Puncto, Puncture.]

  1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing instrument, as a needle or a pin.

  2. An instrument which pricks or pierces, as a sort of needle used by engravers, etchers, lace workers, and others; also, a pointed cutting tool, as a stone cutter's point; -- called also pointer.

  3. Anything which tapers to a sharp, well-defined termination. Specifically: A small promontory or cape; a tract of land extending into the water beyond the common shore line.

  4. The mark made by the end of a sharp, piercing instrument, as a needle; a prick.

  5. An indefinitely small space; a mere spot indicated or supposed. Specifically: (Geom.) That which has neither parts nor magnitude; that which has position, but has neither length, breadth, nor thickness, -- sometimes conceived of as the limit of a line; that by the motion of which a line is conceived to be produced.

  6. An indivisible portion of time; a moment; an instant; hence, the verge.

    When time's first point begun Made he all souls.
    --Sir J. Davies.

  7. A mark of punctuation; a character used to mark the divisions of a composition, or the pauses to be observed in reading, or to point off groups of figures, etc.; a stop, as a comma, a semicolon, and esp. a period; hence, figuratively, an end, or conclusion.

    And there a point, for ended is my tale.
    --Chaucer.

    Commas and points they set exactly right.
    --Pope.

  8. Whatever serves to mark progress, rank, or relative position, or to indicate a transition from one state or position to another, degree; step; stage; hence, position or condition attained; as, a point of elevation, or of depression; the stock fell off five points; he won by tenpoints. ``A point of precedence.''
    --Selden. ``Creeping on from point to point.''
    --Tennyson.

    A lord full fat and in good point.
    --Chaucer.

  9. That which arrests attention, or indicates qualities or character; a salient feature; a characteristic; a peculiarity; hence, a particular; an item; a detail; as, the good or bad points of a man, a horse, a book, a story, etc.

    He told him, point for point, in short and plain.
    --Chaucer.

    In point of religion and in point of honor.
    --Bacon.

    Shalt thou dispute With Him the points of liberty ?
    --Milton.

  10. Hence, the most prominent or important feature, as of an argument, discourse, etc.; the essential matter; esp., the proposition to be established; as, the point of an anecdote. ``Here lies the point.''
    --Shak.

    They will hardly prove his point.
    --Arbuthnot.

  11. A small matter; a trifle; a least consideration; a punctilio.

    This fellow doth not stand upon points.
    --Shak.

    [He] cared not for God or man a point.
    --Spenser.

  12. (Mus.) A dot or mark used to designate certain tones or time; as:

    1. (Anc. Mus.) A dot or mark distinguishing or characterizing certain tones or styles; as, points of perfection, of augmentation, etc.; hence, a note; a tune. ``Sound the trumpet -- not a levant, or a flourish, but a point of war.''
      --Sir W. Scott.

    2. (Mod. Mus.) A dot placed at the right hand of a note, to raise its value, or prolong its time, by one half, as to make a whole note equal to three half notes, a half note equal to three quarter notes.

  13. (Astron.) A fixed conventional place for reference, or zero of reckoning, in the heavens, usually the intersection of two or more great circles of the sphere, and named specifically in each case according to the position intended; as, the equinoctial points; the solstitial points; the nodal points; vertical points, etc. See Equinoctial Nodal.

  14. (Her.) One of the several different parts of the escutcheon. See Escutcheon.

  15. (Naut.)

    1. One of the points of the compass (see Points of the compass, below); also, the difference between two points of the compass; as, to fall off a point.

    2. A short piece of cordage used in reefing sails. See Reef point, under Reef.

  16. (Anc. Costume) A a string or lace used to tie together certain parts of the dress.
    --Sir W. Scott.

  17. Lace wrought the needle; as, point de Venise; Brussels point. See Point lace, below.

  18. pl. (Railways) A switch. [Eng.]

  19. An item of private information; a hint; a tip; a pointer.

  20. (Cricket) A fielder who is stationed on the off side, about twelve or fifteen yards from, and a little in advance of, the batsman.

  21. The attitude assumed by a pointer dog when he finds game; as, the dog came to a point. See Pointer.

  22. (Type Making) A standard unit of measure for the size of type bodies, being one twelfth of the thickness of pica type. See Point system of type, under Type.

  23. A tyne or snag of an antler.

  24. One of the spaces on a backgammon board.

  25. (Fencing) A movement executed with the saber or foil; as, tierce point.

  26. (Med.) A pointed piece of quill or bone covered at one end with vaccine matter; -- called also vaccine point.

  27. One of the raised dots used in certain systems of printing and writing for the blind. The first practical system was that devised by Louis Braille in 1829, and still used in Europe (see Braille). Two modifications of this are current in the United States:

    New York point founded on three bases of equidistant points arranged in two lines (viz., : :: :::), and a later improvement,

    American Braille, embodying the Braille base (:::) and the New-York-point principle of using the characters of few points for the commonest letters.

  28. In technical senses:

    1. In various games, a position of a certain player, or, by extension, the player himself; as: (1) (Lacrosse & Ice Hockey) The position of the player of each side who stands a short distance in front of the goal keeper; also, the player himself. (2) (Baseball) (pl.) The position of the pitcher and catcher.

    2. (Hunting) A spot to which a straight run is made; hence, a straight run from point to point; a cross-country run. [Colloq. Oxf. E. D.]

    3. (Falconry) The perpendicular rising of a hawk over the place where its prey has gone into cover.

    4. Act of pointing, as of the foot downward in certain dance positions.

      Note: The word point is a general term, much used in the sciences, particularly in mathematics, mechanics, perspective, and physics, but generally either in the geometrical sense, or in that of degree, or condition of change, and with some accompanying descriptive or qualifying term, under which, in the vocabulary, the specific uses are explained; as, boiling point, carbon point, dry point, freezing point, melting point, vanishing point, etc.

      At all points, in every particular, completely; perfectly.
      --Shak.

      At point, In point, At the point, In the point, or On the point, as near as can be; on the verge; about (see About, prep., 6); as, at the point of death; he was on the point of speaking. ``In point to fall down.''
      --Chaucer. ``Caius Sidius Geta, at point to have been taken, recovered himself so valiantly as brought day on his side.''
      --Milton.

      Dead point. (Mach.) Same as Dead center, under Dead.

      Far point (Med.), in ophthalmology, the farthest point at which objects are seen distinctly. In normal eyes the nearest point at which objects are seen distinctly; either with the two eyes together (binocular near point), or with each eye separately (monocular near point).

      Nine points of the law, all but the tenth point; the greater weight of authority.

      On the point. See At point, above.

      Point lace, lace wrought with the needle, as distinguished from that made on the pillow.

      Point net, a machine-made lace imitating a kind of Brussels lace (Brussels ground).

      Point of concurrence (Geom.), a point common to two lines, but not a point of tangency or of intersection, as, for instance, that in which a cycloid meets its base.

      Point of contrary flexure, a point at which a curve changes its direction of curvature, or at which its convexity and concavity change sides.

      Point of order, in parliamentary practice, a question of order or propriety under the rules.

      Point of sight (Persp.), in a perspective drawing, the point assumed as that occupied by the eye of the spectator.

      Point of view, the relative position from which anything is seen or any subject is considered.

      Points of the compass (Naut.), the thirty-two points of division of the compass card in the mariner's compass; the corresponding points by which the circle of the horizon is supposed to be divided, of which the four marking the directions of east, west, north, and south, are called cardinal points, and the rest are named from their respective directions, as N. by E., N. N. E., N. E. by N., N. E., etc. See Illust. under Compass.

      Point paper, paper pricked through so as to form a stencil for transferring a design.

      Point system of type. See under Type.

      Singular point (Geom.), a point of a curve which possesses some property not possessed by points in general on the curve, as a cusp, a point of inflection, a node, etc.

      To carry one's point, to accomplish one's object, as in a controversy.

      To make a point of, to attach special importance to.

      To make a point, or To gain a point, accomplish that which was proposed; also, to make advance by a step, grade, or position.

      To mark a point, or To score a point, as in billiards, cricket, etc., to note down, or to make, a successful hit, run, etc.

      To strain a point, to go beyond the proper limit or rule; to stretch one's authority or conscience.

      Vowel point, in Arabic, Hebrew, and certain other Eastern and ancient languages, a mark placed above or below the consonant, or attached to it, representing the vowel, or vocal sound, which precedes or follows the consonant.

Point

Point \Point\ (point), v. i.

  1. To direct the point of something, as of a finger, for the purpose of designating an object, and attracting attention to it; -- with at.

    Now must the world point at poor Katharine.
    --Shak.

    Point at the tattered coat and ragged shoe.
    --Dryden.

  2. To indicate the presence of game by fixed and steady look, as certain hunting dogs do.

    He treads with caution, and he points with fear.
    --Gay.

  3. (Med.) To approximate to the surface; to head; -- said of an abscess.

    To point at, to treat with scorn or contempt by pointing or directing attention to.

    To point well (Naut.), to sail close to the wind; -- said of a vessel.

Point

Point \Point\ (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pointed; p. pr. & vb. n. Pointing.] [Cf. F. pointer. See Point, n.]

  1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also figuratively; as, to point a moral.

  2. To direct toward an abject; to aim; as, to point a gun at a wolf, or a cannon at a fort.

  3. Hence, to direct the attention or notice of.

    Whosoever should be guided through his battles by Minerva, and pointed to every scene of them.
    --Pope.

  4. To supply with punctuation marks; to punctuate; as, to point a composition.

  5. To mark (a text, as in Arabic or Hebrew) with vowel points; -- also called vocalize.

    Syn: vocalize. [1913 Webster + RP]

  6. To give particular prominence to; to designate in a special manner; to indicate, as if by pointing; as, the error was pointed out.
    --Pope.

    He points it, however, by no deviation from his straightforward manner of speech.
    --Dickens.

  7. To indicate or discover by a fixed look, as game.

  8. (Masonry) To fill up and finish the joints of (a wall), by introducing additional cement or mortar, and bringing it to a smooth surface.

  9. (Stone Cutting) To cut, as a surface, with a pointed tool.

    To point a rope (Naut.), to taper and neatly finish off the end by interweaving the nettles.

    To point a sail (Naut.), to affix points through the eyelet holes of the reefs.

    To point off, to divide into periods or groups, or to separate, by pointing, as figures.

    To point the yards (of a vessel) (Naut.), to brace them so that the wind shall strike the sails obliquely.
    --Totten.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
point

c.1200, "minute amount, single item in a whole; sharp end of a sword, etc.," a merger of two words, both ultimately from Latin pungere "prick, pierce, puncture" (see pungent). The Latin neuter past participle punctum was used as a noun, meaning "small hole made by pricking," subsequently extended to anything that looked like one, hence, "dot, particle," etc. This yielded Old French point "dot; smallest amount," which was borrowed in Middle English by c.1300.\n

\nMeanwhile the Latin fem. past participle of pungere was puncta, which was used in Medieval Latin to mean "sharp tip," and became Old French pointe "point of a weapon, vanguard of an army," which also passed into English, early 14c.\n

\nThe senses have merged in English, but remain distinct in French. Extended senses are from the notion of "minute, single, or separate items in an extended whole." Meaning "small mark, dot" in English is mid-14c. Meaning "distinguishing feature" is recorded from late 15c. Meaning "a unit of score in a game" is first recorded 1746. As a typeface unit (in Britain and U.S., one twelfth of a pica), it went into use in U.S. 1883. As a measure of weight for precious stones (one one-hundredth of a carat) it is recorded from 1931.\n

\nThe point "the matter being discussed" is attested from late 14c.; meaning "sense, purpose, advantage" (usually in the negative, as in what's the point?) is first recorded 1903. Point of honor (1610s) translates French point d'honneur. Point of no return (1941) is originally aviators' term for the point in a flight "before which any engine failure requires an immediate turn around and return to the point of departure, and beyond which such return is no longer practical."

point

late 14c., "indicate with the finger;" c.1400, "wound by stabbing; make pauses in reading a text; seal or fill openings or joints or between tiles," partly from Old French pointoier "to prick, stab, jab, mark," and also from point (n.).\n

\nMid-15c. as "to stitch, mend." From late 15c. as "stitch, mend;" also "furnish (a garment) with tags or laces for fastening;" from late 15c. as "aim (something)." Related: Pointed; pointing. To point up "emphasize" is from 1934; to point out is from 1570s.

Wiktionary
point

n. 1 A discrete division of something. 2 # An individual element in a larger whole; a particular detail, thought, or quality. (from 13th c.) 3 # A particular moment in an event or occurrence; a juncture. (from 13th c.) 4 # (context archaic English) condition, state. (from 13th c.) 5 # A topic of discussion or debate; a proposition, a focus of conversation or consideration. (from 14th c.) 6 # (context obsolete English) The smallest quantity of something; a jot, a whit. (14th-17th c.) 7 # (context obsolete English) A tiny amount of time; a moment. (14th-17th c.) 8 # A specific location or place, seen as a spatial position. (from 14th c.) 9 # (context mathematics science English) A zero-dimensional mathematical object representing a location in one or more dimensions; something considered to have position but no magnitude or direction. (from 14th c.) 10 # A purpose or objective. (from 14th c.) 11 # A full stop or other terminal punctuation mark. (from 14th c.) 12 # (context music English) A dot or mark used to designate certain tones or time. In ancient music, it distinguished or characterized certain tones or styles (points of perfection, of augmentation, etc.). In modern music, it is placed on the right of a note to raise its value, or prolong its time, by one half. 13 # (context by extension English) A note; a tune. 14 # A distinguishing quality or characteristic. (from 15th c.) 15 # Something tiny, as a pinprick; a very small mark. (from 15th c.) 16 # (context now only in phrases English) A tenth; formerly also a twelfth. (from 17th c.) 17 # Each of the marks or strokes written above letters, especially in Semitic languages, to indicate vowels, stress etc. (from 17th c.) 18 # (context gaming English) A unit of scoring in a game or competition. (from 18th c.) 19 # (context mathematics English) A decimal point (now especially when reading decimal fractions aloud). (from 18th c.) 20 # (context economics English) A unit used to express differences in prices of stocks and shares. (from 19th c.) 21 # (context typography English) a unit of measure equal to 1/12 of a pica, or approximately 1/72 of an inch (exactly 1/72 of an inch in the digital era). (from 19th c.) 22 # (context UK English) An electric power socket. (from 20th c.) 23 # (context navigation nautical English) A unit of bearing equal to one thirty-second of a circle, ''i.e.'' 11.25°. 24 A sharp extremity. 25 # The sharp tip of an object. (from 14th c.) 26 # Any projecting extremity of an object. (from 14th c.) 27 # An object which has a sharp or tapering tip. (from 14th c.) 28 # (context backgammon English) Each of the twelve triangular positions in either table of a backgammon board, on which the stones are played. (from 15th c.) 29 # A peninsula or promontory. (from 15th c.) 30 # The position at the front or vanguard of an advancing force. (from 16th c.) 31 # Each of the main directions on a compass, usually considered to be 32 in number; a direction. (from 16th c.) 32 # (context nautical English) The difference between two points of the compass. 33 # pointedness of speech or writing; a penetrating or decisive quality of expression. (from 17th c.) vb. (context intransitive English) To extend the index finger in the direction of something in order to show where it is or to draw attention to it.

WordNet
point
  1. v. indicate a place, direction, person, or thing; either spatially or figuratively; "I showed the customer the glove section"; "He pointed to the empty parking space"; "he indicated his opponents" [syn: indicate, show]

  2. be oriented; "The weather vane points North" [syn: orient]

  3. direct into a position for use; "point a gun"; "He charged his weapon at me" [syn: charge, level]

  4. direct the course; determine the direction of travelling [syn: steer, maneuver, manoeuver, manoeuvre, direct, head, guide, channelize, channelise]

  5. be a signal for or a symptom of; "These symptoms indicate a serious illness"; "Her behavior points to a severe neurosis"; "The economic indicators signal that the euro is undervalued" [syn: bespeak, betoken, indicate, signal]

  6. sail close to the wind [syn: luff]

  7. mark (Hebrew words) with diacritics

  8. mark with diacritics; "point the letter"

  9. mark (a psalm text) to indicate the points at which the music changes

  10. be positionable in a specified manner; "The gun points with ease"

  11. intend (something) to move towards a certain goal; "He aimed his fists towards his opponent's face"; "criticism directed at her superior"; "direct your anger towards others, not towards yourself" [syn: target, aim, place, direct]

  12. give a point to; "The candles are tapered" [syn: sharpen, taper]

  13. repair the joints of bricks; "point a chimney" [syn: repoint]

point
  1. n. a geometric element that has position but no extension; "a point is defined by its coordinates"

  2. the precise location of something; a spatially limited location; "she walked to a point where she could survey the whole street"

  3. a brief version of the essential meaning of something; "get to the point"; "he missed the point of the joke"; "life has lost its point"

  4. a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process; "a remarkable degree of frankness"; "at what stage are the social sciences?" [syn: degree, level, stage]

  5. an isolated fact that is considered separately from the whole; "several of the details are similar"; "a point of information" [syn: detail, item]

  6. an instant of time; "at that point I had to leave" [syn: point in time]

  7. the object of an activity; "what is the point of discussing it?"

  8. a V shape; "the cannibal's teeth were filed to sharp points" [syn: tip, peak]

  9. a very small circular shape; "a row of points"; "draw lines between the dots" [syn: dot]

  10. the unit of counting in scoring a game or contest; "he scored 20 points in the first half"; "a touchdown counts 6 points"

  11. a promontory extending out into a large body of water; "they sailed south around the point"

  12. a distinct part that can be specified separately in a group of things that could be enumerated on a list; "he noticed an item in the New York Times"; "she had several items on her shopping list"; "the main point on the agenda was taken up first" [syn: item]

  13. a style in speech or writing that arrests attention and has a penetrating or convincing quality or effect

  14. an outstanding characteristic; "his acting was one of the high points of the movie" [syn: spot]

  15. sharp end; "he stuck the point of the knife into a tree"; "he broke the point of his pencil"

  16. any of 32 horizontal directions indicated on the card of a compass; "he checked the point on his compass" [syn: compass point]

  17. a linear unit used to measure the size of type; approximately 1/72 inch

  18. a punctuation mark (.) placed at the end of a declarative sentence to indicate a full stop or after abbreviations; "in England they call a period a stop" [syn: period, full stop, stop, full point]

  19. a V-shaped mark at one end of an arrow pointer; "the point of the arrow was due north" [syn: head]

  20. the property of a shape that tapers to a sharp point [syn: pointedness] [ant: unpointedness]

  21. a distinguishing or individuating characteristic; "he knows my bad points as well as my good points"

  22. the gun muzzle's direction; "he held me up at the point of a gun" [syn: gunpoint]

  23. a wall socket [syn: power point]

  24. a contact in the distributor; as the rotor turns its projecting arm contacts distributor points and current flows to the spark plugs [syn: distributor point, breaker point]

Gazetteer
Point, TX -- U.S. city in Texas
Population (2000): 792
Housing Units (2000): 331
Land area (2000): 2.773143 sq. miles (7.182407 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 2.773143 sq. miles (7.182407 sq. km)
FIPS code: 58532
Located within: Texas (TX), FIPS 48
Location: 32.931512 N, 95.870957 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 75472
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Point, TX
Point
Wikipedia
Point

Point or points may refer to:

Point (tennis)

A point in tennis is the smallest subdivision of the match, the completion of which changes the score. A point can consist of a double fault by the server, in which case it is won by the receiver; otherwise, it begins with a legal serve by one side's server to the receiver on the other, and continues until one side fails to make a legal return to the other, losing the point. Four points win a game, counted as 15 (1 point), 30 (2 points), 40 (3 points). A game must be won by at least two points.

Point (basketball)

Points in basketball are used to keep track of the score in a game. Points can be accumulated by making field goals (two or three points) or free throws (one point). If a player makes a field goal from within the three-point line, the player scores two points. If the player makes a field goal from beyond the three-point line, the player scores three points. The team that has recorded the most points at the end of a game is declared that game's winner.

Point (album)

Point is a 2001 album by Cornelius. The album contains innovative rhythmic use of sound, and is notable for its use of sounds from nature, such as water sounds and bird sounds, into its mix.

Point (geometry)

In modern mathematics, a point refers usually to an element of some set called a space.

More specifically, in Euclidean geometry, a point is a primitive notion upon which the geometry is built. Being a primitive notion means that a point cannot be defined in terms of previously defined objects. That is, a point is defined only by some properties, called axioms, that it must satisfy. In particular, the geometric points do not have any length, area, volume, or any other dimensional attribute. A common interpretation is that the concept of a point is meant to capture the notion of a unique location in Euclidean space.

Point (ice hockey)

In ice hockey, point has three contemporary meanings:

  • A point is awarded to a player for each goal scored or assist earned. The total number of goals plus assists equals total points. The Art Ross Trophy is awarded to the National Hockey League (NHL) player who leads the league in scoring points at the end of the regular season.
  • Points are also awarded to assess standings (or rankings). For winning a match, a team always earns two points in the standings whether they win in regulation or overtime. When a team ties, they earn one point. Often, there are no ties (in the NHL as a result of many rule changes after the 2004–05 NHL lockout). However, a rule that was instituted in the 1999–2000 NHL season makes it so that when a team loses in overtime, they shall earn one point for making it to overtime. This rule includes shootouts, which were instituted after the aforementioned lockout. Teams that win in overtime or shootout receive a bonus point together with the point they received for the initial draw.
  • When a team is in the offensive zone, the area near the blue line and the boards is referred to as " the point". When a team is on the power play, its defencemen usually take up positions at the point. The name is taken from the former names of the defence positions, point and cover point, as first developed in the 19th century, the earliest days of ice hockey's development.
Point (typography)

In typography, the point is the smallest unit of measure. It is used for measuring font size, leading, and other items on a printed page. The size of the point has varied throughout the history of printing. Since the 18th century, the point's size has varied from 0.18 to 0.4  millimeters. Following the advent of desktop publishing in the 1980s and 1990s, digital printing has largely supplanted the letterpress printing and has established the DTP point (desktop publishing point) as the de facto standard. The DTP point is defined as of an international inch (about 0.353 mm) and, as with earlier American point sizes, is considered to be of a pica.

In metal type, the point size of the font described the height of the metal body on which the typeface's characters were cast. In digital type, letters of a font are designed around an imaginary space called an em square. When a point size of a font is specified, the font is scaled so that its em square has a side length of that particular length in points. Although the letters of a font usually fit within the font's em square, there is not necessarily any size relationship between the two, so the point size does not necessarily correspond to any measurement of the size of the letters on the printed page.

Point (Outer Hebrides)

Point , also known as the Eye Peninsula, is a peninsula some 11 km long in the Outer Hebrides (or Western Isles), Scotland. The majority of Point is connected to the rest of the Isle of Lewis by a narrow isthmus, one mile in length and at one point barely 100 metres wide. The peninsula is just 6 km east of the regional capital of Stornoway, however the district of Point actually starts at the Parkend estate on Stornoway's outskirts. Point is home to around 2,600 people and is one of the few districts of the Western Isles where the population is increasing. There are about 17 villages and hamlets in Point: (listed west to east) Melbost (Mealabost) (Including Stornoway Airport), Branahuie (Bràigh na h-Aoidhe), Aignish (Aiginis), Knock (An Cnoc), Swordale (Suardail), Garrabost, Lower Bayble (Pabail Iarach), Eagleton (Baile na h-Iolaire), Upper Bayble (Pabail Uarach), Shulishader (Sulaisiader, usually referred to as Shader), Sheshader (Seisiader), Flesherin (Fleisirin), Cnoc Amhlaigh, Portnaguran (Port nan Giuran), Aird, Broker (Brocair), and Portvoller (Port Mholair).

Point (mortgage)

Points, sometimes also called "discount points", are a form of pre-paid interest. One point equals one percent of the loan amount. By charging a borrower points, a lender effectively increases the yield on the loan above the amount of the stated interest rate. Borrowers can offer to pay a lender points as a method to reduce the interest rate on the loan, thus obtaining a lower monthly payment in exchange for this up-front payment. In United States, for each point purchased, the loan rate is typically reduced by anywhere from 1/8% (0.125%) to 1/4% (0.25%).

Selling the property or refinancing prior to this break-even point will result in a net financial loss for the buyer while keeping the loan for longer than this break-even point will result in a net financial savings for the buyer. The longer you keep the property financed under the loan with purchased points, the more the money spent on the points will pay off. Accordingly, if the intention is to buy and sell the property or refinance in a rapid fashion, paying points is actually going to end up costing more than just paying the loan at the higher interest rate.

Points may also be purchased to reduce the monthly payment for the purpose of qualifying for a loan. Loan qualification based on monthly income versus the monthly loan payment may sometimes only be achievable by reducing the monthly payment through the purchasing of points to buy down the interest rate, thereby reducing the monthly loan payment.

Discount points may be different from origination fee or broker fee. Discount points are always used to buy down the interest rates, while origination fees sometimes are fees the lender charges for the loan or sometimes just another name for buying down the interest rate. Origination fee and discount points are both items listed under lender-charges on the HUD-1 Settlement Statement.

The difference in savings over the life of the loan can make paying points a benefit to the borrower. If you intend to stay in your home for an extended period of time, it may be worthwhile to pay additional points in order to obtain a lower interest rate. Any significant changes in fees should be re-disclosed in the final good faith estimate (GFE).

Also directly related to points is the concept of the ' no closing cost loan', in which the consumer accepts a higher interest rate in return for the lender paying the loan's closing costs up front.

Usage examples of "point".

On this occasion it was unlocked, and Marian was about to rush forward in eager anticipation of a peep at its interior, when, child as she was, the reflection struck her that she would stand abetter chance of carrying her point by remaining perdue.

Salmissra, her eyes ablaze, pointed at the prostrate Essia and snapped her fingers twice.

Finally, he points out the practical bearing of the subject--for example, the probability of calculus causing sudden suppression of urine in such cases--and also the danger of surgical interference, and suggests the possibility of diagnosing the condition by ascertaining the absence of the opening of one ureter in the bladder by means of the cystoscope, and also the likelihood of its occurring where any abnormality of the genital organs is found, especially if this be unilateral.

After all, I needed to know at what point it was unsafe for me, the host, to abort the caller.

I respond by pointing out that one of those babies that was aborted thirty years ago might have grown up to be a brilliant scientist and could have discovered the cure for AIDS.

He could feel the points abrading his skin and saw stars for a moment behind his closed lids.

Yet during abreaction at one point she was acting out holding the knife and doing the slashing.

Memphis from New Orleans, even the narrow strip on either side swept by their cannon was safe at any point only while they were abreast it.

Roman court, and gave his abridgment the name of Breviary, which thus came to denote a work which from another point of view might be called a Plenary, involving as it did the collection of several works into one.

And this is the Absolute Ugly: an ugly thing is something that has not been entirely mastered by pattern, that is by Reason, the Matter not yielding at all points and in all respects to Ideal-Form.

Their theory is confirmed by the cases in which two mixed substances occupy a greater space than either singly, especially a space equal to the conjoined extent of each: for, as they point out, in an absolute interpenetration the infusion of the one into the other would leave the occupied space exactly what it was before and, where the space occupied is not increased by the juxtaposition, they explain that some expulsion of air has made room for the incoming substance.

But the point is that, where there once appeared a single and absolutely unbridgeable gap between the world of matter and the world of lifea gap that posed a completely unsolvable problemthere now appeared only a series of minigaps.

The advocate of equal rights is preoccupied by these opportunities for the abusive exercise of power, because from his point of view rights exercised in the interest of inequality have ceased to be righteous.

Tim had always found himself especially attuned to the deserted charms of Candie Gardens in winter, enjoying the bare traceries of the trees and the widened harbour view, the few points of colour against the monochrome background - the red and pink of the camellias near the top gate, the hanging yellow bells of the winter-flowering abutilon with their red clappers, even the iridescence of the mallard drake circling the largest of the ponds with his speckled mate.

Each chain over a shore span consists of two segments, the longer attached to the tie at the top of the river tower, the shorter to the link at the top of the abutment tower, and the two jointed together at the lowest point.