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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
target
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a realistic goal/target
▪ Set realistic goals for yourself.
a sales target
▪ It achieved only 20% of its sales target.
easy target
▪ The soldiers on the streets are an easy target for terrorists.
fall short of a goal/target/ideal
▪ The economy fell short of the Treasury’s target of 2% growth.
hit...target
▪ The bomb failed to hit its target.
moving target
▪ an archer learning to hit a moving target
performance targets
▪ Several train operators failed to meet the performance targets.
production levels/targets etc
reduction targets
▪ The agreement set strict reduction targets for carbon emissions.
sb's target weight (=the weight someone is trying to be)
▪ I've reached my target weight.
soft target
target practice (=practice shooting at something)
▪ The area is used by the army for target practice.
the target audience (=the type of people a programme etc aims to attract)
▪ The target audience is mostly men aged 28 to 35.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
easy
▪ It's always sad when a figure of fun, an easy target for a laugh, disappears into oblivion.
▪ It was a natural and easy target for newspapers.
▪ Such an organization would have been an easy target for Labour's disciplinarians.
▪ That makes them easy targets for mining industry recruiters.
▪ You can see so little as you blunder on that you are an easy target for any animal seeking fresh meat.
▪ So we opt for cheap grace, and easy targets, instead.
▪ Well, the reader may say, he's small fry, an easy target.
▪ Young people are an easy target.
financial
▪ Each year business managers draw up a budget and suggest a series of financial targets.
▪ Then we need to set a measurable financial target.
▪ Objectives were still too diffuse to be encompassed within the scope of financial targets.
▪ Indeed, tighter financial targets increasingly conflicted with the consensual political decision to maintain a certain size of railway system.
▪ Both governments also attempted to control the financial demands of the railways by strengthening the framework of financial targets and constraints.
▪ To this rather limited extent, the methods seem unexceptionable. Financial targets came in earlier, in the 1961 White Paper.
▪ We have also set some demanding but attainable financial targets.
▪ We made every financial target they set us.
main
▪ The main target is striped dolphin, because it is the easiest to capture.
▪ Brown main target Brown was speaker of the Assembly and had been in the Legislature for three decades.
▪ The main target for pirates are computer games that run on microcomputers.
▪ If we had drilled that prospect, we would have missed our main target.
▪ With bigger fish in serious decline, mackerel, sardines and anchovies are now the main targets.
▪ The civilian became the soldiers' main target.
▪ Dace and roach on the Salmon Hall stretch but chub main target to big baits.
▪ The first main targets are the central government buildings and the radio station.
obvious
▪ Dysart was an obvious target: ex-Navy, Ministry of Defence, outspoken in support of the Union.
▪ New auditors are for ever charging at birth as an obvious target.
▪ Far from being impartial, he had an obvious target.
▪ Clearly the review might shift this balance making pensions the obvious target.
▪ My cousin was simply the easiest and most obvious target.
▪ Child benefit may be another obvious target for the departmental review.
▪ It has been an obvious target for economy-minded governments.
▪ They were an obvious target for hungry birds and were easily picked off.
prime
▪ The prime target market, then, is seen to be pre-retirement.
▪ Although nationally distributed boxes do not change fronts often, the regional ones do, making them a prime target for collectors.
▪ The cults would be the prime targets: their acolytes would be dispersed, their leaders bought off or incarcerated.
▪ It was clear the police were looking for reporters, that they were prime targets.
▪ The law and order section is a prime target for every kind of scam.
▪ It should shrivel in ineptitude.. Prime target.
▪ All of these conditions are making hospitals a prime target for reform.
soft
▪ First, an overwhelming urge to find a market researcher and kick him or her hard on a soft target area.
▪ First, Barak was no soft target.
■ NOUN
area
▪ First, an overwhelming urge to find a market researcher and kick him or her hard on a soft target area.
▪ The plan was not area specific, thus loans and grants would simply be made available in all eligible first-year target areas.
▪ But just into the third there was movement around the target area.
▪ We know the terrain in the target area is complicated, rugged.
▪ The approach involves identifying variations in the functioning of target areas and relating those variations to known differences in cortical function.
▪ After completing one circuit, each bird dives out of the sky into the aquatic target area.
▪ For details of schemes in the target areas and general advice on rural out-of-school schemes, ring her.
▪ Finally, the plan registered a clear commitment to limit program benefits to the designated target areas.
attainment
▪ Pupils with physical disabilities Pupils with physical disabilities should in general have the same attainment targets and programmes of study as their peers.
▪ All of the attainment targets can be assessed at various levels, with corresponding programmes of study leading towards them.
▪ Good historical practice will usually ensure that the attainment targets are covered many times over in the course of the work.
▪ On several occasions we spent weekends working furiously hard in small groups at drafts of attainment targets and programmes of study.
▪ For each attainment target we have recommended statements of attainment and programmes of study at up to 10 levels.
▪ Therefore, we do not recommend that there should be a handwriting attainment target after level 4.
▪ This means that teachers must try to think simultaneously about the attainment targets and the statements of attainment within the levels.
audience
▪ Most of its students are the provincial poor, the target audience of leftist guerrilla groups.
▪ The key is to analyze the target audience, Half said.
▪ It is worth reiterating here the point that the media offer a means of influencing your target audiences.
▪ The team rejected traditional Biblical phrasing, figuring they would be unfamiliar or unappealing to the target audience.
▪ But, as Mr Malik kept reminding him, this was not the target audience of the school.
▪ The key target audience for the reports was overwhelmingly stated as being the company's own employees.
company
▪ The offeror will then be obliged to bid to acquire all the shares in the target company.
▪ It may be used to acquire control of a target company as an alternative to a takeover offer.
▪ The result is that the shareholders in the target company become the majority shareholders in the acquiring company.
▪ The target company will also assemble a similar team in a contested bid.
▪ X, an officer at Kleinwort Benson, telephoned D and told him that the target company had accepted a new offer.
▪ In determining whether the City Code applies it is the nature of the target company which is relevant.
▪ Stage 3: Additional criteria would be defined and agreed with the client to compile the shortlist of target companies.
▪ The requirement for disclosure of information in the proposed Directive is aimed at protecting the interests of shareholders of the target company.
date
▪ The target date has now been moved to 1 January 1994.
▪ December 1998 is the target date for completion of all the improvements.
▪ The absence of a target date by which the Protestant/Catholic unemployment differential would be significantly reduced is partly explained by this.
▪ The target date to begin providing services is July.
▪ It may be that August 1 would now have to be a more realistic target date.
▪ Mr Mates replies that the target date for doing so at Belfast Prison is not until the year 2000.
▪ The long-awaited supercomputer had been promised for last year, but the target date was later pushed back to October 1993.
▪ The target date has been postponed to 2015.
group
▪ The corollary of tax breaks for target groups and desirable business behaviour is the need for identification and proof of qualification.
▪ I think gay people have become a target group for people who no longer target racial minorities.
▪ The other major target group is those hospitalised with infectious illnesses.
▪ Providing prevention materials to state health departments will ensure that target groups have ready access to such materials.
▪ Passport schemes are a price discrimination device which allows subsidies to be directed towards target groups.
▪ The drinks industry circulates briefing packs consisting of audio and visual material to its target groups.
▪ As far as coverage is concerned, this comes out of the definition of the target group and the media available to reach it.
▪ The differences, where there are any, will be dictated by the target group of learners and their particular needs.
growth
▪ As a result, in the 1987 Budget, the growth target for M3 was formally abandoned.
▪ The government has said it will revise down its initial 2. 8 percent growth target in coming weeks.
▪ Objectively the chances of reaching the Chancellor's 3 percent growth target in 1994 are mixed at best.
▪ The most lengthy and energetic discussion occurred around financial goals because both groups had surprised themselves by setting very high growth targets.
▪ From 1968 onwards, the growth targets became somewhat lower but continued to be too optimistic.
▪ The Bundesbank officially bases its interest rate policy on M3 growth and sets a growth target each year.
▪ The growth target for M3 will remain at 5 percent a year in the medium-term, Trichet said.
language
▪ Decide from the very beginning that your aim is to use the target language as much as possible in the sessions.
▪ This creates additional problems of target language suitability, problems which have yet to be solved.
▪ Is the contact of the learner with the target language group likely to be intermittent rather than extensive?
▪ For this reason, spoken language interpreters are specifically trained to reject the effects of their utterance of the target language.
▪ This can happen when the target language has a grammatical category which the source language lacks.
▪ You can use a camera in the classroom to let learners see and hear themselves communicating in the target language.
▪ Differential grammar enables us to determine some of the main grammatical difficulties involved in learning the target language.
▪ Module 1 is designed for beginners ie those with no prior knowledge of the target language.
market
▪ The prime target market, then, is seen to be pre-retirement.
▪ Each make had the performance, appearance, and handling characteristics suited to the lifestyle and needs of its target market.
▪ You are not a target market.
▪ But the manufacturers of meat substitutes say vegetarians are a small niche in their target market.
▪ If the product is a child's toy then the target market will clearly be important.
▪ In a marketing sense, you seek 100 percent share of your target market.
▪ Unfortunately, the target market also want to smoke at every available opportunity.
▪ Housing activists argue the agency could sell more houses if it were more adept at reaching its target market.
practice
▪ It is merely target practice using live targets.
▪ He knew that on these streets young kids with guns used people on the sidewalks for target practice.
▪ Firstly in a country full of guns it doesn't do to stand there asking to become target practice.
▪ A downtown establishment has always made for satisfying target practice.
▪ After sundown, a bit of target practice on the estate, using his collection of sophisticated weapons.
▪ For the cynics of the world, Philip Gould is easy target practice.
▪ It ensured that no trigger-happy missile controller would fail to observe the safety precautions and attempt a little target practice.
▪ Prisoners taken were blinded, mutilated, dragged behind the hooves of horses and used as target practice by archers.
■ VERB
achieve
▪ How can they achieve maximum or target levels of profits or sales without precise information concerning their revenues and costs?
▪ The tendency to achieve planned targets by whatever means is well known in other Eastern block countries.
▪ Your own work objectives will, in turn, help to achieve these targets.
▪ The new group did not in fact achieve its target of 100,000 pledged supporters and had faded away by March.
▪ Actual performance is recorded and the information fed back to the managers responsible for achieving the target performance.
▪ We may receive some payment in September 1994 if we achieve targets.
▪ With Thames privatised, it is a private sector project with appropriate incentives paid to workers who achieve their targets.
▪ Success is when you achieve your target 20 percent return on assets at the year's end.
hit
▪ They hope to hit a target of £10,000.
▪ A rotten Big Boy hitting the target is a memorable sound.
▪ The Lancasters had to drop the bouncing bomb from precisely sixty feet to hit their target.
▪ She sensed that in hitting the target, Ronnie had reinforced his daily lesson of entitlement.
▪ The ball couldn't have bounced better for Steve White, who took aim and and hit the target with some style.
▪ The large drops leave the spray behind and pass on to hit the target.
▪ A pistol like this can hit somewhere near its target.
▪ My man, the bag, was hit in each target location twice.
identify
▪ The initial emphasis was on speakers and their ability to encode messages sufficiently clearly to enable listeners to identify the target object.
▪ A good objective has to identify a target in very precise terms.
▪ We need to identify the target market.
▪ Begin by identifying the target behavior and the time frame in which it occurs.
▪ At once more flares were identifying the target area and a fair concentration of bombs directed on the aiming point.
▪ First we identify our target and set a measurable objective that states from where to where by when.
▪ It had to identify new target markets.
▪ These examples illustrate the central problem of characterising chromosomal deletions - how do you know when you have identified the target gene?
meet
▪ However some branches have managed to make good progress towards meeting their target.
▪ But the company failed to meet that target, Hashagen said.
▪ When do the Government expect to meet the target for overseas aid of 0.7 percent. of gross national product?
▪ This means that savings of around 10 million tons will have to be found to meet the target.
▪ The trick is to meet the target projected for the current fiscal year and to do this by 15 October.
▪ They are set targets by higher management, and it is their responsibility to meet those targets.
▪ Officials calculated that the council would have to invest £500,000 per year to meet the target.
▪ High offer ratios often reflect the relative difficulty of meeting the targets for a small number of fields.
miss
▪ These attacks missed their political targets, though they left a child dead.
▪ But the interceptor missed its target in a second test in January.
▪ All of the missiles missed their target and the attacks resulted in no casualties and little damage to property.
▪ What if he missed the target now?
▪ I can't confirm that but I do remember the one occasion that he missed his target.
▪ It missed the target by several feet.
▪ They missed their target but killed eighteen bystanders and injured many more.
▪ If we had drilled that prospect, we would have missed our main target.
reach
▪ Within a week of launching the Oxfam Cold Front Appeal we reached our target of half a million coats and jumpers.
▪ Enemy radar must have detected our approach, for Hurricane fighters came out to intercept before we reached the target.
▪ The danger is that the pressure to reach target leads you to exaggerate chargeable hours.
▪ Yet in the 1980s Britain missed its chance to reach for those targets.
▪ Housing activists argue the agency could sell more houses if it were more adept at reaching its target market.
▪ According to the study, the means-tested benefit is reaching its targets more often and more effectively than many had feared.
▪ They then reached their target for the loss of three wickets.
set
▪ Most of us set ourselves personal targets: four laps within six minutes, for example.
▪ The most lengthy and energetic discussion occurred around financial goals because both groups had surprised themselves by setting very high growth targets.
▪ A realistic plan sets achievable targets against which progress can be monitored.
▪ Promise Keepers declined to set attendance targets.
▪ And that's a problem for the Government, which has set targets for cutting the number of deaths on the roads.
▪ The Bundesbank officially bases its interest rate policy on M3 growth and sets a growth target each year.
▪ Self-assessment is a key feature of the module and students should set targets for themselves based on their initial self-assessment.
▪ Furthermore, firms may set themselves several targets and not simply restrict themselves to the sole target of profit maximisation.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a moving target
▪ As always, this is a moving target.
▪ At its best, Gramm-Rudman-Hollings is a game of how to master a moving target.
▪ Duration is a moving target as rates and portfolios change, though it is already used by many managers.
▪ Nobody hits a moving target and you can quote me.
▪ Only the top half of her body was visible, and she resembled a moving target on a shooting gallery.
be a prime candidate/target (for sth)
▪ And if you understood that, you are a prime target for the party's newest election weapon.
▪ In addition, any enemy hit by a net is a prime target for a club attack as explained below.
▪ It was clear the police were looking for reporters, that they were prime targets.
▪ Joseph was a prime candidate for deportation.
▪ The law and order section is a prime target for every kind of scam.
▪ The school meals service is a prime target in the government's plans for bringing in outside contractors.
▪ Vinyl and aluminum siding are prime candidates to take flight in a high wind.
▪ We would have thought this was a prime candidate for disclosure.
find its mark/target
▪ But now their enmity found its target in the flesh.
▪ I doubt whether it could have found its target but the very shape of it in my hands was reassuring.
▪ It found its mark; one of the suitors fell dying to the floor.
intended target/victim/destination etc
▪ After they failed to find their intended victim, they embarked on an indiscriminate anti-foreigner rampage.
▪ Eloise was capable of what almost amounted to mesmerism, so thoroughly did she take in her intended victims.
▪ It can not move and shoot in the same turn, except that it can be turned to face its intended target.
▪ Recovering his balance with uncanny speed, he snarled and launched himself after the still tumbling figure of his intended victim.
▪ Satisfied his intended victim was asleep, he gripped the door handle and turned it slowly.
▪ Was the call-girl the intended victim?
▪ We are near our intended target and head directly there with a vector supplied from above, but we find nothing.
▪ What if Everett's putative murderer had been the intended victim of sabotage rather than its practitioner?
meet a goal/target etc
▪ Employees who work off-site are evaluated on their ability to work independently yet communicate with their team to meet goals.
▪ Headquarters motivates managers to meet targets in time-honoured style: carrot and stick.
▪ Its only hope of meeting targets was to purchase the right to pollute from less prosperous nations.
▪ The good news was that chief executive Crispin Davis insisted the company was on track to meet targets for 2002.
reach a target/goal
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Holding a US passport makes these tourists a prime target for terrorists.
▪ I set myself a target of learning 20 new words each week.
▪ Kay was the target of a noisy demonstration in which 54 people were arrested.
▪ Our target is the release of all political prisoners.
▪ The target for the appeal is £20,000, all of which will go to children's charities.
▪ The bomb missed its target by several kilometres.
▪ The commonly used roads are the targets of heavy fire.
▪ The Communist Party has become the main target for critical attack among left wing intellectuals.
▪ The company will reach its target of 12% growth this year.
▪ The GIA continued its attacks on civilian targets.
▪ The government is struggling to reach its original target of $23 billion in spending cuts.
▪ The Institution has been the target of terrorist attack several times.
▪ We produced 16,000 cars this year, but our target was 17,500.
▪ When the plane gets to the target area, it drops the missile and returns to base.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But just into the third there was movement around the target area.
▪ He set the wage levels, the production targets, the safety standards, and he really planned the whole industry.
▪ Hiring at the three previous centers took about twice as long as the company's 60-day target, Norden said.
▪ How can they achieve maximum or target levels of profits or sales without precise information concerning their revenues and costs?
▪ It has been given the lowest efficiency target in the country by the Government's new Passenger's Charter.
▪ Now, by budget resolutions, it establishes targets in May and final ceilings in September.
▪ The company, named for a friend who died from an infection, would search for new targets for antibiotics.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
area
▪ The data collected will then be used to target areas of public health which need most improvement.
▪ Targeting particular sectors sounds fine, but other strong competitors may already be targeting the very same areas.
▪ It is important to prioritize and target areas which reflect on the key areas of the operation.
audience
▪ He says they're targeting a unique audience of young adults.
company
▪ The company is targeting financial and medical markets.
▪ The company is targeting the business, home, school and Third-World markets.
▪ The company may then target its efforts on these preferred locations.
▪ The diet companies are targeting new markets outside their traditional client base of fairly affluent, young to middle-aged white women.
▪ Commercial Union is one of several major insurance companies to target the Grey market with specially designed policies in the past year.
▪ He is president of Graham Gregory Bozell Inc., a marketing company targeting black consumers.
market
▪ They target aircraft at specific markets.
▪ The diet companies are targeting new markets outside their traditional client base of fairly affluent, young to middle-aged white women.
▪ The company is targeting financial and medical markets.
▪ Some scientists were dissatisfied with Gould's decision to target such an elitist market.
▪ Commercial Union is one of several major insurance companies to target the Grey market with specially designed policies in the past year.
people
▪ But firearms enthusiasts, who shoot for pleasure, have accused politicians of targeting the wrong people.
▪ It will target specifically chosen people in an effort to help them make links with the changing climate.
▪ Surely all hon. Members would argue that it is wrong for the industry to be able to target young people.
▪ But a spokesman for the club said many enthusiasts believed politicians were targeting the wrong people.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a moving target
▪ As always, this is a moving target.
▪ At its best, Gramm-Rudman-Hollings is a game of how to master a moving target.
▪ Duration is a moving target as rates and portfolios change, though it is already used by many managers.
▪ Nobody hits a moving target and you can quote me.
▪ Only the top half of her body was visible, and she resembled a moving target on a shooting gallery.
be a prime candidate/target (for sth)
▪ And if you understood that, you are a prime target for the party's newest election weapon.
▪ In addition, any enemy hit by a net is a prime target for a club attack as explained below.
▪ It was clear the police were looking for reporters, that they were prime targets.
▪ Joseph was a prime candidate for deportation.
▪ The law and order section is a prime target for every kind of scam.
▪ The school meals service is a prime target in the government's plans for bringing in outside contractors.
▪ Vinyl and aluminum siding are prime candidates to take flight in a high wind.
▪ We would have thought this was a prime candidate for disclosure.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ For example, they tried to link training placement to jobs, or to target construction jobs on local people.
▪ Ireland is more ruthless still in targeting public health care.
▪ The company may then target its efforts on these preferred locations.
▪ These and other economic development proposals have emphasized targeting and leveraging to get maximum use of the federal dollars.
▪ Warshaw says Waxman and other critics have charged that police are targeting black neighborhoods.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Target

Target \Tar"get\, n. [OF. targette, dim. of OF. & F. targe, of Teutonic origin; cf. AS. targe, OD. targie, G. zarge a frame, case, border, OHG. zarga, Icel. targa shield.]

  1. A kind of small shield or buckler, used as a defensive weapon in war.

    1. A butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.

    2. The pattern or arrangement of a series of hits made by a marksman on a butt or mark; as, he made a good target.

  2. (Surveying) The sliding crosspiece, or vane, on a leveling staff.

  3. (Railroad) A conspicuous disk attached to a switch lever to show its position, or for use as a signal.

  4. A thin cut; a slice; specif., of lamb, a piece consisting of the neck and breast joints. [Eng.]

  5. A tassel or pendent; also, a shred; tatter. [Obs. Scot.]

  6. A goal for an activity; as, the target of this year's fundraising drive is 2 million dollars.

  7. A metallic object toward which a beam of electrons is aimed in a tube designed to generate X-rays; when the electrons strike the target, the impact causes emission of X-rays.

  8. Any object toward which a beam of photons, a laser beam, an electron beam, or a beam of atomic or subatomic particles is aimed.

  9. A person who is the subject of criticism or ridicule.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
target

c.1300, "shield," diminutive of late Old English targe, from Old French targe "light shield" (12c.), from Frankish *targa "shield," from Proto-Germanic *targ- (cognates: Old High German zarga "edging, border," German zarge "border, edge, frame," Old English targe, Old Norse targa "shield, buckler"), perhaps originally "edge of a shield." Meaning "round object to be aimed at in shooting" first recorded 1757, originally in archery, perhaps suggested by the concentric circles in both. Target-practice is from 1801. Target audience is by 1951; early reference is to Cold War psychological warfare.

target

"to use as a target," 1837, from target (n.). Earlier it meant "to shield" (1610s). Related: Targeted; targeting.

Wiktionary
target

n. 1 A butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile. 2 A goal or objective. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target). 2 (context transitive figuratively English) To aim for as an audience or demographic. 3 (context transitive computing English) To produce code suitable for.

WordNet
target
  1. n. a reference point to shoot at; "his arrow hit the mark" [syn: mark]

  2. a person who is the aim of an attack (especially a victim of ridicule or exploitation) by some hostile person or influence; "he fell prey to muggers"; "everyone was fair game"; "the target of a manhunt" [syn: prey, quarry, fair game]

  3. the location of the target that is to be hit [syn: target area]

  4. sports equipment consisting of an object set up for a marksman or archer to aim at [syn: butt]

  5. the goal intended to be attained (and which is believed to be attainable); "the sole object of her trip was to see her children" [syn: aim, object, objective]

target

v. intend (something) to move towards a certain goal; "He aimed his fists towards his opponent's face"; "criticism directed at her superior"; "direct your anger towards others, not towards yourself" [syn: aim, place, direct, point]

Wikipedia
Target

Target may refer to:

Target (Embrace song)

"Target" is a song by English rock band Embrace and is featured on their number-one charting fifth album, This New Day. It was released 11 September 2006 as the follow-up to the band's official World Cup 2006 Anthem. It didn't repeat the top 3 success of their two recent singles from their album, peaking at #29 in the UK Singles Chart.

Target (UK TV series)

Target was a police drama series, which ran from 1977–78, on BBC1. The show was the BBC's response to ITV's successful series, The Sweeney.

Target (magazine)

Target was a popular Indian children's magazine that was published monthly in English from 1979 to 1995. It featured a mix of reader contributions, stories from regular writers, do-it-yourself articles and several popular comic strips.

Target (New Zealand TV series)

Target is a New Zealand consumer advice show. It is hosted by Carly Flynn and Brooke Howard-Smith. The show has run for 11 seasons and remains one of New Zealand's highest rated factual programs and has won one Qantas Media Award. The show has been on hiatus since 2013.

Target (1985 film)

Target is a 1985 film directed by Arthur Penn. It stars Matt Dillon and Gene Hackman.

Target (1995 film)

Target is a 1995 Hindi drama film directed by Sandip Ray based on the novel Manushar Juddha written by Prafulla Chandra Roy. The film is centred on the relationship between Singh, a cruel, manipulative landowner and his workers that belong to a caste of pariahs.

Target (2004 film)

Target is a 2004 action film directed by William Webb.

Target (1952 film)

Target is a 1952 Western film starring Tim Holt.

Target (2010 film)

Target: The Final Mission is a 2010 Bengali-language Indian feature film directed by Raja Chanda, starring Mithun Chakraborty in the leading role.

Target (rapper)

Nenad Šimun, also known by his stage names Target or Mladi Gospar, is a Croatian rapper.

He began his career in 1994. He was first in a group called " Young Lordz" but they disbanded in 1996 and soon he and General Woo formed a duo called Tram 11. As part of Tram 11 he became one of the best Croatian rappers up until 2003 when he went solo. He is best known for his songs "Mokri snovi", "Ritam Grada", "Furam obleku" and "Stavi ovo na roštilj". He is the head of his own label WorkshopClass.

Target (T-ara song)

Target is a Japanese song by South Korean girl group T-ara. It was released on July 10, 2013.

Target (project)

Target is the name of a collaborative research project into big data processing and management in northern Netherlands. It is a public-private cooperation, initiated in 2009 and supported by government subsidies. It is run by a consortium of ten academic and computer industry partners, coordinated by the University of Groningen, and researches data management of science projects in the area of astronomy, life sciences, artificial intelligence and medical diagnosis.

Cooperating in the Target project are various divisions of the University of Groningen, its medical center, IBM, Oracle, ASTRON and Dutch IT firms Elkoog/Heeii and Nspyre.

Target's computer center is hosted by the Center for Information Technology, the computing center of the University of Groningen, and consist of more than 10 Petabytes of storage based on IBM's GPFS storage technology , a high-performance computing cluster and a grid cluster, which is a part of the European Grid Infrastructure.

Target (U.S. TV series)

Target is a 30 minute U.S. television anthology series produced by Ziv Television Programs, Inc. for first-run syndication. A total of 38 episodes were aired in 1958.

The show was hosted by Adolphe Menjou. Guest stars included Angie Dickinson, Dyan Cannon, Gene Barry, MacDonald Carey, Frances Bavier, Bonita Granville, Cesare Romero, Hugh Marlowe, and Lee Van Cleef, as well as Howard Duff, Kent Taylor, Hans Conried, Marie Windsor, and Lon Chaney, Jr.

Target (2014 film)

Target is a 2014 Chinese action suspense crime film directed by Yang Jiang. It was released on October 24.

Target (Gerald Walker album)

Target is the debut studio album by American hip hop recording artist Gerald Walker. The album was released on September 22, 2015, by One Step at a Time Music & INgrooves. It is the first double album from Gerald Walker and first album by Walker in collaboration with the eight member vocal ensemble, The Family. Target is also his first independent to digital retailer commercial album, whereas his previous releases were for promotional use only.

Target (1979 film)

'Target ' is a 1979 Italian-Turkish " poliziottesco" film written and directed by Guido Zurli and starring Luc Merenda.

Usage examples of "target".

Leaving the cripple ablaze, settling, and pouring volcanic black smoke from the flammable cargo, he swung around in a long approach to what looked like a big troop Carrier, by far the fattest target in sight.

They have targeted Glenn Abies because he stands for a way of living that we as members of the White Race believe in and hold to be true.

The missiles, like the pinnaces, could be recovered after the completion of their mission, or diverted to other targets, like the merchant vessels that were accelerating madly in an effort to clear the system before Chenforce destroyed them.

Particle accelerators are based on the same principle: They hurl bits of matter such as electrons and protons at each other as well as at other targets, and elaborate detectors analyze the resulting spray of debris to determine the architecture of the objects involved.

An experienced social engineer is able to gain access to virtually any targeted information by using the strategies and tactics of his craft.

By limiting the accessibility of the names and telephone numbers of employees, a company makes it more difficult for the social engineer to identify targets in the company, or names of legitimate employees for use in deceiving other personnel.

There was not an archer in Achar who could better them now, Belial mused, as he watched them practice hitting moving targets while at the gallop.

What first called it to his attention was the unusual way in which it had taken up the bright acridine orange, a staining compound of zinc chloride that targeted the fats of bacterial cells and made them glow orange under the fluorescent light.

But cable television does offer local and regional advertisers a good selection of stations that deliver targeted consumers.

We offered premiums to this highly targeted list of advertisers for correctly counting the number of times Your Place appeared in the brochure we mailed out.

Frequency: the number of times the target market has the opportunity to witness your advertising message during a defined period of time.

Our airfield is now frequently the target of Soviet airforce attacks in low and high level raids.

Behind him, Seregil let out a low whistle of appreciation, but Alec kept his eye on the targets.

Micum began with the basics, teaching Alec how to grip the weapon so that it balanced to his advantage, what stances presented the smallest target to an opponent, and simple slash and parry maneuvers.

He flung the door wide and lurched out, a sure target for Renz, who swung his gun toward Alker before The Shadow could stop him.