Find the word definition

Crossword clues for turn

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
turn
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a key turns
▪ We heard the key turn in the lock.
a turning point (=the time when an important change starts, especially an improvement)
▪ A turning point in the history of the republic came in 1358.
a wheel turns/goes around
▪ The wheels went slowly around.
as things turned out (=used to say what happened or was discovered in the end)
▪ Obviously, there had to be some mistake. As things turned out, there was.
become/turn into a nightmare
▪ Their honeymoon turned into a nightmare when they were involved in a car accident.
conversation turned to
▪ After a while, the conversation turned to a friend’s coming wedding.
dismiss/throw out/turn down an appeal (=not give permission for a decision to be changed)
▪ The taxpayer's appeal was dismissed and the penalty upheld.
do/turn a somersault
▪ Lana turned a somersault in midair.
do/turn cartwheels
▪ The children were doing cartwheels in the park.
get/turn nastyespecially BrE (= suddenly start behaving in a threatening way)
▪ When Harry refused, Don turned nasty and went for him with both fists.
go/turn grey
▪ She was a tall thin woman who had gone grey early.
go/turn red
▪ Every time you mention his name, she goes bright red.
go/turn to sb for advice
▪ People often go to him for advice about their problems.
go/turn/flush/blush crimson
▪ The boy blushed crimson.
go/turn/flush/blush scarlet
▪ Eileen blushed scarlet at the joke.
mark a high/low/turning etc point (=be or happen at a particular time in the development of something)
▪ The day of the accident marked a turning point in Kenny’s life.
put/switch/turn the heating on
▪ Why don't you put the heating on if you're cold?
put/turn the spotlight on sth
▪ A new report has turned the spotlight on the problem of poverty in the inner cities.
refuse/reject/turn down an application (=say no to an application)
▪ Their planning application was rejected because of a lack of parking facilities.
refuse/turn down an invitation (also decline an invitationformal)
▪ She turned down an invitation to take part in a televised debate.
reject/turn down sb's resignation
▪ Initially, his resignation was rejected.
▪ He offered his resignation but it was turned down by the Prime Minister.
sb’s face goes/turns pale (=becomes pale)
▪ I saw her face go pale when he walked in.
sb’s face goes/turns red (=becomes red)
▪ His face went red with embarrassment.
sb’s thoughts turn to sth (=they start thinking about something)
▪ As summer approaches, people’s thoughts turn to holidays.
star turn
switch off/turn off a machine
▪ Is the tape machine switched off?
switch off/turn off/stop an engine
▪ Maggie pulled over and switched off the engine.
switch on/turn on a machine
▪ Turn the machine on and slowly add the hot liquid.
switch on/turn on/start an engine
▪ I fastened my seat belt and turned on the engine.
switch/turn off a lamp
▪ He switched off the lamp beside the bed.
switch/turn off the alarm
▪ I entered the shop and switched off the alarm.
switch/turn on a lamp
▪ Dorothy switched on the desk lamp.
switch/turn the heating off
▪ We turn the heating off before bed.
take an exit/turn off at an exit
▪ Take the next exit, junction 15.
taken a turn for the better (=started to improve)
▪ The president’s fortunes seem, at last, to have taken a turn for the better.
the leaves turn red/brown etc (=become red, brown etc)
▪ The maple leaves had turned a fiery red.
the pivot on/around which sth turns/revolves
▪ Iago’s lie is the pivot on which the play turns.
the tide turns (=starts coming in or going out)
▪ Soon, the tide would turn and the waves would begin to creep inshore again.
the turn of the century (=the time when one century ends and another begins)
▪ The town was expanding at the turn of the century.
the turn of...millennium
▪ events which took place at the turn of the last millennium
the weather turns (=changes)
▪ The weather had turned mild.
three-point turn
throw away/pass up/turn down a chance (=not accept or use an opportunity)
▪ Imagine throwing up a chance to go to America!
turn a key
▪ He climbed into his car and turned the key.
turn a page
▪ I turned the page in order to find out what happened next.
turn a trick (=to have sex with someone for money)
turn down/refuse/reject/decline an offer (=say no to it)
▪ She declined the offer of a lift.
turn in/deliver a performance (=give a performance)
▪ Both actors turn in great performances.
▪ In the role of Carmen, Ms Leblanc delivered a quite exquisite performance.
turn off a tap
▪ I forgot to turn the tap off.
turn off the motorway (=leave the motorway)
▪ We forgot to turn off the motorway and ended up in London.
turn on a tap
▪ Run some cold water into the bath before turning on the hot tap.
turn on the charm (=use your charm to get something)
▪ If you turn on the charm, I’m sure you’ll get the job.
turn out all right
▪ Don’t worry, it’ll turn out all right.
turn out/empty your pockets (=take everything out of your pockets in order to find something)
▪ His mother made him turn out his pockets.
turn signal
turn the corner (=go around a corner)
▪ I walked on and turned the corner into Church Road.
turn the heating down/up
▪ Can you turn the heating down a bit?
turn the radio down/up (=make it quieter or louder)
▪ Can you turn your radio down a bit?
turn the television up/down (=make it louder or quieter)
▪ Rory had turned the television up so loud that the people next door complained.
turn the volume up/down
▪ Can you turn the volume up?
turn the water off/on (=turn a tap to stop water coming out of pipes or to let it come out)
▪ Turn the water off while you're brushing your teeth.
turn to crime (=start committing crimes)
▪ Youngsters who are bored sometimes turn to crime.
turn to sb for assistance (=ask them to help)
▪ The elderly sometimes have no one to turn to for assistance.
turn to/see page 22/45 etc
▪ Turn to page 8 for more details.
turn your attention to sth/sb
▪ She quickly put away the shopping and then turned her attention to preparing dinner.
turn your head
▪ John turned his head to look at the boy.
turn/earn a profit (=make a profit)
▪ Without the liquor sales, the store could not turn a profit.
turned nasty
▪ The weather turned nasty towards the evening.
turned purple
▪ His face turned purple with rage.
turned sour
▪ As time went by, their marriage turned sour.
turned the knob
▪ He thought the door was locked, but he turned the knob and the door opened.
turned to ashes
▪ All her hopes and dreams had turned to ashes.
turned to mush
▪ The boiled vegetables had turned to mush.
turned traitor (=became a traitor)
▪ a politician who turned traitor to the government
turned up like...bad penny (=suddenly appeared)
▪ Sure enough, Steve turned up like the proverbial bad penny.
turned up on the doorstep
▪ I got a shock when he just turned up on the doorstep.
turn/go pale
▪ He suddenly went pale.
turn/go pro
▪ Most young talented players are determined to turn pro.
turn/go sour (=become sour)
turn/grow cold (=become cold, especially suddenly)
▪ The birds fly south before the weather turns cold.
turning circle
turning point
▪ Meeting her was the turning point in my life.
turn...inside out
▪ I always turn my jeans inside out to wash them.
turn/let/set sth loose (=let something go free)
▪ Don’t let your dog loose on the beach.
turns out to be a pig in a poke
▪ What if the car you buy turns out to be a pig in a poke?
turn/switch the radio off
▪ You can turn the radio off, darling, we're not listening to it.
turn/switch the radio on
▪ Dad switched on the radio for the eight-thirty news.
turn/switch the television on/off
▪ I switched off the television and went to bed.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
attention
▪ With a mental sigh that dimmed her meanings, she turned her attention to what she should have been doing all along.
▪ Somewhat relieved, I turned my attention away.
▪ So it will be some time before he can turn his full attention to his hobby-horse Britain's motorway service station crisis.
▪ He was dead, and she drew the sheet over his face before turning her attention to the next.
▪ Once the school began functioning smoothly, Friedman turned his attention to the blacker side of the organization: interception and solution.
▪ She now turns her attention to the women's world outdoor championships, which will held in Ayr in June.
▪ Talisman then turned his attention to Congress.
clock
▪ This great divide can not be bridged by turning the clock back.
▪ Only if somebody can come up with a way to turn back the clock.
▪ No-one can turn back the clock.
▪ The most important thing now is not to turn the clock back.
▪ Tonight, in a special report, we turn back the clock to 1963.
▪ It is time to stop trying to turn back the clock.
▪ What is past is past and you can not turn the clock back.
▪ Can we turn back the clock and revive the system of predetermined roles?
corner
▪ Woolley turned a corner and saw Colonel Hawthorn instructing Corporal Hemsley in the about-turn.
▪ The piglet made short little satisfied grunts and turned ever sharper corners.
▪ Once he had turned the corner, he took the coat off and slipped it over his arm.
▪ And when they turned the next corner they saw that it had indeed been the tax office.
▪ As she turned the corner, her lips curved.
▪ He faced Main Street, where a black hearse turned the corner.
▪ Readers became familiar with their Doppelgangers, as if they had turned a corner and unexpectedly confronted themselves in a mirror.
▪ We had an earlier start than I expected and now we are taking more time to turn the corner.
eye
▪ They no longer supply pretexts for local bullies to oppress, nor reason for western governments to turn a blind eye.
▪ Briefly, a vertical tube turned a blank glass eye on him and Ezra and the glass eye contemplated each other.
▪ The pixies clustered around the walls of the barrow turned their eyes to their Kelda.
▪ He did not turn a blind eye to corruption or greed.
▪ Directors know this is going on and turn a blind eye.
▪ Eventually I turned my eyes away and gave my body to them.
▪ Honouring some one does not mean turning a blind eye to weakness.
▪ Varney turned his eyes on the boy.
face
▪ Mrs Simpson turned her face and looked out of the window.
▪ We turned our faces glum to reaffirm the forced nature of this trip.
▪ She turned and pressed her face against his chest.
▪ I turn my face towards the wall.
▪ What has turned its face that grey colour?
▪ Clarisa turned and slapped her face.
▪ Just turn your face a little to the right.
head
▪ She turned her head, responding to his grin with a smile.
▪ One of the court officers guffawed but turned his head before Kovitsky could spot him.
▪ Open-mouthed, Leith turned her head to stare at him.
▪ When he was at Miami, he turned some heads by proclaiming himself the best receiver in college football.
▪ A noise somewhere near the front of the church made Fenn turn his head.
▪ Ezra turned his head slowly to meet them.
heel
▪ Suddenly, the boar had been faced with a cliff too steep to climb and had turned on its heel.
▪ The throng turned on their heels and stampeded into town.
▪ She turned on her heel and vanished into the murk.
▪ Cooper turned on his heels and walked away.
▪ Then she turned on her heel and we marched back down the hall.
▪ He turned on his heel and went into the dining room.
▪ Then she was turning on her heel and heading for the door, anxious to make a speedy escape.
light
▪ The sky was turning rosy and the lights on the pier were coming on, one by one.
▪ I turn on the other light on my side of the carriage.
▪ It was dark, but he had not turned on the light.
▪ Would you mind turning the light out, Robert?
▪ Mrs Vanya turned on a weak light, and motioned for me to sit.
▪ You'd turn the lights on and all the light would drop backwards out of the room.
▪ After an hour, though still wide awake, I crimped the page and turned off the light.
offer
▪ She'd turned down the offers of promotion because of Emily.
▪ She seemed relieved when he turned down her offer to come live with them.
▪ Not deterred the offer price was raised and raised again, until the family could no longer turn down this fabulous offer.
▪ Was it possible that he had actually wanted her to turn his offer down?
▪ Yet there are times when bureaucracies have turned down offers of money.
▪ The birthday princess was serenaded by Phil the year she turned down the offer of a party from Charles.
▪ After careful consideration, Jay turned down the offer.
page
▪ For full details, turn to centre pages.
▪ She leans over his shoulder to follow the music; her hand brushes his arm when she turns a page.
▪ They turned their pages in perfect harmony and experienced a decent run through of a difficult text rather than an intense spiritual journey.
▪ Ezra turned the page and scanned the chapter titles down.
▪ A tomato juice by my side, I began slowly to turn the pages of the paper.
▪ They turn quickly to the page she wants.
▪ He turned the pages of an old magazine that was filthy with a skin of grease that came off on his fingers.
▪ He turned the pages of the Tribune.
profit
▪ Richard could be turning his nightmares to profits, but his dad thinks they may have thrown away a fortune already.
▪ As a result, they turn a profit quicker, Johannesen said.
▪ But private operators can turn profits only if prices rise radically and rapidly.
▪ And the 1984 Olympics turned a profit of $ 225 million.
▪ A loss had been turned to a profit and teamwork has led to empowered people with a commitment to the business.
▪ Y., said the industry turned a slim profit last year after losses of $ 150 million in 1995.
▪ These have turned in greatly enhanced profits for the year ending December 31.
▪ At a time when many chains are losing money, Lechters is turning a healthy profit.
table
▪ It's time to turn the tables.
▪ Women shrieked and ran at the sight of pistols, and men turned over tables to hide.
▪ Is this what women became if afforded the luxury of turned tables?
▪ So much for turning the tables.
▪ Isn't it nice to see a couple turning the tables on a double-glazing salesman?
▪ I sat down and he turned on a table lamp.
▪ Especially when such a rider turns the tables.
▪ She reached over and turned on a table lamp.
tap
▪ Tears rolling down her face, she turned on the taps.
▪ Then her hand was in his pants, matter-of-fact, like she was turning on a tap.
▪ I could tell that my questioning was slowly turning off the taps of their charm.
▪ She turned on the tap and watched water swirl into the drain.
▪ We have never had water simply by turning on a tap like most people.
▪ I tried to turn the tap off but it still dripped.
▪ She turned on taps that emitted nothing but a despairing sigh and she laughed.
tide
▪ However, in the battle which followed it was certainly Rodrigo who helped turn the tide of events for Sancho.
▪ If conscience can not turn the tide, perhaps it is the panic of self-interest which will finally do the job.
▪ I can only hope I am proved wrong: things have gone too far to turn back the tide.
▪ Breeding programs for apes are a failure, and even hard-nosed experimenters will be turning the tide.
▪ It took the rise of the socialist movement to turn the tide.
▪ The cumulative effect of all of these efforts would ultimately turn the tide.
▪ They had the desperate courage that flowed from knowing that this might be their last chance to turn the tide.
▪ Newport look for coaches to turn a falling tide.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
come/go/turn full circle
▪ A manufacturer of sun care products has just issued a report showing that the view on tanning has come full circle.
▪ Now his fortunes are poised to turn full circle again.
▪ Now the pattern has turned full circle.
▪ Only a classic endures, and sooner or later the fashion comes full circle.
▪ The neo-colonial wheel has almost come full circle.
▪ The wheel has turned full circle in the past 25 years.
▪ Thus the research has come full circle.
▪ Today, society has evolved and the wheel has come full circle.
come/turn up trumps
▪ And a dream come true ... The advert for grandparents that came up trumps.
▪ Conrad Allen came up trumps again, finishing fourth in the boys 800 metres in a personal best 2 mins. 22.
▪ Ibanez seem to have taken another daring step in their continuing success story and come up trumps once again.
▪ In part two: Four of a kind ... Durnin plays the winning hand as United come up trumps against Luton.
▪ You've come up trumps, Derek.
feel like/turn to jelly
go/turn over sth in your mind
make/turn sth into an art form
▪ Ronald Reagan turned it into an art form.
▪ To avoid simultaneous borrowing and depositing you should monitor how accurate your forecasting is, without turning this into an art form.
not do a hand's turn
not turn a hair
poacher turned gamekeeper
put/set/turn your mind to sth
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ Across the table, Lalage put her mind to the subjugation of Dada.
▪ Anybody could do what I do if they put their mind to it.
▪ But he can turn his mind to detailed needs, like pensions, if he has to.
▪ He would put his mind to other issues, one of which was sobering in its own right.
▪ I turned my mind to Archie.
▪ Whatever you set your mind to, your personal total obsession, this is what kills you.
▪ When Medea knew the deed was done she turned her mind to one still more dreadful.
put/turn sth to good account
▪ The extra time was turned to good account.
put/turn the clock back
▪ If I could turn the clock back, I don't think I'd study law again.
▪ It would be nice to put the clock back to the years when Mum and Dad were still alive.
▪ He thinks you can turn the clock back.
▪ It was almost like turning the clock back a couple of centuries.
▪ Not unless they fell into Morton's hands. Turn the clock back.
▪ Or not lie, maybe. Turn the clock back.
▪ The most important thing now is not to turn the clock back.
▪ This great divide can not be bridged by turning the clock back.
▪ We can not turn the clock back.
▪ What is past is past and you can not turn the clock back.
sb would turn in their grave
set the wheels in motion/set the wheels turning
take a turn for the worse
▪ Stock prices have taken a turn for the worse.
the worm turns
turn King's evidence
turn Queen's evidence
turn State's evidence
▪ If both turn state's evidence, the five-year rule applies.
turn a blind eye (to sth)
▪ Many landlords turn a blind eye to the fact that two families are sharing apartments.
▪ Automakers say that in their zeal to promote airbags, regulators turned a blind eye to evidence of hazards.
▪ But the police turn a blind eye to the lawbreaking.
▪ Directors know this is going on and turn a blind eye.
▪ He would prefer to turn a blind eye to the problem of asylum seekers around the world.
▪ Rugby, whose spectators are a fairly respectable lot, turns a blind eye to fighting on the field.
▪ The best the authorities could do was turn a blind eye.
▪ The staff knew what was going on but they turned a blind eye.
▪ They just had to put up with it and turn a blind eye.
turn a deaf ear (to sth)
▪ She wouldn't be keeping the Law if she turned a deaf ear to the call or ran away from it.
▪ The race committee turned a deaf ear to the objections of Amelia and the other fliers.
▪ They may display their feelings by refusing to eat, and turning a deaf ear to anyone who calls their name.
▪ Thus, year after year, working people turn a deaf ear to union entreaties.
turn a room/building etc inside out
turn on the waterworks
▪ She was one of those people who could turn on the waterworks in order to get what they want.
▪ Before Reagan turned on the waterworks, crying in public was widely considered a sign of weakness.
turn over a new leaf
▪ After being released from jail, Tony decided to turn over a new leaf.
▪ I know I've done some bad things in the past, but now I'm turning over a new leaf.
▪ Faldo, perhaps above all, will be hoping to turn over a new leaf.
▪ Like all fathers, I see fatherhood as a chance to turn over a new leaf.
▪ Monnett agrees too, so much that he has turned over a new leaf.
▪ There is no indication that Hollywood is turning over a new leaf, free of bloodstains.
▪ We urge them to turn over a new leaf.
turn sth upside down
▪ A distorted religion has turned the world upside down, denying that anything ever existed before itself.
▪ I turn the box upside down and bring it out empty.
▪ The girl was turning everything upside down.
▪ The history of implants has been equally painful; implants can shift or turn themselves upside down.
▪ They studied the map for a while, scratched their heads, turned it upside down and studied it some more.
▪ We could turn the glass upside down and sideways without having the water pour out because air pressure pushes in all directions.
▪ Yet with an appealing brew of nationalism and promise of democratic reform, Kostunica has since turned Yugoslav politics upside down.
turn tail
▪ He caught sight of a few others, but they turned tail and vanished when they saw him through the mist.
▪ If one animal suddenly turns tail, it is liable to be attacked and might get injured.
▪ She wanted to turn tail and run, but she couldn't have stood herself if she appeared such a coward.
turn the corner
▪ A superior actor might have turned the corner on this film.
▪ He faced Main Street, where a black hearse turned the corner.
▪ He turned the corner toward home and heard the familiar, booming bark from the garage.
▪ I ran on down the road and when I turned the corner I was at the shops.
▪ I thought by January we would turn the corner.
▪ I watched him until he turned the corner.
▪ Their car had hardly turned the corner when the mob arrived and smashed the house to pieces.
▪ Willie caught sight of them as he turned the corner.
turn the other cheek
▪ It's hard to turn the other cheek when someone insults you.
▪ Anyway, all I can remember is something about turning the other cheek which I don't believe in.
▪ Maintaining our resolve for peace does not mean, however, turning the other cheek.
▪ No bottling up for me; no turning the other cheek for Walt.
▪ Peregrine responded by turning the other cheek.
turn the tables (on sb)
▪ Her record speed has turned the tables on Runyan, the defending champion.
▪ Antony has turned the tables completely and has now completely destroyed all hopes of the conspirators ever establishing themselves in Rome.
▪ Especially when such a rider turns the tables.
▪ Glenn Hoddle reckons Town are a good bet to turn the tables.
▪ Isn't it nice to see a couple turning the tables on a double-glazing salesman?
▪ It's time to turn the tables.
▪ So much for turning the tables.
▪ That turns the tables on movie ratings.
▪ That would certainly turn the tables, Blue thinks, that would certainly stand the whole business on its head.
turn turtle
▪ Had the tortoise turned turtle in some sulphurous cul-de-sac?
turn up like a bad penny
turn your hand to (doing) sth
▪ Adam Burns was probably good at everything he turned his hand to.
▪ Adult women could often turn their hand to more than one form of casual employment.
▪ Friday marks the start of a new music programme as Channel 4 turns its hand to dance.
▪ He has had to be able to turn his hand to almost anything.
▪ I have turned my hand to trying a bit of writing and I keep meaning to take it up again.
▪ Roth also turned his hand to poetry, his best-known volume being, as you no doubt guessed, his Shit Poems.
▪ She can also turn her hand to mending and spotting.
▪ She turned her hand to short stories, getting two published in the early 1990s.
turn your nose up (at sth)
▪ Many professors turn their noses up at television.
▪ Time and again he had to turn his nose up into the arch of the drain to keep from drowning.
turn your stomach
▪ The sight of the dead body turned his stomach.
▪ The strike has meant piles of rotting garbage in the streets. "It's enough to turn your stomach," said one resident.
▪ And the rich, savoury smell of the hare drifted down to meet her, turning her stomach.
▪ I don't know anything about art, but I know what turns my stomach.
▪ It was in the air, all right, a stink that turned his stomach.
turn/beat swords into ploughshares
turn/beat swords into ploughshares
turn/go to mush
▪ All this quickness of mind, all her decisiveness had turned to mush when Mac came on the scene.
turn/spin on your heel
▪ Seifert turned on his heels and stomped away in anger.
▪ Cooper turned on his heels and walked away.
▪ He turned on his heel and went into the dining room.
▪ I turned on my heel and left the room.
▪ She turned on her heel and vanished into the murk.
▪ Suddenly, the boar had been faced with a cliff too steep to climb and had turned on its heel.
▪ Then she turned on her heel and we marched back down the hall.
▪ Then, without a word, he turned on his heel and left the room.
turn/stand sth on its head
▪ "You stand logic on its head when you use arms control as an argument for a larger defense budget," Aspin said.
▪ Another basic political problem here is that the Dole message turns history on its head.
▪ In fact, it would turn Beveridge on its head and use the national insurance system as a tax system.
▪ It turns time on its head.
▪ Many of these taboos derive from patriarchal societies taking the power of women and turning it on its head.
▪ Rather than ignore Philips's cherished necessity principle, the Government turned it on its head.
▪ Resist that temptation by turning it on its head.
▪ That, of course, is to stand reality on its head, since the industrialised nations are manifestly the real environmental villains.
▪ The next step was to turn reality on its head.
twist/turn the knife (in the wound)
▪ Saints twisted the knife with a glorious try from Tony Sullivan, set up by Gary Connolly.
▪ The tragedy is that you have to twist the knife in your own gray matter to make this defense work.
use/turn sth to your/good advantage
▪ First and foremost, Borland have taken the Windows interface and used it to good advantage.
▪ Homeloans are one of the cheapest ways of borrowing money - find out how to use them to your advantage.
▪ If you would like to reassess your life and learn how to use stress to your advantage, come along.
▪ Parents may feel suspicious of these, or resentful, and will need help in using them to best advantage.
▪ Professionals need to be aware of such things and use them to good advantage.
when/while sb's back is turned
▪ Once, despite the age requirement, my sister charms her way on to this ride while my back is turned.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "What do you think we should do?" she said, turning to her husband.
▪ "What time is it?" "It just turned 3:00."
▪ As the propeller stopped turning, Grady ran up to the plane.
▪ Campbell turned and walked out of the room.
▪ Charles turned his gaze upward to admire the ceiling.
▪ Continue to turn the fritter until both sides are golden brown.
▪ He saw a police car up ahead, so he turned and went down a side street.
▪ Heat the peas briefly till they turn bright green.
▪ I'll read the story and you turn the pages. OK, honey?
▪ I turned a corner and nearly ran into Caroline.
▪ I felt myself turn red with embarrassment.
▪ I got a perm that turned my hair green.
▪ I heard the door knob turning, and then Frank opened the door and tiptoed in.
▪ If we turn the table around we can fit more chairs in the room.
▪ It's getting late - I think we should turn back before it gets dark.
▪ It was late autumn and the leaves were slowly turning golden.
▪ Just when we were all getting our summer clothes out, it turned cold again.
▪ She turned and looked Seth straight in the eyes.
▪ She heard the door opening and turned to see who was coming in.
▪ She put the key in the ignition and turned it, but nothing happened.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ An event that made heads turn and tongues wag.
▪ It turned out about the good-looking fellow from Essex County that he was a football coach who also did some counseling.
▪ Landladies had mysteriously found tenants in the few minutes between a telephone inquiry and one's turning up on the doorstep.
▪ No wonder he has turned the Newtslaying mission over to his deputy, David Bonior.
▪ North Beach and Union Square merchants wait for customers who turn back, frustrated by street closures and a lack of parking.
▪ Peter Allis has turned golf into a kind of harmless interview where public figures hit a few shots and chat about themselves.
▪ Philomela accordingly turned to her loom.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
left
▪ The films were split into the 12 showing right turns and the 12 showing left turns.
▪ A U-turn in Moscow is even more illegal than a left turn.
▪ Ignore right turn just before church and ignore left turn 1/2 mile later.
▪ There was a sharp left turn at the bottom into Ruskin Road.
▪ The division of the stimuli into right and left turns demonstrated separate positive and negative relationships between risk and recognition sensitivity.
▪ I tried going back but I kept getting to corners and not knowing whether to take the left turn or the right.
▪ They noticed the car run wide as the defendant made a left turn and the officers decided to stop the vehicle.
right
▪ I executed a hard right turn, but could not see any other aircraft in my vicinity.
▪ We made a rocky, wet entry, and then took a sharp right turn along a wall.
▪ The films were split into the 12 showing right turns and the 12 showing left turns.
▪ Ignore right turn just before church and ignore left turn 1/2 mile later.
▪ Proceed to the top and take a right turn into Barracks Lane.
▪ Lower Bowland was starting to get further away, and there was still no sign of a right turn.
▪ Up at the top there was a right turn, but he went on.
sharp
▪ The control tower staff saw the aircraft making a sharp left-hand climbing turn before it disappeared into thick low cloud.
▪ The road made a last sharp turn and ran straight west along the shoreline into Angle Inlet.
▪ A sharp turn to the south east took us past St Ives, and up a massive sand-filled estuary towards Hayle.
▪ After a sharp turn in the path, they are suddenly approaching a faint square of light.
▪ There was a sharp left turn at the bottom into Ruskin Road.
▪ His feet and hands kept striking stone corners, sharp turns, and massive columns difficult to circumvent.
▪ Ro and Brent do the carrying, negotiating sharp turns in the stairwell.
wrong
▪ I took a wrong turn out of town.
▪ He took a wrong turn in his life, he concludes.
▪ Their chances of survival vanished the moment they stumbled into the procession; one wrong turn and that was it.
▪ There even have been reports that he took a wrong turn to get there.
▪ How cruel to reflect upon the wrong turns and unsought circumstances of an unlucky life.
▪ We haven't taken one wrong turn or had one row since getting in.
■ VERB
take
▪ In other collaborative activities individuals take turns in sitting vigilantly alert while others feed, thereby functioning as watchdogs or guards.
▪ They stood side by side, taking turns.
▪ Perhaps as a result of his unpopularity, speculation about him has taken a new turn.
▪ We took turns at being the hunter and the hunted.
▪ Let us take these in turn.
▪ As Richard grows up and Joan perseveres, their relationship takes subtle turns.
▪ They took turns with a champagne bottle.
▪ Resler and I took turns flying low level down the road, seeing who could hold the ship in the turns.
wait
▪ Everyone had to wait their turn or be punished by filling in a long complicated questionnaire two hundred and sixteen times.
▪ Jelani had to wait his turn.
▪ Inside, he picked up a magazine and waited his turn.
▪ Wearing red overalls, the princess laughed and chatted to other drivers while she waited her turn.
▪ Men line up in the yard, smoking and passing around flasks and bottles while they wait their turn inside.
▪ Goibniu would have to wait his turn.
▪ In one corner of the improvised surgery lay four other forms on stretchers, waiting their turn.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
come/go/turn full circle
▪ A manufacturer of sun care products has just issued a report showing that the view on tanning has come full circle.
▪ Now his fortunes are poised to turn full circle again.
▪ Now the pattern has turned full circle.
▪ Only a classic endures, and sooner or later the fashion comes full circle.
▪ The neo-colonial wheel has almost come full circle.
▪ The wheel has turned full circle in the past 25 years.
▪ Thus the research has come full circle.
▪ Today, society has evolved and the wheel has come full circle.
come/turn up trumps
▪ And a dream come true ... The advert for grandparents that came up trumps.
▪ Conrad Allen came up trumps again, finishing fourth in the boys 800 metres in a personal best 2 mins. 22.
▪ Ibanez seem to have taken another daring step in their continuing success story and come up trumps once again.
▪ In part two: Four of a kind ... Durnin plays the winning hand as United come up trumps against Luton.
▪ You've come up trumps, Derek.
feel like/turn to jelly
go/turn over sth in your mind
make/turn sth into an art form
▪ Ronald Reagan turned it into an art form.
▪ To avoid simultaneous borrowing and depositing you should monitor how accurate your forecasting is, without turning this into an art form.
not do a hand's turn
put/set/turn your mind to sth
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ Across the table, Lalage put her mind to the subjugation of Dada.
▪ Anybody could do what I do if they put their mind to it.
▪ But he can turn his mind to detailed needs, like pensions, if he has to.
▪ He would put his mind to other issues, one of which was sobering in its own right.
▪ I turned my mind to Archie.
▪ Whatever you set your mind to, your personal total obsession, this is what kills you.
▪ When Medea knew the deed was done she turned her mind to one still more dreadful.
put/turn sth to good account
▪ The extra time was turned to good account.
sb would turn in their grave
speak out of turn
▪ Wagner spoke out of turn when he said the election would be delayed.
▪ Captain Steve Waugh had sharp words with Buchanan, telling him he had spoken out of turn.
take a turn for the worse
▪ Stock prices have taken a turn for the worse.
the worm turns
toss and turn
▪ Do you fall asleep as soon as your head hits the pillow, or do you toss and turn for hours before dropping off?
▪ She had slept badly, tossing and turning before falling into a fitful doze.
▪ If your tossing and turning is taking up needed sleep time, insomnia may be the culprit.
▪ Recurring thoughts about her conversation with Philippe Fontaine had kept her tossing and turning most of the night.
▪ She had slept badly, tossing and turning in the heat though the room had been cool enough.
▪ This, and the sound of heavy machinery passing underneath the window, kept me tossing and turning.
turn King's evidence
turn Queen's evidence
turn State's evidence
▪ If both turn state's evidence, the five-year rule applies.
turn a blind eye (to sth)
▪ Many landlords turn a blind eye to the fact that two families are sharing apartments.
▪ Automakers say that in their zeal to promote airbags, regulators turned a blind eye to evidence of hazards.
▪ But the police turn a blind eye to the lawbreaking.
▪ Directors know this is going on and turn a blind eye.
▪ He would prefer to turn a blind eye to the problem of asylum seekers around the world.
▪ Rugby, whose spectators are a fairly respectable lot, turns a blind eye to fighting on the field.
▪ The best the authorities could do was turn a blind eye.
▪ The staff knew what was going on but they turned a blind eye.
▪ They just had to put up with it and turn a blind eye.
turn a deaf ear (to sth)
▪ She wouldn't be keeping the Law if she turned a deaf ear to the call or ran away from it.
▪ The race committee turned a deaf ear to the objections of Amelia and the other fliers.
▪ They may display their feelings by refusing to eat, and turning a deaf ear to anyone who calls their name.
▪ Thus, year after year, working people turn a deaf ear to union entreaties.
turn on the waterworks
▪ She was one of those people who could turn on the waterworks in order to get what they want.
▪ Before Reagan turned on the waterworks, crying in public was widely considered a sign of weakness.
turn over a new leaf
▪ After being released from jail, Tony decided to turn over a new leaf.
▪ I know I've done some bad things in the past, but now I'm turning over a new leaf.
▪ Faldo, perhaps above all, will be hoping to turn over a new leaf.
▪ Like all fathers, I see fatherhood as a chance to turn over a new leaf.
▪ Monnett agrees too, so much that he has turned over a new leaf.
▪ There is no indication that Hollywood is turning over a new leaf, free of bloodstains.
▪ We urge them to turn over a new leaf.
turn sth upside down
▪ A distorted religion has turned the world upside down, denying that anything ever existed before itself.
▪ I turn the box upside down and bring it out empty.
▪ The girl was turning everything upside down.
▪ The history of implants has been equally painful; implants can shift or turn themselves upside down.
▪ They studied the map for a while, scratched their heads, turned it upside down and studied it some more.
▪ We could turn the glass upside down and sideways without having the water pour out because air pressure pushes in all directions.
▪ Yet with an appealing brew of nationalism and promise of democratic reform, Kostunica has since turned Yugoslav politics upside down.
turn tail
▪ He caught sight of a few others, but they turned tail and vanished when they saw him through the mist.
▪ If one animal suddenly turns tail, it is liable to be attacked and might get injured.
▪ She wanted to turn tail and run, but she couldn't have stood herself if she appeared such a coward.
turn turtle
▪ Had the tortoise turned turtle in some sulphurous cul-de-sac?
turn up like a bad penny
turn your hand to (doing) sth
▪ Adam Burns was probably good at everything he turned his hand to.
▪ Adult women could often turn their hand to more than one form of casual employment.
▪ Friday marks the start of a new music programme as Channel 4 turns its hand to dance.
▪ He has had to be able to turn his hand to almost anything.
▪ I have turned my hand to trying a bit of writing and I keep meaning to take it up again.
▪ Roth also turned his hand to poetry, his best-known volume being, as you no doubt guessed, his Shit Poems.
▪ She can also turn her hand to mending and spotting.
▪ She turned her hand to short stories, getting two published in the early 1990s.
turn your nose up (at sth)
▪ Many professors turn their noses up at television.
▪ Time and again he had to turn his nose up into the arch of the drain to keep from drowning.
turn your stomach
▪ The sight of the dead body turned his stomach.
▪ The strike has meant piles of rotting garbage in the streets. "It's enough to turn your stomach," said one resident.
▪ And the rich, savoury smell of the hare drifted down to meet her, turning her stomach.
▪ I don't know anything about art, but I know what turns my stomach.
▪ It was in the air, all right, a stink that turned his stomach.
turn/beat swords into ploughshares
turn/beat swords into ploughshares
turn/go to mush
▪ All this quickness of mind, all her decisiveness had turned to mush when Mac came on the scene.
turn/spin on your heel
▪ Seifert turned on his heels and stomped away in anger.
▪ Cooper turned on his heels and walked away.
▪ He turned on his heel and went into the dining room.
▪ I turned on my heel and left the room.
▪ She turned on her heel and vanished into the murk.
▪ Suddenly, the boar had been faced with a cliff too steep to climb and had turned on its heel.
▪ Then she turned on her heel and we marched back down the hall.
▪ Then, without a word, he turned on his heel and left the room.
turn/stand sth on its head
▪ "You stand logic on its head when you use arms control as an argument for a larger defense budget," Aspin said.
▪ Another basic political problem here is that the Dole message turns history on its head.
▪ In fact, it would turn Beveridge on its head and use the national insurance system as a tax system.
▪ It turns time on its head.
▪ Many of these taboos derive from patriarchal societies taking the power of women and turning it on its head.
▪ Rather than ignore Philips's cherished necessity principle, the Government turned it on its head.
▪ Resist that temptation by turning it on its head.
▪ That, of course, is to stand reality on its head, since the industrialised nations are manifestly the real environmental villains.
▪ The next step was to turn reality on its head.
twist and turn
▪ And the sporty model, with its bigger tires, felt better in highway twists and turns than its richer sibling.
▪ But the journey of life has many twists and turns.
▪ Despite many bridges, viaducts, embankments, cuttings and tunnels the lines twist and turn in detours around the hills.
▪ First, in high winds the building could twist and turn and pull sections of the walls or windows apart.
▪ Or by the twists and turns of all that is buried in the human heart.
▪ Pros: Lots of pyrotechnics and effects, plenty of twists and turns that keep you hanging on.
▪ She'd twist and turn, she'd fold herself double, she'd cry out.
▪ The roller-coaster ride of the successful entrepreneur has many such twists and turns.
use/turn sth to your/good advantage
▪ First and foremost, Borland have taken the Windows interface and used it to good advantage.
▪ Homeloans are one of the cheapest ways of borrowing money - find out how to use them to your advantage.
▪ If you would like to reassess your life and learn how to use stress to your advantage, come along.
▪ Parents may feel suspicious of these, or resentful, and will need help in using them to best advantage.
▪ Professionals need to be aware of such things and use them to good advantage.
wait your turn
▪ A long line of people waited their turn to shake his hand.
▪ Everyone has to wait their turn.
▪ Everyone had to wait their turn or be punished by filling in a long complicated questionnaire two hundred and sixteen times.
▪ Goibniu would have to wait his turn.
▪ In one corner of the improvised surgery lay four other forms on stretchers, waiting their turn.
▪ Inside, he picked up a magazine and waited his turn.
▪ It is unnecessarily unnerving to be waiting your turn while potential workmates eye you up and down.
▪ Jelani had to wait his turn.
▪ Men line up in the yard, smoking and passing around flasks and bottles while they wait their turn inside.
▪ Wearing red overalls, the princess laughed and chatted to other drivers while she waited her turn.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Loosen the screw one complete turn in order to release the valve.
▪ She can do a 360-degree turn on water skis.
▪ Take the first turn on your right.
▪ Take the first turning after the traffic lights.
▪ Tighten the screw another two or three turns.
▪ We were supposed to take Highway 12, but I think we missed the turn.
▪ With three swift turns of the wheel, he steered the boat away from the rocks.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ In turn, however, the question of where population is growing - or declining - is fundamentally related to human welfare.
▪ My turn to die had come and I had been inexplicably reprieved.
▪ The impartial flames in turn drove them back.
▪ The OEMs in turn pass some of those reductions on to their customers to increase market share.
▪ This in turn gave the schools the heavy assignment of universal literacy.
▪ When it was my turn, I always used to think my time went quicker than when Frank was carrying it.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Turn

Turn \Turn\ (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Turned; p. pr. & vb. n. Turning.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner's chisel, a carpenter's tool for drawing circles; probably akin to E. throw. See Throw, and cf. Attorney, Return, Tornado, Tour, Tournament.]

  1. To cause to move upon a center, or as if upon a center; to give circular motion to; to cause to revolve; to cause to move round, either partially, wholly, or repeatedly; to make to change position so as to present other sides in given directions; to make to face otherwise; as, to turn a wheel or a spindle; to turn the body or the head.

    Turn the adamantine spindle round.
    --Milton.

    The monarch turns him to his royal guest.
    --Pope.

  2. To cause to present a different side uppermost or outmost; to make the upper side the lower, or the inside to be the outside of; to reverse the position of; as, to turn a box or a board; to turn a coat.

  3. To give another direction, tendency, or inclination to; to direct otherwise; to deflect; to incline differently; -- used both literally and figuratively; as, to turn the eyes to the heavens; to turn a horse from the road, or a ship from her course; to turn the attention to or from something. ``Expert when to advance, or stand, or, turn the sway of battle.''
    --Milton.

    Thrice I deluded her, and turned to sport Her importunity.
    --Milton.

    My thoughts are turned on peace.
    --Addison.

  4. To change from a given use or office; to divert, as to another purpose or end; to transfer; to use or employ; to apply; to devote.

    Therefore he slew him, and turned the kingdom unto David.
    --1 Chron. x. 14.

    God will make these evils the occasion of a greater good, by turning them to advantage in this world.
    --Tillotson.

    When the passage is open, land will be turned most to cattle; when shut, to sheep.
    --Sir W. Temple.

  5. To change the form, quality, aspect, or effect of; to alter; to metamorphose; to convert; to transform; -- often with to or into before the word denoting the effect or product of the change; as, to turn a worm into a winged insect; to turn green to blue; to turn prose into verse; to turn a Whig to a Tory, or a Hindu to a Christian; to turn good to evil, and the like.

    The Lord thy God will turn thy captivity, and have compassion upon thee.
    --Deut. xxx. 3.

    And David said, O Lord, I pray thee, turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness.
    --2 Sam. xv. 31.

    Impatience turns an ague into a fever.
    --Jer. Taylor.

  6. To form in a lathe; to shape or fashion (anything) by applying a cutting tool to it while revolving; as, to turn the legs of stools or tables; to turn ivory or metal.

    I had rather hear a brazen candlestick turned.
    --Shak.

  7. Hence, to give form to; to shape; to mold; to put in proper condition; to adapt. ``The poet's pen turns them to shapes.''
    --Shak.

    His limbs how turned, how broad his shoulders spread !
    --Pope.

    He was perfectly well turned for trade.
    --Addison.

  8. Specifically:

    1. To translate; to construe; as, to turn the Iliad.

      Who turns a Persian tale for half a crown.
      --Pope.

    2. To make acid or sour; to ferment; to curdle, etc.: as, to turn cider or wine; electricity turns milk quickly.

    3. To sicken; to nauseate; as, an emetic turns one's stomach.

  9. To make a turn about or around (something); to go or pass around by turning; as, to turn a corner. The ranges are not high or steep, and one can turn a kopje instead of cutting or tunneling through it. --James Bryce. To be turned of, be advanced beyond; as, to be turned of sixty-six. To turn a cold shoulder to, to treat with neglect or indifference. To turn a corner, to go round a corner. To turn adrift, to cast off, to cease to care for. To turn a flange (Mech.), to form a flange on, as around a metal sheet or boiler plate, by stretching, bending, and hammering, or rolling the metal. To turn against.

    1. To direct against; as, to turn one's arguments against himself.

    2. To make unfavorable or hostile to; as, to turn one's friends against him. To turn a hostile army, To turn the enemy's flank, or the like (Mil.), to pass round it, and take a position behind it or upon its side. To turn a penny, or To turn an honest penny, to make a small profit by trade, or the like. To turn around one's finger, to have complete control of the will and actions of; to be able to influence at pleasure. To turn aside, to avert. To turn away.

      1. To dismiss from service; to discard; as, to turn away a servant.

      2. To avert; as, to turn away wrath or evil. To turn back.

        1. To give back; to return.

          We turn not back the silks upon the merchants, When we have soiled them.
          --Shak.

        2. To cause to return or retrace one's steps; hence, to drive away; to repel. --Shak. To turn down.

          1. To fold or double down.

          2. To turn over so as to conceal the face of; as, to turn down cards.

    3. To lower, or reduce in size, by turning a valve, stopcock, or the like; as, turn down the lights. To turn in.

      1. To fold or double under; as, to turn in the edge of cloth.

      2. To direct inwards; as, to turn the toes in when walking.

      3. To contribute; to deliver up; as, he turned in a large amount. [Colloq.] To turn in the mind, to revolve, ponder, or meditate upon; -- with about, over, etc. `` Turn these ideas about in your mind.'' --I. Watts. To turn off.

        1. To dismiss contemptuously; as, to turn off a sycophant or a parasite.

        2. To give over; to reduce.

        3. To divert; to deflect; as, to turn off the thoughts from serious subjects; to turn off a joke.

    4. To accomplish; to perform, as work.

    5. (Mech.) To remove, as a surface, by the process of turning; to reduce in size by turning.

    6. To shut off, as a fluid, by means of a valve, stopcock, or other device; to stop the passage of; as, to turn off the water or the gas. To turn one's coat, to change one's uniform or colors; to go over to the opposite party. To turn one's goods or To turn one's money, and the like, to exchange in the course of trade; to keep in lively exchange or circulation; to gain or increase in trade. To turn one's hand to, to adapt or apply one's self to; to engage in. To turn out.

      1. To drive out; to expel; as, to turn a family out of doors; to turn a man out of office.

        I'll turn you out of my kingdom. -- Shak.

      2. to put to pasture, as cattle or horses.

      3. To produce, as the result of labor, or any process of manufacture; to furnish in a completed state.

      4. To reverse, as a pocket, bag, etc., so as to bring the inside to the outside; hence, to produce.

      5. To cause to cease, or to put out, by turning a stopcock, valve, or the like; as, to turn out the lights. To turn over.

        1. To change or reverse the position of; to overset; to overturn; to cause to roll over.

        2. To transfer; as, to turn over business to another hand.

        3. To read or examine, as a book, while, turning the leaves. ``We turned o'er many books together.''
          --Shak.

        4. To handle in business; to do business to the amount of; as, he turns over millions a year. [Colloq.] To turn over a new leaf. See under Leaf. To turn tail, to run away; to retreat ignominiously. To turn the back, to flee; to retreat. To turn the back on or To turn the back upon, to treat with contempt; to reject or refuse unceremoniously. To turn the corner, to pass the critical stage; to get by the worst point; hence, to begin to improve, or to succeed. To turn the die or To turn the dice, to change fortune. To turn the edge of or To turn the point of, to bend over the edge or point of so as to make dull; to blunt. To turn the head of or To turn the brain of, to make giddy, wild, insane, or the like; to infatuate; to overthrow the reason or judgment of; as, a little success turned his head. To turn the scale or To turn the balance, to change the preponderance; to decide or determine something doubtful; to tip the balance. To turn the stomach of, to nauseate; to sicken. To turn the tables, to reverse the chances or conditions of success or superiority; to give the advantage to the person or side previously at a disadvantage. To turn tippet, to make a change. [Obs.] --B. Jonson. To turn to profit, To turn to advantage, etc., to make profitable or advantageous. To turn turtle, to capsize bottom upward; -- said of a vessel. [Naut. slang] To turn under (Agric.), to put, as soil, manure, etc., underneath from the surface by plowing, digging, or the like. To turn up.

          1. To turn so as to bring the bottom side on top; as, to turn up the trump.

          2. To bring from beneath to the surface, as in plowing, digging, etc.

          3. To give an upward curve to; to tilt; as, to turn up the nose.

            To turn upon, to retort; to throw back; as, to turn the arguments of an opponent upon himself.

            To turn upside down, to confuse by putting things awry; to throw into disorder.

            This house is turned upside down since Robin Ostler died.
            --Shak.

Turn

Turn \Turn\, v. i.

  1. To move round; to have a circular motion; to revolve entirely, repeatedly, or partially; to change position, so as to face differently; to whirl or wheel round; as, a wheel turns on its axis; a spindle turns on a pivot; a man turns on his heel.

    The gate . . . on golden hinges turning.
    --Milton.

  2. Hence, to revolve as if upon a point of support; to hinge; to depend; as, the decision turns on a single fact.

    Conditions of peace certainly turn upon events of war.
    --Swift.

  3. To result or terminate; to come about; to eventuate; to issue.

    If we repent seriously, submit contentedly, and serve him faithfully, afflictions shall turn to our advantage.
    --Wake.

  4. To be deflected; to take a different direction or tendency; to be directed otherwise; to be differently applied; to be transferred; as, to turn from the road. Turn from thy fierce wrath. --Ex. xxxii. 12. Turn ye, turn ye from your evil ways. --Ezek. xxxiii. 1

    1. The understanding turns inward on itself, and reflects on its own operations.
      --Locke.

  5. To be changed, altered, or transformed; to become transmuted; also, to become by a change or changes; to grow; as, wood turns to stone; water turns to ice; one color turns to another; to turn Mohammedan.

    I hope you have no intent to turn husband.
    --Shak.

    Cygnets from gray turn white.
    --Bacon.

  6. To undergo the process of turning on a lathe; as, ivory turns well.

  7. Specifically:

    1. To become acid; to sour; -- said of milk, ale, etc.

    2. To become giddy; -- said of the head or brain.

      I'll look no more; Lest my brain turn.
      --Shak.

    3. To be nauseated; -- said of the stomach.

    4. To become inclined in the other direction; -- said of scales.

    5. To change from ebb to flow, or from flow to ebb; -- said of the tide.

    6. (Obstetrics) To bring down the feet of a child in the womb, in order to facilitate delivery.

  8. (Print.) To invert a type of the same thickness, as temporary substitute for any sort which is exhausted. To turn about, to face to another quarter; to turn around. To turn again, to come back after going; to return. --Shak. To turn against, to become unfriendly or hostile to. To turn aside or To turn away.

    1. To turn from the direct course; to withdraw from a company; to deviate.

    2. To depart; to remove.

    3. To avert one's face. To turn back, to turn so as to go in an opposite direction; to retrace one's steps. To turn in.

      1. To bend inward.

      2. To enter for lodgings or entertainment.

      3. To go to bed. [Colloq.] To turn into, to enter by making a turn; as, to turn into a side street. To turn off, to be diverted; to deviate from a course; as, the road turns off to the left. To turn on or To turn upon.

        1. To turn against; to confront in hostility or anger.

        2. To reply to or retort.

        3. To depend on; as, the result turns on one condition. To turn out.

          1. To move from its place, as a bone.

          2. To bend or point outward; as, his toes turn out.

          3. To rise from bed. [Colloq.]

    4. To come abroad; to appear; as, not many turned out to the fire.

    5. To prove in the result; to issue; to result; as, the crops turned out poorly. To turn over, to turn from side to side; to roll; to tumble. To turn round.

      1. To change position so as to face in another direction.

      2. To change one's opinion; to change from one view or party to another. To turn to, to apply one's self to; have recourse to; to refer to. ``Helvicus's tables may be turned to on all occasions.'' --Locke. To turn to account, profit, advantage, or the like, to be made profitable or advantageous; to become worth the while. To turn under, to bend, or be folded, downward or under. To turn up.

        1. To bend, or be doubled, upward.

        2. To appear; to come to light; to transpire; to occur; to happen.

Turn

Turn \Turn\, n.

  1. The act of turning; movement or motion about, or as if about, a center or axis; revolution; as, the turn of a wheel.

  2. Change of direction, course, or tendency; different order, position, or aspect of affairs; alteration; vicissitude; as, the turn of the tide.

    At length his complaint took a favorable turn.
    --Macaulay.

    The turns and varieties of all passions.
    --Hooker.

    Too well the turns of mortal chance I know.
    --Pope.

  3. One of the successive portions of a course, or of a series of occurrences, reckoning from change to change; hence, a winding; a bend; a meander.

    And all its [the river's] thousand turns disclose. Some fresher beauty varying round.
    --Byron.

  4. A circuitous walk, or a walk to and fro, ending where it began; a short walk; a stroll.

    Come, you and I must walk a turn together.
    --Shak.

    I will take a turn in your garden.
    --Dryden.

  5. Successive course; opportunity enjoyed by alternation with another or with others, or in due order; due chance; alternate or incidental occasion; appropriate time. ``Nobleness and bounty . . . had their turns in his [the king's] nature.''

    His turn will come to laugh at you again.
    --Denham.

    Every one has a fair turn to be as great as he pleases.
    --Collier.

  6. Incidental or opportune deed or office; occasional act of kindness or malice; as, to do one an ill turn.

    Had I not done a friendes turn to thee?
    --Chaucer.

    thanks are half lost when good turns are delayed.
    --Fairfax.

  7. Convenience; occasion; purpose; exigence; as, this will not serve his turn.

    I have enough to serve mine own turn.
    --Shak.

  8. Form; cast; shape; manner; fashion; -- used in a literal or figurative sense; hence, form of expression; mode of signifying; as, the turn of thought; a man of a sprightly turn in conversation.

    The turn of both his expressions and thoughts is unharmonious.
    --Dryden.

    The Roman poets, in their description of a beautiful man, often mention the turn of his neck and arms.
    --Addison.

  9. A change of condition; especially, a sudden or recurring symptom of illness, as a nervous shock, or fainting spell; as, a bad turn. [Colloq.]

  10. A fall off the ladder at the gallows; a hanging; -- so called from the practice of causing the criminal to stand on a ladder which was turned over, so throwing him off, when the signal was given. [Obs.]

  11. A round of a rope or cord in order to secure it, as about a pin or a cleat.

  12. (Mining) A pit sunk in some part of a drift.

  13. (Eng. Law) A court of record, held by the sheriff twice a year in every hundred within his county.
    --Blount.

  14. pl. (Med.) Monthly courses; menses. [Colloq.]

  15. (Mus.) An embellishment or grace (marked thus, ?), commonly consisting of the principal note, or that on which the turn is made, with the note above, and the semitone below, the note above being sounded first, the principal note next, and the semitone below last, the three being performed quickly, as a triplet preceding the marked note. The turn may be inverted so as to begin with the lower note, in which case the sign is either placed on end thus ?, or drawn thus ?. By turns.

    1. One after another; alternately; in succession.

    2. At intervals. ``[They] feel by turns the bitter change.''
      --Milton.

      In turn, in due order of succession.

      To a turn, exactly; perfectly; as, done to a turn; -- a phrase alluding to the practice of cooking on a revolving spit.

      To take turns, to alternate; to succeed one another in due order.

      Turn and turn about, by equal alternating periods of service or duty; by turns.

      Turn bench, a simple portable lathe, used on a bench by clock makers and watchmakers.

      Turn buckle. See Turnbuckle, in Vocabulary.

      Turn cap, a sort of chimney cap which turns round with the wind so as to present its opening to the leeward.
      --G. Francis.

      Turn of life (Med.), change of life. See under Change.

      Turn screw, a screw driver.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
turn

late Old English turnian "to rotate, revolve," in part also from Old French torner "to turn away or around; draw aside, cause to turn; change, transform; turn on a lathe" (Modern French tourner), both from Latin tornare "to polish, round off, fashion, turn on a lathe," from tornus "lathe," from Greek tornos "lathe, tool for drawing circles," from PIE root *tere- (1) "to rub, rub by turning, turn, twist" (see throw (v.)). Transitive sense in English is from c.1300. Related: Turned; turning.\n

\nUse in expression to turn (something) into (something else) probably retains the classical sense of "to shape on a lathe." To turn up "arrive, make an appearance" is recorded from 1755. Turn about "by turns, alternately" is recorded from 1640s. To turn (something) loose "set free" is recorded from 1590s. Turn down (v.) "reject" first recorded 1891, American English. Turn in "go to bed" is attested from 1690s, originally nautical. To turn the stomach "nauseate" is recorded from 1620s. To turn up one's nose as an expression of contempt is attested from 1779.\n

\nTurning point is attested by 1640s in a figurative sense "point at which a decisive change takes place;" literal sense "point on which a thing turns; point at which motion in one direction ceases and that in another or contrary direction begins" is from 1660s.

turn

c.1200, "action of rotating," from Anglo-French tourn (Old French torn, tour), from Latin tornus "turning lathe;" also partly from turn (v.). Meaning "an act of turning, a single revolution or part of a revolution" is attested from late 15c. Sense of "place of bending" (in a road, river, etc.) is recorded from early 15c. Meaning "beginning of a period of time" is attested from 1853 (as in turn-of-the-century, from 1921 as an adjectival phrase).\n

\nSense of "act of good will" is recorded from c.1300. Meaning "spell of work" is from late 14c.; that of "an individual's time for action, when these go around in succession" is recorded from late 14c. The automatic automobile turn-signal is from 1915. Turn-sick "dizzy," is attested from early 15c. Phrase done to a turn (1780) suggests meat roasted on a spit. The turn of the screw (1796) is the additional twist to tighten its hold, sometimes with reference to torture by thumbscrews.

Wiktionary
turn

n. 1 A change of direction or orientation. 2 A movement of an object about its own axis in one direction that continues until the object returns to its initial orientation. 3 A single loop of a coil. 4 A chance to use (something) shared in sequence with others. 5 One's chance to make a move in a game having two or more players. 6 A figure in music, often denoted ~, consisting of the note above the one indicated, the note itself, the note below the one indicated, and the note itself again. 7 (''also'' '''turnaround''') The time required to complete a project. 8 A fit or a period of giddiness. 9 A change in temperament or circumstance. 10 (lb en cricket) A sideways movement of the ball when it bounces (caused by rotation in flight). 11 (lb en poker) The fourth communal card in Texas hold 'em. 12 (lb en poker obsolete) The flop (the first three community cards) in Texas hold 'em. 13 A deed done to another. 14 (lb en rope) A pass behind or through an object. 15 character; personality; nature. 16 (lb en soccer) An instance of going past an opposition player with the ball in one's control. vb. 1 (lb en heading) ''Non-linear physical movement.'' 2 # (lb en intransitive) Of a body, person, etc, to move around an axis through itself. 3 # (lb en transitive) To change the direction or orientation of, especially by rotation.

WordNet
turn
  1. n. a circular segment of a curve; "a bend in the road"; "a crook in the path" [syn: bend, crook]

  2. the act of changing or reversing the direction of the course; "he took a turn to the right" [syn: turning]

  3. the activity of doing something in an agreed succession; "it is my turn"; "it is still my play" [syn: play]

  4. an unforeseen development; "events suddenly took an awkward turn" [syn: turn of events, twist]

  5. a movement in a new direction; "the turning of the wind" [syn: turning]

  6. turning away or in the opposite direction; "he made an abrupt turn away from her"

  7. turning or twisting around (in place); "with a quick twist of his head he surveyed the room" [syn: twist]

  8. a time for working (after which you will be relieved by someone else); "it's my go"; "a spell of work" [syn: go, spell, tour]

  9. (sports) a period of play during which one team is on the offensive [syn: bout, round]

  10. a short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program; "he did his act three times every evening"; "she had a catchy little routine"; "it was one of the best numbers he ever did" [syn: act, routine, number, bit]

  11. a favor for someone; "he did me a good turn" [syn: good turn]

  12. taking a short walk out and back; "we took a turn in the park"

turn
  1. v. change orientation or direction, also in the abstract sense; "Turn towards me"; "The mugger turned and fled before I could see his face"; "She turned from herself and learned to listen to others' needs"

  2. undergo a change or development; "The water turned into ice"; "Her former friend became her worst enemy"; "He turned traitor" [syn: become]

  3. undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election" [syn: change state]

  4. cause to move around or rotate; "turn a key"; "turn your palm this way"

  5. pass into a condition gradually, take on a specific property or attribute; become; "The weather turned nasty"; "She grew angry" [syn: grow]

  6. to send or let go; "They turned away the crowd at the gate of the governor's mansion"

  7. pass to the other side of; "turn the corner"; "move around the obstacle" [syn: move around]

  8. move around an axis or a center; "The wheels are turning"

  9. cause to move around a center so as to show another side of; "turn a page of a book" [syn: turn over]

  10. change to the contrary; "The trend was reversed"; "the tides turned against him"; "public opinion turned when it was revealed that the president had an affair with a White House intern" [syn: change by reversal, reverse]

  11. to break and turn over earth especially with a plow; "Farmer Jones plowed his east field last week"; "turn the earth in the Spring" [syn: plow, plough]

  12. change color; "In Vermont, the leaves turn early"

  13. cause to change or turn into something different;assume new characteristics; "The princess turned the frog into a prince by kissing him"; "The alchemists tried to turn lead into gold"

  14. let (something) fall or spill a container; "turn the flour onto a plate" [syn: release]

  15. twist suddenly so as to sprain; "wrench one's ankle"; "The wrestler twisted his shoulder"; "the hikers sprained their ankles when they fell"; "I turned my ankle and couldn't walk for several days" [syn: twist, sprain, wrench, wrick, rick]

  16. shape by rotating on a lathe or cutting device or a wheel; "turn the legs of the table"; "turn the clay on the wheel"

  17. go sour or spoil; "The milk has soured"; "The wine worked"; "The cream has turned--we have to throw it out" [syn: sour, ferment, work]

  18. accomplish by rotating; "turn a somersault"; "turn cartwheels"

  19. get by buying and selling; "the company turned a good profit after a year"

  20. cause to move along an axis or into a new direction; "turn your face to the wall"; "turn the car around"; "turn your dance partner around"

  21. channel one's attention, interest, thought, or attention toward or away from something; "The pedophile turned to boys for satisfaction"; "people turn to mysticism at the turn of a millenium"

  22. cause (a plastic object) to assume a crooked or angular form; "bend the rod"; "twist the dough into a braid"; "the strong man could turn an iron bar" [syn: flex, bend, deform, twist] [ant: unbend]

  23. alter the functioning or setting of; "turn the dial to 10"; "turn the heat down"

  24. direct at someone; "She turned a smile on me"; "They turned their flashlights on the car"

  25. have recourse to or make an appeal or request for help or information to; "She called on her Representative to help her"; "She turned to her relatives for help" [syn: call on]

  26. become officially one year older; "She is turning 50 this year"

Wikipedia
Turn

Turn may refer to:

Turn (geometry)

A turn is a unit of plane angle measurement equal to 2 radians, 360 ° or 400 gon. A turn is also referred to as a revolution or complete rotation or full circle or cycle or rev or rot.

A turn can be subdivided in many different ways: into half turns, quarter turns, centiturns, milliturns, binary angles, points etc.

Turn (Great Big Sea album)

Turn is the fourth studio album by Canadian folk-rock band Great Big Sea released in June 1999.

Turn (band)

Turn are an Irish band.

Turn (Travis song)

"Turn" is the fourth single from Indie band Travis' second studio album, The Man Who. The single peaked at the number eight position on the UK Singles Chart.

Turn (biochemistry)

A turn is an element of secondary structure in proteins where the polypeptide chain reverses its overall direction.

Turn (knot)

A turn is one round of rope on a pin or cleat, or one round of a coil. Turns can be made around various objects, through rings, or around the standing part of the rope itself or another rope. A turn also denotes a component of a knot.

When the legs of a loop are brought together and crossed the rope has taken a turn. One distinguishes between single turn, round turn, and two round turns depending on the number of revolutions around an object. The benefit of round turns is best understood from the capstan equation.

Turn (swimming)

In swimming, a turn is a reversal of direction of travel by a swimmer. A turn is typically performed when a swimmer reaches the end of a swimming pool but still has one or more remaining pool lengths to swim.

Turn (film)

is a 2001 Japanese film directed by Hideyuki Hirayama.

Turn (Roscoe Mitchell album)

Turn is an album by American jazz saxophonist Roscoe Mitchell which was recorded in 2005 and released on the French RogueArt label. He leads a new quintet with longtime rhythm section Jaribu Shahid on bass and Tani Tabbal on drums, pianist Craig Taborn and new Art Ensemble of Chicago trumpeter Corey Wilkes.

Turn (policy debate)

In policy debate, a turn is an argument that proves an argument the other side has made is in fact support for one's own side. This is as opposed to a take-out which merely argues that the argument the other team has made is wrong. The turn can be used against virtually any argument that includes a link and impact (or something equivalent), including disadvantages, kritiks, and advantages to the affirmative case.

For example, if the negative said "The plan increases poverty," the affirmative could turn with "the plan decreases poverty" or take-out by proving the plan didn't increase poverty.

There are four types of turns:

  • Link Turn
  • Internal Link Turn
  • Impact Turn
  • Straight Turn
Turn (Feeder song)

"Turn" was Feeder's third UK single to be taken from the Echo Park album. It reached #27 in the UK Singles Chart, and led to the Echo Park album re-entering the top 75 due to the pre-release airplay and stocking of the single on release week. It was also the band's third successive top 30 single, the first time this had happened in their career.

The track called "Come Back Around" on CD1 is not the same song as the single from "Comfort In Sound", released a year later but a totally different song. When "Come Back Around" was mentioned as a new single, there was an initial confusion among fans thinking it was a new version of the same song. The title track related to Grant Nicholas's experiences of being away while on tour.

Turn (The Ex album)

Turn is a double album by Dutch anarchist post-punk band The Ex. After 20 years of working with Luc, their former bass guitarist, Turn is the only Ex album to feature double bass player Rosemarie giving the band a sound akin their prior work with cellist Tom Cora. In tandem with The Ex's drummer Katrin, Rosemarie also contributed significant female vocal harmonies to the album.

On Turn, The Ex also displayed their love and interpretations of African rhythms and melodies. On "Theme From Konono" The Ex's guitars imitate amplified thumb pianos in a tribute to the infectious rhythm of Congolese percussion group Konono Nº 1 who had toured Europe with The Ex. "Getatchew" pays tribute to Ethiopian Saxophone legend Getatchew Mekuria with whom The Ex would later record an album. Turn also features The Ex playing the Eritrean revolutionary song "Huriyet" set to a traditional Tigrinya beat.

Turn was recorded by Steve Albini at Electrical Audio, Chicago, and mixed by Mikel Le Roy and The Ex at Studio Le Roy, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Turn (dance and gymnastics)

In dance and gymnastics, a turn is a rotation of the body about the vertical axis. It is usually a complete rotation of the body, although quarter (90°) and half (180°) turns are possible for some types of turns. Multiple, consecutive turns are typically named according to the number of 360° rotations (e.g., double or triple turn).

There are many types of turns, which are differentiated by a number of factors. The performer may be supported by one or both legs or be airborne during a turn. When supported by one leg, that leg is known as the supporting leg and the other as the free, raised, or working leg. During airborne turns, the first leg too leave the floor is the leading leg. Some turns can be executed in either of two directions. In ballet, a turn in the direction of the raised leg is said to be en dehors whereas a turn in the opposite direction is en dedans. Trunk, arm and head positions can vary, and in turns with one supporting leg, the free leg may be straight or bent. Turns can begin in various ways as well. For example, ballet turns may begin by rising to relevé (supported on the ball of the foot) or by stepping directly onto relevé.

In some dance genres and in Labanotation, a turn in which the performer rotates on a pivot point without traveling is known as a pivot. Pivots may be performed on one or on both feet; the latter is sometimes called a twist turn.

TURN (The Utility Reform Network)

TURN (The Utility Reform Network) is a consumer advocacy organization headquartered in San Francisco California. In 1972, Sylvia Siegel started TURN in her kitchen to represent consumers before the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC). Harry Reasoner interviewed Siegel about her work with TURN on CBS's 60 minutes in 1984.

On January 1, 2008, Mark Toney became the executive director of TURN. A Brown University graduate, who later earned his Ph.D. in Sociology at UC Berkeley, Toney also founded DARE (Direct Action for Rights and Equality) to organize low-income families in Providence, Rhode Island in 1986.

California Governor Jerry Brown appointed former TURN attorney Michael Florio to the California Public Utilities Commission in 2011.

Following the gas pipeline explosion in San Bruno, TURN filed a motion with the CPUC to "compel Pacific Gas and Electric Company to respond to data requests seeking production of documents to determine if PG&E engaged in other efforts to undermine due process in this case."

Usage examples of "turn".

Then, turning towards me, he says that I look like a foreigner, and when I say that I am an Italian he begins to speak to me of the court, of the city, of the theatres, and at last he offers to accompany me everywhere.

Ugly and at once it shrinks within itself, denies the thing, turns away from it, not accordant, resenting it.

But, as we shall see in Part V, astronomical data of a disturbingly accurate and scientific nature turns up repeatedly in certain myths, as time-worn and as universal in their distribution as those of the great flood.

Riding side-by-side, Lorn and Kusyl ride toward the Accursed Forest, turning their mounts onto the wall road.

When Archer turned, Tucker was watching the vent port with an accusatory glower.

Stiff, still achy, he turned so he could run his hand up and down her back.

Beside all this, Roderic had had communicated to him, by a supernatural afflatus, that wondrous art, as yet unknown in the plains of Albion, of turning up the soil with a share of iron, and scattering it with a small quantity of those grains which are most useful to man, to expect to gather, after a short interval, a forty-fold increase.

Yet, when at last the expected step drew near, she shuddered, trembled, and turned pale with affright, and, starting to her feet, looked this way and that with a wild impulse to flee: then, as the door opened, she dropped into her chair again, and covered her face with her shaking hands.

The Culture - the real Culture, the wily ones, not these semi-mystical Elenchers with their miserable hankering to be somebody else - had been known to give whole Affronter fleets the run-around for several months with not dissimilar enticements and subterfuges, keeping them occupied, seemingly on the track of some wildly promising prey which turned out to be nothing at all, or a Culture ship with some ridiculous but earnestly argued excuse, while the Culture or one of its snivelling client species got on - or away - with something else somewhere else, spoiling rightful Affronter fun.

With hydrochloric acid, logwood ink marks turn reddish or reddish-gray, alizarin marks greenish, and aniline ink marks reddish or brownish-gray.

The garrotte goes round his neck at the start of the Allegretto grazioso, keeps turning like you turn a can opener until the breath is out of his body and his neck is cut through.

Old Pete, who today actually smelt of old peat, for he had been turning his allotment beds.

As he turned down West Ninety-ninth Street in the daylight, Stefanovitch noticed that the four-story town house that held Allure was in mint condition.

All that had transpired since the first murders at Allure was suddenly redefined for everyone, especially the public, who would hear and greedily read about the new twists and turns the following morning at the latest.

Suddenly she turned and seemed, even to Suzl, to be even more beautiful, even more alluring than ever, and she was somehow glowing.