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Crossword clues for skin

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
skin
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a heart/lung/skin etc condition
▪ I’m taking some medicine for a heart condition.
a skin/brain/lung etc disease
▪ The fumes have caused skin diseases among the villagers.
banana skin
▪ This government has an unhappy knack of slipping on banana skins.
delicate skin
▪ The sun can easily damage a child’s delicate skin.
freckled face/skin
irritate...skin
▪ This cream may irritate sensitive skin.
jumped out of...skin (=was very shocked or frightened)
▪ Don’t shout. I nearly jumped out of my skin!
sallow face/skin/complexion
▪ a woman with dark hair and a sallow complexion
skin graft
skin grafts
▪ Martha had to have several skin grafts.
skin/hair type
▪ The best cleanser for you depends on your skin type.
slipping on banana skins
▪ This government has an unhappy knack of slipping on banana skins.
soaked to the skin
▪ He came in from the barn, soaked to the skin.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
dark
▪ I have dark skin and hair and am a size 16.
▪ In the early part of the century, only field laborers had dark skin.
▪ His white teeth and brown oval eyes stood out in stark contrast against his dark tanned skin.
▪ I would recognize the slanted eyes, the dark glistening skin and the high cheekbones anywhere.
▪ Bourjois is well known for its vibrant collections and their spring range is no exception - ideal for dark skin.
▪ But then Coco Chanel came back from a trip all tan and glowing in 1930, and dark skin was in.
▪ He was in his early thirties with dark skin and a long face from which protruded a sharp, aquiline nose.
▪ One morning she asked the class why it was that some people had darker skin than others.
dry
▪ For example, oedema of dependent parts suggests fluid excess, while dry, wrinkled skin and a dry tongue suggest fluid deficit.
▪ I squatted down and hastily rinsed the bits I could get at, ending up with saturated clothes but mostly dry skin.
▪ Very dry and sensitive skins can not use alcohol-based cleansers and may even find water-cleansing too much.
▪ Some men get more aroused from lots of moisture, some from dry taut skin stimulation.
▪ Stubborn patches of dry skin can be removed with a rough skin remover cream, rubbed in, then rinsed off.
▪ However, dry flaky skin on the scalp is often wrongly diagnosed as dandruff.
▪ Just as you care for dry skin on the face, the scalp needs a soothing touch ... gentle cleansing and moisturising.
▪ For 24 hours a day, the irritation caused by severely dry skin verges on torture.
fair
▪ Freckles usually went with very fair skin.
▪ It was a child of about two, with fair skin, plump, round-eyed. 1 smiled and shrugged.
▪ Having the fair skin that so often accompanied red hair, she was usually more careful.
▪ Mark's fair skin blocks even less.
▪ In spite of being so fair, his skin had taken on quite a deep tan in the few days they had been there.
▪ She was a real beauty, with the Earnshaws' dark eyes and the Lintons' fair skin.
▪ Q I have fair skin that burns very easily and barely tans.
▪ Should I stay out of the sun? Fair skin has little natural protection and is particularly susceptible to damage.
olive
▪ Her eyes were dark and luminous and her faintly olive skin normally carried a dusting of colour, high on her cheekbones.
▪ She had flawless olive skin, huge dark eyes, an almost perfect profile.
▪ His olive skin seemed to glint in the soft light of the hallway; the flat behind him was almost totally dark.
▪ Of course, I thought, she has olive skin.
▪ The sooty eyes, the olive skin, the coarse black mop of the moustache gave little clue as to his origins.
▪ A Southerner, perhaps, with very dark hair, and an olive skin.
▪ The rosebud mouth was painted a glowing coral pink, an exotic contrast with her creamy olive skin, liquid dark eyes.
pale
▪ Sharp movements, too pale a skin, the jut of corsets: she rejected them.
▪ Nina had a round face, pale skin and short-cut hair.
▪ He was accompanied by a tall, dark-haired girl with pale skin and blue eyes whom he introduced as his fiancée.
▪ Tall and slender, with pale skin and jet-black hair, she was less outgoing than her older sister.
▪ He was a stocky, forty-year-old Londoner with a pale skin and crew-cut red hair.
▪ One was a junior doctor at a London hospital with pale skin and frizzy hair.
▪ She is a tall, elegant woman with fine cheekbones and smooth pale skin.
sensitive
▪ For anyone worried about extra sensitive skin, there's also a fragrance free wipe.
▪ She wondered if they would be as sensitive on her skin as they looked.
▪ Very dry and sensitive skins can not use alcohol-based cleansers and may even find water-cleansing too much.
▪ Earthworms have extremely sensitive skins and can not thrive under acid conditions.
▪ There's biological, biological with fabric conditioner, non-biological and non biological for sensitive skins, plus delicate fabric hand wash.
▪ It's designed to protect and soothe even the most sensitive male skins and prices start at £2.45.
▪ Like chameleons, some are able to vary the colour of their sensitive skins, to remain camouflaged.
▪ However, we know that young or sensitive skins of any age require special attention.
smooth
▪ Annie felt her hand enclosed in a warm cocoon of talcum powder and smooth baby skin.
▪ He had a quick smile, smooth skin and a booming fascination with his own anatomy.
▪ The tyres squealed as they braked, the concrete smooth as skin and slick with fluids that had bled from other cars.
▪ They even have the same smooth skin.
▪ Sugar paste, the smooth skin of young girls.
▪ She is a tall, elegant woman with fine cheekbones and smooth pale skin.
▪ She glimpsed smooth skin, but the blood and dirt flooded back in.
soft
▪ Whatever caused the extinction, it is not soft skin that determined survival.
▪ He slid his hands over her waist, so soft like baby skin.
▪ Made from strong, stretchy material that was soft on skin.
▪ It secretes a new, soft wrinkled skin beneath the shell.
▪ He gave an exaggerated stretch, displaying the powerful biceps and the soft inside skin of his arms.
▪ His belt buckle was digging into the soft skin of her stomach and she moved agitatedly, unconsciously provocative.
▪ The unique micro-thin padding acts just like an extra soft layer of skin.
thick
▪ His body is so thick, his skin cool and moist through the thin shirt.
▪ They have a good, thick skin.
▪ The jaws are armed with spine-like mouth papillae, otherwise covered by thick skin which obscures the associated plates.
▪ We often talk among ourselves about developing thicker skins.
▪ As with all hams, the thick skin is removed before sale or serving.
▪ She will just have to grow a thicker skin.
▪ A prerequisite of being a member of our party is a thick skin and a sense of humour.
▪ It requires a high level of stamina, a thick skin and a flexible mind.
thin
▪ Periodically, they moult their thin transparent skins, changing shape as they do so.
▪ McCaffrey is also notorious for his thin skin, which may explain why he has studiously avoided public debate.
▪ The thin permeable skin allows moisture to flow into the animal rather than out of it.
▪ The present land surface is a thin skin on top of a thick record of the past preserved in the rocks.
▪ As they get older they tend to have very thin skin and can bruise from the slightest injury.
▪ There was water at the bottom covered by a thin skin of ice and he splashed into it face first.
▪ The arms may be covered by a thin covering of skin which may obscure the plates.
▪ Clean thin skin, with shallow eyes. 3.
■ NOUN
banana
▪ The enamel has peeled off the taps like so much banana skin, revealing dull, patchy brass.
▪ They dug in garbage piles, looking for anything at all, banana skins, orange peels, discarded greens.
▪ He's just warning voters of the political banana skins on route to the polling booths.
▪ Carrie kicked off her shoes and peeled her leotard down like a banana skin.
▪ A tug-o'-war ensued and suddenly the rope came - unzipping all those carefully placed runners like a thumb through a banana skin.
cancer
▪ Most skin cancers are completely curable, but some can be fatal.
▪ One type of skin cancer is malignant melanoma.
▪ The number of skin cancer cases in Britain has doubled in 10 years, with the South West as the worst area.
▪ Estimates of ozone depletion and skin cancer incidence to examine the Vienna Convention achievements.
▪ Much worse is the link between serious sunburn and deadly skin cancer.
▪ It has been estimated that childhood protection from the sun ban reduce the risk of skin cancer in later life by 78%.
▪ The more moles a person has, the higher the risk of getting the skin cancer.
care
▪ Hence Sensiq's new skin care collection.
▪ Begin new skin care routine if necessary.
▪ But modern products go beyond shampoos and conditioners - new hair problems can be tackled like skin care.
▪ He found them enjoyable too and full of good advice on skin care.
▪ Lipid loss occurs as a result of using harsh skin care products and damage from the elements.
▪ Turn yourself into a natural beauty this summer by adopting a good skin care routine now with the help of Sensiq.
▪ I think good skin care is really important so I get sucked in by anti-wrinkle creams and things like that.
▪ A day cream is the most important skin care treatment.
cell
▪ Firstly they prevent the bacteria that cause urine infections from sticking to the skin cells in the bladder and urethra.
▪ Hypertrophy Increase in size when referring to skin cells.
▪ Unfortunately, it will happen inevitably as your skin cells replace themselves.
▪ The replacement of surface skin cells slows down, and they tend to become more prone to environmental damage.
▪ Dead skin cells are continuously falling off and contribute to the dust in our houses.
▪ A smooth skin also tans more evenly because you have removed dead skin cells.
▪ Types of colour change Colour in fish is controlled by special skin cells called Chromatophores, which contain pigments.
▪ Firstly, it contains special nutrients that will effectively stimulate skin cell activity and so repair past damage.
colour
▪ The gene involved makes the dark pigment-melanin-that is responsible for skin colour.
▪ Her grandmother never used the words white and black to describe skin colour.
▪ I like to use cosmetics as close to my natural skin colour as possible.
▪ It's merely a question of altering your foundation to match your skin colour.
▪ Their skin colour, sexuality or hair hue is irrelevant.
▪ These experiments show that at least one-third of landlords discriminate against ethnic minorities on grounds of skin colour.
▪ For example, skin colour assigns individuals to racial statuses such as black and white but this merely reflects the conventions of particular societies.
▪ Prescriptives now has a foundation to suit just about every skin colour.
tone
▪ Above her elbow, the flesh displayed a normal skin tone.
▪ It seems to be more a matter of personality than skin tone.
▪ The skin tone, the shine on the dark hair, the thick sweep of lashes, were lifelike.
▪ To an outsider, the contrasts of this nation reach far beyond the black and white of skin tones.
▪ You simply press the touch-pad which corresponds to your hair colour and the one which corresponds to your skin tone.
▪ It was as though Norman Rockwell had discovered a new, slightly more tan, skin tone.
▪ Being a water-based mousse, it's ultra light to apply and blends in perfectly with your natural skin tone.
■ VERB
break
▪ A wave of clammy perspiration broke out on my skin.
▪ Marvin gave me a smart kick under the table, nearly breaking the skin on my shin.
▪ I can feel blood on my shoulder, where her teeth broke the skin.
cover
▪ The ventral interradial areas are also covered by naked skin.
▪ Seventy-five percent or more of the outer surface must he covered with skin either attached or used as a wrap.
▪ The jaws and oral area are covered by skin.
▪ Their huts were short tepees protected by tree branches or rounded huts covered with animal skins.
▪ The jaws are armed with spine-like mouth papillae, otherwise covered by thick skin which obscures the associated plates.
▪ At dawn two men with barnacles covering their beautiful skin approached them.
▪ The arms are covered with skin, and are very long with two or three longer than the others.
▪ The arms are covered with skin which obscures the dorsal side of the arm.
feel
▪ At work next day, discussing time-sheets and piecework rates with Dagmar, she could feel her skin irritating her.
▪ His achievements include a finish for silk that feels like the skin of a peach, and the revival of paisley.
▪ Ronni could feel her skin tingle from her scalp to her toes.
▪ For an instant, Bowman felt the skin prickling at the base of his scalp.
▪ She wanted to feel Roman's skin against her and his hands on her naked body.
▪ He drove the blade upwards with one powerful thrust, feeling it puncture skin, rip through muscle and crash into teeth.
▪ She felt her own skin begin to feel chilled as the heat slowly ebbed away.
▪ Stephen felt his skin and nose begin to itch with the dust and seed that was blowing from the crops and hedgerows.
remove
▪ Process in a blender or processor until smooth; then rub the soup through a sieve to remove the pea skins.
▪ Pull meat off ducks and remove any skin, cartilage, or bone.
▪ Stubborn patches of dry skin can be removed with a rough skin remover cream, rubbed in, then rinsed off.
▪ Slice mushrooms. Remove skin and bones from poached chicken.
▪ Turn them over and remove the skin, then grill for a further 5 minutes.
▪ A smooth skin also tans more evenly because you have removed dead skin cells.
▪ Flake the flesh, remove the skin and evenly distribute the fish across the base of the dish.
▪ Rinse off the remover afterwards. Remove hard skin with a file or hard-skin stone, then use a foot cream.
rub
▪ They rub butter on their skins, did you know that?
▪ Calamus-root powder is then rubbed into the skin.
▪ You no longer take your vitamins in pill form these days - the latest trend is to rub them into your skin.
▪ For some children, a light, feathery touch feels like some one rubbing sandpaper over sunburned skin.
▪ Mouth upon mouth, tongue against tongue, limb upon limb, skin rubbing at skin.
▪ Lightly rub spice mixture over skin of quail.
▪ The Apache women rubbing skins and grinding corn, their hair greasy and full of vermin.
▪ Double the smoothing effects of a body scrub by rubbing it on dry skin before taking a shower.
save
▪ But the traditional banana-producing countries are banding together to save their skins.
▪ The fishermen were simply making arrangements to save their own skins.
▪ So Cresci saved his skin, and Menotti flew home, blowing on his fingers.
▪ They had two towels they wetted in the by now black water to save the skin of their thighs.
▪ He is intent only on saving his own skin.
▪ It is not the first time he has resigned to save his political skin.
▪ Set against my wits and guile, Manly strength won't save your skin.
shed
▪ They eat almost continuously for a month, pausing only to shed their skins several times to accommodate their ever-increasing bodies.
▪ Competition on the margin forces organizations shed their skins, time and again.
▪ As she grows, she must periodically shed her inelastic skin.
▪ See how we fight to return, now that we have shed our skins, now that we are only water?
▪ It has to shed its skin four or five times to allow it to grow bigger.
▪ In order to grow, snakes must periodically shed their skins.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
beauty is only skin-deep
break the skin
▪ Marvin gave me a smart kick under the table, nearly breaking the skin on my shin.
dry mouth/skin/lips/hair etc
▪ Finesse's hairspray formulations are non-sticky, and yet give perfect control when applied to dry hair.
▪ For 24 hours a day, the irritation caused by severely dry skin verges on torture.
▪ In places the green is so thick on the page that it develops a gloss like the dried skin of oil paint.
▪ Just as you care for dry skin on the face, the scalp needs a soothing touch ... gentle cleansing and moisturising.
▪ Make sure you use a moisturising shampoo and conditioner for dry hair.
▪ Simply spray Hot Shapes on to clean, dry hair before setting to get instant hold with a glossy finish.
▪ Specific questioning showed symptoms of dry eyes and dry mouth.
▪ There may be a dry burning sensation; a dry mouth, ropy mucus, mouth ulcers.
have a thick skin
▪ Some people have thick skins, others have thin ones and are more easily hurt.
olive skin/complexion
▪ She had a long oval face and an olive complexion.
▪ A thick mop of black hair over a man-boy's smooth olive complexion.
▪ Her eyes were dark and luminous and her faintly olive skin normally carried a dusting of colour, high on her cheekbones.
▪ Her skin complemented her hair; she had an olive complexion which shone like burnished gold.
▪ His olive skin seemed to glint in the soft light of the hallway; the flat behind him was almost totally dark.
▪ Of course, I thought, she has olive skin.
▪ The sooty eyes, the olive skin, the coarse black mop of the moustache gave little clue as to his origins.
▪ They were well-groomed, clean-shaven young men with olive complexions.
save sb's skin/neck/bacon
skin and bone
▪ Four feet eleven inches of skin and bone, but a terrible sight to behold when roused.
▪ Remove any skin and bones and rinse in cold water.
▪ Remove chicken, trim off skin and bones, and return chicken in large pieces to the soup.
▪ Remove pheasant carcass and pull off any meat; discard skin and bones.
▪ Remove skin and bones from poached chicken.
▪ The inflammation was where there had been only skin and bone before.
▪ They are eyes and skins and bones and toes and brains and instincts.
▪ When she died, she was just skin and bone.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a skin disease
▪ a skin on the top of the pudding
▪ a cleanser for oily skin
▪ a sheepskin jacket
▪ He brushed against her beautifully soft skin.
▪ leopard skins
▪ onion skin
▪ potato skins
▪ The toad's skin produces a poisonous substance.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Bunched tightly together by older men in animal skins and carrying spears, they perform a ceremonial dance to insistent drumming.
▪ He was born with a white layer of skin over his right eye.
▪ Remove pits from persimmons, then scrape pulp free from skins with teaspoon.
▪ She felt heady with excitement, and her skin tingled.
▪ Their huts were short tepees protected by tree branches or rounded huts covered with animal skins.
▪ Those cells which can form pigment migrate beneath the skin and enter all the feather germs.
▪ When your skin was young, it could fend for itself.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
beauty is only skin-deep
dry mouth/skin/lips/hair etc
▪ Finesse's hairspray formulations are non-sticky, and yet give perfect control when applied to dry hair.
▪ For 24 hours a day, the irritation caused by severely dry skin verges on torture.
▪ In places the green is so thick on the page that it develops a gloss like the dried skin of oil paint.
▪ Just as you care for dry skin on the face, the scalp needs a soothing touch ... gentle cleansing and moisturising.
▪ Make sure you use a moisturising shampoo and conditioner for dry hair.
▪ Simply spray Hot Shapes on to clean, dry hair before setting to get instant hold with a glossy finish.
▪ Specific questioning showed symptoms of dry eyes and dry mouth.
▪ There may be a dry burning sensation; a dry mouth, ropy mucus, mouth ulcers.
have a thick skin
▪ Some people have thick skins, others have thin ones and are more easily hurt.
keep your eyes peeled/skinned
▪ But if you mean to stick around on the planet for a bit, you need to keep your eyes skinned.
▪ He had kept his eyes peeled.
▪ He pedalled along the canal bank quite slowly, keeping his eyes skinned for signs of defunct animal life.
▪ If you are interested, keep your eyes peeled for nomination lists to that effect.
▪ One final word on buying components, keep your eyes peeled for products that are about to be discontinued.
▪ She still kept her eyes skinned for people coming up the drive though.
▪ The village was in complete wilderness, our toilet a local bush - keeping our eyes peeled for lions!
▪ We keep our eyes peeled for Forest Service Road 670.
olive skin/complexion
▪ She had a long oval face and an olive complexion.
▪ A thick mop of black hair over a man-boy's smooth olive complexion.
▪ Her eyes were dark and luminous and her faintly olive skin normally carried a dusting of colour, high on her cheekbones.
▪ Her skin complemented her hair; she had an olive complexion which shone like burnished gold.
▪ His olive skin seemed to glint in the soft light of the hallway; the flat behind him was almost totally dark.
▪ Of course, I thought, she has olive skin.
▪ The sooty eyes, the olive skin, the coarse black mop of the moustache gave little clue as to his origins.
▪ They were well-groomed, clean-shaven young men with olive complexions.
skin and bone
▪ Four feet eleven inches of skin and bone, but a terrible sight to behold when roused.
▪ Remove any skin and bones and rinse in cold water.
▪ Remove chicken, trim off skin and bones, and return chicken in large pieces to the soup.
▪ Remove pheasant carcass and pull off any meat; discard skin and bones.
▪ Remove skin and bones from poached chicken.
▪ The inflammation was where there had been only skin and bone before.
▪ They are eyes and skins and bones and toes and brains and instincts.
▪ When she died, she was just skin and bone.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Add four boned and skinned duck breasts.
▪ She skinned her knee when she fell off her bike.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Although it wore a dress, the person was unrecognizable as the face had been skinned.
▪ Lucie slipped the scarlet waistcoat off Gabriel's shoulders and skinned him of the white silk shirt.
▪ So as soon as the bamboos were skinned, the fishermen coated them with a natural insect repellent.
▪ The surface of the pond had begun to skin.
▪ You look back and see that there is more than one way to skin a cat.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Skin

Skin \Skin\, n. [Icel. skinn; akin to Sw. skinn, Dan. skind, AS. scinn, G. schined to skin.]

  1. (Anat.) The external membranous integument of an animal.

    Note: In man, and the vertebrates generally, the skin consist of two layers, an outer nonsensitive and nonvascular epidermis, cuticle, or skarfskin, composed of cells which are constantly growing and multiplying in the deeper, and being thrown off in the superficial, layers; and an inner sensitive, and vascular dermis, cutis, corium, or true skin, composed mostly of connective tissue.

  2. The hide of an animal, separated from the body, whether green, dry, or tanned; especially, that of a small animal, as a calf, sheep, or goat.

  3. A vessel made of skin, used for holding liquids. See Bottle, 1. ``Skins of wine.''
    --Tennyson.

  4. The bark or husk of a plant or fruit; the exterior coat of fruits and plants.

  5. (Naut.)

    1. That part of a sail, when furled, which remains on the outside and covers the whole.
      --Totten.

    2. The covering, as of planking or iron plates, outside the framing, forming the sides and bottom of a vessel; the shell; also, a lining inside the framing.

      Skin friction, Skin resistance (Naut.), the friction, or resistance, caused by the tendency of water to adhere to the immersed surface (skin) of a vessel.

      Skin graft (Surg.), a small portion of skin used in the process of grafting. See Graft, v. t., 2.

      Skin moth (Zo["o]l.), any insect which destroys the prepared skins of animals, especially the larva of Dermestes and Anthrenus.

      Skin of the teeth, nothing, or next to nothing; the least possible hold or advantage.
      --Job xix. 20.

      Skin wool, wool taken from dead sheep.

Skin

Skin \Skin\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Skinned; p. pr. & vb. n. Skinning.]

  1. To strip off the skin or hide of; to flay; to peel; as, to skin an animal.

  2. To cover with skin, or as with skin; hence, to cover superficially.

    It will but skin and film the ulcerous place.
    --Shak.

  3. To strip of money or property; to cheat. [Slang]

Skin

Skin \Skin\, v. i.

  1. To become covered with skin; as, a wound skins over.

  2. To produce, in recitation, examination, etc., the work of another for one's own, or to use in such exercise cribs, memeoranda, etc., which are prohibited. [College Cant, U.S.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
skin

late 14c., "to remove the skin from" (originally of circumcision), from skin (n.). As "to have (a particular kind of) skin" from c.1400. In 19c. U.S. colloquial use, "to strip, fleece, plunder;" hence skin-game, one in which one player has no chance against the others (as with a stacked deck), the type of con game played in a skin-house. Skin the cat in gymnastics is from 1845. Related: Skinned; skinning.

skin

c.1200, "animal hide" (usually dressed and tanned), from Old Norse skinn "animal hide, fur," from Proto-Germanic *skintha- (cognates: Old English scinn (rare), Old High German scinten, German schinden "to flay, skin;" German dialectal schind "skin of a fruit," Flemish schinde "bark"), from PIE *sken- "to cut off" (cognates: Breton scant "scale of a fish," Irish scainim "I tear, I burst"), from root *sek- "to cut" (see section (n.)).\n\nFul of fleissche Y was to fele, Now ... Me is lefte But skyn & boon.

[hymn, c.1430]

\nThe usual Anglo-Saxon word is hide (n.1). Meaning "epidermis of a living animal or person" is attested from early 14c.; extended to fruits, vegetables, etc. late 14c. Jazz slang sense of "drum" is from 1927. Meaning "a skinhead" is from 1970. As an adjective, it formerly had a slang sense of "cheating" (1868); sense of "pornographic" is attested from 1968. Skin deep is first attested in this:\n\nAll the carnall beauty of my wife, Is but skin-deep.

[Sir Thomas Overbury, "A Wife," 1613; the poem was a main motive for his murder]

\nThe skin of one's teeth as the narrowest of margins is attested from 1550s in the Geneva Bible literal translation of the Hebrew text in Job xix:20. To get under (someone's) skin "annoy" is from 1896. Skin-graft is from 187
  1. Skin merchant "recruiting officer" is from 179

Wiktionary
skin

n. 1 (context uncountable English) The outer protective layer of the body of any animal, including of a human. 2 (context uncountable English) The outer protective layer of the fruit of a plant. 3 (context countable English) The skin and fur of an individual animal used by humans for clothing, upholstery, etc. 4 (context countable English) A congealed layer on the surface of a liquid. 5 (context countable computing English) A set of resources that modifies the appearance and/or layout of the graphical user interface of a computer program. 6 (context countable slang English) rolling paper for cigarettes. 7 (context countable slang English) (short for skinhead English) 8 (context Australia English) A subgroup of Australian aboriginal people; ''such divisions are cultural and not related to an individual′s physical skin''. '''1994''', ''Macquarie Aboriginal Words'', http://en.wikipedi

  1. org/wiki/Macquarie%20University, paperback ISBN 0-949757-79-9, Introduction. 9 (context countable video games English) An alternate appearance (texture map or geometry) for a 3D character model in a video game. 10 (context slang English) bare flesh, particularly bare breasts. 11 A vessel made of skin, used for holding liquids. 12 (context nautical English) That part of a sail, when furled, which remains on the outside and covers the whole. 13 (context nautical English) The covering, as of planking or iron plates, outside the framing, forming the sides and bottom of a vessel; the shell; also, a lining inside the framing. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To injure the skin of. 2 (context transitive English) To remove the skin and/or fur of an animal or a human. 3 (context colloquial English) To high five. 4 (context transitive computing colloquial English) To apply a skin to (a computer program). 5 (context UK soccer transitive English) To use tricks to go past a defender.

WordNet
skin
  1. v. climb awkwardly, as if by scrambling [syn: clamber, scramble, shin, shinny, struggle, sputter]

  2. bruise, cut, or injure the skin or the surface of; "The boy skinned his knee when he fell" [syn: scrape]

  3. remove the bark of a tree [syn: bark]

  4. strip the skin off; "pare apples" [syn: peel, pare]

  5. strike against an object; "She stubbed her one's toe in the dark and now it's broken" [syn: stub, scrape, abrade]

  6. [also: skinning, skinned]

skin
  1. n. a natural protective covering of the body; site of the sense of touch; "your skin is the largest organ of your body" [syn: tegument, cutis]

  2. the tissue forming the hard outer layer (of e.g. a fruit) [syn: rind, peel]

  3. an outer surface (usually thin); "the skin of an airplane"

  4. body covering of a living animal [syn: hide, pelt]

  5. a person's skin regarded as their life; "he tried to save his skin"

  6. the rind of a fruit or vegetable [syn: peel]

  7. a bag serving as a container for liquids; it is made from the skin of an animal

  8. [also: skinning, skinned]

Wikipedia
Skin (Melissa Etheridge album)

Skin is the seventh album by singer/songwriter Melissa Etheridge, released in 2001 (see 2001 in music). During the singer's split from Julie Cypher, her companion of 12 years, Melissa Etheridge retreated to her home studio to pen songs about her searing pain and confusion. Skin peels back layers of Etheridge's pain and addresses her personal melodrama, as she takes the listener through the stages of grief and recovery. "Heal Me" features background vocals by Laura Dern and Meg Ryan. Etheridge plays almost all the instruments and penned all the songs.

Skin (disambiguation)

Skin is a soft outer covering of an animal, in particular a vertebrate.

Skin or skins may also refer to the following:

Skin (Marvel Comics)

Skin is a fictional mutant in the Marvel Universe of comics. The character first appeared in Uncanny X-Men #317. (1994)

Skin (computing)

In computing, a skin (also known as visual styles in Windows XP) is a custom graphical appearance preset package achieved by the use of a graphical user interface (GUI) that can be applied to specific computer software, operating system, and websites to suit the purpose, topic, or tastes of different users. As such, a skin can completely change the look and feel and navigation interface of a piece of application software or operating system.

Software that is capable of having a skin applied is referred to as being skinnable, and the process of writing or applying such a skin is known as skinning. Applying a skin changes a piece of software's look and feel—some skins merely make the program more aesthetically pleasing, but others can rearrange elements of the interface, potentially making the program easier to use.

Skin (musician)

Deborah Anne Dyer, known by the stage name Skin, (born 3 August 1967) is an English singer, a DJ for electronical music and occasional model. As Deborah Dyer, Skin studied Interior Design at Teesside University in Middlesbrough, from which she later received an honorary degree. She is currently the lead vocalist of English hard rock/metal band Skunk Anansie. Mavis Bayton, author of Frock Rock, an academic book about women musicians in Britain, says that "women like Skin, Natacha Atlas, Yolanda Charles, Mary Genis, and Debbie Smith are now acting as crucial role models for future generations of black women." In 2015 she joined the judging panel of the Italian version of the talent show The X Factor.

Skin (TV series)

Skin is a television serial drama which aired at 9:00 p.m. Monday on Fox in 2003. It followed the tale of two teenagers who came from feuding families on opposite sides of the moral and legal spectrum. Adam ( D.J. Cotrona) is the son of the Los Angeles District Attorney, and Jewel ( Olivia Wilde) is the daughter of a pornographer. The show is a modern-day take on the Romeo and Juliet story. Even after an incredible amount of advertising, the show was cancelled after only three episodes due to poor ratings and less than favorable reviews. It was reprieved in 2005, when SOAPnet acquired broadcasting rights to all eight episodes and aired the last five episodes for the first time.

Skin (British band)

Skin were a UK hard rock band active during the 1990s who reformed in 2009, only to disband again in 2013.

Skin (Skin album)

Skin is the self-titled debut album by UK hard rock band Skin, released in 1994 on Parlophone Records.

Skin (short story)

Skin is a macabre short story written by author Roald Dahl. It is featured in 'A Roald Dahl Selection', a compilation of several short stories by Dahl that has been edited by Roy Blatchford. It is also featured in the short story collection 'Skin and Other Stories' by Roald Dahl

Skin (graphic novel)

Skin is a 48-page graphic novel written by Peter Milligan, created and drawn by Brendan McCarthy and colored by Carol Swain. It tells the story of a young skinhead, Martin Atchitson, who grew up in 1970s London with thalidomide-related birth defects. Milligan has said the story partially addresses "universal themes of major companies shafting people, and corruption in terms of drugs and mass marketing."

Skin (Westworld album)

Skin is the second album by the hard rock group Westworld. The song " Uninvited" was originally recorded by Alanis Morissette on the album City of Angels: Music from the Motion Picture

Skin (Dekker novel)

Skin is a contemporary Christian fiction science fiction/ horror novel released in April 2007 by Ted Dekker. Dekker's novel, Skin was published by Thomas Nelson with the purpose to connect the Circle Trilogy, the Project Showdown books, and an upcoming series of books.

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Skin

Skin is the soft outer covering of vertebrates. Other animal coverings, such as the arthropod exoskeleton have different developmental origin, structure and chemical composition. The adjective cutaneous means "of the skin" (from Latin cutis, skin). In mammals, the skin is an organ of the integumentary system made up of multiple layers of ectodermal tissue, and guards the underlying muscles, bones, ligaments and internal organs. Skin of a different nature exists in amphibians, reptiles, and birds. All mammals have some hair on their skin, even marine mammals like whales, dolphins, and porpoises which appear to be hairless. The skin interfaces with the environment and is the first line of defense from external factors. For example, the skin plays a key role in protecting the body against pathogens and excessive water loss. Its other functions are insulation, temperature regulation, sensation, and the production of vitamin D folates. Severely damaged skin may heal by forming scar tissue. This is sometimes discoloured and depigmented. The thickness of skin also varies from location to location on an organism. In humans for example, the skin located under the eyes and around the eyelids is the thinnest skin in the body at 0.5 mm thick, and is one of the first areas to show signs of aging such as "crows feet" and wrinkles. The skin on the palms and the soles of the feet is 4 mm thick and the back is 14 mm thick and is the thickest skin in the body. The speed and quality of wound healing in skin is promoted by the reception of estrogen.

Fur is dense hair. Primarily, fur augments the insulation the skin provides but can also serve as a secondary sexual characteristic or as camouflage. On some animals, the skin is very hard and thick, and can be processed to create leather. Reptiles and fish have hard protective scales on their skin for protection, and birds have hard feathers, all made of tough β- keratins. Amphibian skin is not a strong barrier, especially regarding the passage of chemicals via skin and is often subject to osmosis and diffusive forces. For example, a frog sitting in an anesthetic solution would be sedated quickly, as the chemical diffuses through its skin. Amphibian skin plays key roles in everyday survival and their ability to exploit a wide range of habitats and ecological conditions.

Skin (Peter Hammill album)

Skin is an album by Peter Hammill, originally released on vinyl on Foundry Records in 1986 and later re-released on CD on Virgin Records. It was also released on CD by DaTE (a division of Line Music GmbH).

The album was notable for spawning that rare thing, a Peter Hammill single: "Painting by Numbers" appeared on both 7" and 12" formats. It was the eleventh (and until now last) single by Hammill. The B-side was the non-album track "You Hit Me Where I Live". This track later appeared on the Virgin CD release of the album. As usual, none of these releases entered the UK charts. The DaTE CD release included two extra tracks, the aforementioned "You Hit Me Where I Live" plus "Painting By Numbers (Extended Version)".

The album sees Hammill employing the Yamaha DX7, the first commercially successful digital synthesiser, an instrument which was typical for the sound of the 1980s and which he plays until today. He also made use of an Emu Drumulator drum machine.

Skin (1995 film)

Skin is an 11-minute short film starring Ewen Bremner and Marcia Rose and directed by Vincent O'Connell. Produced by Tapson/Steel Films for British Screen and Channel 4 Films (now Film4 Productions), it was filmed in September 1995. The screenplay was written in the summer of that year by British playwright Sarah Kane.

It was first screened at the London Film Festival in October 1995, and was later given its television debut on Channel 4 at 11.35pm on 17 June 1997. An original airtime of 9.40pm was pushed back after television executives became worried about the depiction of violence and racism in the film, which, according to the British tabloidThe Daily Mail, they saw as "one of the most violent and racially offensive programmes ever to be made for television in this country".

Vincent O'Connell was nominated for a Golden Bear award in the category "Best Short Film" for the film at the 1996 Berlin International Film Festival.

The film's screenplay was only Kane's second work, written after her 1995 debut Blasted but before 1996's Phaedra's Love. The screenplay appears in the complete collection of Sarah Kane's work, Sarah Kane: Complete Plays, published in 2001 by Methuen.

Bremner and Rose, who had never met prior to making the film, became romantically involved during its shooting, and subsequently had a child together.

Skin (16 Volt album)

Skin was 16Volt's second album, which was released in 1994 under the Re-Constriction label.

Skin (Japanese band)

Skin (stylized as S.K.I.N.) is a music project founded by several Japanese rock musicians in 2007. They are Yoshiki, Gackt, Sugizo and Miyavi, all being important to the visual kei movement or closely related to it, but each being from a different generation. Its debut performance was on June 29, 2007, in Long Beach, California, considered as the "Japanese rock concert of the century". Although they had announced more activities, such as a live tour and releasing a record, all activities were suddenly stopped. The future of the project still remains unclear.

Skin (Endorphin album)

Skin is the second album by the Australian band Endorphin, released in 1999.

Skin (Sarabeth)

"Skin (Sarabeth)" (listed on the album, Feels Like Today, as just "Skin") is a song written by Doug Johnson and Joe Henry, and performed by American country music group Rascal Flatts. The song was originally a hidden track on the first shipment of their album, Feels Like Today, and charted in mid-2005 as an album cut (just called "Skin" at the time) while the single "Fast Cars and Freedom" was climbing the charts. "Skin" became a single in late-2005, peaking at #2 on US country charts, and #42 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. It was later named "Skin (Sarabeth)" on their Greatest Hits Volume 1.

Skin (Katie Noonan album)

Skin is a studio album by Australian musician, Katie Noonan. It was released in August 2007 and peaked at number 6 on the Australian ARIA Charts. Skin was the first album released by Noonan as a solo artist and recorded between the time of 3 and 8 months pregnant. Noonan says: "I love the themes I explored on this album – I was a madly in love newlywed, experiencing the miracle of pregnancy – it was quite a trip to document! Inspired by Donny Hathaway, Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder and Vince Jones, this album was all about exploring groove for me. I learn’t a huge amount making this album and I am really grateful for the arduous journey I took with this process, as since then, it has confirmed my instinct to listen to and trust my inner voice."

Skin (aeronautics)

More about the skin of aircraft covered in its wings and fuselage.

Skin (Breaking Benjamin song)

"Skin" is a song by the American post-grunge/ alternative metal band Breaking Benjamin. It was released as the second single from the band's 2002 debut album Saturate.

Skin (2008 film)

Skin is a British-South African 2008 biographical film – based on the book When She Was White: The True Story of a Family Divided by Race by Judith Stone – directed by Anthony Fabian, about Sandra Laing, a South African woman born to white parents, who was classified as " Coloured" during the apartheid era, presumably due to a genetic case of atavism. Skin premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival on 7 September 2009.

The film was released to a limited number of US cinemas on 30 October 2009. It started showing in South Africa on 22 January 2010, and in Australia and New Zealand 25 July 2010.

Skin (Hayder novel)

Skin (2009) is a novel by British writer Mo Hayder, this novel is the fourth to feature her series character Jack Caffery.

Category:2009 British novels Category:British novels

Skin (Rihanna song)

"Skin" is a song by Barbadian recording artist Rihanna from her fifth studio album, Loud (2010). The song was written by Kenneth Coby and Ursula Yancy, with production helmed by Soundz. Musically, "Skin" is influenced by pop, dance-pop and dubstep genres, whilst lyrically, the song is about being in a relationship with someone and only wanting to feel their skin close to the protagonists. "Skin" received generally positive reviews from critics, as part of their overall review of Loud, praising "Skins compositions as well as Rihanna's sensual vocal performance. The song was included on the set list of the Loud Tour (2011), where Rihanna retrieves a man or woman from the audience near the end of the song, and performs a lap-dance whilst on an elevated platform. "Skin" was also used in Rihanna's advertisement campaign for Armani Jeans.

Skin (Erik Friedlander album)

Skin is a 2000 album by cellist Erik Friedlander which was released on the Siam label and features the quartet that previously appeared on Topaz. The album was also released as a DVD

Skin (Flume album)

Skin is the second studio album by Australian electronic musician Flume. It marks the second full-length release since his self-titled debut in 2012, marking four years between releases.

The album was released on 27 May 2016 by Future Classic, and premiered via a Facebook live stream on 26 May, which also included video segments of Phil Taggart interviewing Flume at the album listening party in London. It has since garnered positive reviews and debuted at number one on the Australian Albums Chart, also peaking at number 8 on the US Billboard 200. The album gained international recognition from the album's second track Never Be Like You.

Usage examples of "skin".

I will now go and skin that troll who went so nigh to slay thee, and break up the carcase, if thou wilt promise to abide about the door of the house, and have thy sword and the spear ready to hand, and to don thine helm and hauberk to boot.

The skin of this young creature, from continual ablutions and the use of mollifying ointments, was inconceivably smooth and soft.

I began to wonder what it was like for Aboriginal people with really dark skin and broad features, how did Australians react to them?

When Miss Wu asked what the medication was, the doctor replied that it was made from abortus, as it is called there, and placenta, and that it was very good for the skin.

Where his face was not bruised or abraded, his usually milk-pale skin was gray.

Trace evidence on the body includes fibers and microscopic debris under the fingernails and adhering to blood and to abraded skin and hair.

He urged her back against the closed door and kissed her neck, the bristle from his shaven jaw abrading her and making her skin tingle.

He could feel the points abrading his skin and saw stars for a moment behind his closed lids.

Her bare foot dragged across it, abrading the skin and producing a burning pain that somehow seemed far worse than any of the aches and stings emanating from the other injuries Mrs.

I reached around and grabbed the belt and hissed as fabric abraided my skin.

She grasped his shoulders then, moving her legs, reveling in the abrasive feel of his hair roughened skin against the softness of her thighs.

Dane saw the gray of Shver skin, black-clothed, and the tension accelerated into danger.

They do not properly tattoo, but color the skin with achote or anatto.

There were deep circles under his eyes, his skin was red and swollen from the acne that ran across it.

If they are allowed to remain, they will produce an irritation of the skin causing an inflammatory disease known as acne, or stone-pock.