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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
temperature
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a temperature gauge
▪ The oil temperature gauge was twice its normal reading.
a temperature rise
▪ They predicted a global temperature rise of 2.5 degrees by the end of the century.
body temperature
▪ Exercise will raise your body temperature.
room temperature
▪ The wine should be served at room temperature.
sub-zero weather/temperatures
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
ambient
▪ Odour emissions are affected by wind direction, temperature inversion, ambient temperatures and humidity.
▪ The ambient temperature in Celsius is roughly equal to the number of cricket chirps in 8 seconds plus 5.
▪ The water in the aquarium will quickly equal the ambient air temperature.
▪ If you space heat then you will have an ambient temperature of 75-80°F and even higher humidity.
▪ Homeothermy or Homoiothermy Temperature regulation in tachymetabolic species in which core temperatures remain roughly steady despite ambient temperature changes.
▪ The ambient temperature for each day of the study was determined from local weekly weather statistics.
average
▪ It should cause a fall of around 0.5 degrees Centigrade, taking average temperatures back to those of the 1950s and 60s.
▪ The average 1995 worldwide temperature was 59. 7 degrees, or the equivalent of a summer day in London.
▪ The average daily temperature from October to December is around 88 degrees Farenheit with nine hours of sunshine per day.
▪ An ice age begins slowly, almost imperceptibly, when the average temperature drops by a few degrees.
▪ Of more practical importance than estimates of global annual average temperature increase is that of resulting regional and seasonal changes.
▪ The plant is more suitable for Zone 10 conditions, where the average minimum temperatures are 30-40 degrees.
▪ The average temperature rise over all areas was 0.59 degrees.
cold
▪ The batteries should not be exposed to excessive heat or cold temperatures, or exposed to moisture.
▪ The limiting factor for early planting is more often waterlogged soil than cold temperatures.
▪ The winters are long and very cold, with temperatures ranging between -16°C and -48°C from October to March.
▪ The market lost its earlier gains on perceptions the coldest temperatures came in areas where previous frost damage forced an early harvest.
▪ The colder the temperature, the more fat reserves a bird needs to maintain body warmth.
▪ Change the water every 30 minutes to maintain the cold temperature.
▪ In cold temperatures the eggs are very resistant and can survive for over a year in soil.
▪ Expect very cold temperatures and true winter conditions.
constant
▪ They estimated that it would take them four months to build the cells, the measuring equipment and constant temperature baths.
▪ Thus the plants have a constant temperature in both leaves and roots.
▪ His law states that gas volume varies inversely with pressure at constant temperature.
▪ Below the frost line, the ground maintains a more constant temperature of about 55 degrees year-round.
▪ Under reasonably constant temperature conditions, the prototype unit provided a time period of 24 hours within two or three minutes.
▪ It emerges from the base of the massive Navajo Dam at constant temperatures and even flows.
▪ In practice the polymer solution is held at a constant temperature while precipitant is added to the stirred solution.
▪ Light intensity is linearly controlled with constant colour temperature and light emission angle.
different
▪ Figure 3.7 shows graphically the Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions of molecular speeds at two different temperatures.
▪ Do you want different temperatures in the living room and the bedroom?
▪ All gauges are carefully monitored with regular readings taken to establish the performance of the engine at different settings and temperatures.
▪ They're available in various weights to suit different temperatures.
▪ Now you can have different temperatures in every part of your home when you want them.
▪ A composite isothermal curve covering the required extensive time scale can then be constructed from data collected at different temperatures.
▪ Not all magmas have the same composition, and magmas with different compositions melt at different temperatures.
▪ Of course different clays can withstand different firing temperatures before they vitrify and lose their structural integrity.
global
▪ The worst case scenario suggests aircraft could be responsible for up to 43 percent of the projected rise in global temperature.
▪ In the last nine thousand years there has been only a single global temperature excursion larger than 0. 5 degrees!
▪ Of more practical importance than estimates of global annual average temperature increase is that of resulting regional and seasonal changes.
▪ Palaeoclimate reconstructions indicate that the meridional temperature gradients decrease, and poleward heat flow increases, as global mean temperature increases.
▪ It's sending back measurements of global sea surface temperatures, with very high accuracy.
▪ The predictions are based on a rise in global temperatures of 1 degree centigrade by 2025.
▪ Fast albedo feedbacks are too weak to change global temperature significantly without global mean radiative forcing.
▪ But internationally agreed carbon taxes, permits and rising global temperatures may push the world along the road towards accepting the unacceptable.
high
▪ On take-off, for example, it would result in excessively high combustion temperatures and detonation.
▪ The plant is sensitive to alkaline conditions and prefers cool waters but temporarily withstands higher temperatures.
▪ Earlier workers failed; one reason was that they did not have the technology to reach the necessary high temperatures and pressures.
▪ The high core temperatures could also be used to support a theory that became fashionable among geophysicists during the l980s.
▪ Its highest temperature is 32 KeV, density 1.2 × 10 20 and energy retention time 1.2 seconds.
▪ The collisions generated extremely high temperatures and pressures.
▪ Their natural habitat is the Amazonian jungle with a high temperature and humidity.
▪ A stream of water is pumped into a hot reactor, where it boils and is heated to very high temperatures.
internal
▪ Eventually the internal pressure and temperature rise sufficiently for thermonuclear fusion to begin.
▪ Both say an oven as low as 140 degrees would not take the meat to the 160-degree internal temperature needed for safety.
▪ Initially the gravitational self-attraction of the stellar material leads to large internal pressures and temperatures which can ignite thermonuclear burning.
▪ Fully cooked ham are heated to an internal temperature of 150-F.
▪ Lund's paper assumes a house with an internal temperature varying on an annual basis between 170C and 270C.
▪ Cooked poultry roasts must have been heated to an internal temperature of 160-F.
▪ Occupiers also raise the internal temperature, thereby increasing the stack effect.
▪ Most of the recipes in this book will give an internal temperature recommendation rather than a minutes-per-pound guideline.
low
▪ It does well at the lower temperature, and will take some time to adapt to the temperatures above 70°F.
▪ The heat can penetrate combustible materials, alter their composition and make them ignite at lower temperatures.
▪ This type is illustrated in Figure 5.6, which shows the pendulum used at Bristol for studies at low temperatures in vacuum.
▪ But salt water has a lower freezing temperature than plain water.
▪ Because of its preference for lower temperatures, this is an ideal plant for the garden pool.
▪ For many years, doctors believed that the lower temperature could reduce the chance of bacterial growth and infection.
▪ By 22 October 1995, the lowest temperature recorded for the bedroom for the forthcoming winter was 200C.
▪ Surgeons and their surgical teams, dressed in watertight garb, also found the low temperatures more comfortable.
maximum
▪ The temperature at point C is the maximum temperature at which two phases can form.
▪ On a thirty-hour journey they passed through a maximum temperature of over two thousand degrees Fahrenheit.
▪ It is recommended that samples be stored at mean maximum temperature and mean maximum humidity appropriate to the market concerned.
▪ The maximum temperature to which a melt is heated is also critical.
▪ Bonfire firings are generally quicker than kilns and a deal less controlled, with their maximum temperatures being held briefly.
▪ It is therefore particularly suitable for estimating maximum temperature exposure or maximum depth of burial.
▪ In the Sonoran desert, average summer temperatures are around 40C, and maximum temperatures may exceed 55C.
mean
▪ This behaviour is similar to the observed evolution of the mean temperature in the lower stratosphere during 1984 and 1989.
▪ The mean temperature in Champagne is 10.53°C sheltered at 2 metres above the ground and 11.21°C at 0.2 metres above the ground.
▪ Palaeoclimate reconstructions indicate that the meridional temperature gradients decrease, and poleward heat flow increases, as global mean temperature increases.
▪ Since then they have been both warmer and colder, with oscillations of the order of 1-2°C about annual mean temperatures.
▪ It is recommended that samples be stored at mean maximum temperature and mean maximum humidity appropriate to the market concerned.
▪ The long-range forecast prophesies Mean temperatures and azure skies.
normal
▪ Make sure you choose a model that can increase the normal temperature to that required for propagation.
▪ An air conditioner to maintain normal room temperature is advisable.
▪ Carbon monoxide and oxygen are both gases at normal Mars-surface temperatures and pressures.
▪ In fact, from its formula one would expect it to be a gas at normal temperatures but it is a liquid.
▪ The alloy of which they were made age-hardened quickly at normal temperatures, and all rivets had to be chilled before use.
▪ Leave the refrigerator at the normal temperature setting.
■ NOUN
air
▪ The snow may crust at night, due to outward radiation, even thought the air temperature remains well above freezing point.
▪ It is calculated using rainfall averages and monthly mean surface and air temperatures.
▪ June Brilliant sun, warm seas, pleasant air temperatures, warm nights.
▪ The outside air temperature was above minimum, but I switched on the engine anti-ice anyway, just to be sure.
▪ Similar air temperatures are observed today in geographically equivalent temperate high latitudes.
▪ The water in the aquarium will quickly equal the ambient air temperature.
▪ Once air temperatures have fallen well below freezing point, frozen spray accumulates along the shore.
▪ The outside air temperature gauge proved very accurate - immediately we entered the red we started to collect ice.
body
▪ They pick up the infant's heartbeat, respiration rate, body temperature, and so on.
▪ Exercise will raise your body temperature, allowing you to adjust to your new circadian rhythm.
▪ Extrapolating this knowledge to a 10-ton dinosaur, they calculated that a one-degree rise in body temperature would take some 86 hours.
▪ In addition, body temperature begins to drop and muscles begin to relax.
▪ In this way body temperature was kept constant and the evaporation of water from abdominal tissues was minimised.
▪ By this time Snyder was lapsing in and out of consciousness and his body temperature was fluctuating wildly.
▪ The result is a dramatic increase in body temperature, until at 43 ° C death occurs.
▪ In the evening, body temperature begins to decrease in preparation for sleep.
change
▪ In Example 12 the temperature change over a time interval was to be worked out.
▪ The autonomic nervous system disperses and concentrates pigment throughout the body after external influences such as fear or temperature change.
▪ Ccontents is the specific heat capacity of the contents; and T is the temperature change of the contents.
▪ When the temperature changes, the timing period will vary by up to two minutes per degree approximately.
▪ Young babies, whose sensitivity to temperature change has not yet developed, are also particularly at risk.
▪ A giant cabinet sealed behind a double skin to protect it's exquisite exterior from dust and temperature change.
▪ Homeothermy or Homoiothermy Temperature regulation in tachymetabolic species in which core temperatures remain roughly steady despite ambient temperature changes.
▪ The stratigraphic record can at best link these two important phenomena - the emergence of species and the long-term atmospheric temperature changes.
control
▪ Recent success has seen a new temperature control product designed in conjunction with Marks &038; Spencer.
▪ For these folks, temperature control is a delicate balance.
▪ Humidity and temperature controls are turned up if any babies or children are brought in for operations.
▪ When the temperature control device is operating, Reclamation can have it both ways.
▪ It is vital for temperature control, for cleanliness, for waterproofing and for controlling the scent-signalling of the feline body.
▪ In all stores adequate ventilation should be provided as an aid to temperature control with mechanical air conditioning if needed.
▪ Room keys activate the temperature controls and turn on an entry light, so guests never enter a dark room.
difference
▪ Shaded areas indicate negative temperature difference.
▪ Consequently, the temperature contrast between them at any level is smaller than the temperature difference between top and bottom.
▪ It's very accurate, reacting to temperature differences of as little as 0.5°C.
▪ This heating is imposed before the vertical temperature difference and, of course, produces weak convection.
▪ If this were the end of the story then there would be large equator to pole temperature differences in the observed troposphere.
▪ The orientation of the rolls will depend on whatever small perturbations happen to be present as the temperature difference is raised.
▪ It took a billion measurements of the sky with an instrument that could detect temperature differences of one part in 100,000.
range
▪ Many reptiles have a preferred temperature range within internally regulated diurnal rhythms.
▪ Desert areas on Earth often have wide diurnal temperature ranges due to nighttime radiative cooling through very clear skies.
▪ A series of simple push-buttons on the solid state device enables the required temperature range to be set precisely.
▪ The temperature range can be between 68°F to 75°F - try not to exceed the maximum.
▪ The patient's normal temperature range is established following admission and checked regularly in the early post-operative period.
▪ The temperature range of the fish to be kept was from 70°s.
▪ And it grows best within a very precise temperature range of 30-31°C.
▪ And Sadia has also introduced a small controller, allowing the user to accurately set the required temperature range.
rise
▪ Since the temperature rise is usually small the temperature must be measured accurately.
▪ The enzyme is active between 130-F and 160-F and is inactivated as temperature rises during cooking.
▪ Some of this increase can be attributed to the evaporation of remaining nitric acid from the condensed phase as temperatures rise.
▪ The liquid is burnt in a plentiful supply of air and the temperature rise in the surrounding water bath is measured.
▪ Eventually the internal pressure and temperature rise sufficiently for thermonuclear fusion to begin.
▪ The average temperature rise over all areas was 0.59 degrees.
▪ As this temperature rise occurs after ovulation has already taken place, it can not predict ovulation in advance.
room
▪ Because of the low activation energies, such reactions are often readily reversible at room temperature.
▪ Glass that is near room temperature is a familiar brittle material, and modeling clay is obviously ductile.
▪ Choosing Choose fruit that's just softening; it will soon ripen at room temperature.
▪ To serve, cut into wedges and serve warm or at room temperature.
▪ The samples were incubated at 80°C for 3 min and at room temperature for 10 min.
▪ Defrost in the refrigerator, never at room temperature.
▪ Incubation was performed at room temperature for 30 minutes.
▪ Marinate for 2 to 3 hours at room temperature.
surface
▪ This means that its surface temperatures must be literally scorching, frequently reaching 700°C.
▪ Before very long on a planetary time scale the surface temperatures would reach Cytherean values.
▪ Patterns of air pressure, surface winds and sea surface temperatures are all interlinked.
▪ An initial surface temperature of 10° C has been assumed in all cases.
▪ It's sending back measurements of global sea surface temperatures, with very high accuracy.
▪ Mercurian surface temperatures have been determined from observations of thermal radiation from the planet's surface.
▪ The Cytherean atmosphere is far more massive than that of the Earth, and the surface temperatures are considerably higher.
▪ The temperature is about 700 K, about the same as the surface temperature everywhere on Venus.
water
▪ This senses the water temperature and sends a signal to the control box where it is processed in a microchip.
▪ A sudden change in water temperature can also be lethal.
▪ It may not be adjusted or working correctly or as it is operated by water temperature, it may be air locked.
▪ The water temperature should be at least 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
▪ A safety thermostat controls the water temperature, so ensuring constant pressure to give a consistent jet of cleansing steam.
▪ The water temperature had risen slightly, and for a few days we even saw an occasional flying fish.
▪ It is just more and more complex and difficult to achieve the right water temperature.
▪ The water temperature in 1996 was a quarter of a degree higher than the 50-year average.
■ VERB
drop
▪ A gas dropping in pressure also drops in temperature - the principle behind the household refrigerator.
▪ As you continued to measure temperatures, the temperature in the ceramic cup dropped faster than the temperature in the foam cup.
▪ Then they reduced humidity levels, cut back on lighting and dropped the temperatures from 75 degrees to about 70.
increase
▪ Make sure you choose a model that can increase the normal temperature to that required for propagation.
▪ The increasing temperature, the thinning ozone-these are signals about the correct size of our society.
▪ There is also a remarkable constancy of lamellar thickness, but this increases as the temperature increases.
▪ Vigorous exercise increases the core body temperature by about two degrees Fahrenheit.
▪ I think it will be the hay that increases the temperature.
▪ Some computer models suggest greenhouse gases may increase world temperatures from two to seven degrees Fahrenheit over the next fifty years.
▪ Readings were only normal when I was walking, perhaps because of the tendency of exertion to increase body temperature.
▪ This enhancement of the greenhouse effect leads to increasing Earth-surface temperatures and global climate change.
keep
▪ The heat from the mass of bodies packed within keeps the temperature around 100°F.
▪ Overcast skies forecast for today should serve to keep temperatures cool.
▪ Take paracetamol to keep your temperature down.
▪ Those who were kept at normal temperatures had notably fewer problems after surgery.
▪ You sweat to keep your body temperature down.
▪ It boasts an ideal cool climate for the grape, as bodies of water near the vineyards keep temperatures moderate.
▪ They keep the temperature so high you can't adjust when you come out, and everyone gets ill.
▪ C, as they seem more susceptible to the disease when kept at lower temperatures.
lower
▪ Keeping the heat inside Sitting in a draughty room will lower your body temperature and make you feel cold and uncomfortable.
▪ They then fan the water so that it evaporates and in doing so lowers the temperature.
▪ To cool, the motor forces air out of the box, so lowering the temperature.
▪ The heat evaporates the water and this also lowers the temperature.
▪ In Winter lower the temperature to around 66°F.
▪ Uplifted sediments would be brought from their depth-related temperature regime and subjected to lower temperatures at higher structural levels.
▪ A spray of fresh mineral water will lower your body's temperature instantly.
maintain
▪ An air conditioner to maintain normal room temperature is advisable.
▪ Change the water every 30 minutes to maintain the cold temperature.
▪ The bees also have other ways of maintaining an even temperature within the nest.
▪ Below the frost line, the ground maintains a more constant temperature of about 55 degrees year-round.
▪ However, once it is triggered the energy produced by the reaction itself will maintain the temperature until the reactants are exhausted.
▪ Such a piece of plutonium can maintain high temperatures without any external power supply, controls, or monitoring for many years.
▪ These rooms are maintained at a fixed temperature, with set lighting and ventilation regimes.
▪ For example, do households living in well-insulated accommodation balance out potential savings by maintaining higher temperatures?
measure
▪ ERS-1 will also measure sea temperature, contributing to studies into the role that the oceans play in determining global climate.
▪ As you continued to measure temperatures, the temperature in the ceramic cup dropped faster than the temperature in the foam cup.
▪ Tony measures the temperature and tells me it is warming up.
▪ The pilot measures temperatures and samples water and rock and an orange microbial fluff.
▪ Make with the sketch maps of the area. Measure the ambient temperature.
▪ What geophysicists have been lacking is a way to measure the temperature deep down, where radioactive heating plays a lesser role.
▪ If you have a thermometer, measure the temperature of the soil after about 2 hours.
▪ The experiment to measure core temperature, though, had to wait nearly thirty years.
raise
▪ It is held in a double-skinned tank which is filled with hot water to raise the temperature of the milk.
▪ Exercise will raise your body temperature, allowing you to adjust to your new circadian rhythm.
▪ A collision would vaporize the oceans and raise atmospheric temperatures to 3000°F.
▪ This again raises the temperature and pressure, until the thermonuclear burning of helium to carbon is ignited.
▪ These would have been used to raise the working temperatures to above 1000 0C in the furnaces when needed.
▪ Don't put hot food straight into the fridge - it raises the temperature and encourages mould to grow.
▪ In future machines the aim will be to raise the temperature without need for so much extra heating.
▪ In copper-oxide superconducting materials, this suggest that to raise the critical temperature you want to make the lattice smaller.
reach
▪ Earlier workers failed; one reason was that they did not have the technology to reach the necessary high temperatures and pressures.
▪ Pressure keeps the hot water from steaming or boiling; it becomes superheated, reaching temperatures of 350oC and more.
▪ I didn't reach temperature last time.
▪ He bought us cold glasses of other wines until ours reached proper temperature.
▪ Glass oven and grill doors, a popular feature on modern cookers, can reach external temperatures of 95°C when in use.
▪ The majority of the incinerators are incapable of reaching sufficiently high temperatures.
▪ The leisurely bath has reached just the right temperature and the birthday bath salts are bubbling away beautifully.
▪ As soon as the milk reaches the correct temperature, give it to your baby.
reduce
▪ When a cool liquid passes over a hot body it will conduct energy away, reducing the temperature of the body.
▪ Cool. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees.
▪ Then reduce the oven temperature to 190°C, 375°F, Gas 5 and cook for a further 20 to 15 min.
▪ Bake pie 20 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees and bake 10 minutes more or until crust is golden brown.
▪ Paracetamol can help reduce the temperature along with fan therapy and tepid sponging.
▪ The latter two points help to minimise disturbance of the interior air and thus reduce the possibility of temperature fluctuations.
▪ The effect of branching is to decrease the percentage crystallinity, broaden the melting range, and reduce the average melting temperature.
require
▪ The recycling of polystyrene, for instance, requires temperatures above 200C and the materials are extensively filtered during the procedure.
▪ This requires reactor temperatures of about 100 million degrees.
▪ Some species require a special temperature, which again means a controller is effective.
▪ But this requires such high temperatures that the hydrogen gas can partially react with the ilmenite.
▪ The extra-oral treatment requires processing at temperatures closer to the glass transition temperature where segmental mobility allows additional polymerisation.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
ambient temperature/light etc
▪ Homeothermy or Homoiothermy Temperature regulation in tachymetabolic species in which core temperatures remain roughly steady despite ambient temperature changes.
▪ If you space heat then you will have an ambient temperature of 75-80°F and even higher humidity.
▪ It really comes into its own with flash as the metering balances the flash against the ambient lighting conditions with great results.
▪ Odour emissions are affected by wind direction, temperature inversion, ambient temperatures and humidity.
▪ The ambient temperature for each day of the study was determined from local weekly weather statistics.
▪ The ambient temperature in Celsius is roughly equal to the number of cricket chirps in 8 seconds plus 5.
run a temperature/fever
▪ The baby was fussing and running a fever, so I called the doctor.
▪ By Sunday morning she was running a temperature.
▪ I think he's running a temperature, and he's off his food.
▪ Lice are very temperature-sensitive and will leave a body which is running a fever.
▪ Lips all cracked, glassy eyes, running a temperature.
▪ Next morning he ran a temperature but insisted on getting up.
▪ No wonder she was running a temperature!
▪ Not running a temperature, are you?
▪ She wasn't tipsy, just a little high, probably running a fever.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Temperatures in the south of the country reached 30 degrees centigrade.
▪ It was sunny, but the temperature was well below zero.
▪ Professional film is stored at a low temperature to prevent it from deteriorating.
▪ Steel is produced at very high temperatures.
▪ The temperature is expected to go down below freezing during the night.
▪ The temperature of the water was just right for swimming.
▪ The temperature of the world's oceans has risen by more than 2 degrees in the past hundred years.
▪ The gas freezes at a temperature of 180C.
▪ The greenhouse is kept at a constant temperature of 40C.
▪ The wine can be served at room temperature.
▪ You feel very hot - let me take your temperature.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All osmotic pressure measurements are extremely sensitive to temperature and must be carried out under rigorously controlled temperature conditions.
▪ In the eastern Pyrenees the high summer temperature can be oppressive.
▪ Season buffalo steaks with salt and pepper to taste and let them rest for 1 hour at room temperature.
▪ The temperature sunk near zero and stayed that way for weeks.
▪ The change in water temperatures that drives the weather can be as little as one or two degrees, Ellis said.
▪ The law only holds under certain conditions: The temperature must be constant.
▪ This was done by reacting the silver in the alloy with salt at high temperatures, leaving the gold unaffected.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Temperature

Temperature \Tem"per*a*ture\, n. [F. temp['e]rature, L. temperatura due measure, proportion, temper, temperament.]

  1. Constitution; state; degree of any quality.

    The best composition and temperature is, to have openness in fame and opinion, secrecy in habit, dissimulation in seasonable use, and a power to feign, if there be no remedy.
    --Bacon.

    Memory depends upon the consistence and the temperature of the brain.
    --I. Watts.

  2. Freedom from passion; moderation. [Obs.]

    In that proud port, which her so goodly graceth, Most goodly temperature you may descry.
    --Spenser.

  3. (Physics) Condition with respect to heat or cold, especially as indicated by the sensation produced, or by the thermometer or pyrometer; degree of heat or cold; as, the temperature of the air; high temperature; low temperature; temperature of freezing or of boiling.

    Note: The temperature of a liquid or a solid body as measured by a thermometer is a measure of the average kinetic energy of the consituent atoms or molecules of the body. For other states of matter such as plasma, electromagnetic radiation, or subatomic particles, an analogous measure of the average kinetic energy may be expressed as a temperature, although it could never be measured by a traditional thermometer, let alone by sensing with the skin.

  4. Mixture; compound. [Obs.]

    Made a temperature of brass and iron together.
    --Holland.

  5. (Physiol. & Med.) The degree of heat of the body of a living being, esp. of the human body; also (Colloq.), loosely, the excess of this over the normal (of the human body 98[deg]-99.5[deg] F., in the mouth of an adult about 98.4[deg]).

    Absolute temperature. (Physics) See under Absolute.

    Animal temperature (Physiol.), the nearly constant temperature maintained in the bodies of warm-blooded (homoiothermal) animals during life. The ultimate source of the heat is to be found in the potential energy of the food and the oxygen which is absorbed from the air during respiration. See Homoiothermal.

    Temperature sense (Physiol.), the faculty of perceiving cold and warmth, and so of perceiving differences of temperature in external objects.
    --H. N. Martin.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
temperature

mid-15c., "fact of being tempered, proper proportion;" 1530s, "character or nature of a substance," from Latin temperatura "a tempering, moderation," from temperatus, past participle of temperare "to be moderate; to mingle in due proportion" (see temper (v.)). Sense of "degree of heat or cold" first recorded 1670 (Boyle), from Latin temperatura, used in this sense by Galileo. Meaning "fever, high temperature" is attested from 1898.

Wiktionary
temperature

n. 1 (context obsolete English) The state or condition of being tempered or moderated. 2 (context now rare archaic English) The balance of humours in the body, or one's character or outlook as considered determined from this; temperament. 3 A measure of cold or heat, often measurable with a thermometer.

WordNet
temperature
  1. n. the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)

  2. the somatic sensation of cold or heat

Wikipedia
Temperature (song)

"Temperature" is the third worldwide and the second American single from Jamaican DJ Sean Paul's album The Trinity (2005). The song was produced by Rohan "Snowcone" Fuller and received a positive reception from music critics. The song was released as the second U.S. single in the first quarter of 2006 and reached number one in the United States on the Billboard Hot 100 and became Paul's third number one hit single. It reached the top ten in Canada and France and the top twenty in the United Kingdom, peaking at #11 there. In Australia, "Temperature" debuted at number nineteen but quickly found its way to number five the following weeks. " Temperature " won Dance Song Of The Year at the 49th Annual Grammy Awards in 2007.

"Temperature" became Sean Paul's biggest hit single in the US. In Australia it became a hit, with Sean Paul making interview appearances on the Paul Celoni Radio Show, and shows alike. Even though it only spent one week at #1, as opposed to "Get Busy" and its three weeks on top, "Temperature" showed extreme longevity on The Billboard Hot 100 spending 17 weeks in the top 10. Until Nelly Furtado and Timbaland's " Promiscuous, this was the longest run in the top ten for a single in 2006. On top of that it became Sean Paul's first single to sell an excess of one million digital downloads, earning platinum certification.

The song uses the dancehall riddim "Applause". It was also used in the game Dance Dance Revolution SuperNOVA 2. It can be heard in the 2007 film, Norbit. This song was also used in the game Dance Central as DLC.

Officially, there are two versions of the song. Only the use of the rhythm makes both versions different.

In 2008, the media reported a story regarding Stacey Gayle of New York City who experienced seizures as a result of hearing the song.

Temperature (disambiguation)

Temperature is a physical property of a system that underlies the common notions of hot and cold.

Closely related are:

  • Thermodynamic temperature
  • Color temperature
  • Effective temperature
  • Normal human body temperature

The term may also refer to:

  • Noise temperature, a measure of the noise of an electronic component.
  • Temperature (game theory), a measure of the value of a game to its players.
  • Temperature (meat), or doneness, a description of how thoroughly cooked a cut of meat is
  • Fever, pyrexia, or having a temperature, the elevation of the body temperature.
Temperature

A temperature is an objective comparative measure of hot or cold. It is measured by a thermometer, which may work through the bulk behavior of a thermometric material, detection of thermal radiation, or particle kinetic energy. Several scales and units exist for measuring temperature, the most common being Celsius (denoted °C; formerly called centigrade), Fahrenheit (denoted °F), and, especially in science, Kelvin (denoted K).

The coldest theoretical temperature is absolute zero, at which the thermal motion of atoms and molecules reaches its minimum – classically, this would be a state of motionlessness, but quantum uncertainty dictates that the particles still possess a finite zero-point energy. In addition to this, a real system or object can never be brought to a temperature of absolute zero by thermodynamic means. Absolute zero is denoted as 0 K on the Kelvin scale, −273.15 °C on the Celsius scale, and −459.67 °F on the Fahrenheit scale.

The kinetic theory offers a valuable but limited account of the behavior of the materials of macroscopic bodies, especially of fluids. It indicates the absolute temperature as proportional to the average kinetic energy of the random microscopic motions of those of their constituent microscopic particles, such as electrons, atoms, and molecules, that move freely within the material.

Temperature is important in all fields of natural science, including physics, geology, chemistry, atmospheric sciences, medicine, and biology, as well as most aspects of daily life.

Usage examples of "temperature".

I zoomed up to Safeway and got some Acetaminophen suppositories, to lower the temperature.

We kept up with the morphine, and I gave her a little Acetaminophen to ease her temperature.

This important plant holds the soils of riparian habitats and also creates fertile micro-climates, adapting its shape and behavior to the amount of moisture it can get and to the elevation in which it grows, which relates then to the temperature that it must endure.

This material was another strictly non-Mesklinite product, a piece of molecular architecture vaguely analogous to zeolite in structure, which adsorbed hydrogen on the inner walls of its structural channels and, within a wide temperature range, maintained an equilibrium partial pressure with the gas which was compatible with Mesklinite metabolic needs.

I replaced them with outdoor lamps, some of the vari-temp, night-into-day lights for hydro- and aeroponics, the millipedes curled up as if to shield themselves, regardless of the temperature.

Plague can be grown easily in a wide range of temperatures and media, and we eventually developed a plague weapon capable of surviving in an aerosol while maintaining its killing capacity.

The only way to water the crops was to somehow extract enough moisture from the airsome was available, but difficult to isolate, especially with very small natural temperature changes in the Maracandan atmosphere.

Nature of the experiments--Effects of boiling water--Warm water causes rapid inflection--Water at a higher temperature does not cause immediate inflection, but does not kill the leaves, as shown by their subsequent reexpansion and by the aggregation of the protoplasm--A still higher temperature kills the leaves and coagulates the albuminous contents of the glands.

The aldehydes and ketones in the beer quickly dispelled any concern about the temperature of the brew.

When the science of medicine reaches perfection, treatment will be given by foods, aliments, fragrant fruits, and vegetables, and by various waters, hot and cold in temperature.

Some kind of dire temperature inversion had clamped itself down over the city like a bell jar, trapping and concentrating the cocktail of dust, automobile exhaust, coal smoke, woodsmoke, manure smoke, and the ammoniated gasses that rose up from the stewn excreta of millions of people and animals.

It is not uncommon for the Cajuns to smoke Andouille for 7 - 8 hours at temperatures no higher than 175 degrees.

In applying this reasoning to the earth, we perceive that a certain influence is due to the difference of temperature of the ethereal medium surrounding the earth, at perihelion and aphelion, being least at the former, and greatest at the latter.

For unless they are equipped with special cooling devices even the armoured cars cannot be used in practice at such temperatures.

The assayer, as a rule, can select his own standard temperature, and may choose one which will always necessitate warming.