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Crossword clues for home

home
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
home
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a home birth (=when a woman gives birth at home, not in a hospital)
▪ I decided I wanted a home birth for my second child.
a home game (=played at a team's own sports field)
▪ Next Saturday Liverpool have a home game against Manchester United.
a home match (=played at the place where a team usually practises)
▪ They have won their last five home matches.
a home remedy (=one that you make at home)
▪ Home remedies for colds include honey and lemon.
a home/car loan (=a loan to buy a home or a car)
▪ They took out a thirty-year home loan.
a luxury hotel/home/apartment
▪ They stayed at luxury hotels during their trip.
arrive home
▪ Jo should arrive home any minute now.
at home and abroad
▪ The books about Harry Potter have been very popular, both at home and abroad.
back home
▪ He was back home by half past eleven.
back home (=in the place that you come from and think of as your home)
▪ It reminded me of evenings back home.
be/get/come home early
▪ Your father said he’d be home early.
care home
children's home
coming home
▪ What time will you be coming home?
convalescent home
enter the home stretch
▪ As they enter the home stretch of the campaign, the president’s lead has grown.
executive cars/homes etc
familiar/home ground (=a subject etc that you know something about)
▪ In his latest book, McManus returns to more familiar ground.
funeral home
go home
▪ There’s nothing more we can do here. Let’s go home.
heading home
▪ It’s about time we were heading home.
hit...home run
▪ I didn’t think I could hit a home run.
holiday home
home base
▪ The band’s home base is Seattle.
home brew
home care (=in people’s own homes)
▪ You can find home care through family service agencies.
home cooking (=food cooked at home, not in a restaurant)
▪ Home cooking always tastes best to me.
home economics
home fans (=fans at their own team’s sports field)
▪ The home fans cheered the team onto the pitch.
home front
▪ The film is set on the home front in 1943.
home ground (=the ground that belongs to a particular team)
▪ It’s their first defeat at their home ground all season.
home help
Home Information Pack
home leave (=time that you are allowed to spend at home from a job that is far away, for example in the army, or from prison)
▪ Roberts had failed to return from home leave, and there was a warrant out for his arrest.
home loan
home movie
Home Office, the
home office
home ownership
▪ The price of home ownership is increasing.
home plate
home room
home rule
home run
▪ I didn’t think I could hit a home run.
Home Secretary
home shopping (=buying things at home, for example from a catalogue)
home stretch
▪ as the election campaign headed into the home stretch
home town
▪ He hired a car and drove up to his home town.
home truth
▪ It’s time someone told him a few home truths.
home video
home/hotel/apartment etc
▪ This is a friendly and comfortable hotel.
homing device
homing pigeon
house/home insurance
▪ The damage may be covered by your house insurance.
international/home/UK etc market
▪ The domestic market makes up about 75% of their sales.
leave home/school/college etc
▪ How old were you when you left home your parents’ home?
▪ My daughter got a job after she left school.
▪ The lawsuit will be postponed until the president leaves office.
live at home (=live with their parents)
▪ Most seventeen-year-olds still live at home.
lost...homes
▪ Hundreds of people lost their homes in the floods.
mobile home
motor home
move house/homeBritish English (= go to live in a different house)
▪ My parents kept moving house because of my dad’s job.
nursing home
old folks' home
old people's home
remand home
residential home
rest home
retirement home
romp homeBritish English
▪ The favourite, Badawi, romped home in the first race.
sb's childhood home
▪ Her childhood home was in North Dakota.
sb's family home (=where someone's family live and where they lived as a child)
▪ Her family home is in a village outside Derry.
sb's home/native city (=where they were born or grew up)
▪ He said that he never wanted to leave his home city.
sb’s home town (=the town where someone was born)
▪ He was buried in his home town of Leeds.
sb’s home/private address
▪ What’s your home address?
sb’s island home
▪ He had invited her back to his island home on Grand Cayman.
sb’s own/home turf (=the place that someone comes from or lives in)
▪ We beat Canada on their home turf.
second home
▪ town-dwellers who buy second homes in the countryside
see...home
▪ I’ll get Nick to see you home.
small office/home office
starter home
stately home
stay (at) home
▪ I decided to stay home.
straight home
▪ Go straight home and tell your mother.
struck home (=hit exactly where it should)
▪ The assassin’s bullet struck home.
taking...home
▪ Would you mind taking Susie home?
the home team (=the team whose sports field a game is being played on)
▪ Hayward then increased the home team’s lead.
the home/domestic/family environment
▪ A lot of children suffer because of problems in their home environment.
told...a few home truths
▪ It’s time someone told him a few home truths.
trail in/home (=finish in a bad position)
▪ He trailed in last after a disastrous race.
walk...home
▪ It’s late – I’ll walk you home.
welcome home
▪ Hello, welcome home.
work from home
▪ Nowadays, many people are able to work from home.
your home/native country (=where you were born or live permanently)
▪ After five years in America, she returned to her home country, Japan.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
foster
▪ After spending a night in a foster home, both girls went to spend Christmas with their grandparents.
▪ It relies on foster homes to provide rescued pets a supportive place to recover until good owners can be found.
▪ All the parents were told that their children were in very nice foster homes, with very nice families.
▪ Four are living together in one foster home and are expected to be adopted by that family.
▪ Only about fifty children actually had to be removed from their foster homes.
▪ Meanwhile, it apparently was consistent with their policy for the girls to languish in a foster home.
▪ The next day they came back and removed him to a temporary foster home.
▪ Another boy is in a regular private foster home.
mobile
▪ A 36-year-old woman died when a tornado swept through her mobile home.
▪ My dad was a minister, and we traveled a lot on weekends in a mobile home.
▪ Videos worth around forty thousand pounds were seized from a mobile home rental business and a number of vehicles.
▪ Some 70 mobile homes were flooded.
▪ Our mobile home was well equipped with two bedrooms, bathroom and kitchen.
▪ Hubert Hagen and Bill Dickson each own mobile homes south of the McNemars.
▪ A couple hiding in a wardrobe escaped unhurt after their mobile home flew 20 yards into a neighbour's house.
▪ The retired Internal Revenue Service employee paid $ 15, 500 for the two-bedroom mobile home on space 72.
new
▪ However, if you find you do start to lose fish mysteriously, then find a new home for the Pictus.
▪ A new rail line to the South Shore is opening the area to business and a flurry of new homes.
▪ However, a new home was now the big one.
▪ Or they moved to escape memories, to search for new lives and new homes.
▪ Problems with their original pitch mean they need a new home venue and are always looking for new members, including men.
▪ At their new home, across town, a residential place for the elderly, Jerome fit right in.
▪ The regional plan for the South-east proposes that some 57,000 new homes should be provided each year.
▪ But lower-priced new homes in entry-level Maryland bedroom communities like Bowie and Arnold are moving.
residential
▪ So the only thing there was, was to be in this hospital, or to go to a residential home.
▪ Being 18, I was too old for many children's homes and too young for adult residential homes.
▪ Finding your feet Many residential homes are almost like large families.
▪ The first few days in a residential home can be very frightening for many elderly people.
▪ There may also be problems for homosexuals in a residential home.
▪ That's where the growth is taking place in the residential homes.
▪ A person admitted to a residential home is joining a different social system, away from the family.
stately
▪ Not a single house in town could match the numerous stately homes in nearby Farmington or Simsbury.
▪ Compton House, another stately home, houses a fine collection of butterflies from all over the world.
▪ A visit to a stately home and certainly a game of Monopoly could not be pure fun, divorced from politics.
Stately homes Much of the generality of what has been said about important religious buildings and castles is true about stately homes.
▪ I remember a stately home which proudly displayed a Nelson letter the original of which was in the National Maritime Museum.
▪ Twelve miles away at Goodwood, you can visit the racecourse, stately home, and country park.
▪ It was, of course, the perfect training for a housewife, even if the house in question were a stately home.
■ NOUN
care
▪ A home care assistant visits daily.
▪ In the last six months of 1994 we had 65 people on home care.
▪ In-service training, weekly group meetings and monthly supervision sessions were all provided for the home care aides.
▪ Spending most of each day in out-of-home care is a real risk factor for a baby.
▪ The night sitter left at 7 a.m. and the home care aide was due to come at 8 a.m.
▪ Long-term nursing home care insurance is prohibitively expensive.
▪ There are also plans to set up a Lothian-wide Information Service for people thinking about residential or nursing home care.
▪ The numbers of men, women and children covered by home care with 24 hour on call has doubled in a year.
game
▪ I think we only lost about 4 home games.
▪ That meant he and Joanne came to most every home game.
▪ Maybe I can make it to my first home game in 15 years!
▪ Thursday night is really, really the first home game for the Oakland Raiders.
▪ The bear used to go hunting, and bring home game for both of them.
▪ And with 20 of the team's 28 scheduled home games canceled, season-ticket holders are out about $ 464,000.
▪ Boro are likely to ask the Football League to postpone next Tuesday's rearranged home game against Barnsley.
▪ It is attached to the hotel where the Packers stay the night before their home games.
holiday
▪ He had his luxury mock-Tudor mansion in Purley, his holiday home in Tenerife.
▪ Cuendet, a company offering holiday homes in everything from converted castles to farmhouses, was the best bet.
▪ He would come back and find the heavy mob were selling Tombstone as holiday homes.
▪ The mill and workshops now form a large dwelling as well as holiday homes.
▪ Nestling in the hillside in the grounds of the Estate are some of the most exclusive holiday homes in the world.
▪ The brochures offer holiday homes costing from £55 a week and touring and camping facilities from as little as £3.60 a night.
▪ All Key classified holiday homes will provide at least some of the facilities found in those of a higher classification.
▪ For these are no ordinary holiday homes.
life
▪ Her honour is tarnished, her home life shattered, her future uncertain.
▪ She has a good day and a good home life where we value and support and teach her.
▪ But I've benefited enormously from having a stable, normal home life.
▪ As long as you set the proper goal: not integration with your home life, but separation from it.
▪ The reality is that a child is a time-consuming, all-engulfing creature who disrupts any semblance of pleasurable home life.
▪ One afternoon that summer, over lunch in the park, Anna talked about her home life.
▪ Is drinking making your home life unhappy? 2.
▪ Chess is not only a part of home life.
market
▪ In the home market, it led the field by a long way, with 4,337,487 units sold.
▪ The home market might be worried about it, and some more people are looking toward clones than Apple product.
▪ The company believes even the home market has been boosted by the housing recession, with people preferring to redecorate rather than move.
▪ The company also will demonstrate a new keyboard aimed at the home market that incorporates a built-in paper scanner.
▪ Credit card donations: Back on the ladder Stella Bingham First-timers spot bargains as home market moves at last.
▪ Acer is one of the few companies shipping a monitor of this size aimed at the home market.
▪ As well as increasing export earnings they also add to the pipeline network supplying the home market.
▪ Wooden hoops used on casks for the home market were usually of hazel and were produced by local firms from local timber.
nursing
▪ Owner Fred Davies is challenging the council after being refused permission to convert the ailing hotel into a nursing home.
▪ She was a patient at the Ashbury Lodge nursing home in Swindon in February.
▪ In its present form it is substantially an early eighteenth-century building, and now serves as a local nursing home.
▪ In the last decade the private sector has started to develop the amount of residential and nursing home care it provided.
▪ Meg thought of Eva Kovacks in the nursing home in Essex and knew who had the best life.
▪ After a lengthy period of care at home, she was first admitted to hospital, then to a nursing home.
▪ Trading places: Staff and residents at a nursing home near Middleton St George have raised more than £120 by trading places.
owner
▪ Three out of four home owners expressed concern about the greenhouse effect.
▪ Were they ministers, the funeral home owner, the largest landowner?
▪ The Royal Commission wants more grants for home owners to remove lead pipes.
▪ Inviting other home owners and managers to each home in turn indicates the extent to which this openness has developed.
▪ He also wanted to scrap the council tax discount offered to second-home owners.
▪ The next few days could decide the fate of thousands of hard-pressed workers, home owners and firms.
▪ For instance, home owners are challenging local authorities' proposed new contracts on the grounds that their terms are unfair.
▪ In some areas, both the client and social services will pay the home owner.
ownership
▪ At the same time home ownership became easier and the norm.
▪ The mortgage interest deduction promotes home ownership.
▪ More significant predictors, especially in recent elections, have been location and home ownership.
▪ Forbes would eliminate all loopholes, including the popular mortgage interest deduction aimed at encouraging home ownership.
▪ The home ownership rate among women continues to lag, Cisneros said at a news conference.
▪ Far from bringing an end to worry, home ownership became a struggle to stay in the place called home.
▪ Because the tax break for mortgage interest would disappear, the finances of home ownership would change.
run
▪ Even a Riddick Bowe victory over Holyfield next week is unlikely to make it any easier to give Lewis a home run.
▪ Obtained in an offseason trade with Atlanta, he had struggled most of the season offensively and only hit 12 home runs.
▪ The stalemate enabled the fallen champions to end a nine-match run of away defeats and extended Arsenal's poor home run.
▪ His home run was off lefty Yorkis Perez.
▪ Then Hank Aaron hit his first home run in an All-Star Game.
▪ Voila, Williamson set a home run record that lasted 35 years.
▪ The home run was his fourth of the spring.
side
▪ Tim Curtis top-scored for the home side with forty-five.
▪ But when Mike Mannion cut loose the home side collapsed to 127 all out.
▪ Having dominated the opening 10 minutes, the home side gave up.
▪ Alderley Edge side Icicals scored 186-6 when they visited Burnage, the home side managed 163-9 in reply.
▪ The home side went ahead through Thierry Henry in the first half and Nwankwo Kanu in the second.
▪ Not until the final quarter did the home side recover their composure, by which time it was way too late.
▪ The Cheshire player took 5-32 as the home side struggled.
▪ But a fine 61 from Martin Jones steered the home side to a thrilling win.
team
▪ The crowd also grows louder as the home team takes the lead or is on a run, which is fun.
▪ You have some one else on your home team.
▪ The home team was being booed off the court.
▪ The home team has not beaten the Scarlets for some dozen matches and should still have their work cut out to win.
▪ The home team won 8-0 and hooked Lawson, whose allegiance has never wavered.
▪ The home team was not quite as productive.
town
▪ C., and Paris, to move to his home town of Perry, Ga., after getting married.
▪ The 18-year-old blue eyed beauty will represent her home town at the Miss Ireland competition in Dublin later this year.
▪ Washington the landmark is mostly white, affluent, politically connected and frightened by the violence of the home town.
▪ It is outwardly then a buoyant picture: a long-established family firm mindful of its responsibility to its home town.
▪ It's in his adopted home town that I first witness him.
▪ The outskirts of her home town excited her as a magical cavern will a child.
way
▪ If I lost her, we would never find our way home.
▪ The girl had insisted on driving her all the way home.
▪ Could something have happened to her on the way home last night?
▪ Young Dan Tennant, a farm labourer from Bakers Farm was on his way home for lunch.
▪ On her way home, she tossed her diaphragm in the first bin at Kennedy Airport.
▪ The next day he and another Bengali boy who lives near by chose another way home, hoping to escape the attackers.
■ VERB
build
▪ How, they will be able to build a home, community for themselves remains uncertain.
▪ Others purchase sites, and a few have even built small homes on foundations.
▪ But women you want to keep a hold of, to share and build a home with, these are not allowed.
▪ My parents had built a pleasant little home for $ 6, 000 in Grand Rapids, Michigan.
▪ I like building my nest at home.
▪ Farrakhan, upon his return, said he would accept the money to build homes, factories and schools.
▪ They alleged they were misled about the cost of building their own luxury homes.
▪ Neswood-Gishey and her husband are building a new home in a village about 50 miles away.
feel
▪ But it is here, at this Hillcrest hospital, where he feels at home.
▪ This immediate social environment is merely that in which he feels at home.
▪ Those elements are inherent in Hispanic culture, making people such as Thomas feel at home.
▪ It made him feel more at home.
▪ Though the rector had been here but once before, he felt instantly at home.
▪ I think it will make our international clientele feel at home.
▪ Amelia felt at home and fitted in.
leave
▪ What a strange feeling to be leaving Gateshead, my home for the whole of my childhood!
▪ One last word about emergency rooms. Leave jewelry at home and bring only enough money to pay the required fees.
▪ Who could ever have left a home where Christopher was growing up?
▪ They left their first temporary home last fall when the overcrowded camp ran out of fresh water and space.
▪ Meirion desperately needed more remunerative work and was on the point of leaving his home town.
▪ But sometimes he forgets and leaves them at home.
▪ He takes pride in clearing his desk at 5.30p.m. and leaving for home.
▪ Barry Bonds not withstanding, major-leaguers generally leave their parents at home.
move
▪ Rabbits are not territorial creatures to the extent of evicting other rabbits moving into their home ground from further afield.
▪ C., and Paris, to move to his home town of Perry, Ga., after getting married.
▪ As soon as it is sold the 58-year-old widow plans to move into the mobile home in nearby Laguna Beach.
▪ Would they move to his home, to servant quarters behind his house?
▪ As the deep black shadow in Glen Keltney closed over them, they moved slowly nearer home in a trance of fatigue.
▪ The couple returned to the United States and moved into a small home in Copperas Cove.
▪ He has one small child and wants to move to a bigger home in order to have some more.
▪ It will give victims of the temblor additional time to find new housing or move back into homes still under repair.
own
▪ Nearly Bthree-quarters of whites own their homes, compared with 45. 8 % of Bblacks and 43 % of Latinos.
▪ I own my own home. l own another home in Lake Tahoe. l have stocks.
▪ Except during tours, the privately owned homes are not open to the public.
▪ Midlanders value owning their own home more than Southerners, who think that freedom is important.
▪ Cisneros said psychological factors also prevent some women from owning homes.
work
▪ However, a large proportion of married women do work outside the home, particularly in part-time work.
▪ MacArthur says that the husband alone should work outside the home.
▪ She's still in business, but now she's a one woman band working at home from her garage.
▪ Local artisans, working close to home, often met the essential needs of the nearby population.
▪ But I could always work from home.
▪ Besides, the boss has either taken the day off or is working from home or at a satellite office.
▪ Every educator has a personal story to tell from working in our home care teams.
▪ The findings also suggest that recession and growing parental responsibility have resulted in fewer legalized women immigrants working outside the home.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an Englishman's home is his castle
bring home the bacon
▪ But, you know, we were the enemy, or something and he was out to bring home the bacon.
▪ Local boys Hong Kong made good their pledge to bring home the bacon for retiring coach Jim Rowark.
broken home
▪ He was the product of a broken home and therefore a single-parent child.
▪ Helen knew plenty about broken homes, because she came from one.
▪ J., the product of a broken home.
▪ Over 28 years I've had two broken marriages and broken homes, family and friends.
▪ The majority of offenders do not come from disturbed or broken homes, and many broken homes do not produce delinquents.
▪ They came from broken homes and were desperate to help struggling mums.
▪ Vitro knows all about being dirt poor in the rural South and growing up in a broken home.
charity begins at home
▪ After all, charity begins at home.
▪ Despite the profit-making prospects in this it has been treated with utter contempt on the grounds that charity begins at home.
close to home
▪ And interestingly, the pictures these two picked are close to home.
▪ Even closer to home is the enchanting beauty of the Craigendarroch Country Estate.
▪ For a third it might be a school close to home.
▪ It is important, however, to have a source of money close to home.
▪ Local artisans, working close to home, often met the essential needs of the nearby population.
▪ She says it was too close to home and it could easily have been them.
▪ Some commute long distances while others work close to home.
▪ Yet familiarity may be blinding us to equal intelligence expressed by animals far closer to home.
dream house/home/job etc
▪ A palace, Carolyn told herself, a dream house.
▪ But just a couple of days after they moved into their dream home in Quedgeley, it was stolen and torched.
▪ Cracking up ... the dream home that's become a couple's nightmare.
▪ Finally, my family had a dream home and I had my own room with a view of Mount Fuji.
▪ It was all preparation for her dream job: a foreign correspondent, roaming the world in a trench coat.
▪ John Combes and his wife lived out their lives in their dream house, and their children stayed here until the 1760s.
▪ Sadly, they were forced to rent their dream house to tenants for the $ 25 monthly mortgage.
drive sth home
drum sth home
eat sb out of house and home
▪ Our sixteen-year-old is eating us out of house and home.
foster home
▪ All the parents were told that their children were in very nice foster homes, with very nice families.
▪ Another boy is in a regular private foster home.
▪ For eight or nine months Mike was shunted from foster home to foster home.
▪ Meanwhile, it apparently was consistent with their policy for the girls to languish in a foster home.
▪ Only about fifty children actually had to be removed from their foster homes.
▪ She was told one of her daughters was receiving tuition in her foster home.
▪ This is, as already indicated, a foster home where practicable.
▪ When John left this last facility, Social Services offered to place him in a therapeutic foster home.
hammer sth home
hearth and home
▪ the joys of hearth and home
▪ Though there were undercurrents here, I was absorbed by the sense of family, the polished details of hearth and home.
hit home
▪ All of a sudden the hollowness of our triumph over nature hit home with striking effect.
▪ By the early 1970s, this realization had already hit home.
▪ His comment hit home for me, as both therapist and layperson.
▪ His foot hit home, sinking deep into the little man's belly.
▪ I hit home at a Liverpool city centre newsagent.
▪ It should hit home to people to take precautions.
▪ They spend much of the book showing how various companies have used them to hit home runs or strike out.
▪ Within hours, the reality of the situation had hit home.
nothing to write home about
▪ Jim and Marcia's new house is nothing to write home about.
▪ A few long-range efforts, but nothing to write home about.
▪ Three, it is nothing to write home about ... Home ... What's the first thing you remember?
peace-loving/fun-loving/home-loving etc
press home your advantage
▪ Will its foes use the occasion of Kabila s death to press home their advantage?
press sth home
ram sth home
sb's chickens come home to roost
▪ Their extravagant overspending has come home to roost.
▪ Eventually, of course, the chickens came home to roost.
sb's chickens have come home to roost
sb's spiritual home
scrape home
▪ The Green Party scraped home in the local elections.
▪ The referees decided that Foreman had just scraped home.
▪ A poll for the Peterborough Evening Telegraph suggests that the Tories will scrape home.
▪ Even so, two of them scraped home without reaching the quota.
▪ In 1964 the All Blacks defeated Leinster 11-5, they won 17-8 in 1972 and scraped home 8-3 in 1974.
▪ Then they are inside, waiting while he scrapes home the bolts.
▪ We scraped home by the skin of our teeth.
set up home/house
▪ All the costs of getting a mortgage, moving and setting up home can run into thousands.
▪ And he set up house for her in a bungalow further along the river, in a nice secluded part.
▪ Desmond Wilcox was a grown man when he chose to leave his wife and children and set up home with Esther.
▪ Nor do I think that it is disgraceful if two men of a loving disposition should set up home together.
▪ The two new Mr and Mrs Kim-Soons set up house next door.
▪ These nests will shortly be visited by the female in whose larger territory the various males have set up home.
▪ Thousands of them have set up home in the eaves of this house in Banbury.
▪ Why not just leave - set up home in a more tolerant spiritual pew?
strike home
▪ And then those two words struck home.
▪ It must have struck home in some way.
▪ Some of the things Edgar had said had struck home.
▪ That was a shot in the dark, but judging from the expression on his face it struck home.
▪ The flinty look in Pargeter's face told Dexter that Blanche had struck home in some way.
▪ The simple idea that resources ought to be concentrated in areas where unemployment is highest has struck home.
▪ Young soccer star Stephen Kilgour strikes home a penalty shot during the interval at Darlington's home match on Saturday.
the home/final stretch
▪ As the debate moves into the final stretch, Britain is not without its bargaining cards either.
▪ Clinton also had two personal strikes against him as he went into the home stretch toward the July Democratic convention.
▪ I was tired on the home stretch, but the crowd was wonderful.
▪ The debate is a milestone signalling the final stretch in the campaign leading to the caucuses.
▪ The van laboured its way up the final stretch of the brae, its engine protesting at the strain.
till the cows come home
▪ They stay up and play cards till the cows come home.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Between 1945 and 1970 the government built 110,000 new homes for low-paid workers.
▪ Buying your first home is a very important step.
▪ Her home, she said, was in Hong Kong, but she hadn't been there since she was a child.
▪ I've lived in Madrid for many years, and it feels like home to me now.
▪ I never wanted to put my mother in a home.
▪ It took us about ten years to think of Atlanta as home.
▪ People like to feel secure in their own homes.
▪ She was born in Italy, but she's made Charleston her home.
▪ The restaurant isn't far from our home, so it's convenient.
▪ The tax rate depends on when the home was purchased.
▪ They grew up in a children's home in Ohio.
▪ They want to build forty luxury homes on a disused railway site.
▪ To raise the extra money they had to sell the family home.
▪ You need to maintain a good balance between your home life and career.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And owners note a perceptible increase in door-hangers, fliers and other pleas from agents to put their homes up for sale.
▪ Any readers attempting to furnish a home should find ample material in the September issue.
▪ In fact, he finds that he is able to get a great deal of work done at home on these days.
▪ It is the home of that most Freudian of plants, the coco-de-mer.
▪ Their homes are mobile in name only.
▪ They were cared for by friends at their home in nearby Witney.
II.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
arrive
▪ When Alice arrived home, she counted what she had.
▪ When Jim arrived home from work, Della told Jim what she had done to buy his Christmas present.
▪ When she arrived home she had found Larry polishing his shoes at the table.
▪ You arrive home, unlock the door, and realize you are very hot and sweaty.
▪ When he arrived home a year later it was too late.
▪ My son arrived home from a summer of camp just a few weeks ago.
▪ Role play: Excuses Thinking Situation: A parent is very angry because their son or daughter has arrived home late.
▪ Judy Boone arrived home to find 28 dead sheep pressed against her fence.
bring
▪ Being for once in the mood to get things right, Phoebe had brought home from the library a book about dragonflies.
▪ Go on down there with the boys and bring home some supper.
▪ Life had become easier ... but this was only as she saw it, as Dorothy brought home to her.
▪ He brings home the books that have been given to him by his boss for preparation.
▪ Our room was an ark, and I had no wish for the dove to bring home a green leaf.
▪ She brought home a large jar of holy water from the cathedral.
come
▪ You come home in agony because, apparently, few people learn to do it well.
▪ When she comes home, I tell her.
▪ As the first curl of smoke rose into the air, the full enormity of what was happening came home to Sara.
▪ Perhaps I will come home for Easter.
▪ My father is lucky to be coming home alive and unharmed.
▪ Martin Bean did not come home.
drive
▪ I got into the van and drove home like a zombie.
▪ But then, as I drive home after a failed chase, I can enjoy the sight of the sunset.
▪ She drove home through further rain.
▪ He felt proud of himself as he drove home.
▪ Strange the tricks that life plays, I mused as I drove home, popping the tape of madrigals into the player.
▪ The Protestant yeomanry still rode around the countryside intent on driving home the lessons of 1798: Rebellion will be punished!
▪ Kate drove home in a stupor.
▪ The first couple of times I picked him up he hardly looked at me as we drove home.
fly
▪ On Monday she flew home to London, to her flat, her office, her own business, her friends.
▪ He got permission to fly home to Detroit for a look-see at his troubled right ankle.
▪ Carwyn was flying home, Ted was working on his self-esteem, Richie was nursing a broken nose.
▪ I remember in the early days flying home from one of my infrequent trips to the outside world.
▪ Mr Major has now flown home to deal with the economic crisis.
▪ While flying home I sat next to a senior executive with a large international organization.
▪ On the Sunday I flew home.
▪ Then he expects her to run when they fly home.
get
▪ It started when I got home from hospital after having my baby.
▪ I said I had to get home.
▪ I never eat anything when I get home.
▪ When you get home, start your homework right away.
▪ His mother was out again when he got home that afternoon.
▪ Because police had cordoned off Lake Drive, she was unable to get home to check on her ranch.
▪ I would get home at about 7.30 in the evening and I still had to do my homework.
▪ As soon as she gets home from work, she goes there and closes the door.
go
▪ It made him feel he was going home.
▪ Visitors to the camps went home with dismal stories to relate....
▪ You know, this has been a charming evening, but I must go home.
▪ Now that he wants to go home, the money stops coming.
▪ A few dozen herring here or there; nobody troubled: every child went home with a few dozen herring on a string.
▪ I want him to go home.
▪ Needless to say, I went home and apologised for being late.
▪ I want you to go home tonight and take a good look at yourself in the mirror, fully clothed.
hammer
▪ He was here to hammer home plans to spend more on education.
▪ If not, the Internal Revenue Service certainly hammered home the message.
▪ That lesson was hammered home by a 1995 Louis Harris and Associates poll commissioned by the Shriners.
▪ But the vice-president kept hammering home his belief that every vote cast in Florida should be counted before the presidency is awarded.
▪ This is hardly surprising, given the way governments the world over have for decades hammered home the dogma of prohibition.
▪ The real danger of these rigs was hammered home recently during a small Open match which saw me ducking for shelter.
▪ That is precisely the message that our consumer society implicitly hammers home.
head
▪ Wright conceded a corner after tipping over Johnson's header and Wark rose unmarked to head home the equaliser.
▪ Having done our bit to fend off a recession we head home, masters of our fates.
▪ After work, all the men went out together to drink before heading home.
▪ My parents locked up and headed home.
▪ Boyd's cross from the left was flicked in by Nicholas.Saints broke immediately and Redford soared to head home Maskrey's cross.
▪ His teammates were long gone, headed home to celebrate the biggest victory of their pro careers.
hit
▪ She could see that her remark had hit home.
▪ His comment hit home for me, as both therapist and layperson.
▪ Within hours, the reality of the situation had hit home.
▪ By the early 1970s, this realization had already hit home.
▪ His foot hit home, sinking deep into the little man's belly.
▪ All of a sudden the hollowness of our triumph over nature hit home with striking effect.
▪ And to go back to your start-up page hit Home.
▪ Then her words seemed to hit home.
press
▪ Will its foes use the occasion of Kabila s death to press home their advantage?
▪ For a complete forward search, press Home Home up arrow to reach the first page before pressing F2.
reach
▪ When they reached home, happy and a little tipsy, they drank cocoa in the kitchen, then went to separate rooms.
▪ When they reached home it was dusk, and the street looked shabbier than ever.
▪ Her backache got much worse, and when she reached home she was ready to collapse with pain and exhaustion.
▪ She found out what they must do next in order to reach home safely.
▪ By the time Mark reached home that evening, the pains in his head were excruciating.
▪ Although I felt like murdering her at the time I regretted having hit her long before I reached home.
▪ Yanto's mind was in a turmoil when he reached home that night.
▪ She cycled quickly along the lane out of the town, hoping to reach home before the storm burst.
return
▪ Fifthly, the disappointment at not returning home becomes another loss.
▪ Everywhere, refugees are beginning to return home.
▪ It is true that Jacob will emerge more than just unscathed from the danger that fills his mind as he returns home.
▪ In November of 1969 John Wade returned home with a great many decorations.
▪ The pensioner was later treated in hospital and was taken to a nursing home because she was too distressed to return home.
▪ He hoped to escape El Paso, do great things, and return home a hero.
▪ Mandru's agent had been outbid, however, and he'd been reluctant to return home empty-handed.
▪ Since the children know they need their parents desperately, they attempt to return home after being deserted.
run
▪ Oliver, who had a natural distaste for policemen, crossed the road and ran home, on the other side.
▪ But his eyes, dey get muy grande and he take to feet an try to run home.
▪ He ran home, blood trickling down his left cheek.
▪ Terror-stricken, I dropped my fragrant booty and ran home.
▪ Then I ran home as fast as I could.
▪ I run home, skipping and humming to myself.
▪ The appellant had used offensive language to a 12 year old girl who had run home and complained to her father.
▪ She ran home sobbing at lunch time.
send
▪ The first group was sent home in a widely criticised night operation two weeks ago.
▪ Everyone was sent home with the assignment to draft a proposed definition.
▪ When he refused he was sent home, with lavish presents, to complete his task.
▪ If Sean forgot the sheet or if it was not signed, he was sent home.
▪ At the same time he arranged for Burgess to be sent home to extricate Maclean before the net closed.
▪ Some 800, 000 federal workers were sent home for six days in November.
▪ The recently arrived cultural attache, Ian Sloane, was among the diplomats to be sent home.
▪ Finally, a substantial number of Volunteers were sent home for disciplinary reasons.
stay
▪ Best of all, Joe was sure of being able to stay home after his trip.
▪ Women could stay home and have kids.
▪ David had not gone to his office, had stayed home to help her.
▪ Whichever way we say this, any sensible person knows that the staying home is because of the rain.
▪ Many sympathisers stayed home at the last election, no longer fearing that Jose
▪ Maybe it was nothing more than the statistical impossibility of everyone staying home all of the time.
▪ And what about women who want to stay home with their children?
strike
▪ Some of the things Edgar had said had struck home.
▪ And then those two words struck home.
▪ That was a shot in the dark, but judging from the expression on his face it struck home.
▪ It must have struck home in some way.
▪ The flinty look in Pargeter's face told Dexter that Blanche had struck home in some way.
▪ The simple idea that resources ought to be concentrated in areas where unemployment is highest has struck home.
▪ Young soccer star Stephen Kilgour strikes home a penalty shot during the interval at Darlington's home match on Saturday.
walk
▪ I was walking home, a chore, accomplished, looking forward to nothing to do.
▪ He walked home, oddly troubled.
▪ She was walking home near Colbayns School when a man approached her and asked the time.
▪ Couples walked home from late dinners.
▪ A few people were about, returning from church or walking home with a newspaper or a neatly wrapped pastry.
▪ He walked home and told his mother his adventures.
▪ Encouraged by reflecting on these events, we walked home arm in arm.
write
▪ He often writes home about his window boxes.
▪ I was thrilled, and I promptly wrote home.
▪ In May the Girls would sit out on the steel fire escapes during shows and write home complaining about the unaccustomed heat.
▪ Stewart wrote home in late 1937.
▪ When she wrote home, as she now did regularly, she wrote believing herself to be very contented.
▪ I wrote home that this place made Tijuana look like Palm Springs.
▪ A few long-range efforts, but nothing to write home about.
▪ Letters are written home, and before the night seems settled, dawn is breaking and another day begins.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an Englishman's home is his castle
bring home the bacon
▪ But, you know, we were the enemy, or something and he was out to bring home the bacon.
▪ Local boys Hong Kong made good their pledge to bring home the bacon for retiring coach Jim Rowark.
bring home the bacon
▪ But, you know, we were the enemy, or something and he was out to bring home the bacon.
▪ Local boys Hong Kong made good their pledge to bring home the bacon for retiring coach Jim Rowark.
broken home
▪ He was the product of a broken home and therefore a single-parent child.
▪ Helen knew plenty about broken homes, because she came from one.
▪ J., the product of a broken home.
▪ Over 28 years I've had two broken marriages and broken homes, family and friends.
▪ The majority of offenders do not come from disturbed or broken homes, and many broken homes do not produce delinquents.
▪ They came from broken homes and were desperate to help struggling mums.
▪ Vitro knows all about being dirt poor in the rural South and growing up in a broken home.
charity begins at home
▪ After all, charity begins at home.
▪ Despite the profit-making prospects in this it has been treated with utter contempt on the grounds that charity begins at home.
close to home
▪ And interestingly, the pictures these two picked are close to home.
▪ Even closer to home is the enchanting beauty of the Craigendarroch Country Estate.
▪ For a third it might be a school close to home.
▪ It is important, however, to have a source of money close to home.
▪ Local artisans, working close to home, often met the essential needs of the nearby population.
▪ She says it was too close to home and it could easily have been them.
▪ Some commute long distances while others work close to home.
▪ Yet familiarity may be blinding us to equal intelligence expressed by animals far closer to home.
dream house/home/job etc
▪ A palace, Carolyn told herself, a dream house.
▪ But just a couple of days after they moved into their dream home in Quedgeley, it was stolen and torched.
▪ Cracking up ... the dream home that's become a couple's nightmare.
▪ Finally, my family had a dream home and I had my own room with a view of Mount Fuji.
▪ It was all preparation for her dream job: a foreign correspondent, roaming the world in a trench coat.
▪ John Combes and his wife lived out their lives in their dream house, and their children stayed here until the 1760s.
▪ Sadly, they were forced to rent their dream house to tenants for the $ 25 monthly mortgage.
drive sth home
drum sth home
eat sb out of house and home
▪ Our sixteen-year-old is eating us out of house and home.
foster home
▪ All the parents were told that their children were in very nice foster homes, with very nice families.
▪ Another boy is in a regular private foster home.
▪ For eight or nine months Mike was shunted from foster home to foster home.
▪ Meanwhile, it apparently was consistent with their policy for the girls to languish in a foster home.
▪ Only about fifty children actually had to be removed from their foster homes.
▪ She was told one of her daughters was receiving tuition in her foster home.
▪ This is, as already indicated, a foster home where practicable.
▪ When John left this last facility, Social Services offered to place him in a therapeutic foster home.
hammer sth home
hearth and home
▪ the joys of hearth and home
▪ Though there were undercurrents here, I was absorbed by the sense of family, the polished details of hearth and home.
hit home
▪ All of a sudden the hollowness of our triumph over nature hit home with striking effect.
▪ By the early 1970s, this realization had already hit home.
▪ His comment hit home for me, as both therapist and layperson.
▪ His foot hit home, sinking deep into the little man's belly.
▪ I hit home at a Liverpool city centre newsagent.
▪ It should hit home to people to take precautions.
▪ They spend much of the book showing how various companies have used them to hit home runs or strike out.
▪ Within hours, the reality of the situation had hit home.
nothing to write home about
▪ Jim and Marcia's new house is nothing to write home about.
▪ A few long-range efforts, but nothing to write home about.
▪ Three, it is nothing to write home about ... Home ... What's the first thing you remember?
peace-loving/fun-loving/home-loving etc
press home your advantage
▪ Will its foes use the occasion of Kabila s death to press home their advantage?
press sth home
ram sth home
sb's chickens come home to roost
▪ Their extravagant overspending has come home to roost.
▪ Eventually, of course, the chickens came home to roost.
sb's chickens have come home to roost
sb's spiritual home
scrape home
▪ The Green Party scraped home in the local elections.
▪ The referees decided that Foreman had just scraped home.
▪ A poll for the Peterborough Evening Telegraph suggests that the Tories will scrape home.
▪ Even so, two of them scraped home without reaching the quota.
▪ In 1964 the All Blacks defeated Leinster 11-5, they won 17-8 in 1972 and scraped home 8-3 in 1974.
▪ Then they are inside, waiting while he scrapes home the bolts.
▪ We scraped home by the skin of our teeth.
set up home/house
▪ All the costs of getting a mortgage, moving and setting up home can run into thousands.
▪ And he set up house for her in a bungalow further along the river, in a nice secluded part.
▪ Desmond Wilcox was a grown man when he chose to leave his wife and children and set up home with Esther.
▪ Nor do I think that it is disgraceful if two men of a loving disposition should set up home together.
▪ The two new Mr and Mrs Kim-Soons set up house next door.
▪ These nests will shortly be visited by the female in whose larger territory the various males have set up home.
▪ Thousands of them have set up home in the eaves of this house in Banbury.
▪ Why not just leave - set up home in a more tolerant spiritual pew?
strike home
▪ And then those two words struck home.
▪ It must have struck home in some way.
▪ Some of the things Edgar had said had struck home.
▪ That was a shot in the dark, but judging from the expression on his face it struck home.
▪ The flinty look in Pargeter's face told Dexter that Blanche had struck home in some way.
▪ The simple idea that resources ought to be concentrated in areas where unemployment is highest has struck home.
▪ Young soccer star Stephen Kilgour strikes home a penalty shot during the interval at Darlington's home match on Saturday.
the home/final stretch
▪ As the debate moves into the final stretch, Britain is not without its bargaining cards either.
▪ Clinton also had two personal strikes against him as he went into the home stretch toward the July Democratic convention.
▪ I was tired on the home stretch, but the crowd was wonderful.
▪ The debate is a milestone signalling the final stretch in the campaign leading to the caucuses.
▪ The van laboured its way up the final stretch of the brae, its engine protesting at the strain.
till the cows come home
▪ They stay up and play cards till the cows come home.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Come straight home after the theatre, won't you?
▪ He cleans the offices after all the workers have gone home.
▪ You can take the laptop home with you if you like.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And then he blagged a twin-engined Squirrel helicopter to take him home from a rugby match.
▪ Dreamer placed Tallis on the snow, facing south, facing home.
▪ Extra ferries are needed to bring them back home.
▪ She herself went home for the night.
▪ The day of the trial, I stayed home.
III.adjective
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an Englishman's home is his castle
bring home the bacon
▪ But, you know, we were the enemy, or something and he was out to bring home the bacon.
▪ Local boys Hong Kong made good their pledge to bring home the bacon for retiring coach Jim Rowark.
bring home the bacon
▪ But, you know, we were the enemy, or something and he was out to bring home the bacon.
▪ Local boys Hong Kong made good their pledge to bring home the bacon for retiring coach Jim Rowark.
charity begins at home
▪ After all, charity begins at home.
▪ Despite the profit-making prospects in this it has been treated with utter contempt on the grounds that charity begins at home.
dream house/home/job etc
▪ A palace, Carolyn told herself, a dream house.
▪ But just a couple of days after they moved into their dream home in Quedgeley, it was stolen and torched.
▪ Cracking up ... the dream home that's become a couple's nightmare.
▪ Finally, my family had a dream home and I had my own room with a view of Mount Fuji.
▪ It was all preparation for her dream job: a foreign correspondent, roaming the world in a trench coat.
▪ John Combes and his wife lived out their lives in their dream house, and their children stayed here until the 1760s.
▪ Sadly, they were forced to rent their dream house to tenants for the $ 25 monthly mortgage.
drive sth home
drum sth home
eat sb out of house and home
▪ Our sixteen-year-old is eating us out of house and home.
hammer sth home
hearth and home
▪ the joys of hearth and home
▪ Though there were undercurrents here, I was absorbed by the sense of family, the polished details of hearth and home.
hit home
▪ All of a sudden the hollowness of our triumph over nature hit home with striking effect.
▪ By the early 1970s, this realization had already hit home.
▪ His comment hit home for me, as both therapist and layperson.
▪ His foot hit home, sinking deep into the little man's belly.
▪ I hit home at a Liverpool city centre newsagent.
▪ It should hit home to people to take precautions.
▪ They spend much of the book showing how various companies have used them to hit home runs or strike out.
▪ Within hours, the reality of the situation had hit home.
nothing to write home about
▪ Jim and Marcia's new house is nothing to write home about.
▪ A few long-range efforts, but nothing to write home about.
▪ Three, it is nothing to write home about ... Home ... What's the first thing you remember?
press home your advantage
▪ Will its foes use the occasion of Kabila s death to press home their advantage?
press sth home
ram sth home
sb's chickens come home to roost
▪ Their extravagant overspending has come home to roost.
▪ Eventually, of course, the chickens came home to roost.
sb's chickens have come home to roost
scrape home
▪ The Green Party scraped home in the local elections.
▪ The referees decided that Foreman had just scraped home.
▪ A poll for the Peterborough Evening Telegraph suggests that the Tories will scrape home.
▪ Even so, two of them scraped home without reaching the quota.
▪ In 1964 the All Blacks defeated Leinster 11-5, they won 17-8 in 1972 and scraped home 8-3 in 1974.
▪ Then they are inside, waiting while he scrapes home the bolts.
▪ We scraped home by the skin of our teeth.
set up home/house
▪ All the costs of getting a mortgage, moving and setting up home can run into thousands.
▪ And he set up house for her in a bungalow further along the river, in a nice secluded part.
▪ Desmond Wilcox was a grown man when he chose to leave his wife and children and set up home with Esther.
▪ Nor do I think that it is disgraceful if two men of a loving disposition should set up home together.
▪ The two new Mr and Mrs Kim-Soons set up house next door.
▪ These nests will shortly be visited by the female in whose larger territory the various males have set up home.
▪ Thousands of them have set up home in the eaves of this house in Banbury.
▪ Why not just leave - set up home in a more tolerant spiritual pew?
strike home
▪ And then those two words struck home.
▪ It must have struck home in some way.
▪ Some of the things Edgar had said had struck home.
▪ That was a shot in the dark, but judging from the expression on his face it struck home.
▪ The flinty look in Pargeter's face told Dexter that Blanche had struck home in some way.
▪ The simple idea that resources ought to be concentrated in areas where unemployment is highest has struck home.
▪ Young soccer star Stephen Kilgour strikes home a penalty shot during the interval at Darlington's home match on Saturday.
the home/final stretch
▪ As the debate moves into the final stretch, Britain is not without its bargaining cards either.
▪ Clinton also had two personal strikes against him as he went into the home stretch toward the July Democratic convention.
▪ I was tired on the home stretch, but the crowd was wonderful.
▪ The debate is a milestone signalling the final stretch in the campaign leading to the caucuses.
▪ The van laboured its way up the final stretch of the brae, its engine protesting at the strain.
till the cows come home
▪ They stay up and play cards till the cows come home.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
home appliances
Home furnishings are on the second floor next to the toy department.
▪ a home game
▪ The company has decided to expand in the home computer market.
IV.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
family
▪ Final phase of the approval process to build 28 single-#family homes on 14.18 acres.
▪ Newton and Marie Shank received final approval to build 10 single-#family homes on 17.35 acres. 11.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an Englishman's home is his castle
bring home the bacon
▪ But, you know, we were the enemy, or something and he was out to bring home the bacon.
▪ Local boys Hong Kong made good their pledge to bring home the bacon for retiring coach Jim Rowark.
broken home
▪ He was the product of a broken home and therefore a single-parent child.
▪ Helen knew plenty about broken homes, because she came from one.
▪ J., the product of a broken home.
▪ Over 28 years I've had two broken marriages and broken homes, family and friends.
▪ The majority of offenders do not come from disturbed or broken homes, and many broken homes do not produce delinquents.
▪ They came from broken homes and were desperate to help struggling mums.
▪ Vitro knows all about being dirt poor in the rural South and growing up in a broken home.
charity begins at home
▪ After all, charity begins at home.
▪ Despite the profit-making prospects in this it has been treated with utter contempt on the grounds that charity begins at home.
close to home
▪ And interestingly, the pictures these two picked are close to home.
▪ Even closer to home is the enchanting beauty of the Craigendarroch Country Estate.
▪ For a third it might be a school close to home.
▪ It is important, however, to have a source of money close to home.
▪ Local artisans, working close to home, often met the essential needs of the nearby population.
▪ She says it was too close to home and it could easily have been them.
▪ Some commute long distances while others work close to home.
▪ Yet familiarity may be blinding us to equal intelligence expressed by animals far closer to home.
dream house/home/job etc
▪ A palace, Carolyn told herself, a dream house.
▪ But just a couple of days after they moved into their dream home in Quedgeley, it was stolen and torched.
▪ Cracking up ... the dream home that's become a couple's nightmare.
▪ Finally, my family had a dream home and I had my own room with a view of Mount Fuji.
▪ It was all preparation for her dream job: a foreign correspondent, roaming the world in a trench coat.
▪ John Combes and his wife lived out their lives in their dream house, and their children stayed here until the 1760s.
▪ Sadly, they were forced to rent their dream house to tenants for the $ 25 monthly mortgage.
foster home
▪ All the parents were told that their children were in very nice foster homes, with very nice families.
▪ Another boy is in a regular private foster home.
▪ For eight or nine months Mike was shunted from foster home to foster home.
▪ Meanwhile, it apparently was consistent with their policy for the girls to languish in a foster home.
▪ Only about fifty children actually had to be removed from their foster homes.
▪ She was told one of her daughters was receiving tuition in her foster home.
▪ This is, as already indicated, a foster home where practicable.
▪ When John left this last facility, Social Services offered to place him in a therapeutic foster home.
hearth and home
▪ the joys of hearth and home
▪ Though there were undercurrents here, I was absorbed by the sense of family, the polished details of hearth and home.
peace-loving/fun-loving/home-loving etc
sb's chickens have come home to roost
sb's spiritual home
the home/final stretch
▪ As the debate moves into the final stretch, Britain is not without its bargaining cards either.
▪ Clinton also had two personal strikes against him as he went into the home stretch toward the July Democratic convention.
▪ I was tired on the home stretch, but the crowd was wonderful.
▪ The debate is a milestone signalling the final stretch in the campaign leading to the caucuses.
▪ The van laboured its way up the final stretch of the brae, its engine protesting at the strain.
till the cows come home
▪ They stay up and play cards till the cows come home.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Decoys that can confuse the homing sensor in the interceptor are the Achilles' heel of this system.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
home

Homelyn \Home"lyn\, n. [Scot. hommelin.] (Zo["o]l) The European sand ray ( Raia maculata); -- called also home, mirror ray, and rough ray.

home

home \home\ (h[=o]m), v. i.

  1. To return home.

  2. To proceed toward an object or location intended as a target; -- of missiles which can change course in flight under internal or external control; usually used with in on; as, the missile homed in on the radar site.

  3. [fig.] To arrive at or get closer to an object sought or an intended goal; used with in on; as, the repairman quickly homed in on the cause of the malfunction.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
home

Old English ham "dwelling, house, estate, village," from Proto-Germanic *haimaz (cognates: Old Frisian hem "home, village," Old Norse heimr "residence, world," heima "home," Danish hjem, Middle Dutch heem, German heim "home," Gothic haims "village"), from PIE root *tkei- "to settle, dwell, be home" (cognates: Sanskrit kseti "abides, dwells," Armenian shen "inhabited," Greek kome, Lithuanian kaimas "village;" Old Church Slavonic semija "domestic servants").\n'Home' in the full range and feeling of [Modern English] home is a conception that belongs distinctively to the word home and some of its Gmc. cognates and is not covered by any single word in most of the IE languages.

[Buck]

\nHome stretch (1841) is originally a reference from horse racing. Home base in baseball attested by 1859 (home plate by 1867; home as the goal in a sport or game is from 1778). Home economics first attested 1899. Slang phrase make (oneself) at home "become comfortable in a place one does not live" dates from 1892. To keep the home fires burning is from a song title from 1914. To be nothing to write home about "unremarkable" is from 1907. Home movie is from 1919; home computer is from 1967.
home

1765, "to go home," from home (n.). Meaning "be guided to a destination by radio signals, etc. (of missiles, aircraft, etc.) is from 1920; it had been used earlier in reference to pigeons (1862). Related: Homed; homing. Old English had hamian "to establish in a home."

Wiktionary
home
  1. 1 Of or pertaining to one’s dwelling or country; domestic; not foreign; as home manufactures; home comforts. 2 close; personal; pointed; as, a home thrust. adv. 1 To one’s home or country. 2 close; closely. 3 To the place where it belongs; to the end of a course; to the full length. 4 In one's place of residence or one's customary or official location; at home. 5 (context UK soccer English) Into the goal. 6 (context internet English) To the home page. n. 1 (lb en heading) ''A dwelling.'' 2 #One’s own dwelling place; the house or structure in which one lives; especially the house in which one lives with his family; the habitual abode of one’s family; also, one’s birthplace. 3 #The place where a person was raised; childhood or parental home; home of one’s parents or guardian. 4 #The abiding place of the affections, especially of the domestic affections. 5 #A place of refuge, rest or care; an asylum. 6 #(lb en by extension) The grave; the final rest; also, the native and eternal dwelling place of the soul. 7 One’s native land; the place or country in which one dwells; the place where one’s ancestors dwell or dwelt. 8 The locality where a thing is usually found, or was first found, or where it is naturally abundant; habitat; seat. 9 (lb en heading) ''A focus point.'' 10 #(lb en gaming in various games) The ultimate point aimed at in a progress; the goal. 11 #(lb en baseball) home plate. 12 #(lb en lacrosse) The place of a player in front of an opponent’s goal; also, the player. 13 #(lb en Internet) The landing page of a website; the site's homepage. 14 (lb en US slang) ''Shortened form of'' '''homeboy'''. v

  2. ''(usually with "in on")'' To seek or aim for something.

WordNet
home
  1. n. where you live at a particular time; "deliver the package to my home"; "he doesn't have a home to go to"; "your place or mine?" [syn: place]

  2. housing that someone is living in; "he built a modest dwelling near the pond"; "they raise money to provide homes for the homeless" [syn: dwelling, domicile, abode, habitation, dwelling house]

  3. the country or state or city where you live; "Canadian tariffs enabled United States lumber companies to raise prices at home"; "his home is New Jersey"

  4. an environment offering affection and security; "home is where the heart is"; "he grew up in a good Christian home"; "there's no place like home"

  5. an institution where people are cared for; "a home for the elderly" [syn: nursing home, rest home]

  6. the place where you are stationed and from which missions start and end [syn: base]

  7. a social unit living together; "he moved his family to Virginia"; "It was a good Christian household"; "I waited until the whole house was asleep"; "the teacher asked how many people made up his home" [syn: family, household, house, menage]

  8. (baseball) base consisting of a rubber slab where the batter stands; it must be touched by a base runner in order to score; "he ruled that the runner failed to touch home" [syn: home plate, home base, plate]

  9. place where something began and flourished; "the United States is the home of basketball"

home
  1. adv. at or to or in the direction of one's home or family; "He stays home on weekends"; "after the game the children brought friends home for supper"; "I'll be home tomorrow"; "came riding home in style"; "I hope you will come home for Christmas"; "I'll take her home"; "don't forget to write home"

  2. on or to the point aimed at; "the arrow struck home"

  3. to the fullest extent; to the heart; "drove the nail home"; "drove his point home"; "his comments hit home"

home
  1. v. provide with, or send to, a home

  2. return home accurately from a long distance; "homing pigeons"

home
  1. adj. used of your own ground; "a home game" [syn: home(a)] [ant: away]

  2. relating to or being where one lives or where one's roots are; "my home town"

  3. inside the country; "the British Home Office has broader responsibilities than the United States Department of the Interior"; "the nation's internal politics" [syn: home(a), interior(a), internal, national]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Home

A home is a dwelling-place used as a permanent or semi-permanent residence for an individual, family, household or several families in a tribe. It is often a house, apartment, or other building, or alternatively a mobile home, houseboat, yurt or any other portable shelter. Homes typically provide areas and facilities for sleeping, preparing food, eating and hygiene. Larger groups may live in a nursing home, children's home, convent or any similar institution. A homestead also includes agricultural land and facilities for domesticated animals. Where more secure dwellings are not available, people may live in the informal and sometimes illegal shacks found in slums and shanty towns. More generally, "home" may be considered to be a geographic area, such as a town, village, suburb, city, or country.

Transitory accommodation in a treatment facility for a few weeks is not normally considered permanent enough to replace a more stable location as 'home'. In 2005, 100 million people worldwide were estimated to be homeless.

Home (magazine)

Home Magazine was a magazine published in the United States by Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S..

Home (Dixie Chicks album)

Home is the sixth studio album by American country band Dixie Chicks, released in 2002 on Monument/ Columbia Records. It is notable for its acoustic bluegrass sound, which stands in contrast with their previous two country pop albums.

The group was promoting the album when lead singer Natalie Maines made controversial comments about U.S. President George W. Bush. The album's third single, " Travelin' Soldier", was #1 on the Billboard Country Chart the week that Maines' comments hit the press. The following week, as many stations started a still-standing boycott of the Chicks' music, the song collapsed. None of their following singles gained traction with country radio.

Despite these events, the album was certified 6× Multi- platinum status by the RIAA and has sold 5,979,000 copies in the United States up to November 2008. The album also featured a cover of Fleetwood Mac's " Landslide", which was their biggest pop crossover hit until 2007, when " Not Ready to Make Nice" peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The album was also successful in Australia, in its 175th week in the country charts it was certified Triple Platinum for shipments of 210,000 copies.

The album was nominated at the 45th Grammy Awards for 6 awards, including their second attempt for Album of the Year. The group went home with 4 in 2003, including Best Country Album, Best Recording Package, Best Country Instrumental Performance for "Lil' Jack Slade", and Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal for " Long Time Gone". Additionally, they were nominated for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical and Darrell Scott was nominated for Best Country Song for Long Time Gone. Two years later, they were nominated and won Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, this time for " Top of the World".

It debuted at #1 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums chart and stayed there for 4 non-consecutive weeks. It also debuted at #1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums, and stayed there for 12 non-consecutive weeks.

Home (TV channel)

Home is an interior home and garden-orientated lifestyle television channel broadcasting in the United Kingdom and Ireland, as part of the UKTV network of channels. The channel originally launched on 1 November 1997 and relaunched in its current format on 30 April 2009. Home is broadcast 24 hours a day on Sky, Virgin Media and TVPlayer. The channel was transmitted by terrestrial provider ITV Digital 24 hours a day until the company's collapse in 2002. Home made a return to terrestrial screens for a time in the mid-2000s (decade) as part of the now-defunct Top Up TV system, and became available as a free-to-air linear service on Freeview from 1 March 2016.

Home (Blessid Union of Souls album)

Home is the debut album by the American alternative rock band Blessid Union of Souls. It was released on March 21, 1995 on the EMI label. The album contains their biggest hit single, " I Believe", which reached #8 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Home (The Corrs album)

Home is The Corrs' fifth studio album. An Irish-themed album, it includes covers of old Irish songs and traditionals, but also covers of non-Irish songs such as "Heart Like A Wheel". It includes two tracks in Irish, "Buachaill Ón Éirne" and "Bríd Óg Ní Mháille"; and three instrumentals, "Old Hag (You Killed Me)", "Haste To The Wedding", and "Return to Fingall". Home was compiled from a songbook of the late Jean Corr (their mother). The album was released exactly 10 years after the release of their first album Forgiven, Not Forgotten.

Home (disambiguation)

A home is a place of residence. In real estate usage, new or unoccupied dwelling units are often euphemistically called "homes" even though no one lives there.

Home may also refer to:

Home (Ryan Malcolm album)

Home is the debut album from Ryan Malcolm, who was the winner of the first season of Canadian Idol. The album was released on December 9, 2003.

Home (Depeche Mode song)

"Home" is Depeche Mode's thirty-third UK single, released on 16 June 1997, and the third single from the album Ultra.

Home (Star Trek: Enterprise)

"Home" is the third episode of the fourth season of the American science fiction television series Star Trek: Enterprise. It first aired on October 22, 2004, on the UPN network in the United States. It was the second episode of the season directed by Allan Kroeker and the first in season four to be written by Michael Sussman.

Set in the 22nd century, the series follows the adventures of the first Starfleet starship, Enterprise, registration NX-01. This episode brought to a close the Xindi story arc that ran throughout Season 3, with the crew returning to Earth after the successful mission. It features three stories; Captain Jonathan Archer ( Scott Bakula) coming to terms with the psychological impact of the previous mission, Doctor Phlox ( John Billingsley) finds that the people on Earth have become hostile to aliens, while Commander Charles "Trip" Tucker ( Connor Trinneer) and Sub-Commander T'Pol ( Jolene Blalock) travel to Vulcan for her arranged marriage.

The episode featured the return of several recurring characters, such as Vaughn Armstrong as Admiral Maxwell Forrest and Gary Graham as Ambassador Soval. Others who made their first of several appearances included Michael Reilly Burke, Ada Maris, Jack Donner and Joanna Cassidy as T'Pol's mother. Filming took seven days, during which time the standing sets used for the interior of Enterprise were redressed to appear as its sister ship, Columbia (NX-02), and location filming was conducted at Malibu Creek State Park. "Home" received a mixed reception from critics, and was watched by 3.16 million viewers on first broadcast.

Home (2003 film)

Home is a paranoid, darkly comic, hour-long television film made by the BBC and directed by Richard Curson Smith. He adapted it from a short story by J. G. Ballard in 2003. The plot follows a middle class man who chooses to abandon the outside world and restrict himself to not leaving his house, becoming a hermit. He soon starts to destroy his furniture to rid his life of clutter.

The viewer follows his plight through both his video diary (in which he addresses the viewer) and through traditional film cameras.

All he has is the food in his cupboard, and once the bills run out will have no gas or electricity - his mind soon becomes fevered. As he runs out of food he begins to consume shampoo, plants from his garden, his neighbours' cats (which he catches with a home-made trap) and anything else which crosses his path. In his increasing fear of the outside world he kills a man who comes to reclaim the television who insists upon entering, but refuses to hand over a cable which connects his video camera to his television.

He claims the house is revealing itself to him, beginning in the attic: a bright light appears and the room expands - this pattern continues and develops. Upon viewing his video diaries he notices the effect does not appear, and is concerned that it may be limited to his mind. The film ends with him killing a friend who breaks into his house following her concern for him - he soon puts her in his freezer and climbs in after her.

Home (1988 TV series)

Home, also referred to as The Home Show, was a daytime informational talk show which aired on ABC from 1988 to 1994.

The program was co-hosted by Robb Weller and Sandy Hill during the first season.

Gary Collins hosted the show for the remainder of its run. Co-hosts included Cristina Ferrare, Dana Fleming, Beth Ruyak and Sarah Purcell. Decorating and craft segments were frequently presented by Hanala Sagal aka Suzan Stadner, Fitness Expert and Sally Marshall, Dian Thomas, Carol Duvall and Kitty Bartholomew. Marc Summers and Wil Shriner presented segments on the latest in technology ( computers, home gaming, etc.).

The show's various directors were Arthur Forrest (who directed the pilot), Booey Kober, Bob Loudin, Jerry Kupcinet, Paul Forrest and Bob Levy.

Mother Love joined the show as the announcer in the final season, replacing Bob Hilton.

Home (Angel)

"Home" is episode 22 of season 4 in the television show Angel. Written and directed by Tim Minear, it was originally broadcast on May 7, 2003 on the WB network. In the Season Four finale, Connor – having defeated Jasmine in the previous episode – plans to blow himself up with a comatose Cordelia and other hostages, while an undead Lilah Morgan offers Angel Investigations control of the Wolfram & Hart L.A. branch.

Home (Angela Aki song)

"Home" is the first major label single by Japanese singer Angela Aki. It was released on September 14, 2005, and reached number 38 on the Oricon Charts.

Home (Angela Aki album)

Home is the first major-label album from Angela Aki. The album includes the songs from the singles released over the monthly period. In addition to the normal version of the album, a limited edition was also released. A special song entitled "Rain" from her previous mini album One is also featured. The album has charted at #2 on the Oricon Charts, selling well over 121,000 copies in its first week.

Home (Collective Soul album)

Home: A Live Concert Recording with the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra is a live album by Atlanta-based American alternative rock band, Collective Soul. The performance is from two live Atlanta concerts with the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra. The album peaked at #183 on the Billboard 200.

Home (Procol Harum album)

Home is Procol Harum's fourth album, released in 1970. With the departure of organist Matthew Fisher and bassist David Knights and the addition of the remaining musicians' ( Gary Brooker, B.J. Wilson and Robin Trower) former bandmate bassist/organist Chris Copping from The Paramounts, Procol Harum was, for all intents and purposes, The Paramounts again in all but name. The purpose of bringing in Copping was to return some of the R&B sound to the band that they had with their previous incarnation.

The initial sessions were performed in London at Trident Studios under the supervision of former organist Matthew Fisher who had also produced the band's previous album. Unhappy with the sound and performances, the band scrapped the Trident sessions and began again with producer Chris Thomas and engineer Jeff Jarratt at Abbey Road Studios. Once the album was completed it was decided that the cover would be a parody of the British board game Snakes and Ladders featuring members of the band.

When the album was released in June 1970 it charted at No. 34 in the United States and No. 49 in the United Kingdom, making the Danish Top 10 peaking at #6. The album was preceded by the single "Whiskey Train" written by guitarist Robin Trower with lyricist Keith Reid.

Home (Kit Chan song)

Home (家), sung by Kit Chan, was composed by Dick Lee in 1998 as the first in a series of yearly songs commissioned for Singapore's National Day Parade, together with the other NDP song that year titled as City For The world. It has English and Chinese versions, both sung by Kit. In 2004, it was remixed for three child soloists, one of whom was young actress and singer Shanice Elizabeth Nathan. The children were accompanied by a girls' choir and the piece was reused as the National Day song for 2004 to elect Mr Lee Hsien Loong as the 3rd Prime Minister of Singapore. In 2010, Kit performed the song at the 2010 National Day Parade.

In 2011, the music video of a new arrangement of the song was launched on Total Defence Day. Kit is the executive producer of the music video. The new arrangement was performed by 39 local singers (including Kit), accompanied by the Singapore Symphony Orchestra.

Home (Simply Red album)

Home is the eighth Simply Red studio album, released in 2003. It is the first Simply Red album released on band frontman Mick Hucknall's own record label, Simplyred.com. The album was a success all around the world, due to the hit singles, "Sunrise", "Fake", "You Make Me Feel Brand New" and "Home".

The success of "Sunrise" was due in part to the sensuous video being shot in Rio de Janeiro, and its borrowing of a loop found in the 1981 Hall and Oates single " I Can't Go for That" (as well as some of the lyrics).

The album includes three cover versions: the Bob Dylan song, " Positively 4th Street," the The Stylistics' soul hit, "You Make Me Feel Brand New," and the Dennis Brown song, "Money in My Pocket".

Home (Sevendust album)

Home is the second studio album by American alternative metal band Sevendust, released on August 24, 1999 through TvT Records. The album appeared on the Billboard 200, remained there for fourteen weeks and peaked at 19 on September 11, 1999. Home was certified gold on May 18, 2000 through the Recording Industry Association of America. The album features thirteen tracks on the United States release and sixteen tracks on the Japan release, with two tracks featuring artists outside of Sevendust. Three singles were released from the album, two of which appeared on the mainstream and modern Billboard charts.

"Waffle" is used in the 2001 Down to Earth film, and "Denial" is used in the 2001 ATV Offroad Fury video game.

Home (Sheryl Crow song)

"Home" is a single from Sheryl Crow's 1996 self-titled album. It was the final single from the album, following " A Change Would Do You Good", and was later included on the album The Very Best of Sheryl Crow. It was only released commercially in Europe.

The black-and-white video was directed by Samuel Bayer and features Crow performing on a village car racing festival. Several villagers are portrayed, sharing their definitions of what 'home' is for them with the viewer. At the end of the video, Crow ends up covered in mud thrown around by the racing cars.

"Home" became Crow's ninth top-40 hit in both Canada and the United Kingdom.

Home (Three Days Grace song)

"Home" is the third single by the band Three Days Grace. It is from their self-titled album.

Home (Josh Rouse album)

Home is the second full-length studio album by the indie folk musician Josh Rouse. The album was released in March 2000 by Slow River Records and included the single " Directions", which was also featured on the soundtrack to the Cameron Crowe movie " Vanilla Sky" entitled " Music from Vanilla Sky".

Home (Spearhead album)

Home is the debut album by Spearhead, released in 1994 under the Capitol Records label. It includes thirteen tracks. It was produced by Joe "The Butcher" Nicolo (Ruffhouse Records) at Studio 4 in Philly. "Hole in the Bucket" was released as a single, which became an MTV Buzz Bin song and won a Clio Award.

Home (Daughtry song)

"Home" is a 2007 song by American rock band Daughtry from their self-titled debut album. The song had been climbing up the U.S. charts for a few weeks before the song was announced as the second single from the album. The song was covered by Irish musician Kian Egan that serves as the lead single from his debut album with the same name.

Home (American band)

Home is an experimental pop band formed in Tampa, Florida in the early-1990s, before relocating to New York in 1996. The band released eight self-produced, sequentially-numbered, ultra-low-distribution albums on cheap Radio Shack cassettes before signing to Sony's Relativity Records label, which distributed its ninth album (appropriately titled IX) in 1995. This album, Home's only release on a major label, received favorable reviews in publications such as Spin, The Village Voice and Magnet. Subsequent Home albums have appeared on independent record labels, also to generally positive reviews. Dave Fridmann of The Flaming Lips was the producer behind at least two of Home's albums.

Though Home was originally regarded as a lo-fi band due to its primitive recording techniques, its releases starting with IX have largely featured a cleaner sound highlighted by guitars and various electronic keyboards. In reviewing IX, The Village Voice observed that Home's sound resembles bands from "the late '80s ( Sebadoh, Grifters) and mid-70s ( Devo, Faust, David Bowie) sprinkled with enough influences out of the bargain-bins ( Elton John, Gong, David Bowie) to push the hipster taste-envelope a smidgen closer to both prog-art and schmaltz-rock." That album received a 7-out-of-10 rating from Spin. A year later, describing the band's independent album Elf: Gulf Bore Waltz, The Chicago Tribune wrote: "Laboring in the rock 'n' roll hinterland of Florida, the band Home has developed a refreshingly scattershot sound that wanders erratically through folky balladry, prog rock, ragged pop, and unclassifiable experimentation. Though somewhat reminiscent of indie rock obscurantists like Pavement, Home is both more ambitious and more consistently tuneful than many of its trendier peers."

Less charitably, The Trouser Press Record Guide opined: "When intently focused, Home can squeeze an agreeably synthetic, Devo-esque poptone (like 'Make It Right') from its gizmos. More often, though, Home lapses into wildly freeform freakouts (like 'Atomique') that combine electronic noise, found sound and even a bit of spoken word. ... Those endowed with short attention spans will no doubt have the easiest time making it all the way through IX."

The members of Home also helped found the Screw Music Forever record label and music collective. Besides releasing Home's own 7-inch singles, Screw Music also has released recordings by related bands such as Dumbwaiters, Pee Shy, Leels and the 100% Storms Ensemble.

Home's 16th album, Sexteen, which the band describes as "a concept record about fucking," was released in 2006. This album also marked the end of the band's longstanding relationship with its European label, Cooking Vinyl. During the same year, members of Home performed under the name Home Hunters during the Come The Freak On music festival at Bombshell Gallery in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Home appeared on This Is Next Year: A Brooklyn-Based Compilation - Arena Rock Recording Co. - 2001

As of late 2006, Home was making preparations for its next album, Seventeen, envisioned as the soundtrack to a movie that the band members were simultaneously preparing to film.

Home (Battlestar Galactica)

"Home" is a two-part episode of the reimagined Battlestar Galactica television series. Part 1 aired originally on the Sci Fi Channel on August 19, 2005, and Part 2 aired on August 26, 2005.

In the episode, Starbuck returns to the human fleet bearing the Arrow of Apollo. President Laura Roslin leads a team to the surface of Kobol to find the Tomb of Athena and a map to Earth. Commander William Adama overcomes his anger at Roslin and her allies and joins them on Kobol, where the Tomb provides a clue to Earth's location. The fleet is reunited.

According to executive producer David Eick, who wrote Part 1 and co-wrote Part 2 with executive producer Ronald D. Moore, "Home" is more about character development and relationships than about story. The episode received favorable critical review.

Home (The Wilkinsons album)

Home is the fifth studio album by the Canadian country music group The Wilkinsons, released on March 20, 2007. Five singles were released from the album: "Six Pack", " Fast Car", "Papa Come Quick", "Nobody Died" and "Closets".

Home (This World Fair album)

Home was released in 2003 by an alternative rock band called Kalgren which has since changed its name to This World Fair. Four tracks off the album were awarded Track of the Day by Garageband. The most popular track from the album, "Waiting For You" was featured on the television series Radio Free Roscoe for its final episode.

Home (UK band)

Home was a British rock band, active in the early 1970s.

The core line up was:

  • Mick Stubbs – lead guitar, lead vocals
  • Laurie Wisefield – lead guitar, vocals
  • Cliff Williams – bass, vocals
  • Mick 'Cookie' Cook – drums

They also had two keyboardists over the years. From 1971 to 1972 it was Swansea's Clive John (from the Welsh band Man), and the other for the rest of their short career was Jimmy Anderson.

Home (Playstation3 game)
Home (Suzanne Palmer album)

Home is the second album by singer-songwriter Suzanne Palmer. The album consists of Progressive Trance, House music and some Dance-pop songs. It features the singles, "Show Me", "Luv 2 Luv", "Sound of the Drum", "Fascinated", "Free My Love" and the title track. The album is notable for being her first album to have a major release. Her self-titled debut remains unreleased because the label, Twisted UK, folded.

Home (The Gathering album)

Home is the eighth album by Dutch band The Gathering. The album was released on 15 April 2006 by Sanctuary Records through its heavy metal label Noise. The album had a separate release in North America which took place on 18 April 2006 by Brooklyn-based label The End Records. It was the last album to feature lead singer and lyricist Anneke van Giersbergen.

In an interview for the San Diego-based magazine Modern Fix, drummer Hans Rutten described Home as being "more stripped-down...Souvenirs was quite structured and was quite heavy to make. This one is more simple, I think, but still there, still in a Gathering kind of way. But rhythmically speaking, it's more stripped-down, it’s more primitive, I think. I think 'primitive' is a good word...it’s more instinctive (and) more primitive. It’s not as layered as Souvenirs, and maybe it’s less 'trippish.' Maybe it’s more...yeah, primitive trip-rock, something like that."

Home (Delaney & Bonnie album)

Home is the debut album by husband-and-wife singers Delaney & Bonnie, released on the Stax label (catalog no. STS-2026). Most of the album was recorded at Stax Studios in Memphis, Tennessee from February to November 1968 with additional overdubs in July 1969, and features many of Stax's house musicians, including Donald "Duck" Dunn, Steve Cropper, Booker T. Jones, and Isaac Hayes.

The album's cover photo shows Delaney and Bonnie with Delaney's grandfather, John Bramlett, in front of the log cabin in Pontotoc, Mississippi where Delaney grew up.

Stax released two singles from the album in the U.S., "It's Been a Long Time Coming" (1969) and "Hard to Say Goodbye" (1970). (The latter was issued to capitalize on the success of Delaney and Bonnie's later recordings for Atco/ Atlantic, which once had a partnership with Stax.) "Just Plain Beautiful" b/w "Hard to Say Goodbye" was also issued as a single in the UK in 1969.

Home was remastered and re-released by Stax / Universal on CD, including several bonus tracks, in 2006. Unfortunately someone thought it prudent to remaster in MONO only (although the cover states "AAD/Stereo), all previous vinyl, tape and CD issues were in stereo. The album's two US single A-sides are also included in the Stax compilation box set The Complete Stax/Volt Soul Singles, Vol. 2 - 1968-71.

Home (The X-Files)

"Home" is the second episode of the fourth season of the American science fiction television series The X-Files, which originally aired on the Fox Broadcasting Company network on October 11, 1996. Directed by Kim Manners, it was written by Glen Morgan and James Wong. "Home" is a " Monster-of-the-Week" story—a stand-alone plot unconnected to the overarching mythology of The X-Files. Watched by 18.85 million viewers, the initial broadcast had a Nielsen rating of 11.9. "Home" was the first episode of The X-Files to receive a viewer discretion warning for graphic content and the only to have carried a TV-MA rating upon broadcast. Critics were generally complimentary, and praised the disturbing nature of the plot; several made comparisons to the work of director David Lynch. Some reviewers nevertheless felt that the violent subject matter was excessive.

The series centers on FBI special agents Fox Mulder ( David Duchovny) and Dana Scully ( Gillian Anderson), who work on cases linked to the paranormal, called " X-Files". Mulder is a believer in the paranormal; the skeptical Scully was initially assigned to debunk his work, but the two have developed a deep friendship. In this episode, Mulder and Scully investigate the death of an infant with severe birth defects. Traveling to the small isolated town of Home, Pennsylvania, the pair meet the Peacocks, a family of deformed farmers who have not left their house in a decade. Initially, Mulder suspects that the brothers kidnapped and raped a woman to father the child, but the investigation uncovers a long history of incest involving the Peacocks' own mother.

"Home" marks the return of writers Morgan and Wong, who left the show following its second season. The duo attempted to make their first episode upon return as ambitious and shocking as possible. They were inspired by real-life events, including a story from Charlie Chaplin's autobiography about an encounter in an English tenement home. The graphic content of the script attracted controversy from early in the production process. Commentators have identified themes within the episode that satirize the American dream, address the concept of globalization, and explore the nature of motherhood. It has been cited as a seminal episode of The X-Files by critics and crew members.

Home (6cyclemind album)

Home is the third album of the Filipino band, 6cyclemind. Having 10 cover tracks and only one original song, it was released by Sony BMG Pilipinas in 2007.

Home (Michael Bublé song)

"Home" is a song recorded by Canadian singer Michael Bublé, and released on March 28, 2005, as the second single from his second major-label studio album, It's Time. The song was written by Bublé, along with co-writers Alan Chang and Amy Foster-Gillies.

Home (nightclub)

Home was a music venue and nightclub located at 1 Leicester Square in central London. It was closed by Westminster Council in late March 2001 due to alleged evidence of open drug-dealing occurring within the club despite its famously tough door checks. The club went into receivership shortly after it was closed. It was part of the Home (nightclub chain) owned by Big Beats (Inc.), including the clubs in Sydney and London, as well as the Homelands outdoor festivals. The decline of the club started earlier however due to Westminster council denying the club a 6am licence.

Home (Mr. Children album)

HOME is the twelfth studio album by Mr. Children, released on March 14, 2007. Its first press limited edition includes a documentary DVD on the making of the album and live performances by members of the group between recording sessions. The album debuted at the number 1 position, with 693,038 copies sold in the first week.

Its first single was used as the theme song for a series of Toyota commercials. The second single, , used as the theme song to the Japanese television drama, , was the seventh best selling single, with over 550,000 copies sold in 2006. The last single, , released on January 24, 2007, was used as the theme song to the live-action film adaptation of Osamu Tezuka's Dororo. A promotional video was created for to promote the album and the song was also used for the Olympus E-410 commercials. Four songs from the HOME sessions are not included on the album, and my sweet heart are included as B-sides on the , while and are found on the single. The B-sides are also available on their B-SIDE compilation.

Mr. Children held 14 concerts in support of the album, known as the HOME Tour, from May 4, 2007 to June 23, 2007. They visited 7 cities in Japan. They performed songs from the album, as well as a selection of their old songs were in their tour. Another tour, known as HOME -in the field-, was held from August 4, 2007 - September 30, 2007. A previously unreleased song, debuted in their second tour.

HOME is the best selling album in the 2007 Oricon Yearly Album Chart marking their first yearly number 1 position on the charts in their 16th year since their debut. A total of 1,181,241 copies were sold in 2007.

Home (Hothouse Flowers album)

Home is the second album by the Irish rock band Hothouse Flowers. Released in 1990 via London Records, it reached number 2 on the UK Albums Chart and spent 1 week at number 1 on the Australian charts. The band did an extended tour in Australia, and had built up a significant following there, which may have contributed to their success in the charts. Two singles from the album charted in the United Kingdom: "Give It Up" (#30) and " I Can See Clearly Now" (#23). "Give It Up" also charted in the United States (#2 Modern Rock Tracks/#29 Mainstream Rock Tracks).

Home (play)

Home is a play by David Storey. It is set in a mental asylum, although this fact is only revealed gradually as the story progresses. The five characters include seemingly benign Harry, highly opinionated Jack, cynical Marjorie, and flirtatious Kathleen. As they interact we come to realize their delusions and pretensions are similar to those of people living in a supposedly normal society.

The play premiered at the Royal Court Theatre in London on 17 June 1970, directed by Lindsay Anderson. It transferred to the Apollo Theatre, where it ran for three months, then to Broadway, opening on 17 November 1970 at the Morosco Theatre, where it ran for 110 performances. The London and Broadway casts both included John Gielgud as Harry, Ralph Richardson as Jack, Dandy Nichols as Marjorie and Mona Washbourne as Kathleen. Jessica Tandy replaced Nichols later in the Broadway run. Storey adapted his play for the 6 January 1972 broadcast of the British television series Play for Today. It was directed by Anderson and featured the same cast.

It was revived off-Broadway by the Actors Company Theatre (TACT) in 2006, starring British actor Simon Jones and American actress Cynthia Harris.

More recently it was part of the Peter Hall Company season in 2009 at the Theatre Royal, Bath, and the Soulpepper Theatre season in 2012 in Toronto, Ontario.

Home (B'z song)

"Home" is the twenty-fifth single by B'z, released on July 8, 1998. This song is one of B'z many number-one singles in Oricon weekly chart. Japanese rock band L'Arc-en-Ciel released three singles in the same day. Although L'Arc-en-Ciel's three singles—" Honey", " Shinshoku (Lose Control)" and " Kasō"—passed the first week sales of 500,000 copies each and were ranked at number two, three and four respectively, the single "Home" managed to debut at the number-one position. The single sold over 961,000 copies according to Oricon. While they won "the artist of the year award", the song was elected as one of "songs of the year" at the 13th Japan Gold Disc Award.

Home (Journey South album)

Home is the second album from The X Factor UK series 2 finalists Journey South. It was released in 2007 (see 2007 in music).

The album charted at number 42 on the UK albums chart with sales of 5,120.

Home (Keller Williams album)

Home is the eighth studio album by Keller Williams. Home centers on his love for his hometown of Fredericksburg, Virginia and contains audio clips from his childhood within the songs.

The album ranked 39th on Billboard's Independent Albums listing in 2003.

Home (Bone Thugs-n-Harmony song)

"Home" is a song by rap group Bone Thugs-n-Harmony released as the third single from their album Thug World Order. The song features samples from British singer Phil Collins' song " Take Me Home".

Home (David Murray album)

Home is the fourth album by David Murray to be released on the Italian Black Saint label and the second to feature his Octet. It was released in 1982 and features performances by Murray, Henry Threadgill, Olu Dara, Lawrence "Butch" Morris, George Lewis, Anthony Davis, Wilbur Morris and Steve McCall.

Home (sports)

In sports, home is the place and venue identified with a team sport. Most professional teams are named for, and marketed to, particular metropolitan areas; amateur teams may be drawn from a particular region, or from institutions such as schools or universities. When they play in that venue, they are said to be the "home team"; when the team plays elsewhere, they are the away, visiting, or road team. Home teams wear home colors.

Each team has a location where it practices during the season and where it hosts games. This is referred to as the home court, home field, home stadium, home arena, or home ice. When a team is serving as host of a contest, it is designated as the "home team". The event is described as a "home game" for that team and the venue that the game is being played is described as the "home field." In most sports, there is a home field advantage whereby the home team wins more frequently because it has a greater familiarity with the nuances of the venue and because it has more fans cheering for it, which supposedly gives the players adrenaline and an advantage. The opposing team is said to be the visiting team, the away team, or the road team.

In baseball, sometimes, when teams are playing a makeup game from an earlier game postponed by rain, the game may have to be made up in the other team's stadium. An example of this occurred on September 26, 2007, with a game between the Cleveland Indians, who were the "home" team, but the game was played vs. the Seattle Mariners in Safeco Field, with their fans, etc. Other instances of the home team playing in the visitor's stadium include the New Orleans Saints hosting the New York Giants at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey a few weeks after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005; and the Toronto Blue Jays playing a 2010 home series with the Philadelphia Phillies in the Phillies' Citizens Bank Park while the G-20 Summit was being held near the Rogers Centre in Toronto. Because it was an interleague series, the designated hitter rule was instituted in a National League ballpark for the first time in the regular season.

A spectator can often tell which team is home by looking at the field of play. Often a home team logo, insignia or name is in the middle of the field at center ice, midfield, or center court. Also, the logo, insignia or name may be found atop a dugout in baseball or in the end zone in American football.

Rules and conventions often apply to the choice of home and away colors. In Australian football, the home team traditionally wears black shorts. In American football and hockey, the home team tends to wear uniforms that feature their team colors, whereas the visiting team will wear white or a lighter color. On the other hand, in baseball and basketball, the home team will typically choose to wear the lighter colored version of its uniform. In fact, many teams have a home uniform which is mostly white and referred to as the "home whites". The road team will generally wear a version of its uniform with one of the darker of its official colors as the main color, or in baseball with a grey main color referred to as the "road greys". The term "home whites" originated in the early days of Major League Baseball. Typically the visiting team had no access to laundry facilities and thus the players were unable to clean their uniforms on the road. By wearing grey or another dark color the visiting team was better able to conceal the dirt and grass stains that had accumulated on their uniforms over the course of the series. The home team, having access to laundry facilities, was able to wear clean white uniforms each day, hence the term "home whites".

In any context where a game score or the pair of teams meeting in a game are mentioned, the team mentioned first (left or top) is the home team, except in the United States and Canada, and to a lesser extent, Japan, where home teams are mentioned second.

Typically, the home team has responsibilities such as supplying the venue and equipment, hosting its opponent, media and the officials ( referees, umpires, etc.), and may have the opportunity to sell tickets, food and media rights.

Home (Sheena Easton album)

Home is the 14th studio album by Scottish singer, Sheena Easton, and was released in 1999 by Universal/Victor for the Japanese market only and charted at #97 in Japan. The disc consists of 4 covers and 6 tracks of new material and has pop/acoustic sound.

"Carry A Dream" was the 1st single release. It is the theme song and it coincided with the release of Marco, a Japanese animated movie that same year. A second single titled "My Treasure is You" was issued the latter part of 1999.

Easton self produced and arranged 9 tracks on the disc.

Home (Deep Blue Something album)

Home is the second album by alternative rock band Deep Blue Something. It was originally released by RainMaker Records in 1994 and re-released on Interscope in 1995.

Home (La Toya Jackson song)

"Home" is a sentimental ballad by La Toya Jackson which first appeared on the 2003 promotional copy her album Startin' Over. Jackson released the single on July 28, 2009 in dedication to her younger brother, Michael Jackson, who died on June 25. All proceeds will go to AIDS Project Los Angeles, one of Michael's favorite charities.

Home (The Wiz song)

"Home" is a song from the 1975 Broadway musical, The Wiz. It was written by Charlie Smalls and was performed by Stephanie Mills in the stage production and by Diana Ross in the 1978 film adaptation and released on the soundtrack album in 1978.

Stephanie Mills recorded the song for her 1989 album Home, and eventually scoring her another number one on the Billboard Hot Black Singles chart. The single would be the last of five number ones for Mills on the R&B Singles chart.

Home (Joe Diffie song)

"Home" is a song written by Fred Lehner and Andy Spooner, and recorded by American country music singer Joe Diffie as his debut single. It was released in August 1990 as the lead-off single from his debut album A Thousand Winding Roads. "Home" rose to the top of all three major country format charts that were in existence at the time — Billboard, Radio & Records (now known as Mediabase 24/7), and the now-defunct Gavin Report — marking the first time in chart history that a country singer's debut single had done so. It also peaked at number 1 on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks chart.

Home (Alan Jackson song)

"Home" is a song written and recorded by American country music artist Alan Jackson. The song was originally recorded by him on his 1990 debut album Here in the Real World. The original 1989 recording served as the B-side to three of Jackson's singles: his debut single "Blue Blooded Woman", as well as his first two Number One hits " I'd Love You All Over Again" and " Don't Rock the Jukebox."

Jackson included "Home" in 1995 for his first Greatest Hits package, The Greatest Hits Collection. The song served as the B-side to that album's first two singles, " Tall, Tall Trees" and " I'll Try" before it was issued in 1996 as the album's third single. In mid-1996, "Home" reached a peak of number 3 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks (now Hot Country Songs) charts.

Home (Terry Hall album)

Home is the début solo-album by the British singer Terry Hall. It was released in 1994 on the Anxious label.

Although Hall had been in the music industry for fifteen years at the time of release, Home was his first album credited to him alone; previously Hall had recorded and fronted The Specials, Fun Boy Three, The Colourfield, Terry, Blair & Anouchka and Vegas.

The album was critically acclaimed when released but was not a commercial success, peaking at number ninety-five on the UK Albums Chart. It includes the singles "Forever J", "Sense" and the Rainbows EP which featured "Chasing a Rainbow". In 1995 the album was re-released with a different picture sleeve and had the inclusion of the track "Chasing a Rainbow" co-written by and featuring Damon Albarn. Both editions of the album have since been deleted and are difficult to purchase.

Hall wrote the majority of the album with guitarist Craig Gannon and wrote in collaboration with several acclaimed musicians namely Ian Broudie of The Lightning Seeds, Andy Partridge of XTC, Nick Heyward of Haircut One Hundred and most notably Damon Albarn of Blur on "Chasing a Rainbow", which was an extra track on the 1995 re-issue of the album. The album was produced by Ian Broudie, whom Hall has previous worked during his time with The Colourfield and on Broudie's 1992 Lightning Seeds album Sense. Hall and Broudie have written and recorded together on the majority of Broudie's albums.

Home (Robinson novel)

Home is a novel written by the Pulitzer Prize-winning American author Marilynne Robinson. Published in 2008, it is Robinson's third novel, preceded by Housekeeping in 1980 and Gilead in 2004.

The novel chronicles the life of the Boughton family, specifically the father, Reverend Robert Boughton, and Glory and Jack, two of Robert's adult children who return home to Gilead, Iowa. A companion to Gilead, Home is an independent novel that takes place concurrently.

The novel won one of the 2008 Los Angeles Times Book Prizes, the 2009 Orange Prize for Fiction and was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award for Fiction.

Home was named one of the "100 Notable Books of 2008" by The New York Times, one of the "Best Books of 2008" by The Washington Post, one of the "Favorite Books 2008" of The Los Angeles Times, one of the "Best Books of 2008" of The San Francisco Chronicle, as well as one of The New Yorker book critic James Wood's ten favorite books of 2008.

Home (Rooster song)

"Home" was the first single from UK indie group Rooster from their second album Circles and Satellites. The song reached No.33 in the UK Singles Chart.

Home (2008 film)

Home is a 2008 Swiss drama film directed by Ursula Meier and starring Isabelle Huppert and Olivier Gourmet. The film was the official Swiss submission for Best Foreign Language Film at the 82nd Academy Awards.

Home (Goo Goo Dolls song)

"Home" is a song by the Goo Goo Dolls. It is the lead single from their ninth studio album, Something for the Rest of Us, which was released on August 31, 2010. "Home" was released to the Apple iTunes Store on June 8, 2010.

Home (Home album)

Home is the second album by UK rock band Home. It was released in 1972 by CBS Records.

Home (Boardwalk Empire)

"Home" is the seventh episode of the first season of HBO's crime drama Boardwalk Empire. The episode aired on October 31, 2010. The episode was written by executive producer Tim Van Patten and Paul Simms and directed by Allen Coulter. Nucky purges some bad childhood memories. Jimmy forges a new alliance with a fellow veteran named Richard Harrow, while Luciano and a friend cut a deal with the D'Alessio brothers.

Home (BoDeans album)

Home is the BoDeans' third studio album, and was released in 1989. It peaked at number 94 on the Billboard 200 chart.

Home (Mirbeau)

Home, also translated as Charity , is a French three-act comedy by the novelist and playwright Octave Mirbeau, written in collaboration with Thadée Natanson. It was performed in December 1908 on the stage of the Comédie-Française, in Paris.

The comedy raised a big scandal because in it Mirbeau denounces the Catholic charity-business and broaches a new taboo subject : the economic and sexual exploitation of young girls in “charitable” homes. In order to see his play performed as intended, he brought a suit against Jules Claretie and the Comédie-Française. He won his trial and the comedy could at last be performed.

An English translation, by Richard Hand, has been published by Intellect Books : Two Plays: “Business is Business” and “Charity”, January 2012, 147 pages (ISBN 9781841504865).

Home (2009 film)

Home is a 2009 documentary by Yann Arthus-Bertrand. The film is almost entirely composed of aerial shots of various places on Earth. It shows the diversity of life on Earth and how humanity is threatening the ecological balance of the planet. The English version was read by Glenn Close. The Spanish version was read by Salma Hayek. The Arabic version was read by Mahmood Said. The film had its world festival premiere at the Dawn Breakers International Film Festival in 2012. Before the festival premier, it was released simultaneously on 5 June 2009, in cinemas across the globe, on DVD, Blu-ray, television, and on YouTube, opening in 181 countries. The film was financed by Kering, a French multinational holding company specializing in retail shops and luxury brands, as part of their public relation strategy.

Home (Glee)

"Home" is the sixteenth episode of the American television series Glee. The episode premiered on the Fox network on April 27, 2010. It was directed by Paris Barclay and written by series creator Brad Falchuk. "Home" sees new cheerleader Mercedes Jones ( Amber Riley) deal with body image issues, while Kurt Hummel ( Chris Colfer) sets his dad and Finn Hudson's mom together, in an attempt to get closer to Finn ( Cory Monteith), and club director Will Schuester ( Matthew Morrison) is reunited with his friend April Rhodes ( Kristin Chenoweth). Chenoweth first appeared in Glee in the episode " The Rhodes Not Taken". She enjoyed the role of April so much that she agreed to return for "Home", and has expressed an interest in reappearing in the future.

The episode features cover versions of five songs, all of which were released as singles, available for digital download, and four of which are included on the soundtrack albumGlee: The Music, Volume 3 – Showstoppers. "Home" was watched by 12.18 million American viewers and received mixed reviews from critics. Both Gerrick D. Kennedy of the Los Angeles Times and Tim Stack of Entertainment Weekly recommended that Chenoweth receive an Emmy nomination for her performance, and Mark A. Perigard of the Boston Herald opined that the episode itself should be submitted for Emmy consideration. Jean Bentley of MTV felt that Chenoweth was overused in the episode, however, and criticized the songs performed as being unrecognizable to younger viewers. Todd VanDerWerff of The A. V. Club felt that the episode was poorly balanced, and Bobby Hankinson of the Houston Chronicle deemed "Home" the weakest episode of Glee thus far.

Home (Monifah album)

Home is the third and final album released by R&B singer Monifah. It was released on October 17, 2000 through Universal Records, with Teddy Riley serving as both an executive producer and producer for the album. Despite input from the legendary Riley, Home was both a critical and commercial flop, becoming her lowest selling and lowest charting album, only making it to 151 on the Billboard 200 and 39 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums. The album's only charting single was "I Can Tell", it was minor hit on the R&B charts. After the album ran its course selling a disappointing 113,000 copies to date, Monifah virtually disappeared from the music business.

Home (Love Amongst Ruin song)

"Home" is the second single by British rock band Love Amongst Ruin. The single was released on October 25, 2010 on Ancient B Records.

Home (Remixes)

"Home (Remixes)" is the first EP release by British rock band Love Amongst Ruin. The EP was released on October 25, 2010 on Ancient B Records and featured six remixes of Home.

Home (Loretta Lynn album)

Home is a 1975 country music album by Loretta Lynn recorded on MCA Records. The album's back cover features a photo of Lynn's famous home in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee (the second consecutive album with a back cover picturing the home) and a brief notice of Lynn's upcoming autobiography Coal Miner's Daughter". Several of the album's tracks are cover versions of recent hits, including "Wrong Road Again", the first major hit by Lynn's sister Crystal Gayle.

Home (Miriam Yeung album)

Home is Cantopop artist Miriam Yeung's seventh EP album. It was released by Capital Artists on 7 October 2010.

The album includes five new songs, two of which were featured in her movies: Love in a Puff and Perfect Wedding . The album also included four music videos.

Home (Steve Swallow album)

Home is an album by bassist Steve Swallow featuring poetry by Robert Creeley recorded in 1979 and released on the ECM label.

Home (2006 film)

Home (2006) is a documentary about New York and the concept of "home" from the perspective of recent Irish Immigrant Alan Cooke, along with a number of notable New York City residents.

Home (August Burns Red album)

Home is a live album by metalcore band August Burns Red released through Solid State Records. in a CD/DVD format. It was filmed live on June 4, 2010 at Warehouse 54 in Manheim, Pennsylvania and was released on September 28, 2010 through Solid State Records.

August Burns Red played different songs from their previous albums. The performance featured many fan favorites from the band’s three full-length albums, Constellations, 2007’s Messengers and 2005’s Thrill Seeker.

The show drew a sold-out crowd of 1250 people who wanted to participate in the performance, including some who traveled internationally, from as close as Montreal to as far as away as Amsterdam. Home also features a bonus video documentary called "Away Games" and featured August Burns Red being interviewed on how they were formed and what they had experienced. It also featured some footage of them touring and fans being interviewed on how August Burns Red had influenced their lives.

Home (nightclub chain)

The Home chain of nightclubs were initially started at the height of popularity of house music. The chain was originally called "Jacobs" until being bought out in 2015. The clubs are notorious for its "anti mobile phones" policy, where phones are confiscated before entrance, and when people breach this rule, a form of "punishment" is implemented. The two clubs at the time were two of the largest nightclubs in their respective countries, and were of a number of dance music enterprises operated by the one company, including various other smaller clubs and the outdoor music festival Homelands.

Home (surname)

Home is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Daniel Dunglas Home (1833–1886), Scottish spiritualist
  • Sir Everard Home, 1st Baronet (1756–1832), British physician
  • John Home (1722–1808), Scottish poet and dramatist
  • John Home, Lord Renton, Senator of the College of Justice
  • Anne Hunter (née Home) (1742–1821), poet and socialite
Home (Dierks Bentley song)

"Home" is a song co-written and recorded by American country music artist Dierks Bentley. It was released in October 2011 as the seventeenth single release of his career, and the second from his sixth studio album for Capitol Records, also titled Home. Bentley co-wrote the song with Dan Wilson and Brett Beavers. The song was selected by the Arizona Centennial Commission to serve as its official song for the state’s 100 year celebration.

Home (When Shadows Fall)

"Home (When Shadows Fall)" is a song written by Harry Clarkson, Geoffrey Clarkson and Peter van Steeden in 1931.

In I Live in Grosvenor Square (1945) it is performed by Irene Manning with a band, and then reprised by Cyril Baker who accompanies himself at the piano. Both Manning and Baker were portraying USO entertainers.

It was later performed by soul singer Sam Cooke and appeared on his album " Ain't That Good News" in 1964.

The song is covered by Paul McCartney on his standards album, Kisses on the Bottom, released February 7, 2012.

Home (Dierks Bentley album)

Home is the sixth studio album by American country music singer Dierks Bentley. It was released in February 2012 via Capitol Records Nashville. The album produced four singles—" Am I the Only One", the " title track", " 5-1-5-0", and " Tip It On Back"—on the Hot Country Songs chart between 2011 and 2012, with the first three on those reaching went to number 1.

Home (schooner)

The Home was a schooner that sank in Lake Michigan off the coast of Centerville, Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, United States. In 2010 the shipwreck site was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Home (Stephanie Mills album)

Home is the twelfth studio album by American R&B recording artist Stephanie Mills. It was released June 26, 1989 on MCA Records and peaked at no. 5 on Billboard Top R&B Albums. The album features R&B hit singles, "Home" and "Something in the Way (You Make Me Feel)" both were number-one hits on Billboard Top R&B Songs chart.

Home (Chris de Burgh album)

Singer/songwriter Chris De Burgh's album, Home, is a collection of acoustic re-recordings of 14 of his generally lesser-known songs.

Home (Nesli album)

Home is the second solo album by Italian rapper Nesli.

Home (Inbari novel)

Home is a 2009 first novel by Israeli author Assaf Inbari. Originally published in Hebrew, the book has not yet appeared in English translation.

It is composed of documentary materials, including passages from speeches, letters, kibbutz newsletter articles, minutes of meetings, and diaries.

Home (Rudimental album)

Home is the debut studio album by British drum and bass band Rudimental. It was released on 29 April 2013 by Asylum Records, Atlantic Records and Black Butter Records. The album includes the singles "Spoons", " Feel the Love", " Not Giving In", " Waiting All Night", " Right Here", and " Free", " Powerless", and "Give You Up". The album cover features the Hackney Peace Carnival Mural. It was nominated for the 2013 Mercury Prize.

Home (Morrison novel)

Home is a novel by the American author Toni Morrison, originally published in 2012 by Alfred A. Knopf. It tells the story of Frank Money, a 24-year-old African-American veteran of the Korean War, and his journey home "a year after being discharged from an integrated Army into a segregated homeland."

Home (2012 film)

Home: Love, Happiness, Memories (Thai title: Home , Home - Khwam Rak Khwam Suk Khwam Song Cham) is a Thai drama film directed by Chookiat Sakveerakul. It was produced and distributed by Sahamongkolfilm International and released in Thailand on 19 April 2012. The film, set in Chiang Mai, consists of three continuous segments, each focusing on a group of characters whose relationships are revealed in the third segment. According to Chookiat, "Unlike my previous works, Home doesn't question any social problems. It's more of a personal film that pulls together my own memories."

In the first segment, recent secondary school graduate Nae (Chutavuth Pattarakampol) is taking photographs of his school campus at night when he meets a younger student acquaintance, Beam (Kittisak Patomburana). The two talk about their experiences, relationships and plans for the future, but have to part as morning comes. The second segment tells the story of widow Buajan ( Penpak Sirikul), who continues to find notes left by her late husband (Witoon Jaiprom), which keep her bonded to his memory but also prevents her from moving on. The last segment centres on the wedding of Chiang Mai native Preeya ( Siraphan Wattanajinda) and Leng ( Ruangsak Loychusak), a businessman from Phuket. Problems arise on the wedding day after Preeya has an encounter with her ex-boyfriend Pek ( Supoj Chancharoen), although she is supported by her aunt (Puttachat Pongsuchat) and brother ( Witwisit Hiranyawongkul).

Home was released on 19 April 2012, and grossed 5,346,751 baht on its opening weekend, placing it second in the Thai box office that weekend after Battleship. The film won the 22nd National Film Association Award for Best Picture, and Chookiat won the Best Director award for his direction of the film.

Home (Phillip Phillips song)

"Home" is the debut single and coronation song from American Idol season 11 winner Phillip Phillips. The song was co-written by Drew Pearson and Greg Holden, and produced by Drew Pearson. Phillips first performed the song on the season's final performance night on May 22, 2012, and then again on the finale after he was declared the winner. His recording of "Home" was released as a single on May 23, 2012 and included as a track on the compilations American Idol Season Finale - Season 11 EP and Journey to the Finale released at the same time. The song was also included on his debut album, The World from the Side of the Moon, released later in November that year.

The single debuted at No. 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 with a first week sales figure of 278,000 downloads. It has the biggest digital sales week for any Idol winner's coronation song, and it became the best selling of all coronation songs, as well as the best-selling song by any Idol alum. It has sold over 5 million copies in the United States.

Home (2015 film)

Home is a 2015 American 3D computer-animated science-fiction buddy comedy film produced by DreamWorks Animation and distributed by 20th Century Fox. It is loosely based on Adam Rex's 2007 children's book The True Meaning of Smekday and starring the voices of Jim Parsons, Rihanna, Steve Martin, Jennifer Lopez, and Matt Jones. Tim Johnson is the director of the film, Chris Jenkins and Suzanne Buirgy are its producers, and the screenplay is by Tom J. Astle and Matt Ember. The story takes place on planet Earth, where an alien race called the Boov invade the planet. However, a girl named Gratuity "Tip" Tucci manages to avoid capture, and goes on the run with Oh, a fugitive Boov.

The film was released in theaters on March 27, 2015. Home was promoted with the release of a four-minute short film titled Almost Home, which was shown in theaters before DreamWorks Animation's Mr. Peabody & Sherman and Blue Sky Studios' Rio 2 in 2014. It premiered at the Boulder International Film Festival on March 7, 2015. Besides lending her voice to the film, Rihanna also created a concept album of the same name. The soundtrack includes guest vocals from Jennifer Lopez, among others, was supported by two singles, " Towards the Sun" and " Feel the Light". Home grossed $386 million worldwide.

Home (Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros song)

"Home" is a song written and recorded by American group Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. It was released in January 2010 as the second single from the album, Up from Below. The song came in at number 73 on Australian radio station Triple J's 100 hottest songs of the past 20 years.

Home (Nosaj Thing album)

Home is the second studio album by American electronic musician Nosaj Thing. It was released on January 22, 2013.

Home (Caspar Brötzmann Massaker album)

Home is the fifth album by Caspar Brötzmann Massaker, released in January 1995 through Our Choice.

Home (Gabrielle Aplin song)

"Home" is a single by British singer-songwriter Gabrielle Aplin. It was released as the fourth single from her debut studio album English Rain (2013). The song was released in the United Kingdom as a digital download on 14 July 2013 through Parlophone. The song peaked at number 48 on the UK Singles Chart.

Home (Carrie Akre album)

Home is the debut solo studio album by the American artist Carrie Akre.

Home (2011 film)

Home is a 2011 Russian drama film directed by Oleg Pogodin.

Home (Kian Egan album)

Home is the debut solo studio album by Irish recording artist Kian Egan, formerly of Westlife. Consisting entirely of cover versions, it was released Ireland on 14 March 2014, and on 17 March in the United Kingdom, through Rhino Records. A signed limited edition was exclusively released through Amazon.

Home (The Walking Dead)

"Home" is the tenth episode of the third season of the post-apocalyptic horror television series The Walking Dead. It was written by Nichole Beattie and directed by Seith Mann, and aired on AMC in the United States on February 17, 2013. In the episode, Rick Grimes ( Andrew Lincoln) begins to see visions of his deceased wife and asks Hershel ( Scott Wilson) for help. Meanwhile, The Governor ( David Morrissey) plans an assault on the prison while Daryl ( Norman Reedus) and Merle Dixon ( Michael Rooker) fend for themselves out in the forest.

HOME (Manchester)

HOME is a centre for international contemporary art, theatre and film in Manchester that opened on 24 April 2015 as part of the First Street development. HOME was formed by the merger of two Manchester-based arts organisations, Cornerhouse and the Library Theatre Company.

The project was funded by Manchester City Council, Arts Council England and the Garfield Weston Foundation. HOME operates under a service contract with Manchester council stating that HOME will provide social benefit to the community.

In 2014, it was announced that filmmaker Danny Boyle would become a patron, along with actress and comedian Meera Syal, director Nicholas Hytner, novelist and poet Jackie Kay, filmmaker Asif Kapadia, actress Suranne Jones, artist Phil Collins and visual artist Rosa Barba.

Home (Public Image Ltd song)

"Home" is a single released by Public Image Ltd in 1986. It reached number seventy five on the UK Singles Chart.

Steve Vai contributes his guitar work to the track.

Home (The Vampire Diaries)

"Home" is the 22nd and last episode of the fifth season of the American series The Vampire Diaries and the series' 111th episode overall. "Home" was originally aired on May 15, 2014, on The CW. The episode was written by Caroline Dries and Brian Young and directed by Chris Grismer.

Home (Naughty Boy song)

Home is a 2014 song by Naughty Boy from his album Hotel Cabana. It features RØMANS, who is signed to Roc Nation. The song was released as a digital download on 27 July 2014. The song has peaked at number 45 on the UK Singles Chart.

Home (1954 TV series)

Home was an American daytime television program hosted by Arlene Francis. Intended for an audience of women, it debuted in 1954 as one of NBC's three major non-primetime shows. While the other two shows— Today and Tonight—are still being produced 60 years later, Home was cancelled in 1957.

Home (Leah McFall song)

"Home" is a song recorded by British singer Leah McFall, the runner-up on the second series of the BBC talent show The Voice, featuring guest vocals from her show mentor will.i.am. Built around a sample from American indie folk band Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros's same-titled 2010 song, it was written and produced by Jean-Baptiste, Ryan Buendia, Michael McHenry, and will.i.am for McFall's debut album Weird to Wonderful, and released as its leading single on Capitol Records on July 27, 2014. This song also featured in the latest film, The Book of Life.

Home (2016 film)

Home is a 2016 American horror film directed by Frank Lin and starring Heather Langenkamp and Samantha Mumba.

Home (Gemma Hayes song)

"Home" is a song written by Irish singer-songwriter Gemma Hayes for her third studio album The Hollow of Morning. This single was released as a promo single in 2008 a follow up to Out Of Our Hands.

A music video accompanied the track in 2009.

Home (Roy Kim album)

Home (sometimes stylized as HOME) is the second studio album by South Korean singer-songwriter Roy Kim, released and distributed on October 8, 2014 through CJ E&M Music. The album features nine tracks in total, and produced a top-five hit which shares the same name as the title of the album. As of July 2016, Home has sold over 12,000 physical copies and about 800,000 individual track downloads in Kim's native country (see Roy Kim discography).

Home (Hip Hop Caucus album)

' HOME 'is a compilation album from American political activism organization Hip Hop Caucus. Announced on 14 November 2014, and released via iTunes on 2 December 2014, the albums features songs from prominent artists such as Elle Varner, Ne-Yo and Crystal Waters. The first single from the album, " Mercy Mercy Me" by recording artist Antonique Smith was released on 20 September 2014.

Home (Madeon song)

"Home" is a single produced by the French electronic musician Madeon. It premiered in 10 March 2015 on Annie Mac's new BBC Radio 1 show. The song serves as the fourth single from his debut studio album, Adventure (2015). The song features vocals from Madeon himself.

Home (1915 film)

Home is a 1915 British silent drama film directed by Maurice Elvey and starring Elisabeth Risdon, Fred Groves and A.V. Bramble. A poor girl discovers she is really a Duke's daughter, but eventually returns to her own family of fishermen.

Home (soundtrack)

Home: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack is the soundtrack album for Home, a 2015 animation film based on the 2007 children book The True Meaning of Smekday by Adam Rex. It features songs recorded by Rihanna, Clarence Coffee Jr., Kiesza, Charli XCX, Jacob Plant, and Jennifer Lopez. It was released on March 23, 2015 through Westbury Road and Roc Nation. Following the announcement that Rihanna would star in the film, it was revealed she would release a concept album based on the animated film. As the executive producer of the soundtrack, she called on various artists to feature on the album. Rihanna's " Towards the Sun" and Jennifer Lopez's " Feel the Light" were released as singles to promote the album.

Home (Ken McIntyre album)

Home is an album recorded by American saxophonist Ken McIntyre in 1975 for the SteepleChase label.

Home (One Direction song)

"Home" is a song by English-Irish boy band One Direction from the Perfect EP. It was released as part of the digital EP on iTunes and Apple Music on 22 October 2015. The song is included as a bonus track on the Japanese version of Made in the A.M.. This song was written by Louis Tomlinson, Liam Payne, and Jamie Scott.

Home (Mocca album)

Mocca introducing the new album, "Home" in the end of year 2014.

The album is been worked at home. This tells the story of a long journey towards the way home. For the deluxe edition, this album packaging can be formed as the house.

Home album begins with a warm Good Morning greeting, and closed with a Good Night whisper.

Home (Blue October album)

Home is the eighth studio album by Blue October. The album was recorded between August and November 2015 at Orb Studios in Austin, Texas and Justin Furstenfeld's home studio Crazy Making Studio. Long-time collaborator Tim Palmer co-produced and mixed the album. The first single, the title track "Home" made its radio debut December 16, 2015. Upon release, the album shot to the #1 spot on the iTunes alternative albums chart. After its first week of sales, Home charted at #10 on the Building Album Sales chart with sales of 22,194 units. In the wake of Prince's death, several of his albums saw a surge in sales. Had it not been for five of Prince's albums charting in the top 10 the same week as Home's debut, the album would have been in the #5 slot. On the Billboard charts, Home debuted at #1 on the Alternative Albums Chart, #1 on the Independent Albums Chart, and #19 on the Billboard 200.

Home (Game of Thrones)

"Home" is the second episode of the sixth season of HBO's fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 52nd overall. The episode was written by Dave Hill and directed by Jeremy Podeswa.

With Jon Snow's ( Kit Harington) assassination still causing disputes at Castle Black, the Wildlings arrive and prevent Alliser Thorne ( Owen Teale) and other leaders of the Night's Watch from retrieving Snow's body, leading to his resurrection. At Winterfell, news of Fat Walda's ( Elizabeth Webster) birthing of a son reaches Roose Bolton ( Michael McElhatton) and Ramsay Bolton ( Iwan Rheon), leading Ramsay to murder his father and newborn brother. Across the Narrow Sea, Tyrion Lannister ( Peter Dinklage) unchains the dragons being held in the catacombs of Meereen, and Arya Stark ( Maisie Williams) proceeds to the next step in her training in Braavos. Meanwhile beyond the Wall, Bran Stark ( Isaac Hempstead Wright) experiences visions of his home, Winterfell, in the distant past.

"Home" received high praise from critics, citing the return of Jon Snow, the reintroduction of Bran Stark with the Three-eyed Raven, the shocking death of Roose Bolton and long awaited death of Balon Greyjoy as high points in the episode. Filming of the episodes closing scene, the director took inspiration from The Anatomy Lesson. In the United States, the episode premiere achieved a viewership of 7.29 million in its initial broadcast. The episode earned an nomination at the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Cinematography for a Single-Camera Series.

Home (Loretta Lynn song)

"Home" is a song written by Bobby Harden that was originally performed by American country music artist Loretta Lynn. It was released as a single in July 1975 via MCA Records.

Usage examples of "home".

But I have bethought me, that, since I am growing old and past the age of getting children, one of you, my sons, must abide at home to cherish me and your mother, and to lead our carles in war if trouble falleth upon us.

For if so be it doth not, then may ye all abide at home, and eat of my meat, and drink of my cup, but little chided either for sloth or misdoing, even as it hath been aforetime.

Wilt thou abide here by Walter thyself alone, and let me bring the imp of Upmeads home to our house?

End, I will lead you over this green plain, and then go back home to mine hermitage, and abide there till ye come to me, or I die.

So they abode a little, and the more part of what talk there was came from the Lady, and she was chiefly asking Ralph of his home in Upmeads, and his brethren and kindred, and he told her all openly, and hid naught, while her voice ravished his very soul from him, and it seemed strange to him, that such an one should hold him in talk concerning these simple matters and familiar haps, and look on him so kindly and simply.

She often returned home pale and silent, having reached the uttermost depths of human abomination, and never daring to say all.

StregaSchloss on the end of a moth-eaten damask curtain was a bad idea, or maybe the sight of the Borgia money going to such an undeserving home had simply robbed the estate lawyer of the will to live, but miraculously his abseiling suicide attempt didnt kill him.

Idea to hearth and home, it would become a new thing, for it would cease to be the thing apart, the ground of all else, the receptacle of absolutely any and every form.

Brook Community Home to find her way to Cromwell Street, nor was she the last to be brutally abused there by Frederick and Rosemary West.

February 20, Garner convened two days of closed-door meetings in a packed amphitheater at Fort McNair, the stately home of the National Defense University, abutting the Potomac River in Washington.

The Pleiades were all abuzz over the advent of their visiting star, Miss Frances Homer, the celebrated monologuist, who, at Eaton Auditorium, again presented her Women of Destiny series, in which she portrays women of history and the influence they brought to bear upon the lives of such momentous world figures as Napoleon, Ferdinand of Spain, Horatio Nelson and Shakespeare.

His provincial accent roughened a little, the Anglic harshened with the tones of Haven, his home planet.

He invited me to come and spend a whole day with him, naming the days when I would be certain to find him at home, but he advised me to consult the Pacha Osman before accepting his invitation.

And the problem is that I need to access my workstation and the server from home, and I left my Secure ID in my desk.

Would it stay obstinately still or would I feel it riding up the side of the acetabulum on the way to its proper home?