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Crossword clues for game

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
game
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a ball game
▪ He’s always watching ball games on TV.
a championship game/match
▪ He was playing in his first championship game of the season.
a chess game/match
▪ Who won the chess game?
a computer game
▪ Kids love playing computer games.
a football match/game
▪ Do you often go to football matches?
a game bird (=that people shoot and eat)
▪ They hunt game birds such as ducks and pheasants.
a game of golf
▪ Anybody fancy a game of golf this afternoon?
a game show (=in which people play games or answer questions to win prizes)
▪ It’s been a popular game show for years.
a hard-fought battle/contest/game etc
▪ one of the most hard-fought games this season
▪ a hard-fought battle for the presidency
a team game/sport (=one that is played by teams)
▪ In those days, girls didn’t play team sports.
arcade game
ball game
▪ I used to be a teacher, so working in an office is a whole new ball game.
big game
▪ a big game hunter
board game
end game
fair game
▪ The young star’s behavior made her fair game for the tabloid press.
game of bluff
▪ Whatever you say, you must do it. This isn’t a game of bluff.
game park
game plan
▪ He has his game plan all worked out.
game point
game reserve
game show
game warden
games console
▪ They're bringing out a new games console this Christmas.
gave the game away (=showed something that he was trying to keep secret)
▪ The look on his face gave the game away.
give the game away (=give information that should be secret)
▪ I don’t want to give the game away by saying too much.
head game
▪ He’s obviously playing head games with you.
home team/game/crowd/club etc
▪ The home team took the lead after 25 minutes.
in as many days/weeks/games etc
▪ A great trip! We visited five countries in as many days in five days.
multi-player gaming
Olympic Games, the
▪ the 1976 Olympic Games
parlour game
party games
▪ The children had great fun playing party games.
pick-up game
platform game
playing head games
▪ He’s obviously playing head games with you.
shell game
▪ Critics called the proposal a shell game.
video game
war game
win a game/match
▪ It’s supposed to be easier to win your home games.
zero-sum game
▪ Diplomatic negotiations often aim at a zero-sum game.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ He says it's a big game for me and the club.
▪ Everyone else is capable of a big game but rarely do they occur together.
▪ It's all a big game.
▪ Nebraska finishes with Iowa State, watered-down Colorado and some second-tier opponent in the Big 12 title game.
▪ They reckon it's no bad thing to be going from one big game to another.
▪ The biggest game of them all!
▪ He scooped the jackpot and a diamond ring prize after calling house on 52 in our big money game number 229.
▪ I love to play in big games.
fair
▪ All kinds of birds and fish were also fair game, with parrots being particularly prized prey.
▪ Any woman on this street would seem to be fair game, and especially a gaijin.
▪ Unlike the Koran, however, the Bible has long been fair game for spirited literary re-readings.
▪ Government officials were always fair game to be bought by special interests.
▪ To be fair his game did exceed that. emailinc Glurk.
▪ And everything is fair game: If it moves, you can shoot.
▪ However, small, non-mechanical parts are fair game and might show considerable savings.
▪ Without a man, such women would be fair game for violence from anyone.
good
▪ Female speaker It's a good laugh; good team game, loads of spirit.
▪ So the Raiders played their best game of the season.
▪ Neil Greenwood says Rugby League is a better game than Union.
▪ She really wasn't any good at this game of deception - especially where her friend was concerned.
▪ My best games are ahead of me.
olympic
▪ But it also did not want to tarnish its image as a candidate to host the 2008 Olympic games.
▪ The same teams meet in a pool A Olympic game July 26.
▪ The third task of universities is a sort of Olympic games for intellectuals.
▪ These Olympic games are themselves the product not of a municipal bid, but of private entrepreneurship.
▪ The Olympic games version would settle for less than 10 per cent of school-leavers.
▪ It happened at the Olympic games at Munich in 1972.
▪ So important were the Olympic games in the ancient world that the calendar was set by them.
video
▪ At one school, children watched television and played video games as usual.
▪ Why not turn the sport into a video game?
▪ He saw her playing with the video games, checking out the board games, giving the stuffed animals trial hugs.
▪ The self-absorbed child who is bright and verbal may be-come quite expert in computer, chess, and video games.
▪ Congressional interest in video game violence has decreased.
▪ You can also use his interest in computer or video games to motivate him to join in other activities.
whole
▪ In my case, this may happen once in a whole game.
▪ Pretty music underscores the whole game.
▪ I don't want you giving away our whole game.
▪ It was so loud the whole game that you really have to appreciate that.
▪ Clearly the whole game has a dimension of linear extension which enables a continual process of growth in recognition.
▪ My whole game came together, putting included.
▪ He did nearly nothing the whole game.
▪ Do you want me to slam into 300-pound guys the whole game?
■ NOUN
ball
▪ Read in studio Still to come on Central News, it's a whole new ball game.
▪ Analysts said the company had done just what it needed to do to stay in the telephone company ball game.
▪ He also went out to the streets of Sedgefield to interview villagers on their feelings about the Sedgefield ball game.
▪ Nothing works quite like finger food in terms of complementing a b-#ball game.
▪ This war will start at an appointed time, like a ball game.
▪ Everyone laughed. Ball games became even more fun.
▪ They looked like three guys relaxing after a ball game.
▪ As we enter the final straight, everything will hinge on how we respond and adjust to the new ball game.
board
▪ Games At one time most games relevant to history were board games.
▪ Lots of computer-generated technical dazzle in this fantasy about jungle animals escaping a supernatural board game and terrorizing a New Hampshire town.
▪ When you are laying out a new workshop you can play a particularly entertaining board game.
▪ He saw her playing with the video games, checking out the board games, giving the stuffed animals trial hugs.
▪ But this trendy new board game is littered with connotations of drug use.
▪ Cyril said, throwing the board games, one by one, downward.
▪ A family hooked on the board game Cluedo found Asha'a body in Somerset last week, 14 years after she vanished.
▪ Designed like a board game, your choices move a young writer through his career.
card
▪ He was said to have returned to his own room to finish a card game of patience before reporting finding the body.
▪ She also acts vividly, and the card game and last-minute rescue are effectively tense.
▪ Consider the card games, whist and bridge.
▪ There were, as Yves had predicted so confidently, no card games in the boathouse.
▪ A little fat guy came in and said he was for the card game in Room 42.
▪ Many also knew card games like monte, poker, and seven-up.
computer
▪ Children from well-off families would rather play computer games than go outside.
▪ The museum car also features computer games and quizzes to test visitors' knowledge of train lore and station architecture.
▪ We both read a great deal and play computer games.
▪ They played computer games, partied together, had a lot of the same friends.
▪ The children in particular had a great time with computer games, entertainers and bouncy castles to keep them occupied.
▪ Presley City, all of it, is some kind of big computer game.
▪ Entertainment World run one of the biggest computer games clubs.
football
▪ In May 1988, Tudorbury dealers had the bright idea of fixing a football game with Harvard Securities.
▪ Or with so many global crises to keep an eye on, what the Almighty was doing watching a football game.
▪ He also happened to have a wager on the outcome of the football game.
▪ All were allegedly taken at the same football game by freelance photographer E. J. Flammer.
▪ Lula exclaimed when Alvin approached her with news of a school football game he was to play in.
▪ Oh, and there will a football game, too.
home
▪ Also, what's the situation with home games?
▪ Every home game has been sold out to season ticket-holders since 1960.
▪ It was tense for a few minutes ... but it was the first home game ... and the first win at stake.
▪ It is attached to the hotel where the Packers stay the night before their home games.
▪ Middlesbrough hope for a good crowd despite it being the third home game of the week.
▪ The caution takes Mohan to 21 points and a one-match ban that will rule him out of the home game against Barnsley.
▪ David takes him to one of the home games, then briefs Jody by phone before the guy calls for a date.
league
▪ This, in fact, was the seventh defeat in their last nine League games.
▪ It's Monday night and he's watching a National Football League game.
▪ Chelsea have yet to win a League game in his absence, taking four points from a possible 12.
▪ Their first league game was played at the beginning of September, at the Glenpatrick Road pitch.
▪ Worked-out by the all-conquering micro-chip this gives Durham four home fixtures, including two Sunday league games, by April 26.
▪ Crosby has 18 players in his squad all fighting to make a Wembley impression in the remaining four league games.
▪ We haven't lost in 13 league games 8 of which are wins.
▪ Darlington had only eight wins in 31 League games, with the worst defensive away record in the four divisions.
show
▪ Eccentric I see that the television game show that inspired letters to you recently has been at it again.
▪ Sting performed at the Super Bowl pre-game show.
▪ The Christmas Day morale booster was only the game show host's second trip outside hospital since his near-fatal crash.
▪ So it's only politically correct and fair to write about an actor who's appearing on that other famous game show.
▪ And television has enshrined these twin virtues in quiz and games shows.
▪ A game show appeared to be in progress, and lights were flashing, indicating that some one had won.
▪ This isn't some game show where you barter with another contestant for the big prize.
war
▪ Many of these were war games which involved the movement of fighting forces and resources over a map on the board.
▪ But such autopsies, like war games, often bear little resemblance to actual war.
▪ The unit was one of dozens participating in the Kernel Blitz 97 biennial war game at Camp Pendleton.
▪ Planned events include a fantasy role-playing war games day, an Easter egg hunt and motorcycle display.
▪ The U.S. military's favorite way of testing its assumptions and ideas is to run a war game.
▪ The war game was fought out at Schriever Air Force base in Colorado and was set in space in the year 2017.
▪ Generals love virtual reality, war games of any kind.
■ VERB
lose
▪ Unfortunately we lost our last game and other results went against us so we were down and out.
▪ Past Cat teams would have been mortified at the thought of losing four conference games.
▪ After a convincing win in game 1 Kasparov fell prey to overconfidence, losing games 4 and 5.
▪ Drake was the only team that offered a real challenge, and Oregon lost that game.
▪ It would have been very easy for the Cats to lose that game.
▪ Nearest challengers Enfield lost their third game in a row by 2-0 at home to Basingstoke Town.
▪ I was lost in the game.
miss
▪ Scrafford also injured a foot last year and missed nine games.
▪ He misses his second game in succession when Instonians are the visitors tomorrow at Stevenson Park.
▪ No way I was going to miss that game.
▪ And I was missing too many games complaining of a bad knee when there was nothing really wrong with it.
▪ He missed all of April last season with a strained left hip and missed 20 games due to injury.
▪ Spellman, in the second year of a four-year, $ 11. 6 million contract, had missed five straight games.
▪ In 1995-96, he averaged seven points over 51 games, missing 23 games with a sprained ankle.
play
▪ But we're certainly not going to play highest-bidder games.
▪ I know how to play the game myself.
▪ The voluptuous actress wouldn't need to play foolish games with him.
▪ The graphics and special effects are described by many who have played the game as being well beyond anything out there.
▪ Don't play games with me, dear monk.
▪ But Symington and the Legislature are simply playing games here.
▪ Or am I playing some deep game, as I was with the choice of accommodation?
▪ Roberts' poor physical condition combined with nagging injuries prevented him from playing more than 51 games in the past four seasons.
start
▪ Highly-rated midfielder Gary Owers could also start a game for the first time in over three months, depending on Bracewell's condition.
▪ Kent Graham has been in the league and started games.
▪ In no time, your baby will be starting this hilarious game himself.
▪ Carr started 10 games early in the season when the Suns were banged up.
▪ Law 10 Kick-Off A place-kick is now only taken to start the game, or to start the game after half-time.
▪ He started the majority of games in the final two months of the season as Clyde Drexler recovered from knee surgery.
▪ She had a good view of the hospital entrance, so she started her private game of guessing what the people were.
▪ Right-hander Carlos Reyes, who will pitch opening day, has started just 10 major-league games.
watch
▪ Even better, the two young women were lounging near the bar, watching the darts game in progress.
▪ We were sitting around, watching games, imagining every scenario.
▪ We used to watch the game together and I'd suddenly see him wince in pain.
▪ The simple joy of watching a game slowly unfold was replaced by the chrome brutality of the box score.
▪ But if you watched Swindon's game on Sunday ... you were in for a treat.
▪ Parents have to drive them to soccer practice, and stay to watch the game, or be considered child abusers.
▪ They all started watching the game very intently.
▪ It takes an hour and a half to watch the game.
win
▪ No-one deserved to win this uninspiring game!
▪ The Bears won just one more game after that, finishing the year with a disappointing 6-6 record.
▪ Give the flower to Mum to win the game.
▪ They won more games since Jan. 7 than the Sharks won all year.
▪ Now, whatever Wimbledon do, Bradford will stay up if they win their last two games.
▪ And even if equal opportunity to win the game were attained it would only establish the game.
▪ In terms of price for what you get, it wins - game, set and match.
▪ The present and future won a big basketball game Wednesday night at the Coliseum Arena.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(play) a/the waiting game
▪ Although most people were relieved that the waiting game was over, the first days and nights were nerve-racking.
▪ But von Steinholz wanted to play a waiting game and see where the trail led him.
▪ Friday, and volunteer fireman Dave Papenfuss said it was purely a waiting game after that.
▪ It was a waiting game now, she thought anxiously.
▪ Lucy only wished that she could have more of the patience required to play a waiting game.
▪ She had played a waiting game with great skill in the 1540s.
▪ The Danley strike, like many others, was a waiting game and a numbers game.
▪ Unfortunately, with work inhibition, the waiting game only ensures future problems.
a whole new ball game
▪ I used to be a teacher, so working in an office is a whole new ball game.
▪ Although not my cup of tea, I must admit Manchester United is a whole new ball game.
▪ Read in studio Still to come on Central News, it's a whole new ball game.
▪ So obviously if he's hidden this one, he's playing a whole new ball game.
ahead of the game/curve
▪ Belmont city leaders have never been ahead of the curve in environmental matters.
▪ Businesses that want to stay ahead of the curve find trend research crucial.
▪ It just shows how desperate New Yorkers are to be ahead of the curve.
▪ Reagan was ahead of the curve in his sensible discussion of the economics of Social Security.
▪ The successful programs I know of in college football stay ahead of the game.
▪ Then again, some major thinkers are way ahead of the curve.
▪ This talk gave me another view of Mike-a little guy who had once been ahead of the game.
be a mug's game
be at the top of your game
fun and games
▪ It started out as fun and games but became a successful business.
▪ A wild midnight gallop lands her on the very doorstep of her ancestral home, and the fun and games commence.
▪ As head of the Fort Baxter motor pool, Bilko runs all the fun and games on the base.
▪ Free fun and games ... Happy children make happy holidays - for everyone.
▪ In return for the fun and games, the youthful members, whether or not interested in politics, are expected to help with the electioneering.
▪ It was not all fun and games.
▪ Next time the left hand section of Cheedale's Cornice dries out, we should see some fun and games.
▪ Party and Class All this fun and games is not looked upon with disapproval by the seniors in the Conservative Party.
▪ Police suspected that the boys, whose fun and games hurt a lot of people, were on drugs.
play (a game of) cat and mouse (with sb)
▪ For the rest of the hunting season, the saboteurs will play a cat and mouse game with the huntsmen.
▪ They played cat and mouse with the Bay, now scrambling for the outside, now sneaking back in.
play games
▪ As a child she preferred playing games with boys to dressing up dolls.
▪ But Symington and the Legislature are simply playing games here.
▪ Don't waste time by playing games.
▪ I don't play games at all!
▪ If they want to play games with their parachutes, then that is their affair.
▪ Just going out to resupply some patrols on a secure road was so bland that we played games to make it interesting.
▪ The Dauphin was showing Henry that he was just a stupid kid who should still be playing games.
▪ They can only create challenges for themselves, play games within the games.
play the game
▪ Diillon won't get promoted if he's not willing to play the game.
▪ He thought he was playing the game again.
▪ I know how to play the game myself.
▪ Just like playing the game itself, it seems.
▪ Last year three hundred and sixty pupils were injured from three thousand schools who regularly play the game.
▪ Most manufacturers have played the game.
▪ Until that point we were really just playing the game.
▪ We assume to start with that the weighted patterns provide a rough guide to playing the game.
▪ While online, the user could play the game, which would be stored in short-term memory.
the name of the game
▪ Popularity is the name of the game in television.
▪ But inequality is still the name of the game for many.
▪ No-one ever really suggested it and we never knew the name of the game.
▪ Popularity is the name of the game in television.
▪ Selection is inevitable and flexibility is the name of the game.
▪ Survival was the name of the game, as it has been throughout history.
▪ When the cause is known the effects are clearly understood: metaphysics was the name of the game.
the shock/surprise/game etc of sb's life
▪ And so that would be the surprise of her life.
▪ But on Sunday Collins played the game of his life in destroying the fancied Vikings.
▪ Goalie Garth Snow played the game of his life to save Philly.
▪ He had arrived before the others, and got the shock of his life when he saw Nails.
▪ He said he was the security guard, but he had the shock of his life when he saw me.
▪ She is having the game of her life.
▪ So when he followed up by pointing us towards the touchline, I got the shock of my life.
throw a match/game/fight
▪ This year, he is throwing a game party at his home in Austin.
two can play at that game
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Psychic Detective" is a CD-ROM computer game from Electronic Arts Studios.
▪ a video game
▪ About 7 million households have people who play computer games.
▪ Barcelona beat Real Madrid 3-2 in a thrilling game.
▪ Board games are still popular gifts.
▪ board games like Monopoly and Ludo
▪ Chadwick suggested that baseball evolved from the English game of rounders.
▪ Chess is such a difficult game.
▪ Do you want to come and watch the volleyball game this Saturday?
▪ Evansville will play Maryland in the championship game.
▪ Harvey has devised a Spanish-English language card game.
▪ Have you ever played Mah Jong? It's a Chinese game.
▪ How about a game of tennis this evening?
▪ I'm not very good at card games.
▪ I got two tickets for the Bulls' game.
▪ In Wales, rugby is the national game.
▪ Let's have a game of chess.
▪ Rugby is a very exciting, fast-moving game.
▪ Sampras leads, two games to one.
▪ Sharpe had injured a knee in a football game a few weeks earlier
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Breakdown must be one of the best reader's games we've ever had.
▪ But I just tried to keep focusing on the game.
▪ In 18 games for Ottawa last season he had 15 points.
▪ Players have stepped up their games.
▪ That is why so few books on the middle game, he wrote, though plenty on openings and endgames.
▪ The Vikings nearly won the game in regulation.
▪ Then you proceed to get all the other pairs to win the game ten pairs to none.
▪ They were, though, marginally the more inventive in a game that showed signs of decline from the early stages.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
straight
▪ They hit 10 of 17 attempts, the fourth straight game they have made 10 or more 3-pointers.
▪ It was the second straight game Lang and Conacher were held out.
■ NOUN
animal
▪ At that time, an ice age was ending, game animals were flourishing, and humans were relatively few.
▪ A more challenging species of game animal.
▪ Only one of the hoofed mammals has never been a game animal.
▪ Studies have shown that game animals, principally venison, are more efficient land users than domesticated livestock.
▪ As huntress she both preserves and destroys game animals, but she does not draw the line at animals.
ball
▪ They gave him a standing ovation from the dugout and promised to present him with the game ball.
▪ Palic, whose best punt was a 55-yard bomb, was awarded a game ball afterward.
bird
▪ All my work has been involved with estates where game birds were the prime consideration.
▪ Shopping for Quail Quail, one of the most widely available of all game birds, are stocked in many poultry departments.
▪ Some of these may be used in combination when grilling meat or game birds.
▪ It is one of the few game birds where the flavor does not vary substantially between the wild and farm-raised fowl.
▪ Like all other game birds, quail need to be cooked carefully to avoid overcooking, as the flesh can dry out.
▪ They are, however, slightly more forgiving than squab and other game birds to overcooking.
▪ Pickling is a very old technique that was used to preserve game birds before refrigeration was widely available.
▪ Similar accomplishments can be found in the raising of many almost-extinct species of game birds, such as wild turkey.
day
▪ But on game day, security shut that down.
▪ They sold 271 burritos on game day, 38 the day before.
face
▪ Stunned, the Haleys managed to put on a game face.
▪ Jody wants them to put on their game face, to get serious, get tough.
▪ This is the closest she has ever come to having a game face.
▪ The players all have their game faces on.
park
▪ Yes, Bert agreed, he had gone to the game parks with his whole family. he had seen them.
plan
▪ When he needed to vary his game plan Hamed was unable to.
▪ That took them out of the game plan, too.
▪ The previous commissioner spent months with us, analysing our game plans and marketing strategy.
▪ Member companies spent most of the first year trying to hammer out a mission and a game plan.
▪ Whether he can establish a solid relationship with him, likes his attitude-and if that player fits his game plan.
▪ The Raiders' game plan revealed astonishing flexibility.
▪ As the staff looks toward the future, its game plan is to provide quality care.
▪ Rison was conspicuously absent from much of the Jaguars' game plan.
play
▪ It must have stunning graphics, appealing game play and often a computer opponent of just the right difficulty level.
▪ The game play is choppy, with slow player movements, while shooting and ball control are difficult to handle.
▪ The result of this advance to multimedia users will mean higher-quality graphics, extended 3-D animation and enhanced game play.
player
▪ An attempt by Bandai to break into the game player business has encountered even more problems.
show
▪ Afterwards it feels like the satisfactory completion of another episode of a long-running game show.
▪ They appeared with starlets at cabarets, guested on game shows and even flirted with politics, always wearing their masks.
▪ Traditionally, a game show has a host.
theory
▪ Recently game theory has made strides.
▪ One of the few notions from game theory to penetrate the popular culture was the distinction of zero-sum and nonzero-sum games.
time
▪ Camby is expected to suit up and decide just before game time whether to play.
▪ But at game time, when they were warming up, they had white players on their team.
▪ Even football fans may be driven to boycott the products, turn off the television set at game time or throw up.
▪ The song echoes through Mac Court, which, just a few minutes before game time, is almost empty.
▪ A few hours before game time Thursday afternoon, Jody is out jogging around the marina.
▪ Two hours before game time, she was curled up on her living-room floor clutching her stomach.
▪ Jody tells the team in the locker room before game time.
▪ His availability will be determined at game time.
warden
▪ The game warden and the biospherians were facing each other on either side of a thick airtight window.
▪ On patrol, game warden Jay Little Hawk discovers the bodies of a herd of mutilated deer.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ An attempt by Bandai to break into the game player business has encountered even more problems.
▪ But at game time, when they were warming up, they had white players on their team.
▪ Meat stocks are essential to the intense sauces commonly found in game cooking.
▪ The game play and artificial intelligence are unmatched in sports video gaming.
▪ The present $ 400 gap between it and the game machines looks daunting.
III.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
computer
▪ Years ago, my introduction to computer gaming came via a program called Adventure.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a whole new ball game
▪ I used to be a teacher, so working in an office is a whole new ball game.
▪ Although not my cup of tea, I must admit Manchester United is a whole new ball game.
▪ Read in studio Still to come on Central News, it's a whole new ball game.
▪ So obviously if he's hidden this one, he's playing a whole new ball game.
ahead of the game/curve
▪ Belmont city leaders have never been ahead of the curve in environmental matters.
▪ Businesses that want to stay ahead of the curve find trend research crucial.
▪ It just shows how desperate New Yorkers are to be ahead of the curve.
▪ Reagan was ahead of the curve in his sensible discussion of the economics of Social Security.
▪ The successful programs I know of in college football stay ahead of the game.
▪ Then again, some major thinkers are way ahead of the curve.
▪ This talk gave me another view of Mike-a little guy who had once been ahead of the game.
be a mug's game
be at the top of your game
fun and games
▪ It started out as fun and games but became a successful business.
▪ A wild midnight gallop lands her on the very doorstep of her ancestral home, and the fun and games commence.
▪ As head of the Fort Baxter motor pool, Bilko runs all the fun and games on the base.
▪ Free fun and games ... Happy children make happy holidays - for everyone.
▪ In return for the fun and games, the youthful members, whether or not interested in politics, are expected to help with the electioneering.
▪ It was not all fun and games.
▪ Next time the left hand section of Cheedale's Cornice dries out, we should see some fun and games.
▪ Party and Class All this fun and games is not looked upon with disapproval by the seniors in the Conservative Party.
▪ Police suspected that the boys, whose fun and games hurt a lot of people, were on drugs.
play (a game of) cat and mouse (with sb)
▪ For the rest of the hunting season, the saboteurs will play a cat and mouse game with the huntsmen.
▪ They played cat and mouse with the Bay, now scrambling for the outside, now sneaking back in.
the name of the game
▪ Popularity is the name of the game in television.
▪ But inequality is still the name of the game for many.
▪ No-one ever really suggested it and we never knew the name of the game.
▪ Popularity is the name of the game in television.
▪ Selection is inevitable and flexibility is the name of the game.
▪ Survival was the name of the game, as it has been throughout history.
▪ When the cause is known the effects are clearly understood: metaphysics was the name of the game.
the shock/surprise/game etc of sb's life
▪ And so that would be the surprise of her life.
▪ But on Sunday Collins played the game of his life in destroying the fancied Vikings.
▪ Goalie Garth Snow played the game of his life to save Philly.
▪ He had arrived before the others, and got the shock of his life when he saw Nails.
▪ He said he was the security guard, but he had the shock of his life when he saw me.
▪ She is having the game of her life.
▪ So when he followed up by pointing us towards the touchline, I got the shock of my life.
two can play at that game
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Console users take gaming seriously, and their brand loyalty is frightening.
▪ For one thing, most other potential bidders have expertise in either lodging or gaming, not both.
▪ So heed Film's guide to gaming.
▪ The game play and artificial intelligence are unmatched in sports video gaming.
▪ The next largest source of income is from raffles and gaming.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Game

Game \Game\, a. [Cf. W. cam crooked, and E. gambol, n.] Crooked; lame; as, a game leg. [Colloq.]

Game

Game \Game\, n. [OE. game, gamen, AS. gamen, gomen, play, sport; akin to OS., OHG., & Icel. gaman, Dan. gammen mirth, merriment, OSw. gamman joy. Cf. Gammon a game, Backgammon, Gamble v. i.]

  1. Sport of any kind; jest, frolic.

    We have had pastimes here, and pleasant game.
    --Shak.

  2. A contest, physical or mental, according to certain rules, for amusement, recreation, or for winning a stake; as, a game of chance; games of skill; field games, etc.

    But war's a game, which, were their subject wise, Kings would not play at.
    --Cowper.

    Note: Among the ancients, especially the Greeks and Romans, there were regularly recurring public exhibitions of strength, agility, and skill under the patronage of the government, usually accompanied with religious ceremonies. Such were the Olympic, the Pythian, the Nemean, and the Isthmian games.

  3. The use or practice of such a game; a single match at play; a single contest; as, a game at cards.

    Talk the game o'er between the deal.
    --Lloyd.

  4. That which is gained, as the stake in a game; also, the number of points necessary to be scored in order to win a game; as, in short whist five points are game.

  5. (Card Playing) In some games, a point credited on the score to the player whose cards counts up the highest.

  6. A scheme or art employed in the pursuit of an object or purpose; method of procedure; projected line of operations; plan; project.

    Your murderous game is nearly up.
    --Blackw. Mag.

    It was obviously Lord Macaulay's game to blacken the greatest literary champion of the cause he had set himself to attack.
    --Saintsbury.

  7. Animals pursued and taken by sportsmen; wild meats designed for, or served at, table.

    Those species of animals . . . distinguished from the rest by the well-known appellation of game.
    --Blackstone.

    Confidence game. See under Confidence.

    To make game of, to make sport of; to mock.
    --Milton.

Game

Game \Game\ (g[=a]m), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Gamed (g[=a]md); p. pr. & vb. n. Gaming.] [OE. gamen, game?en, to rejoice, AS. gamenian to play. See Game, n.]

  1. To rejoice; to be pleased; -- often used, in Old English, impersonally with dative. [Obs.]

    God loved he best with all his whole hearte At alle times, though him gamed or smarte.
    --Chaucer.

  2. To play at any sport or diversion.

  3. To play for a stake or prize; to use cards, dice, billiards, or other instruments, according to certain rules, with a view to win money or some other thing waged upon the issue of the contest; to gamble.

Game

Game \Game\, a.

  1. Having a resolute, unyielding spirit, like the gamecock; ready to fight to the last; plucky.

    I was game . . . .I felt that I could have fought even to the death.
    --W. Irving.

  2. Of or pertaining to such animals as are hunted for game, or to the act or practice of hunting. Game bag, a sportsman's bag for carrying small game captured; also, the whole quantity of game taken. Game bird, any bird commonly shot for food, esp. grouse, partridges, quails, pheasants, wild turkeys, and the shore or wading birds, such as plovers, snipe, woodcock, curlew, and sandpipers. The term is sometimes arbitrarily restricted to birds hunted by sportsmen, with dogs and guns. Game egg, an egg producing a gamecock. Game laws, laws regulating the seasons and manner of taking game for food or for sport. Game preserver, a land owner who regulates the killing of game on his estate with a view to its increase. [Eng.] To be game.

    1. To show a brave, unyielding spirit.

    2. To be victor in a game. [Colloq.]

      To die game, to maintain a bold, unyielding spirit to the last; to die fighting.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
game

"ready for action, unafraid, and up to the task;" probably literally "spirited as a game-cock," 1725, from game-cock "bird bred for fighting" (1670s), from game (n.) in the "sport, amusement" sense. Middle English adjectives gamesome, gamelich meant "joyful, playful, sportive."

game

"lame," 1787, from north Midlands dialect, of unknown origin, perhaps a variant of gammy (tramps' slang) "bad," or from Old North French gambe "leg" (see gambol (n.)).

game

Middle English gamen "to sport, joke, jest," from Old English gamenian "to play, jest, joke;" see game (n.). The Middle English word is little recorded from c.1400 and modern use for "to play at games" (1520s) probably is a new formation from the noun; and it might have been re-re-coined late 20c. in reference to computer games. Related: Gamed; gaming.

game

c.1200, from Old English gamen "joy, fun; game, amusement," common Germanic (cognates: Old Frisian game "joy, glee," Old Norse gaman "game, sport; pleasure, amusement," Old Saxon gaman, Old High German gaman "sport, merriment," Danish gamen, Swedish gamman "merriment"), said to be identical with Gothic gaman "participation, communion," from Proto-Germanic *ga- collective prefix + *mann "person," giving a sense of "people together."\n

\nThe -en was lost perhaps through being mistaken for a suffix. Meaning "contest for success or superiority played according to rules" is first attested c.1200 (of athletic contests, chess, backgammon). Especially "the sport of hunting, fishing, hawking, or fowling" (c.1300), thus "wild animals caught for sport" (c.1300), which is the game in fair game (see under fair (adj.)), also gamey. Meaning "number of points required to win a game" is from 1830. Game plan is 1941, from U.S. football; game show first attested 1961.

Wiktionary
game
  1. 1 (context colloquial English) Willing to participate. 2 (context of an animal English) That shows a tendency to continue to fight against another animal, despite being wounded, often severely. 3 Persistent, especially in senses similar to the above. 4 Injured, lame (of a limb). n. 1 A playful or competitive activity. 2 # A playful activity that may be unstructured; an amusement or pastime. 3 # (label en countable) An activity described by a set of rules, especially for the purpose of entertainment, often competitive or having an explicit goal. 4 # (label en countable) A particular instance of playing a game; '''match'''. 5 # That which is gained, such as the stake in a game. 6 # The number of points necessary to win a game. 7 # (label en card games) In some games, a point awarded to the player whose cards add up to the largest sum. 8 # (label en countable) The equipment that enables such activity, particularly as packaged under a title. 9 # One's manner, style, or performance in playing a game. 10 (label en countable informal nearly always singular) A field of gainful activity, as an industry or profession. 11 (label en countable figuratively) Something that resembles a game with rules, despite not being designed. v

  2. 1 (context intransitive English) To gamble. 2 (context intransitive English) To play games and be a gamer. 3 (context transitive English) To exploit loopholes in a system or bureaucracy in a way which defeats or nullifies the spirit of the rules in effect, usually to obtain a result which otherwise would be unobtainable. 4 (context transitive slang of males English) To perform premeditated seduction strategy.

WordNet
game
  1. n. a single play of a game; "the game lasted 2 hours"

  2. a contest with rules to determine a winner; "you need four people to play this game"

  3. an amusement or pastime; "they played word games"; "he thought of his painting as a game that filled his empty time"; "his life was all fun and games"

  4. animal hunted for food or sport

  5. the game equipment needed to play a game; "the child received several games for his birthday"

  6. your occupation or line of work; "he's in the plumbing game"; "she's in show biz" [syn: biz]

  7. (games) the score at a particular point or the score needed to win; "the game is 6 all"; "he is serving for the game"

  8. the flesh of wild animals that is used for food

  9. a secret scheme to do something (especially something underhand or illegal); "they concocted a plot to discredit the governor"; "I saw through his little game from the start" [syn: plot, secret plan]

  10. frivolous or trifling behavior; "for actors, memorizing lines is no game"; "for him, life is all fun and games"

game
  1. adj. disabled in the feet or legs; "a crippled soldier"; "a game leg" [syn: crippled, halt, halting, lame]

  2. willing to face danger [syn: gamy, gamey, gritty, mettlesome, spirited, spunky]

game

v. place a bet on; "Which horse are you backing?"; "I'm betting on the new horse" [syn: bet on, back, gage, stake, punt]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Game (disambiguation)

A game is a recreational activity with a set of rules.

Game or games may also refer to:

Game (hunting)

Game or quarry is any animal hunted for sport or for food.

The type and range of animals hunted for food varies in different parts of the world. This is influenced by climate, animal diversity, local taste and locally accepted views about what can or cannot be legitimately hunted. Sometimes a distinction is also made between varieties and species of a particular animal, such as wild turkey and domestic turkey. Fish caught for sport are referred to as game fish.

The term game arises in medieval hunting terminology by the late 13th century and is particular to English, from the generic meaning of Old English gamen (Germanic *gamanan) "joy, amusement, sport, merriment". Quarry in the generic meaning is early modern (first recorded 1610), in the more specific sense "bird targeted in falconry" late 14th and 15th centuries as quirre "entrails of deer placed on the hide and given to the hunting-dogs as a reward", from Old Frenchcuiriee "spoil, quarry" (ultimately Latin corium "hide"), but influenced by corée "viscera, entrails" (Late Latin *corata "entrails", from cor "heart").

In some countries, game is classified, including legal classification with respect to licences required, as either "small game" or "large game". Small game includes small animals, such as rabbits, pheasants, geese or ducks. A single small game licence may cover all small game species and be subject to yearly bag limits. Large game includes animals like deer and bear and are often subject to individual licensing where a separate licence is required for each individual animal taken (tags).

Big game is a term sometimes used interchangeably with large game although in other contexts it refers to large, typically African, mammals (specifically " big five game" or "dangerous game") which are hunted mainly for trophies in safaris.

Game (dog)

Game or gameness is a quality of fighting dogs or working terriers that are selectively bred and conditioned from a very early age to develop traits of eagerness despite the threat of substantive injury. Dogs displaying this trait can also be described as persevering, ready and willing, full of fight, spirited, or plucky.

Game (2003 film)

Game (stylized [email protected]) is a 2003 Japanese thriller film, based on a novel by Keigo Higashino.

Game (KHM album)

Game is the debut album by KHM, a rap group consisting of Kool Keith, H-Bomb (aka Jacky Jasper), and Marc Live. The album was released on November 19, 2002 for Number 6 Records and was produced by all three members of the group. The album gained some positive reviews but was a commercial failure and did not make it to the Billboard charts or spawn any hit singles. English trip hop artist Tricky makes a guest appearance on the track "Run Dem Red".

Game (BoA song)

"Game" is Korean singer BoA's debut single from her sixth Korean album Hurricane Venus. It was released as a promotional digital download, to preview two songs from her new album. The single would be followed up by the title song "Hurricane Venus". The single for "Game" was released under the same name as the album, Hurricane Venus, Vol. 6. The song "Yeop Saram" was performed live on"KJE's Chocolate" on August 22, 2010

Game (retailer)

Game Digital plc (formerly The Game Group plc; usually known by its high street name Game and stylised as GAME) is a British video games retail company.

The company's origins lie in the founding of the Rhino Group by Terry Norris and Bev Ripley in 1991. A number of mergers and acquisitions followed during the 1990s, and in 1999, the company was purchased by Electronics Boutique Limited, which rebranded itself as The Game Group. The company continued to expand during the 2000s, purchasing several retailers including Gameswizards in Australia.

In March 2012, several suppliers, including Nintendo, Electronic Arts and Capcom refused to supply their latest products due to concerns over Game's creditworthiness. Game subsequently entered administration on 26 March 2012, and was purchased by OpCapita the following week. Baker Acquisitions was subsequently renamed Game Retail Ltd.

The company operated in the United Kingdom under the Game and Gamestation brands from the acquisition of the latter in May 2007 until late-2012, when it was announced that the business would focus solely on the Game brand.

Game (Scientology)

In the Church of Scientology, the Official Scientology and Dianetics glossary defines L. Ron Hubbard's concept of "game" as:

game: a contest of person against person or team against team. A game consists of freedoms, barriers and purposes, and there is a necessity in a game to have an opponent or an enemy. Also there is a necessity to have problems, and enough individuality to cope with a situation. To live life fully, then, one must have in addition to "something to do," a higher purpose, and this purpose, to be a purpose at all, must have counter-purposes or purposes which prevent it from occurring.

The Aberree noted in its Volume 3, issue 1 (April 1956): "Scientology is Hubbard's game......It is also anyone's game who really wants to own and play it."

Scientologist and jazz musician Chick Corea refers to Hubbard's "game" concept in his song "What Games Shall We Play Today?"

Compare the Scientological view of life as "a game. A game in which everyone can win and no one need lose."

Game (Perfume album)

Game (capitalized as GAME) is the debut studio album by Japanese girl group Perfume. It was released on April 16, 2008 by Tokuma Japan Communications. Game marks Perfume's first studio album to be fully produced by Japanese producer and Capsule member Yasutaka Nakata, while Perfume contributes to the album as the lead and background vocalists.

Game was recorded and mixed by Nakata in Shibuya, Tokyo. Four different formats were released to promote the album; a standalone CD, a limited CD and DVD bundle, and a digital release. It was re-released in February 2016 as a 12-inch LP, featured in both Perfume's 2016 box set Perfume Complete LP Box and a limited singular release. Two different artworks were issued for the album's cover sleeve; one has Perfume inside a small room with synthetic grass, while the second has Perfume holding LED lamps in a dark room.

Upon the album's release, it was met with mixed to favourable reviews from music critics. Several critics highlighted the commercial appeal, composition, and noted it as a resurgence of the techno-pop genre. However, some critics were ambivalent towards the album's lack of personality and polished production. Game has been listed on several publication lists as their best albums of 2008 and the J-pop genre. Commercially, Game was a success. It became Perfume's debut studio album to reach the top spot on Japan's Oricon Albums Chart, and was certified double platinum by the Recording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ) for shipments of 500,000 units.

Three singles were released from Game, including one promotional, one a-side single, and extended play. Its lead single and EP Fan Service (Sweet) reached number 31 on Japan's Oricon Singles Chart, while its spawning promotional single "Chocolate Disco" reached number 24 on Japan's Hot 100 chart. The second single " Polyrhythm" reached number seven on the Oricon Singles Chart, and was one of the theme songs for the Disney Pixar film Cars 2. The album's third and final single, the a-side release " Baby Cruising Love/Macaroni" reached number three on the Oricon Singles Chart. Perfume promoted the album on their 2009 Game Tour.

Game (2002 film)

Game is a 2002 Indian Tamil drama film directed by John Amritraj. The film features Karthik and Radha in lead roles with Rajashree in a pivotal role. The film, produced by Srimasani Amman Pictures, had musical score by S. P. Venkatesh and was released after several delays in November 2002 to negative reviews.

Game (2014 film)

Game is a 2014 action thriller Bengali film choreographed and directed by Baba Yadav and produced and distributed by Reliance Entertainment. The film features actors Jeet and Subhasree Ganguly in the lead roles. Music of the film has been composed by Jeet Ganguly. The film is a remake of the Tamil film Thuppakki (2012). The film released to positive reviews from critics and went on to become a blockbuster.

Game (Flow album)

Game is Flow's second studio album. The single has two editions: regular and limited. The limited edition includes a bonus DVD. It reached #4 on the Oricon charts and charted for 17 weeks. *

Game (play)

Game is a 2015 dramatic play written by Mike Bartlett.

Game premiered at the Almeida Theatre in London, England.

Game

A game is structured form of play, usually undertaken for enjoyment and sometimes used as an educational tool. Games are distinct from work, which is usually carried out for remuneration, and from art, which is more often an expression of aesthetic or ideological elements. However, the distinction is not clear-cut, and many games are also considered to be work (such as professional players of spectator sports or games) or art (such as jigsaw puzzles or games involving an artistic layout such as Mahjong, solitaire, or some video games).

Key components of games are goals, rules, challenge, and interaction. Games generally involve mental or physical stimulation, and often both. Many games help develop practical skills, serve as a form of exercise, or otherwise perform an educational, simulational, or psychological role.

Attested as early as 2600 BC, games are a universal part of human experience and present in all cultures. The Royal Game of Ur, Senet, and Mancala are some of the oldest known games.

Game (2011 film)

Game is a 2011 Hindi action thriller film directed by Abhinay Deo and produced by Farhan Akhtar and Ritesh Sidhwani of Excel Entertainment. It stars Abhishek Bachchan, Kangana Ranaut, Anupam Kher, Sarah-Jane Dias, Shahana Goswami, Boman Irani, Gauahar Khan and Jimmy Shergill among others.

The film is a stylish action thriller and is shot at locations in Mumbai, Samos, Greece, Istanbul, London and Bangkok. It is said to be in the same type of genre as The Bourne Identity trilogy. It is similar to Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None. The theatrical trailer was premièred in theatres with Anees Bazmee's No Problem on 10 December 2010. The film was released on 1 April 2011, and was a massive financial failure.

Game (2006 film)

Game is a 2006 Telugu Slice of life drama film directed by Ram Prasad. It stars Mohan Babu and Vishnu Manchu in lead roles with Shobana, Parvati Melton, Sumalatha and Giri Babu in supporting roles. The film's background score and soundtrack were composed by music composer, Joshua Sridhar. The soundtrack for the movie was released on 27 July 2006. The movie is based on Hollywood Movie Changing Lanes which was remade in three Indian languages, Taxi No. 9211 (2006) in Hindi, TN-07 AL 4777 (2009) in Tamil and this movie itself in Telugu. Unlike the previous versions, Game received negative reviews and failed at the box-office.

Usage examples of "game".

Here was my wife, who had secretly aided and abetted her son in his design, and been the recipient of his hopes and fears on the subject, turning to me, who had dared to utter a feeble protest or two only to be scoffed at, and summarily sat upon, asking if the game was really safe.

They must have come the back way, the same as the intruders, where the farm abutted a thousand acre exotic game preserve owned by some eccentric zillionaire.

He had instead been cultivating his acquaintanceship with Mercer, a game plan that would have come to an abrupt end if the Lorrimores had deserted the trip, which they would have done at once if the Canadian had ploughed into their home-from-home.

Margland was a woman of family and fashion, but reduced, through the gaming and extravagance of her father, to such indigence, that, after sundry failures in higher attempts, she was compelled to acquiesce in the good offices of her friends, which placed her as a governess in the house of Sir Hugh.

He brought Darryl Adin to the regular poker game one evening, and Dare won, resoundingly.

With a similar design, to admonish kings that they are strong only in the strength of their subjects, the same Indians invented the game of chess, which was likewise introduced into Persia under the reign of Nushirvan.

Greedo, on the edge of adulthood, had left the games of childhood behind.

In this instance, we altered the game plan from institutional advertising to promotional.

They know Papa was wroth with them for playing this game, how afeard he was that two of them might appear at once in the same place together, and bom be slain!

It worked, up until he tried to beat some Afghani smugglers at their own game.

Games were also to go to the lower level and take the aft end including the auxiliary machinery room, then cover Pig and Python.

As I explained to Mr Du Pont at our first game, I suffer from an obscure complaint - agoraphobia -the fear of open spaces.

Tapirs, deer, agouti and other game fell before his arrows, until he had accumulated enough to supply the cabin for weeks to come.

He wheeled, dodged between two Danes, end vanished down a game trail with alacritous churning of short legs.

She turned over and buried her face in the sheets, and imagined that there was nothing in the world but this dark room, no one else but Alan, drinking beer and watching the Red Sox game.