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Crossword clues for bear

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
bear
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a compass bearing/reading (=a direction shown by a compass)
▪ We took a compass bearing to ensure we were walking in the right direction.
ball bearing
bear a scarformal (= have it on your body)
▪ He still bore the scars of its teeth on his leg.
bear a slogan (=have a slogan printed on something)
▪ a badge bearing a campaign slogan
bear a/some similarity to sth (=be like something)
▪ The murder bore a striking similarity to another shooting 25 miles away.
bear claw
bear hug
bear little/no resemblance to sb/sth
▪ He bore little resemblance to the photograph in the newspaper.
bear market
bear no relation to reality (=not match what is really happening or true)
▪ His vision of European politics bears no relation to reality.
bear no/little relationship to sth
▪ The allegations bore no relationship to the facts.
bear resentment (=feel it)
▪ My father's favourite was my younger sister, and I'd always borne him some resentment for this.
bear responsibility for sth (=be responsible for something bad)
▪ Developed countries must bear much of the responsibility for environmental problems.
bear signs of sth (=have signs)
▪ The bed was neatly made and bore no signs of having been slept in.
Bear Stearns
bear the hallmark of
▪ Their performance did not bear the hallmark of European champions.
bear the suspense
▪ She couldn’t bear the suspense a moment longer.
bear/carry a grudge
▪ Wallace said the rumors had been started by someone who bore a grudge against him.
bear/carry a watermark
▪ The sheet bears the watermark ‘1836’.
bear/carry/shoulder the burden (=be responsible for something)
▪ At the age of 16, Suzy bore the burden of providing for her family.
bear/have a resemblance to sb/sth
▪ People said he bore a striking resemblance to the President.
bear/hold etc no grudge
▪ He insisted that he held no grudge against Taylor.
bearing in mind (=because of)
▪ More money should be given to housing, bearing in mind the problem of homelessness.
bore...malice (=did not feel any malice towards her)
▪ James bore her no malice .
bore...the stamp of (=had)
▪ The speech borethe stamp of authority.
bring pressure to bear on sb (=put pressure on them)
▪ These groups have brought pressure to bear on the government.
can’t bear the thought of sth
▪ I can’t bear the thought of you being hurt.
carry/bear scars (=to suffer from feelings of fear or sadness )
▪ These children will carry their emotional scars with them for the rest of their lives.
full bore
▪ Kate took a huge slice and was going at it full bore.
grizzly bear
have...crosses to bear
▪ I feel sorry for you, but we all have our crosses to bear.
hold/bear sth aloft
▪ He emerged, holding a baby aloft.
meet/bear the cost of sth (=pay for something, especially with difficulty)
▪ His family were unable to meet the cost of his operation.
not stand up to scrutiny/not bear scrutiny (=be found to have faults when examined)
▪ Such arguments do not stand up to careful scrutiny.
polar bear
teddy bear
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
hardly
▪ She could hardly bear to listen to them, smiling Clyde, amiable Harvey, fat Marlene.
▪ Heartrending, Rob thought; he could hardly bear to look.
▪ The two sides of the equation did not balance and she could hardly bear the implications of that.
▪ I am so homesick I can hardly bear it.
▪ At school the next day I hurt so much I could hardly bear to stay sitting down.
▪ I remember being filled with such excitement I could hardly bear it.
▪ What that will do to Strachan's nerves hardly bears thinking about.
▪ He could hardly bear to go on.
■ NOUN
brunt
▪ A recent report showed how older workers bear the brunt of economic recession.
▪ It will bear the brunt of the estimated $ 1 billion cost for the changes on Okinawa.
▪ The depot is bearing the brunt of a package of cost cutting measures across three sites.
▪ Southern California, where the banks had the most overlap, will bear the brunt of the cuts.
▪ He thought that the garrison of Richmond ought now to bear the brunt of the fighting.
▪ Millions of carers argue that they bear the brunt of the job ... without recognition, or proper payment.
▪ Retailers are in the immediate line of fire and were first to bear the brunt of cost cutting.
burden
▪ Those people may have roughly the same income and circumstances and they may all be able to bear the same burden.
▪ To what extent are the various taxes shifted and who bears the ultimate burden?
▪ People can not afford to bear a heavier burden, and we shall not put a heavier burden on them.
▪ Wives bore a greater burden in dealing with these daily difficulties than did their preoccupied husbands.
▪ If this applies, small indexed sequential files bear a heavy burden compared with larger files.
▪ Some have struggled all their lives, and now are forced to bear this unexpected burden during retirement.
▪ Is the potential for misidentification any less when the defence bear the burden of proof?
▪ He went further and said that the prosecution bore that burden whenever the issue of prejudice through delay was raised.
child
▪ Others develop the feeling of bearing a child more gradually.
▪ Reproductive system After the menopause, women are no longer able to bear children, as their ovaries stop releasing eggs.
▪ Quintana, who works at a car wash, said she bore her first child at age 13.
▪ Next, their wives were fed since they could bear more children.
▪ She bore two children, was banished from the colony and yet reappeared later.
▪ She was a lady of unearthly beauty who married a Count of Anjou and bore him four children.
▪ Even if women are raped, he says, they should be legally required to bear the children.
cost
▪ And who will bear the cost?
▪ Such action forces potential offenders, under the threat of legal action, to bear all the costs associated with their production.
▪ The buyers therefore had to bear the costs of the deterioration.
▪ Instead, landowner Peter Dillingham will bear the cost.
▪ A long debate determines who will be unlucky and bear the cost of eggs rather than sperm.
▪ Retailers are in the immediate line of fire and were first to bear the brunt of cost cutting.
▪ The insured must bear the costs of the Engineers fees unless liability is subsequently established under the policy.
▪ The Society are now seeking a skilled modeller to carry out this work and have undertaken to bear the costs involved.
costs
▪ The buyers therefore had to bear the costs of the deterioration.
▪ In terms of our organizational behavior model, costs bring the fear of low performance immediately to bear.
▪ The Legal Aid Fund bears the costs risk rather than the litigant.
▪ Such action forces potential offenders, under the threat of legal action, to bear all the costs associated with their production.
▪ For the moment, capital was bearing the costs of overaccumulation.
▪ Other terms Purchaser and vendor to bear their own costs.
▪ The insured must bear the costs of the Engineers fees unless liability is subsequently established under the policy.
▪ Any exports to the mainland have to bear high transport costs.
cross
▪ We all have our crosses to bear.
▪ Was this his Cross to bear?
▪ Each symbol was placed in front of larger crosses bearing the name and crest of the unit or group.
▪ He says it's a cross to bear.
▪ Look - you've got your cross to bear, all right, I've got mine.
▪ Thought it has a supportive county council and a productive work force, yet it has its cross to bear.
▪ A tall stone cross on the site bears the following dedication: To the Brave of Both Nations.
fruit
▪ Some investment does not bear fruit.
▪ They began to see that devoting time and energy to this endeavor bore fruit.
▪ The first is that the policies have largely been implemented as intended and that they are bearing fruit.
▪ What contacts there are do not always bear fruit.
▪ Whether the 90s will bear further fruit remains to be seen.
▪ It bears fruit continuously throughout the growing season.
▪ The years of work and attention were bearing fruit now, and suddenly this stroke of luck with Betty.
▪ Never would she let the earth bear fruit until she had seen her daughter.
grudge
▪ Drought-lovers are natural container plants and will not bear a grudge if you forget to water them.
▪ Otis, who bore lifelong grudges over provocations infinitely smaller than this, was realistic enough to know when he was had.
▪ It would not do to have Miss Blagden imagine she bore any grudge.
▪ Does some one bear a grudge against Vallejo?
▪ Lets hope they don't bear a grudge!
▪ He said both men came from deprived backgrounds and bore a grudge against the area in which they lived.
▪ Guenelon bears a grudge in his heart, which eventually blossoms into a scheme for revenge.
▪ Y/N 7 I am willing to forgive people who have upset me and do not bear grudges against them.
hallmark
▪ It also bears the hallmarks of a long-cherished project.
▪ The attack bore all the hallmarks of a loyalist murder bid.
▪ Whatever it was, it didn't bear the hallmark of life in Knockglen.
▪ In singling out gay men, the offence bears the hallmarks of homophobic prejudice, and belongs to the less tolerant era.
▪ Cricket is primarily a man's game, bearing all the hallmarks of male camaraderie.
▪ The sculptures bear all the hallmarks of the Braun workshop and date from 1713-19.
▪ But they said the type of attack bore all the hallmarks of the I-R-A.
▪ It does not, in other words, bear the hallmarks of Thatcherism.
influence
▪ Nor was noble influence brought to bear only in moments of crisis.
▪ Campaigning can bring political influences to bear on the students that might affect them detrimentally. 3.
▪ The outside influences have no bearing on what you can do for your basketball team....
▪ He also wrote letters to bring the full weight of the family's influence to bear on Cambridge University.
▪ All sorts of influences are brought to bear upon us every time we turn on the radio or open a newspaper.
mark
▪ A large piece of whale blubber, bearing the marks of fleshing knives, has been discovered off west Falkland.
▪ The imam still bore the mark of that experience in his gaunt frame and sallow, jaundiced complexion.
▪ The great Leinster dinner service of 1747 was his swansong: no silver bearing his mark appears thereafter.
▪ Products graded in accordance with established standards bear the appropriate grade marks.
▪ And her body, bearing one tiny mark, had been found with a bird's head, near the barrow.
▪ Krupat's face, which I knew so well, bore some recent marks.
▪ Some of you have the look of lords, yet you bear the mark of hard travelling and your steeds are scarred.
▪ None the less, nationalization still bore the mark of long struggles by the labour movement to further working class interests.
mind
▪ You should also bear in mind that social security payments might be higher abroad.
▪ And bear in mind that it was an hour later and in the middle of the week.
▪ And while that would seem to leave Jen open to offers, bear in mind that she can be a difficult customer.
▪ The Home Secretary should bear in mind the fact that this case is subjudice.
▪ Meredith, bearing in mind Harriet's warning that this horse might kick, prudently moved away a little.
▪ I have no authority to do that in a half-day debate, but perhaps hon. Members will bear it in mind.
▪ We should bear in mind continually that the whole field is controversial.
▪ To approach this question, we bear in mind the principle that variability in language is socially functional.
name
▪ He devised a set of heavy draft horse casting hobbles which are now outmoded but still bear his name.
▪ The Lechmere chain traces its roots to merchant Abraham Cohen, who opened a harness store that bore his name in 1913.
▪ The large old building, with its sign over the door bearing the Grenfell name, stood silent and empty.
▪ Croix, who was dizzy and nauseated when he penciled in the river that bears his name.
▪ Each symbol was placed in front of larger crosses bearing the name and crest of the unit or group.
▪ Conoco currently operates in 37 states from Texas to Montana, with 5, 125 service stations bearing the Conoco name.
▪ There was a second edition in 1803, bearing Coleman's name.
▪ They all bore the name of the same author.
pressure
▪ He brought undue pressure to bear on his parents by giving them an entirely misleading account of the documents.
▪ With all the pressure brought to bear upon them, both President Lincoln and General Halleck stood by me....
▪ This concession would not have happened but for the pressure brought to bear on the authorities.
▪ In London Channel 4 journalists and Insight News, the production company, brought pressure to bear.
▪ As consumers in a capitalist society we have great power to bring pressure to bear.
▪ On his eastern border, Ine brought pressure to bear on the eastern Saxons who were sheltering exiles from his kingdom.
▪ Those groups have brought pressure to bear on government to provide resources or pursue policies to the benefit of their members.
▪ No pressure was brought to bear on visitors who were reluctant to co-operate.
relation
▪ The yardage on the card often bears little relation to the club you select.
▪ The punishment in this instance is not arbitrary; it bears some relation to the punishable behavior.
▪ They bear little enough relation to the land that now lies west of Jerusalem.
▪ It bore no relation to the equivalent of aerodynamic facts, namely, anthropological evidence as a whole.
▪ Hence the amount of Business Rate each local authority receives will bear no relation to the amount actually collected in each area.
▪ This bull market bears no relation to that gambling spree.
▪ The picture bore no relation to the blotchy, snotty, shouting face of angry childhood.
▪ Furthermore, who told the stories about whom seemed to bear some relation to the conventional pecking order.
relationship
▪ This chapter has reviewed a wide range of research which may bear on relationships between subjective risk and memory for driving situations.
▪ Why is life so unfair-whether you live or die bears no relationship to what kind of person you are.
▪ The available statistical evidence bears out this crude relationship between years of education and earnings.
▪ The symbols used in a language are arbitrary and bear no relationship to what they represent.
▪ Availability of resources and their actual use seem frequently to bear little relationship to each other.
▪ Expiatory punishment is arbitrary in character because it does not bear any relationship to the offense.
▪ They too complain of pain whose severity bears little or no relationship to the tissue destruction.
resemblance
▪ The oldest Tertiary rocks contained archaic mammals that bore no resemblance to the living families within the class.
▪ The rumors bore an uncanny resemblance to whatever people feared most.
▪ I say nuclear catastrophe partly because any exchange of nuclear arsenals will bear no resemblance to anything that could be called war.
▪ But his co-defendant, Terry Nichols, bears no resemblance to the sketch of John Doe 2.
▪ And he was helped by the fact that he bears a slight resemblance to the blond singer in Abba, too.
▪ She bore little resemblance to the fashionable woman she had been just a few weeks ago.
▪ They say that the handwriting at the top bears no resemblance to that of any Press office staff.
▪ Citations commonly bore little resemblance to events.
responsibility
▪ No one likes to bear the responsibility for such decisions.
▪ It was hard to tell which side bore more responsibility for the disorders, the police or the rioters.
▪ Ironically, the papacy must bear some responsibility for these developments.
▪ But women bear some responsibility, too.
▪ But he bears primary responsibility for tax and economic policies that lost Labour the election.
▪ In the past, the companies have said they bear no responsibility for the actions of dealers who sell guns.
▪ It was as though she were dead and he bore the responsibility for killing her.
▪ He must bear primary responsibility for the chaos that descended upon the White House when such disclosure did occur.
scar
▪ His twice broken kneecap still bears the scars - for Lawrence today was the test he's been waiting for.
▪ All bore ugly scars from repeated knife fights on the streets and in the dives around Clinton Avenue.
▪ This boat was used in an Indiana Jones film and still bears the scars.
▪ She still bore the scars of battle, a battle she had nearly lost.
▪ He had only ever been discovered once and still bore the scars on his wrist from the Alsatian's razor-sharp-teeth.
▪ He still bore the scars of her teeth on his calf and upper thigh.
▪ And within a week Aseta was playing again-though she still bears the scar today.
▪ Many people bear permanent scars from such encounters.
similarity
▪ If this was Richard's first experience of war it bore an ironical similarity to his last.
▪ They say the cases bear no similarity.
▪ The interiors of these churches are tall and dark and bear strong similarities to inverted ships.
▪ In fact, of course, much of this material bore only a tenuous similarity to its genuinely customary counterparts.
▪ This description bears marked similarities to those offered by a number of eminent sociologists who adopt the trait approach.
son
▪ Eleven months later she bore his son.
▪ She would bear him a son named Epaphus, and live for ever after happy and honored.
▪ He further conquered her by ensuring she fell in love with him, and she bore him three sons.
▪ After she died in 1647, a new wife bore him one more son in his sixtieth year.
▪ She was jealous that I was to bear her husband's son - I could not hate her for that.
▪ She bore him one posthumous son.
▪ Somehow that was easier to bear than a son.
▪ For example, the ability to bear sons remained important in early twentieth-century farming communities.
stamp
▪ It did not, now, bear the stamp of Duncan on it.
▪ His early work, produced between 1930 and 1933, bears the stamp of sectarianism.
▪ In the first two weeks of January 1992, 18 more people were killed in murders bearing the stamp of death squads.
▪ The scheme bore the unmistakable stamp of Kurt Hahn and his trust system that Charles had seen in operation at Gordonstoun.
▪ How could she produce anything that bore the stamp of continuity and at the same time managed to be fresh and original?
▪ Wycliffe lifted out a man's wrist watch and a little wad of letters still in their envelopes and bearing foreign stamps.
▪ Such cheques will bear the bank's stamp and a bank official's signature on their face.
thought
▪ Riley, Riley, I can't bear the thought of your leaving.
▪ You couldn't bear the thought of a chit of a girl sweeping in and scooping the jackpot.
▪ And she couldn't bear the thought of being sucked back into the ebb tide of loneliness again either.
▪ He simply can not bear the thought of his hated enemy getting hold of young Adam.
▪ I can't bear the thought of Batty playing against Leeds.
▪ I couldn't bear the thought that it was you he loved.
▪ She longed to encounter some other human presence and could not bear the thought of it.
weight
▪ But to my mind neither section 8 nor the Gillick decision will bear the weight which he seeks to place upon them.
▪ I went down the steps, slowly, enjoying the way each step bore my weight.
▪ Yet these will hardly bear the weight of a theory so grand as the fusion of legacy and trust.
▪ Differences that had seemed slight when they were in their early twenties now bore social weight.
▪ The Hooper who existed in Brideshead Revisited, though, bore all the weight of Waugh's opprobrium.
▪ If the floor is properly framed, you should not need extra support underneath to bear the weight of the fireplace.
▪ As a foundation it is inadequate to bear the weight of the case that Mr. McGregor sought to build upon it.
▪ His arms were numb, his hands too weak to bear his weight.
witness
▪ I did not steal or bear false witness.
▪ There, too, literature bears witness.
▪ Sparrow's books bear witness to his movement in the most exclusive circles.
▪ They also bear witness to trade over long distances.
▪ The Prisoner of Zenda and its sequel certainly bear witness to their author's craftsmanship.
▪ Those empty houses bore mute witness to the violence of the times.
▪ The Mutawas, clothed in self-righteousness, were there to bear witness to the appropriate punishment.
▪ Half way across the site, the earth is scorched, and the remnants of dwellings bear witness to a horrendous fire.
■ VERB
bring
▪ This would bring financial pressure to bear on his friends and family, and besides it was profitable.
▪ Mummy and I will bring our guns to bear.
▪ There is a finite amount of government resources we can bring to bear.
▪ Anyway, on with my story, for soon other pressures were to be brought to bear.
▪ In bringing the arts to bear on his discussion, Hardison shines brightly.
▪ Employers brought maximum pressure to bear on workers in order to restore order: recalcitrant strikers faced lockouts.
▪ He asserts that he is: bringing to bear the precision of photography in the illustration of our subject.
grin
▪ We just have to grin and bear it.
▪ It's not exactly affectionate, but we Limeys can grin and bear it.
▪ But she was not on the tour, so I had to grin and bear it.
▪ And up to now, you've had to quit or grin and bear it.
▪ Abu Salim decided that a third day wasn't necessary so I had to grin and bear it.
▪ There was no alternative but to grin and bear it.
▪ After debate the team concluded that they had to grin and bear it rather than descend into paranoia.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be borne in on/upon sb
bear the mark of sth
▪ A large piece of whale blubber, bearing the marks of fleshing knives, has been discovered off west Falkland.
▪ None the less, nationalization still bore the mark of long struggles by the labour movement to further working class interests.
▪ Some of you have the look of lords, yet you bear the mark of hard travelling and your steeds are scarred.
▪ The imam still bore the mark of that experience in his gaunt frame and sallow, jaundiced complexion.
bear/keep sb/sth in mind
▪ Bobcat. Keep that in mind.
▪ But they keep Soviet might in mind, however remote the threat now seems.
▪ If he had ... no conclusions yet, just bear it in mind.
▪ It is important to bear this in mind in any study of the role of school governors in meeting special educational needs.
▪ It is important to keep your audience in mind when writing a report.
▪ They might bear that in mind.
▪ To keep it in mind, at all costs.
▪ We've got to bear it in mind.
bear/take/suffer etc the brunt of sth
▪ Group comportment had deteriorated by the day, with yours truly bearing the brunt of the collective delinquency.
▪ He thought that the garrison of Richmond ought now to bear the brunt of the fighting.
▪ Her hands, which she threw up to protect her face took the brunt of the injury.
▪ It will bear the brunt of the estimated $ 1 billion cost for the changes on Okinawa.
▪ Retailers are in the immediate line of fire and were first to bear the brunt of cost cutting.
▪ Southern California, where the banks had the most overlap, will bear the brunt of the cuts.
▪ The depot is bearing the brunt of a package of cost cutting measures across three sites.
▪ The front of the car, and those in it, took the brunt of the impact.
bore sb silly
bore/scare etc the pants off sb
▪ He wasn't interested in the heavy political stuff which bored the pants off most people.
▪ It took ten minutes to reach Honey Cottage, with Yanto trying his best to scare the pants off Mary.
▪ Lovely people who scared the pants off him.
▪ The tests scare the pants off many managers.
▪ Though, mind you, it scares the pants off poor old Crumwallis.
have a/some/no etc bearing on sth
▪ And that it might have some bearing on what has happened now.
▪ But the facts of the past seemed to have no bearing on the facts of the present.
▪ It has come to have a bearing on the larger questions of civilized survival.
▪ Party political factors, professionalism and the dispositions of key personalities all usually have some bearing on internal management structures.
▪ The availability of security may, however, have a bearing on whether or not a particular loan will be granted.
▪ The observations on immortality in Chapter Thirteen may be seen to have some bearing on this.
▪ The outside influences have no bearing on what you can do for your basketball team....
▪ This year's form will have a bearing on all future claims.
water-borne/sea-borne/air-borne etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A messenger arrived, bearing a letter from the ambassador.
▪ An oak table bore several photographs of the family.
▪ At the head of the procession a group of dark-suited men bore the coffin into the church.
▪ He bore the pain stoically.
▪ Her loneliness was hard to bear, after her husband died.
▪ I really can't bear him.
▪ Jean will never be able to bear children.
▪ My leg really hurts -- I'm not sure how much longer I can bear it.
▪ Several of the guests arrived bearing gifts.
▪ She bears the title of "Executive Director."
▪ Talking to a counsellor can help divorcees to bear the pain of separation.
▪ The baby's narrow neck looked too fragile to bear the weight of its head.
▪ The ice wasn't thick enough to bear his weight.
▪ The list bore the names of people still missing after the disaster.
▪ The melon rind bore traces of a rare type of the Salmonella bacteria.
▪ The police are asking residents to keep an eye out for a person bearing this description.
▪ The trial was a great scandal but she bore it all with courage and dignity.
▪ The tunnel would have needed to be extremely strong to bear the full weight of the earth above.
▪ They arrived in Israel on the same plane that bore Assad's coffin.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A close scrutiny of films showing lions killing zebras does not bear this out.
▪ Dissident radicals of all sorts were assumed to bear loyalty to alien ideologies, and deportation became the fate of many.
▪ For Blanche the atmosphere bore no resemblance to the glamorous, fun-filled evening promised in the advertisements.
▪ I can not bear it any longer, I am crying now.
▪ Never would she let the earth bear fruit until she had seen her daughter.
▪ Some products that bear freshness dates are cheeses, breakfast cereals, bakery products, and mayonnaise.
▪ There Charles went solo again, unveiling a plaque - which bore both their names - as Diana stood meekly behind him.
▪ You know, as in, which one bore more excitement and panache.
II.noun
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be borne in on/upon sb
bear the mark of sth
▪ A large piece of whale blubber, bearing the marks of fleshing knives, has been discovered off west Falkland.
▪ None the less, nationalization still bore the mark of long struggles by the labour movement to further working class interests.
▪ Some of you have the look of lords, yet you bear the mark of hard travelling and your steeds are scarred.
▪ The imam still bore the mark of that experience in his gaunt frame and sallow, jaundiced complexion.
bear-baiting/badger-baiting etc
bear/keep sb/sth in mind
▪ Bobcat. Keep that in mind.
▪ But they keep Soviet might in mind, however remote the threat now seems.
▪ If he had ... no conclusions yet, just bear it in mind.
▪ It is important to bear this in mind in any study of the role of school governors in meeting special educational needs.
▪ It is important to keep your audience in mind when writing a report.
▪ They might bear that in mind.
▪ To keep it in mind, at all costs.
▪ We've got to bear it in mind.
bear/take/suffer etc the brunt of sth
▪ Group comportment had deteriorated by the day, with yours truly bearing the brunt of the collective delinquency.
▪ He thought that the garrison of Richmond ought now to bear the brunt of the fighting.
▪ Her hands, which she threw up to protect her face took the brunt of the injury.
▪ It will bear the brunt of the estimated $ 1 billion cost for the changes on Okinawa.
▪ Retailers are in the immediate line of fire and were first to bear the brunt of cost cutting.
▪ Southern California, where the banks had the most overlap, will bear the brunt of the cuts.
▪ The depot is bearing the brunt of a package of cost cutting measures across three sites.
▪ The front of the car, and those in it, took the brunt of the impact.
bore sb silly
bore/scare etc the pants off sb
▪ He wasn't interested in the heavy political stuff which bored the pants off most people.
▪ It took ten minutes to reach Honey Cottage, with Yanto trying his best to scare the pants off Mary.
▪ Lovely people who scared the pants off him.
▪ The tests scare the pants off many managers.
▪ Though, mind you, it scares the pants off poor old Crumwallis.
bring sth to bear (on/upon sth)
▪ Campaigning can bring political influences to bear on the students that might affect them detrimentally. 3.
▪ Employers brought maximum pressure to bear on workers in order to restore order: recalcitrant strikers faced lock-outs.
▪ He brought undue pressure to bear on his parents by giving them an entirely misleading account of the documents.
▪ He could not bring his mind to bear on the distant world her handwriting suggested.
▪ He resisted the pain, tried to bring the weapon to bear.
▪ Mummy and I will bring our guns to bear.
▪ Short of a hostile military intervention in Kosovo, there are other ways of bringing outside power to bear.
▪ Workers have their own organisations which can bring pressure to bear on governments and make demands on the state.
crashing bore
▪ At worst, a crashing bore.
grin and bear it
▪ Abu Salim decided that a third day wasn't necessary so I had to grin and bear it.
▪ After debate the team concluded that they had to grin and bear it rather than descend into paranoia.
▪ And up to now, you've had to quit or grin and bear it.
▪ But she was not on the tour, so I had to grin and bear it.
▪ It's not exactly affectionate, but we Limeys can grin and bear it.
▪ There was no alternative but to grin and bear it.
▪ We just have to grin and bear it.
sth doesn't bear repeating
water-borne/sea-borne/air-borne etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The federal estate tax form is a real bear to fill out.
▪ Visitors to the park are warned not to feed the bears.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After three weeks out in the field Skipper looked like an overgrown teddy bear.
▪ Also pictured with funnyman Les is Barnardos' best-known bear and official mascot, Barnaby.
▪ Barnett replied drily that Davis's best option was to feed the gingerbread to his bears.
▪ Buy teddy bear wrapping paper for decorations.
▪ Giraffes and upstanding bears are more popular than snakes, rats and spiders.
▪ With few bears and wolves about these days, elk rule their forest habitat.
▪ Zeus got after her one morning in the guise of a brown bear.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Bear

Bear \Bear\ (b[^a]r), n. [OE. bere, AS. bera; akin to D. beer, OHG. bero, pero, G. b["a]r, Icel. & Sw. bj["o]rn, and possibly to L. fera wild beast, Gr. fh`r beast, Skr. bhalla bear.]

  1. (Zo["o]l.) Any species of the genus Ursus, and of the closely allied genera. Bears are plantigrade Carnivora, but they live largely on fruit and insects.

    Note: The European brown bear ( Ursus arctos), the white polar bear ( Ursus maritimus), the grizzly bear ( Ursus horribilis), the American black bear, and its variety the cinnamon bear ( Ursus Americanus), the Syrian bear ( Ursus Syriacus), and the sloth bear, are among the notable species.

  2. (Zo["o]l.) An animal which has some resemblance to a bear in form or habits, but no real affinity; as, the woolly bear; ant bear; water bear; sea bear.

  3. (Astron.) One of two constellations in the northern hemisphere, called respectively the Great Bear and the Lesser Bear, or Ursa Major and Ursa Minor.

  4. Metaphorically: A brutal, coarse, or morose person.

  5. (Stock Exchange) A person who sells stocks or securities for future delivery in expectation of a fall in the market.

    Note: The bears and bulls of the Stock Exchange, whose interest it is, the one to depress, and the other to raise, stocks, are said to be so called in allusion to the bear's habit of pulling down, and the bull's of tossing up.

  6. (Mach.) A portable punching machine.

  7. (Naut.) A block covered with coarse matting; -- used to scour the deck. Australian bear. (Zo["o]l.) See Koala. Bear baiting, the sport of baiting bears with dogs. Bear caterpillar (Zo["o]l.), the hairy larva of a moth, esp. of the genus Euprepia. Bear garden.

    1. A place where bears are kept for diversion or fighting.

    2. Any place where riotous conduct is common or permitted.
      --M. Arnold.

      Bear leader, one who leads about a performing bear for money; hence, a facetious term for one who takes charge of a young man on his travels.

Bear

Bear \Bear\ (b[^a]r), v. i.

  1. To produce, as fruit; to be fruitful, in opposition to barrenness.

    This age to blossom, and the next to bear.
    --Dryden.

  2. To suffer, as in carrying a burden.

    But man is born to bear.
    --Pope.

  3. To endure with patience; to be patient.

    I can not, can not bear.
    --Dryden.

  4. To press; -- with on or upon, or against.

    These men bear hard on the suspected party.
    --Addison.

  5. To take effect; to have influence or force; as, to bring matters to bear.

  6. To relate or refer; -- with on or upon; as, how does this bear on the question?

  7. To have a certain meaning, intent, or effect.

    Her sentence bore that she should stand a certain time upon the platform.
    --Hawthorne.

  8. To be situated, as to the point of compass, with respect to something else; as, the land bears N. by E. To bear against, to approach for attack or seizure; as, a lion bears against his prey. [Obs.] To bear away (Naut.), to change the course of a ship, and make her run before the wind. To bear back, to retreat. ``Bearing back from the blows of their sable antagonist.'' --Sir W. Scott. To bear down upon (Naut.), to approach from the windward side; as, the fleet bore down upon the enemy. To bear in with (Naut.), to run or tend toward; as, a ship bears in with the land. To bear off (Naut.), to steer away, as from land. To bear up.

    1. To be supported; to have fortitude; to be firm; not to sink; as, to bear up under afflictions.

    2. (Naut.) To put the helm up (or to windward) and so put the ship before the wind; to bear away.
      --Hamersly.

      To bear upon (Mil.), to be pointed or situated so as to affect; to be pointed directly against, or so as to hit (the object); as, to bring or plant guns so as to bear upon a fort or a ship; the artillery bore upon the center.

      To bear up to, to tend or move toward; as, to bear up to one another.

      To bear with, to endure; to be indulgent to; to forbear to resent, oppose, or punish.

Bear

Bear \Bear\ (b[=e]r), n. A bier. [Obs.]
--Spenser.

Bear

Bear \Bear\, v. t. (Stock Exchange) To endeavor to depress the price of, or prices in; as, to bear a railroad stock; to bear the market.

Bear

Bear \Bear\, Bere \Bere\ (b[=e]r), n. [AS. bere. See Barley.] (Bot.) Barley; the six-rowed barley or the four-rowed barley, commonly the former ( Hordeum hexastichon or Hordeum vulgare). [Obs. except in North of Eng. and Scot.]

Bear

Bear \Bear\ (b[^a]r), v. t. [imp. Bore (b[=o]r) (formerly Bare (b[^a]r)); p. p. Born (b[^o]rn), Borne (b[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. Bearing.] [OE. beren, AS. beran, beoran, to bear, carry, produce; akin to D. baren to bring forth, G. geb["a]ren, Goth. ba['i]ran to bear or carry, Icel. bera, Sw. b["a]ra, Dan. b[ae]re, OHG. beran, peran, L. ferre to bear, carry, produce, Gr. fe`rein, OSlav. brati to take, carry, OIr. berim I bear, Skr. bh[.r] to bear. [root]92. Cf. Fertile.]

  1. To support or sustain; to hold up.

  2. To support and remove or carry; to convey.

    I 'll bear your logs the while.
    --Shak.

  3. To conduct; to bring; -- said of persons. [Obs.]

    Bear them to my house.
    --Shak.

  4. To possess and use, as power; to exercise.

    Every man should bear rule in his own house.
    --Esther i. 22.

  5. To sustain; to have on (written or inscribed, or as a mark), as, the tablet bears this inscription.

  6. To possess or carry, as a mark of authority or distinction; to wear; as, to bear a sword, badge, or name.

  7. To possess mentally; to carry or hold in the mind; to entertain; to harbor
    --Dryden.

    The ancient grudge I bear him.
    --Shak.

  8. To endure; to tolerate; to undergo; to suffer.

    Should such a man, too fond to rule alone, Bear, like the Turk, no brother near the throne.
    --Pope.

    I cannot bear The murmur of this lake to hear.
    --Shelley.

    My punishment is greater than I can bear.
    --Gen. iv. 13.

  9. To gain or win. [Obs.]

    Some think to bear it by speaking a great word.
    --Bacon.

    She was . . . found not guilty, through bearing of friends and bribing of the judge.
    --Latimer.

  10. To sustain, or be answerable for, as blame, expense, responsibility, etc.

    He shall bear their iniquities.
    --Is. liii.

  11. Somewhat that will bear your charges.
    --Dryden.

    11. To render or give; to bring forward. ``Your testimony bear''
    --Dryden.

  12. To carry on, or maintain; to have. ``The credit of bearing a part in the conversation.''
    --Locke.

  13. To admit or be capable of; that is, to suffer or sustain without violence, injury, or change.

    In all criminal cases the most favorable interpretation should be put on words that they can possibly bear.
    --Swift.

  14. To manage, wield, or direct. ``Thus must thou thy body bear.''
    --Shak. Hence: To behave; to conduct.

    Hath he borne himself penitently in prison?
    --Shak.

  15. To afford; to be to; to supply with.

    His faithful dog shall bear him company.
    --Pope.

  16. To bring forth or produce; to yield; as, to bear apples; to bear children; to bear interest. Here dwelt the man divine whom Samos bore. --Dryden. Note: In the passive form of this verb, the best modern usage restricts the past participle born to the sense of brought forth, while borne is used in the other senses of the word. In the active form, borne alone is used as the past participle. To bear down.

    1. To force into a lower place; to carry down; to depress or sink. ``His nose, . . . large as were the others, bore them down into insignificance.''
      --Marryat.

    2. To overthrow or crush by force; as, to bear down an enemy. To bear a hand.

      1. To help; to give assistance.

      2. (Naut.) To make haste; to be quick. To bear in hand, to keep (one) up in expectation, usually by promises never to be realized; to amuse by false pretenses; to delude. [Obs.] ``How you were borne in hand, how crossed.'' --Shak. To bear in mind, to remember. To bear off.

        1. To restrain; to keep from approach.

        2. (Naut.) To remove to a distance; to keep clear from rubbing against anything; as, to bear off a blow; to bear off a boat.

    3. To gain; to carry off, as a prize.

    4. (Backgammon) To remove from the backgammon board into the home when the position of the piece and the dice provide the proper opportunity; -- the goal of the game is to bear off all of one's men before the opponent. To bear one hard, to owe one a grudge. [Obs.] ``C[ae]sar doth bear me hard.'' --Shak. To bear out.

      1. To maintain and support to the end; to defend to the last. ``Company only can bear a man out in an ill thing.''
        --South.

      2. To corroborate; to confirm.

        To bear up, to support; to keep from falling or sinking. ``Religious hope bears up the mind under sufferings.''
        --Addison.

        Syn: To uphold; sustain; maintain; support; undergo; suffer; endure; tolerate; carry; convey; transport; waft.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
bear

Old English beran "to bear, bring; bring forth, produce; to endure, sustain; to wear" (class IV strong verb; past tense bær, past participle boren), from Proto-Germanic *beran (cognates: Old Saxon beran, Old Frisian bera, Old High German beran, German gebären, Old Norse bera, Gothic bairan "to carry, bear, give birth to"), from PIE root *bher- (1) meaning both "give birth" (though only English and German strongly retain this sense, and Russian has beremennaya "pregnant") and "carry a burden, bring" (see infer).\n

\nBall bearings "bear" the friction. Many senses are from notion of "move onward by pressure." Old English past tense bær became Middle English bare; alternative bore began to appear c.1400, but bare remained the literary form till after 1600. Past participle distinction of borne for "carried" and born for "given birth" is from late 18c. To bear (something) in mind is from 1530s.

bear

Old English bera "bear," from Proto-Germanic *beron, literally "the brown (one)" (cognates: Old Norse björn, Middle Dutch bere, Dutch beer, Old High German bero, German Bär), from PIE *bher- (3) "bright, brown" (see brown (adj.)).\n

\nGreek arktos and Latin ursus retain the PIE root word for "bear" (*rtko; see Arctic), but it is believed to have been ritually replaced in the northern branches because of hunters' taboo on names of wild animals (compare the Irish equivalent "the good calf," Welsh "honey-pig," Lithuanian "the licker," Russian medved "honey-eater"). Others connect the Germanic word with Latin ferus "wild," as if it meant "the wild animal (par excellence) of the northern woods."\n

\nSymbolic of Russia since 1794. Used of uncouth persons since 1570s. Stock market meaning "speculator for a fall" is 1709 shortening of bearskin jobber (from the proverb sell the bearskin before one has caught the bear); i.e. "one who sells stock for future delivery, expecting that meanwhile prices will fall." Paired with bull from c.1720. Bear claw as a type of large pastry is from 1942, originally chiefly western U.S.

Wiktionary
bear

n. (surname: English)

WordNet
bear
  1. n. massive plantigrade carnivorous or omnivorous mammals with long shaggy coats and strong claws

  2. an investor with a pessimistic market outlook; an investor who expects prices to fall and so sells now in order to buy later at a lower price [ant: bull]

  3. [also: borne, born, bore]

bear
  1. v. have; "bear a resemblance"; "bear a signature"

  2. give birth (to a newborn); "My wife had twins yesterday!" [syn: give birth, deliver, birth, have]

  3. put up with something or somebody unpleasant; "I cannot bear his constant criticism"; "The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks"; "he learned to tolerate the heat"; "She stuck out two years in a miserable marriage" [syn: digest, endure, stick out, stomach, stand, tolerate, support, brook, abide, suffer, put up]

  4. move while holding up or supporting; "Bear gifts"; "bear a heavy load"; "bear news"; "bearing orders"

  5. bring forth, "The apple tree bore delicious apples this year"; "The unidentified plant bore gorgeous flowers" [syn: turn out]

  6. take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person; "I'll accept the charges"; "She agreed to bear the responsibility" [syn: take over, accept, assume]

  7. contain or hold; have within; "The jar carries wine"; "The canteen holds fresh water"; "This can contains water" [syn: hold, carry, contain]

  8. bring in; "interest-bearing accounts"; "How much does this savings certificate pay annually?" [syn: yield, pay]

  9. have on one's person; "He wore a red ribbon"; "bear a scar" [syn: wear]

  10. behave in a certain manner; "She carried herself well"; "he bore himself with dignity"; "They conducted themselves well during these difficult times" [syn: behave, acquit, deport, conduct, comport, carry]

  11. have rightfully; of rights, titles, and offices; "She bears the title of Duchess"; "He held the governorship for almost a decade" [syn: hold]

  12. support or hold in a certain manner; "She holds her head high"; "He carried himself upright" [syn: hold, carry]

  13. be pregnant with; "She is bearing his child"; "The are expecting another child in January"; "I am carrying his child" [syn: have a bun in the oven, carry, gestate, expect]

  14. [also: borne, born, bore]

Gazetteer
Bear, DE -- U.S. Census Designated Place in Delaware
Population (2000): 17593
Housing Units (2000): 6265
Land area (2000): 5.743051 sq. miles (14.874434 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 5.743051 sq. miles (14.874434 sq. km)
FIPS code: 04130
Located within: Delaware (DE), FIPS 10
Location: 39.620362 N, 75.684776 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 19701
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Bear, DE
Bear
Wikipedia
Bear (disambiguation)

A bear is a type of mammal.

Bear or Bears may also refer to:

BEAR (cipher)
Bear (song)

"Bear" is the first single from The Antlers' studio album Hospice. The song was released as a digital download in April 2009 to promote the self-released version of Hospice, then released in the United Kingdom on 7" vinyl on November 16, 2009. The single features an exclusive remix of "Bear" by Antlers' Darby Cicci on the B-side. The song evolved out of the 2008 track "Sylvia (An Introduction)", which was released on the New York Hospitals EP, partially bearing the same tune but with different lyrics.

Bear (2010 film)

Bear is a natural horror Z movie directed by John Rebel and stars Patrick Scott Lewis and Katie Lowes. The film was released on June 4, 2010 in the United Kingdom.

Bear (surname)

Bear is a surname which may refer to:

  • Elizabeth Bear, pen name of American author Sarah Bear Elizabeth Wishnevsky (born 1971)
  • Glecia Bear (born 1912), Canadian Cree writer
  • Greg Bear (born 1951), American author
  • Jack Bear (1920-2007), American costume designer
  • Michael Bear (1934–2000), English cricketer
Bear (2011 film)

Bear is a 2011 Australian short black comedy drama film directed by Nash Edgerton and written by David Michod and Nash Edgerton. The film had its world premiere in competition at the Cannes Film Festival on 21 May 2011.

Bear (barony)

Bear (or Bere; ) is the westernmost barony in County Cork in Ireland. It comprises the western tip and southern part of the eponymous Beara peninsula, the north of which is part of the County Kerry barony of Glanarought. The barony of Bear is bounded by Glanarought to the north, the Cork barony of Bantry to the north-east, Bantry Bay to the south, and the Kenmare River to the north-west.

Bear (novel)

Bear is a novel by Canadian author Marian Engel, published in 1976. It won the Governor General's Literary Award the same year. It is Engel's fifth novel, and her most famous. The story tells of a lonely librarian in northern Ontario who enters into a sexual relationship with a bear. The book has been called "the most controversial novel ever written in Canada".

Bear

Bears are mammals of the familyUrsidae. Bears are classified as caniforms, or doglike carnivorans, with the pinnipeds being their closest living relatives. Although only eight species of bears are extant, they are widespread, appearing in a wide variety of habitats throughout the Northern Hemisphere and partially in the Southern Hemisphere. Bears are found on the continents of North America, South America, Europe, and Asia.

Common characteristics of modern bears include large bodies with stocky legs, long snouts, shaggy hair, plantigrade paws with five nonretractile claws, and short tails. While the polar bear is mostly carnivorous, and the giant panda feeds almost entirely on bamboo, the remaining six species are omnivorous with varied diets.

With the exception of courting individuals and mothers with their young, bears are typically solitary animals. They are generally diurnal, but may be active during the night ( nocturnal) or twilight ( crepuscular), particularly around humans. Bears possess an excellent sense of smell and, despite their heavy build and awkward gait, are adept runners, climbers, and swimmers. In autumn, some bear species forage large amounts of fermented fruits, which affects their behavior. Bears use shelters, such as caves and burrows, as their dens; most species occupy their dens during the winter for a long period (up to 100 days) of sleep similar to hibernation.

Bears have been hunted since prehistoric times for their meat and fur. With their tremendous physical presence and charisma, they play a prominent role in the arts, mythology, and other cultural aspects of various human societies. In modern times, the bears' existence has been pressured through the encroachment on their habitats and the illegal trade of bears and bear parts, including the Asian bile bear market. The IUCN lists six bear species as vulnerable or endangered, and even least concern species, such as the brown bear, are at risk of extirpation in certain countries. The poaching and international trade of these most threatened populations are prohibited, but still ongoing.

Bear (gay culture)

In male gay culture, a bear is often a larger, hairier man who projects an image of rugged masculinity. Bears are one of many LGBT communities with events, codes, and a culture-specific identity.

The term bear was popularized by Richard Bulger, who, along with his then partner Chris Nelson (1960–2006) founded Bear Magazine in 1987. There is some contention surrounding whether Bulger originated the term and the subculture's conventions. George Mazzei wrote an article for The Advocate in 1979 called "Who's Who in the Zoo?", that characterized homosexuals as seven types of animals, including bears.

Some bears place importance on presenting a clear masculine image and may show disliking towards men who exhibit effeminacy. The bear concept can function as an identity, an affiliation, and there is ongoing debate in bear communities about what constitutes a bear.

Bears are almost always gay or bisexual men. However, as LGBT culture and modern slang has taken on a wider appeal in modern society, it is possible to call a hairy and burly straight man a bear (although they would not be strictly part of the gay bear community). Increasingly, transgender men ( trans men) and those who shun labels for gender and sexuality are also included within bear communities. However, heterosexual men who have bearish physical traits and are affirming of their gay friends and family (or their gay fans, in the case of a celebrity) may also be informally accorded "honorary" bear status. A smaller number of lesbians, particularly those portrayed as butch, also participate in bear culture, referring to themselves with the distinct label of ursula.

Bear (comics)

Bear is a popular black and white alternative comic book created by British writer/artist Jamie Smart and published in the United States by Slave Labor Graphics. It follows the adventures of a small stuffed bear named Bear and his roommate/ antagonist, a psychotic housecat named Looshkin. Looshkin often plays cruel, sadistic, and nonsensical pranks on Bear, and it is not uncommon for faeces and dismemberment to come into play.

Smart's linework is bold and expressive, and his panels are littered with information and throw-away gags. The stories are marked by a combination of violent shocks, random silliness, and other hallmarks of Dada.

10 issues were published between 2003 and 2005.

Bear (nickname)

People nicknamedBear or the Bear include:

  • Albert the Bear (c. 1100–1170), Margrave of Brandenburg
  • Paul William Bryant (1913–1983), known as Bear Bryant, American college football coach
  • Dainton Connell (1961–2007), Arsenal hooligan leader known as "The Bear", assistant to the Pet Shop Boys
  • Edward Ellice (merchant) (1783-1863), British merchant and politician known as "The Bear"
  • Edward Michael Grylls (born 1974), known as Bear Grylls, British adventurer and television presenter
  • Bear McCreary (born 1979), musician and composer
  • Owsley Stanley (1935–2011), underground LSD cook known as "The Bear"
  • Cameron White (born 1983), Australian cricketer
  • Raymond Wolf (1904-1979), American football and baseball player and coach
  • James Brady (1940-2014), press secretary to U.S. President Ronald Reagan and shooting victim

Usage examples of "bear".

Every year, more children were born Aberrant, more were snatched by the Weavers.

It bore both the rich aroma of leaves being burnt in the fall and the faint perfume of wildflowers ablow in the spring, but it also held a third attar which seemed to be the breath of the Wind itself which none could ever set name to.

Finally, he points out the practical bearing of the subject--for example, the probability of calculus causing sudden suppression of urine in such cases--and also the danger of surgical interference, and suggests the possibility of diagnosing the condition by ascertaining the absence of the opening of one ureter in the bladder by means of the cystoscope, and also the likelihood of its occurring where any abnormality of the genital organs is found, especially if this be unilateral.

Ann they had both been aboad a bus cruising at eighteen miles an hour along the sixty-lane freeway that ran from Bear Canyon to Pasadena, near the middle of Los Angeles.

That supposition was borne out as the captain came aboard, followed by a spotty midshipman and his file of marines.

Once was I taken of the foemen in the town where I abode when my lord was away from me, and a huge slaughter of innocent folk was made, and I was cast into prison and chains, after I had seen my son that I had borne to my lord slain before mine eyes.

The guns of those ships, being disposed along the sides, were for the most part able to bear only upon an enemy abreast of them, with a small additional angle of train toward ahead or astern.

A State statute which forbids bodies of men to associate together as military organizations, or to drill or parade with arms in cities and towns unless authorized by law, does not abridge the right of the people to keep and bear arms.

But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the Executive and Judicial officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion, or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State.

Martin Cash was a fellow countryman, born at Enniscorthy in County Wexford, and when he had been sent to Norfolk Island, he had talked freely of his exploits as absconder and bushranger, taking great pride in both.

Besides the glands, both surfaces of the leaves and the pedicels of the tentacles bear numerous minute papillae, which absorb carbonate of ammonia, an infusion of raw meat, metallic salts, and probably many other substances, but the absorption of matter by these papillae never induces inflection.

The Pleiades were all abuzz over the advent of their visiting star, Miss Frances Homer, the celebrated monologuist, who, at Eaton Auditorium, again presented her Women of Destiny series, in which she portrays women of history and the influence they brought to bear upon the lives of such momentous world figures as Napoleon, Ferdinand of Spain, Horatio Nelson and Shakespeare.

New Orleans, simply clothed in homespun cotton striped red and blue, abysmally poor and surrounded by swarms of children who all seemed to bear names like Nono and Vev6 and Bibi, cheerfully selling powdered file and alligator hides and going away again without bothering, like the Americans did, to sample the delights of the big city.

Brutus and his men that night Achates was born, only infinitely more frightening, more murderous.

Brutus, you said to me the day after Achates was born that we should make the best of the marriage we were doomed to.