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Crossword clues for fly

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
fly
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a ball flies/sails
▪ The ball flew over the goalkeeper’s head and into the net.
a bird flies
▪ Some birds fly incredible distances.
a bullet flies (=moves fast)
▪ Bullets were flying around our heads.
a door flies/bursts open (=opens very suddenly and quickly)
▪ Then the door burst open and two men with guns came in.
a flag is flying (=a flag is shown on a pole)
Flags were flying at half-mast because of the death of the Premier.
a flying insect
▪ Toads mainly eat small dark flying insects.
a flying start (=a very good start)
▪ The appeal got off to a flying start at the weekend when the group held a raffle.
a flying visitBritish English (= a very short visit)
▪ Timpson was due to pay a flying visit to London.
a plane flies
▪ Several planes flew overhead.
an insect flies
▪ Insects were flying around the food on the counter.
come running/flying/speeding etc
▪ Jess came flying round the corner and banged straight into me.
crane fly
flew open
▪ The bar door flew open and a noisy group burst in.
fly ball
fly half
fly into a temper (=suddenly become very angry)
▪ He flew into a temper at the slightest thing.
fly leaf
flying at an altitude
▪ We’re flying at an altitude of 40,000 feet.
flying buttress
flying debris
▪ She was hit by flying debris from the blast.
flying doctor
flying fish
flying fox
flying leap
▪ He threw a stick into the river and the dog went after it in a flying leap.
flying officer
flying picket
flying saucer
flying squad
▪ the head of Scotland Yard’s Flying Squad
flying tackle
fly/pilot a plane
▪ I admire the guys who flew those planes.
fruit fly
knocked flying
▪ Garry answered the door only to be knocked flying as two policemen came rushing in.
passed with flying colours (=got very high marks)
▪ She passed with flying colours.
pop fly
rumours fly around (=are talked about by a lot of people)
▪ There were wild rumours flying around the office on Wednesday.
sand fly
sparks...flying (=people were arguing angrily)
▪ The sparks were really flying at the meeting!
tsetse fly
tzetze fly
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
air
▪ Miranda found herself flying through the air.
▪ Now he was lord of the air, flying wherever he would, envied of all.
▪ Do not think that a command-and-control vehicle in the air was just a flying radio.
▪ In Air Sugihan rumours flew that the settlers were to be shifted so that the elephants could be left in peace.
aircraft
▪ The remaining seven aircraft were flown back to Prestwick for re-allotment.
▪ The page also will list the types of aircraft each airline flies.
▪ But witnesses in a nearby aircraft said the plane flew directly into the swamp.
▪ Undamaged, the aircraft was later flown from the field direct to Renfrew by F/O Pickard.
▪ Even aircraft are forbidden from flying closer than two and a half miles from the Gap.
▪ Outraged residents protested last night over the decision to allow the crippled aircraft to fly over their homes.
▪ Leaned, that aircraft will fly 116 miles on the same fuel which takes it only 100 miles in rich.
ball
▪ A black metal ball flew from his right hand.
▪ Striking the ball was a total physical pleasure, and the ball flew, bounced, and rolled some 220 yards.
▪ There was a nasty moment before the ball flew over the three bunkers that block the fairway.
▪ The ball flew fantastically well in the air of that glen and sat invitingly on its lively turf.
▪ The ball flew towards the travellers, and one of the street urchins collided with the Doctor.
▪ He blew his nose and sent the ball of tissue flying into the dark.
▪ The ball flew high and wide of Judy and over the high wire fence behind her.
▪ Aldridge, however, signalled a no-ball, ruling that the ball flew above the permitted height under the series rules.
bird
▪ You then bring your hands down and show that the birds have flown.
▪ Sometimes the hawk will begin to circle or glide and a smaller bird will fly directly beneath him.
▪ The sky had darkened, clouds had gathered, and birds were returning, flying in belatedly to feed their chicks.
▪ I was with her one day when a bird flew into her house.
▪ I saw birds fly across, pigeons, I think.
▪ The birds flew up noisily, circled, and then they came down and settled in another tree not far away.
▪ Fairly large, long-necked, long-legged wading birds, habitually flying with neck outstretched: a useful distinction from herons.
door
▪ Then the door of the laboratory flew open.
▪ Not those nosy Klubocks, she thought, turning to see the back door fly open.
▪ Martin and Mihal, gazing from the mountain-top, saw the door fly open.
▪ He saw both truck doors fly open and the humans jumped out just as Jekub -.
▪ The back door flew open and Norm rushed in, pulling off his filthy shirt.
▪ A moment later the sounds of the storm were magnified suddenly in the hut as the door at one end flew open.
▪ When I pedal-turned the tail away from the flames, my door flew open.
face
▪ The decades since Malthus's time have seen progress of a kind that flies in the face of everything he foresaw.
▪ But strong biological determinism flies in the face of experience.
▪ I find this hard to believe since it flies in the face of all the principles of wrestling.
▪ Neill triumphantly flies in the face of a long line of buffoon kings on film.
▪ Anita Roddick has made a virtue of flying in the face of business convention.
▪ Whatever the riddle is called, it flies in the face of 3, 000 years of logical philosophy.
▪ It flies in the face of commitments made at the Earth Summit to reduce consumption.
▪ That concept is irrational and unworkable because it flies in the face of everything we know about human nature.
flag
▪ A smaller, lower battle flag will fly in front of the capitol, beside a monument to slain Confederate soldiers.
▪ He is expected eventually to rule that the Union flag must fly, and he called the row unnecessary.
▪ There are no white flags flying outside the former Santa Rosa.
▪ Now I am passing an area where the crescent moon flag flies over shops, bakeries and mosques.
▪ Watch out for his flag being flown from the church towers on this day.
▪ The flags were flying at half-mast.
▪ Don't enter the firing ranges when the red flags are flying - usually from prominent places such as hilltops.
helicopter
▪ James Carney may have been hurled from a flying helicopter.
▪ She was flown to hospital by helicopter in a coma but died of multiple skull fractures.
▪ You either patrolled an area close by or you were flown by helicopter to the more remote places.
▪ At roundup time, Mercer teams with his oldest son, Gary, who flies a helicopter.
▪ She was flown by helicopter to hospital in Orlando.
▪ Maybe I ought to fly my helicopter up there and find out.
kite
▪ All of these generalisations depend of course on a constant wind speed sufficient to fly the kite within its designed wind window.
▪ We explored dry creek beds, burned mesquite wood for campfires, flew kites, and swam in lakes.
▪ Let's fly a kite or blow some bubbles up into the sky.
▪ Baldwin merely intended to fly a policy kite at Plymouth.
▪ In 1986, Kent cigarettes launched an ad campaign which depicted two people flying a kite on a page.
▪ This he duly did while Eric and I were out flying kites.
▪ The Government flies these kites of disinformation then people feel grateful when they don't happen.
night
▪ His soul would have no repose and would hover over the place, flying through the night.
▪ They were gone and they had left me alone with whatever was flying the night sky.
▪ They often flew through the night without the benefit of fighter escort.
▪ We flew at night with a minigun set up on the doors of the aircraft and a starlight scope.
▪ This is useful if you fly by night or live in murky waters.
▪ The summer Kim turned sixteen, they flew every night his father was home.
▪ Often flies by night, and hovers for insects in dusk.
▪ Any minute I expected the poor little madman to go flying in the night, dead.
pilot
▪ She became a pilot and now flies jumbo jets between Bali, Hawaii and Los Angeles.
▪ One pilot flew Dade County commissioners over the crash site, another pilot said.
▪ A helicopter pilot has to fly to a point 200 kilometres due East.
▪ Marine pilots flew their big H-34s off the rolling deck of their carrier to the hazy coastline and then returned.
▪ The pilot was flying the aircraft fairly close to the ground and was using road signs to help determine his location.
▪ Aspiring pilots get to fly seven Imperial fighters, each with its own characteristics.
▪ This is very noticeable with experienced pilots flying into cloud without the help of the instruments.
▪ But recently, Brothers' pilots have flown over Havana, dropping leaflets urging protests of the Castro regime.
plane
▪ The unarmed plane flew very fast and very high.
▪ While a second airframe shell was built as a back-up, it was destroyed after the plane stopped flying.
▪ Other aircrew who died in the crash were ... In Lyneham, the transport planes were flying again today.
▪ The disclosure came in response to reporters' questions about why the planes were not flying.
▪ Looking out of the window, Branson saw flames streaming momentarily from an engine; then the plane righted itself and flew on.
▪ He looked up at the sky and heard the rumble of planes flying above the cottony blanket of sky.
rage
▪ Mitch was going to fly into a rage.
▪ Whenever Stewart showed signs of rejecting that outlook, Joe would fly into a rage.
▪ Maclean immediately flew into a rage.
▪ He flew into a rage with him and brained him with his lute.
▪ The Collector had flown into a rage.
▪ I flew into a rage and quit.
▪ He gambled and drank, and she had to humour him always to prevent him from flying into rages ....
▪ Caledor flew into a towering rage and dismissed their fears as groundless.
spark
▪ They've a revolutionary scoreboard for the fans and on the pitch soccer to set the sparks flying.
▪ Over the past few weeks they'd been rubbing along fairly civilly, though not without the occasional spark flying between them.
▪ There would be blue sparks flying.
▪ The last person to use it saw sparks fly.
▪ Nothing Less likely to start sparks flying Than a burnt-out flame.
▪ All clear: sparks fly along the nerve wires, pins and needles and it's over.
▪ A spark flew, igniting the gaseous oxygen in the tank.
▪ Stirring the embers with a stick sent sparks flying, echoes of the vast starry night.
■ VERB
learn
▪ The strange and difficult was becoming second nature in the way that it had when I'd learned to fly.
▪ After learning to fly she took a job as a pilot with a small commuter airline based in Humberside.
▪ He learned to fly, naturally, on seaplanes.
▪ It would have been like stamping on a little bird you watch learning to fly.
▪ She let her daughter learn to fly and try to become the youngest child to fly cross-country.
▪ At best this will always be a compromise-which explains why this is one of the most difficult aspects of learning to fly.
▪ If you made it through that initiation, you got to the flight line and actually began to learn to fly.
let
▪ At playtime she opened the tin and let the cockroach fly into my blouse.
▪ With computers you can write quickly, letting your fingers fly from key to key.
▪ Quench me quick and clean: let the ashes fly lightly where they will; no plaques.
▪ The slicks slowed from 100 knots to about 80 to let the gunships fly ahead.
▪ Alternatively, let him fly high to act as a aerial patrol to intercept an enemy trying the same thing.
▪ There are many ways to engage in a productive argument, and letting it fly is certainly one of them.
▪ So we dismantled the screen over the window and let them fly around the back of the barn.
▪ Away with me! Let us fly these deadly waters!
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a flying jump/leap
a flying start
▪ David Currie gave Barnsley a flying start, scoring after 31 seconds, and Andy Rammell added their second.
▪ However, you also need to give yourself a flying start by stimulating the circulation through massage and natural herbal extracts.
▪ It's given them a flying start ahead of their Japenese competitors, who until now were the traditional market leaders in electronics.
▪ Racers, once the top team in Britain, will want a flying start to the season to reassert themselves.
▪ That nagging thought deepened as the captain came in first, and gave the innings a flying start.
▪ The appeal got off to a flying start at the weekend when the group held a jumble sale and raffle.
▪ Video-Taped report follows Voice over Despite missing 7 first team regulars Gloucester got off to a flying start.
▪ Well, it seems we have a flying start.
a flying visit
▪ Its inventor looks like he's on a flying visit to the twentieth century.
as the crow flies
▪ My house is ten miles from here as the crow flies.
▪ The distance between the two towns is only 10 kilometres as the crow flies, but it can take up to 2 hours along the narrow coastal road.
▪ Similarly a stone's throw, as the crow flies, etc.
▪ The course should be five and a half miles as the crow flies.
▪ The distance between Avonmouth, near Bristol, and Poole in Dorset is only 65 miles as the crow flies.
fly a kite
▪ And, let's go fly a kite.
▪ In 1986, Kent cigarettes launched an ad campaign which depicted two people flying a kite on a page.
▪ Let's fly a kite or blow some bubbles up into the sky.
▪ This he duly did while Eric and I were out flying kites.
▪ We explored dry creek beds, burned mesquite wood for campfires, flew kites, and swam in lakes.
fly into a passion
fly/slip under sb's/the radar
keep the flag flying
leave/fly the nest
▪ After about three weeks, the young cuckoo is ready to leave the nest.
▪ Barn owls leave the nest at two to three months and are sexually mature at one year.
▪ If, however, the host appears reluctant to leave the nest, the cuckoo has a more direct approach.
▪ It is so rarely when all the fledglings have left the nest, to have them all together again.
▪ Once deposited, she leaves the nest and he immediately fertilizes the eggs.
▪ She usually builds on the shores of an estuary and there she sits devotedly, seldom leaving the nest.
▪ Unfortunately for her, the host bird showed no inclination to leave the nest.
▪ When the host leaves the nest, the cuckoo makes its approach in a long, silent hawk-like glide.
pigs might fly
the bird has flown
the fur flies
▪ When Marcia found out where Keith was all night, that's when the fur really started to fly.
time flies
▪ Dearest Jeanette How time flies especially when one is meant to be writing lots of letters.
▪ There are so many diversions here that the time flies by on wings.
▪ Think how time flies in periods of intense, purposeful activity.
with flying colours
▪ And they now look set to promote more harmonious race relations in the community after passing with flying colours.
▪ Fortunately, like the other tests, the 31-year-old convent-educated beauty passed with flying colours.
▪ He passed his exams with flying colours.
▪ He would have passed it with flying colours.
▪ Now he's gone back to driving school in an effort to pass with flying colours.
▪ So far James has never given a scrap of trouble and has passed his MoT test with flying colours.
▪ The Honey Thieves are a band who would graduate with flying colours from such a straight-forward system of appraisal.
▪ Trinity High School has just been inspected by Ofsted and come out with flying colours.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Are you going to fly or drive?
▪ As I slowed down another car flew past me and turned to the left.
▪ Brenda's learning to fly.
▪ Fighter jets fly at incredibly high speeds.
▪ Flocks of seagulls flew overhead.
▪ Her long hair was flying in the wind.
▪ His company flew him to Rio to attend the conference.
▪ I'm not allowed to fly visitors into the National Park area without permission.
▪ I flew Aeroflot out of Moscow.
▪ Lindbergh was the first man to fly the Atlantic.
▪ Medical equipment and food are being flown into the areas worst hit by the disaster.
▪ My mother never liked flying.
▪ Papers were flying around in the wind.
▪ Some kids were flying kites in the park.
▪ Stan flew helicopters in Vietnam.
▪ The bus was flying along when suddenly the driver slammed on the brakes.
▪ The ship is flying the Dutch flag.
▪ They were forced to fly the country in 1939.
▪ We'll be flying from New York to Munich.
▪ We're flying nonstop from Milwaukee to Orlando.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ By the end of the year he had converted to twin-engined fighters, joining 252 Squadron to fly Blenheim IVFs and Beaufighters.
▪ Her fa-ther stood up, and the magpie, delighted, flew round and round with a marvelous clatter.
▪ Her heart broke and her soul flew to heaven.
▪ I managed to roll clear just as it flew off into the air, never to be seen again.
▪ Stop flying before it becomes too windy to move or fly the glider.
▪ The number of training sorties flown by its pilots had dropped 7. 8 percent a year for nearly a decade.
▪ This is when the pilots who have been hibernating during the winter months get their gliders out and start flying again.
II.verb
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A revenue passenger mile is one paying passenger flown one mile.
▪ By the end of the year he had converted to twin-engined fighters, joining 252 Squadron to fly Blenheim IVFs and Beaufighters.
▪ Her fa-ther stood up, and the magpie, delighted, flew round and round with a marvelous clatter.
▪ Her heart broke and her soul flew to heaven.
▪ I managed to roll clear just as it flew off into the air, never to be seen again.
▪ Stop flying before it becomes too windy to move or fly the glider.
▪ The number of training sorties flown by its pilots had dropped 7. 8 percent a year for nearly a decade.
▪ This is when the pilots who have been hibernating during the winter months get their gliders out and start flying again.
III.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
black
▪ The air is stale and acrid, and a cluster of black flies hovers over the bed.
▪ They gazed at him with blue- black fly filled eyes, and a small glimmer of happiness grew on their faces.
▪ A fat black fly was buzzing against the windowpane.
▪ Heat waves dazzled off the chugging hood of the truck and fat black flies clung to its warm, splattered sides.
■ NOUN
crane
▪ A brown and white female appeared with a crane fly in her beak.
fruit
▪ Worms and fruit flies, too, have had all their units read off.
▪ The drug tests have been done so far only in fruit flies.
▪ A search through their genes reveals a set almost identical to those that help make the wing of a fruit fly.
▪ Then make sure you cover it, because those citrus pieces will attract fruit flies.
▪ Mutation could once be studied only in bacteria or in fruit flies.
▪ The only problem with the Clivus to date has been an outbreak of fruit flies inside the tank.
▪ Rotting guavas and fruit flies that hover around them are also prevalent on the ridge route.
tsetse
▪ The female tsetse fly retains her young for even longer.
▪ This transformed trypanosome line, ST3, was then transmitted through tsetse flies and the resulting bloodstream forms cloned in mice.
■ VERB
attract
▪ An unkempt coat will provide a refuge for parasites, and if soiled with faecal matter is likely to attract flies.
▪ Then make sure you cover it, because those citrus pieces will attract fruit flies.
▪ The reconditioned air attracts the flies so we wander round like lost nomads thinking about the next meal.
bite
▪ These microscopic biting flies would dry and shrivel in minutes out in the sun.
catch
▪ The reason is that where you get cobwebs, you get spiders - and spiders catch flies!
drop
▪ Then Souness comes and they drop like flies for two seasons running!
▪ Our kids are dropping like flies.
▪ They should be dropping like flies, but that hasn't been the case.
hurt
▪ He wouldn't hurt a fly.
▪ You couldn't hurt a fly with that thing.
keep
▪ It consists of a plastic bin with a lockable lid that will keep out flies, children and so on.
▪ Then, of course, he had a cover for keeping the flies off.
▪ The safe being a large cabinet with a fine wire-mesh door to keep flies off fresh food.
▪ The floor was of beaten earth, the walls washed white with lime to keep off the flies.
▪ To keep the flies away, crush garlic cloves in boiling water, allow to cool and then sponge over horse.
▪ She consoled herself with the thought that the acrid smoke would serve to keep flies out of the room.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a flying jump/leap
a flying start
▪ David Currie gave Barnsley a flying start, scoring after 31 seconds, and Andy Rammell added their second.
▪ However, you also need to give yourself a flying start by stimulating the circulation through massage and natural herbal extracts.
▪ It's given them a flying start ahead of their Japenese competitors, who until now were the traditional market leaders in electronics.
▪ Racers, once the top team in Britain, will want a flying start to the season to reassert themselves.
▪ That nagging thought deepened as the captain came in first, and gave the innings a flying start.
▪ The appeal got off to a flying start at the weekend when the group held a jumble sale and raffle.
▪ Video-Taped report follows Voice over Despite missing 7 first team regulars Gloucester got off to a flying start.
▪ Well, it seems we have a flying start.
a flying visit
▪ Its inventor looks like he's on a flying visit to the twentieth century.
as the crow flies
▪ My house is ten miles from here as the crow flies.
▪ The distance between the two towns is only 10 kilometres as the crow flies, but it can take up to 2 hours along the narrow coastal road.
▪ Similarly a stone's throw, as the crow flies, etc.
▪ The course should be five and a half miles as the crow flies.
▪ The distance between Avonmouth, near Bristol, and Poole in Dorset is only 65 miles as the crow flies.
be bitten by the showbiz/travel/flying etc bug
be dropping like flies
▪ Players from both teams are dropping like flies.
▪ Grocer profits While other retailers are dropping like flies, supermarkets are making fat profits.
▪ Our kids are dropping like flies.
▪ They should be dropping like flies, but that hasn't been the case.
fly into a passion
fly/slip under sb's/the radar
go flying/laughing/rushing etc
▪ Any minute I expected the poor little madman to go flying in the night, dead.
▪ Bodies not strapped in by seat belts go flying.
▪ But shouldn't you try and find out some more about him before you go rushing off?
▪ It tripped on a book and almost went flying, but it just succeeded in remaining upright.
▪ So why had she gone rushing north from Lima to see this half-brother of hers?
▪ Spit went flying, seen by millions.
▪ The doll and blanket went flying, bounced off the far end of the block, and fell into the make-believe river.
▪ The next member of the team took his place at the stumps only to see both bails go flying.
pigs might fly
send sb/sth flying/sprawling/reeling etc
the bird has flown
the fur flies
▪ When Marcia found out where Keith was all night, that's when the fur really started to fly.
time flies
▪ Dearest Jeanette How time flies especially when one is meant to be writing lots of letters.
▪ There are so many diversions here that the time flies by on wings.
▪ Think how time flies in periods of intense, purposeful activity.
with flying colours
▪ And they now look set to promote more harmonious race relations in the community after passing with flying colours.
▪ Fortunately, like the other tests, the 31-year-old convent-educated beauty passed with flying colours.
▪ He passed his exams with flying colours.
▪ He would have passed it with flying colours.
▪ Now he's gone back to driving school in an effort to pass with flying colours.
▪ So far James has never given a scrap of trouble and has passed his MoT test with flying colours.
▪ The Honey Thieves are a band who would graduate with flying colours from such a straight-forward system of appraisal.
▪ Trinity High School has just been inspected by Ofsted and come out with flying colours.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The flies were swarming around the garbage cans.
▪ Your fly is unzipped.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Real fishermen know how to tie flies and cast them so that they dance over the water.
▪ The sun was very bright; flies and insects buzzed on the littered veranda.
▪ Their heads were the size of flies and moved to and fro as they presumably spoke to one another.
▪ There are three ground pegging points at each bellend and one on either side of the fly.
▪ There might be bees, but there are clearly no flies on old Mel.
▪ There was a moment of indecisive silence, then rising voices, then the flies again.
IV.adjective
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
as the crow flies
▪ My house is ten miles from here as the crow flies.
▪ The distance between the two towns is only 10 kilometres as the crow flies, but it can take up to 2 hours along the narrow coastal road.
▪ Similarly a stone's throw, as the crow flies, etc.
▪ The course should be five and a half miles as the crow flies.
▪ The distance between Avonmouth, near Bristol, and Poole in Dorset is only 65 miles as the crow flies.
be bitten by the showbiz/travel/flying etc bug
be dropping like flies
▪ Players from both teams are dropping like flies.
▪ Grocer profits While other retailers are dropping like flies, supermarkets are making fat profits.
▪ Our kids are dropping like flies.
▪ They should be dropping like flies, but that hasn't been the case.
fly a kite
▪ And, let's go fly a kite.
▪ In 1986, Kent cigarettes launched an ad campaign which depicted two people flying a kite on a page.
▪ Let's fly a kite or blow some bubbles up into the sky.
▪ This he duly did while Eric and I were out flying kites.
▪ We explored dry creek beds, burned mesquite wood for campfires, flew kites, and swam in lakes.
fly into a passion
fly/slip under sb's/the radar
go flying/laughing/rushing etc
▪ Any minute I expected the poor little madman to go flying in the night, dead.
▪ Bodies not strapped in by seat belts go flying.
▪ But shouldn't you try and find out some more about him before you go rushing off?
▪ It tripped on a book and almost went flying, but it just succeeded in remaining upright.
▪ So why had she gone rushing north from Lima to see this half-brother of hers?
▪ Spit went flying, seen by millions.
▪ The doll and blanket went flying, bounced off the far end of the block, and fell into the make-believe river.
▪ The next member of the team took his place at the stumps only to see both bails go flying.
keep the flag flying
leave/fly the nest
▪ After about three weeks, the young cuckoo is ready to leave the nest.
▪ Barn owls leave the nest at two to three months and are sexually mature at one year.
▪ If, however, the host appears reluctant to leave the nest, the cuckoo has a more direct approach.
▪ It is so rarely when all the fledglings have left the nest, to have them all together again.
▪ Once deposited, she leaves the nest and he immediately fertilizes the eggs.
▪ She usually builds on the shores of an estuary and there she sits devotedly, seldom leaving the nest.
▪ Unfortunately for her, the host bird showed no inclination to leave the nest.
▪ When the host leaves the nest, the cuckoo makes its approach in a long, silent hawk-like glide.
pigs might fly
send sb/sth flying/sprawling/reeling etc
the bird has flown
the fur flies
▪ When Marcia found out where Keith was all night, that's when the fur really started to fly.
time flies
▪ Dearest Jeanette How time flies especially when one is meant to be writing lots of letters.
▪ There are so many diversions here that the time flies by on wings.
▪ Think how time flies in periods of intense, purposeful activity.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Mmm, that Sharlene is one fly girl.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ If you go fly fishing you are normally wanting to catch either trout or salmon.
▪ Of course you'd expect to find fly ash at any period since people began burning coal in quantity.
▪ What makes fly fishing different from coarse and sea fishing is the way you cast.
▪ When fly fishing you only have the fly tied on the line.
▪ When fly fishing you use an artificially made fly.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Fly

Fly \Fly\ (fl[imac]), v. i. [imp. Flew (fl[=u]); p. p. Flown (fl[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. Flying.] [OE. fleen, fleen, fleyen, flegen, AS. fle['o]gan; akin to D. vliegen, OHG. fliogan, G. fliegen, Icel. flj[=u]ga, Sw. flyga, Dan. flyve, Goth. us-flaugjan to cause to fly away, blow about, and perh. to L. pluma feather, E. plume. [root]84. Cf. Fledge, Flight, Flock of animals.]

  1. To move in or pass through the air with wings, as a bird.

  2. To move through the air or before the wind; esp., to pass or be driven rapidly through the air by any impulse.

  3. To float, wave, or rise in the air, as sparks or a flag.

    Man is born unto trouble, as the sparks fly upward.
    --Job v. 7.

  4. To move or pass swiftly; to hasten away; to circulate rapidly; as, a ship flies on the deep; a top flies around; rumor flies.

    Fly, envious Time, till thou run out thy race.
    --Milton.

    The dark waves murmured as the ships flew on.
    --Bryant.

  5. To run from danger; to attempt to escape; to flee; as, an enemy or a coward flies. See Note under Flee.

    Fly, ere evil intercept thy flight.
    --Milton.

    Whither shall I fly to escape their hands ?
    --Shak.

  6. To move suddenly, or with violence; to do an act suddenly or swiftly; -- usually with a qualifying word; as, a door flies open; a bomb flies apart. To fly about (Naut.), to change frequently in a short time; -- said of the wind. To fly around, to move about in haste. [Colloq.] To fly at, to spring toward; to rush on; to attack suddenly. To fly in the face of, to insult; to assail; to set at defiance; to oppose with violence; to act in direct opposition to; to resist. To fly off, to separate, or become detached suddenly; to revolt. To fly on, to attack. To fly open, to open suddenly, or with violence. To fly out.

    1. To rush out.

    2. To burst into a passion; to break out into license. To let fly.

      1. To throw or drive with violence; to discharge. ``A man lets fly his arrow without taking any aim.''
        --Addison.

      2. (Naut.) To let go suddenly and entirely; as, to let fly the sheets.

Fly

Fly \Fly\, a. Knowing; wide awake; fully understanding another's meaning. [Slang]
--Dickens.

Fly

Fly \Fly\, n.; pl. Flies (fl[imac]z). [OE. flie, flege, AS. fl[=y]ge, fle['o]ge, fr. fle['o]gan to fly; akin to D. vlieg, OHG. flioga, G. fliege, Icel. & Sw. fluga, Dan. flue. [root] 84. See Fly, v. i.]

  1. (Zo["o]l.)

    1. Any winged insect; esp., one with transparent wings; as, the Spanish fly; firefly; gall fly; dragon fly.

    2. Any dipterous insect; as, the house fly; flesh fly; black fly. See Diptera, and Illust. in Append.

  2. A hook dressed in imitation of a fly, -- used for fishing. ``The fur-wrought fly.''
    --Gay.

  3. A familiar spirit; a witch's attendant. [Obs.]

    A trifling fly, none of your great familiars.
    --B. Jonson.

  4. A parasite. [Obs.]
    --Massinger.

  5. A kind of light carriage for rapid transit, plying for hire and usually drawn by one horse. [Eng.]

  6. The length of an extended flag from its staff; sometimes, the length from the ``union'' to the extreme end.

  7. The part of a vane pointing the direction from which the wind blows.

  8. (Naut.) That part of a compass on which the points are marked; the compass card.
    --Totten.

  9. (Mech.)

    1. Two or more vanes set on a revolving axis, to act as a fanner, or to equalize or impede the motion of machinery by the resistance of the air, as in the striking part of a clock.

    2. A heavy wheel, or cross arms with weights at the ends on a revolving axis, to regulate or equalize the motion of machinery by means of its inertia, where the power communicated, or the resistance to be overcome, is variable, as in the steam engine or the coining press. See Fly wheel (below).

  10. (Knitting Machine) The piece hinged to the needle, which holds the engaged loop in position while the needle is penetrating another loop; a latch.
    --Knight.

  11. The pair of arms revolving around the bobbin, in a spinning wheel or spinning frame, to twist the yarn.

  12. (Weaving) A shuttle driven through the shed by a blow or jerk.
    --Knight.

    1. Formerly, the person who took the printed sheets from the press.

    2. A vibrating frame with fingers, attached to a power to a power printing press for doing the same work.

  13. The outer canvas of a tent with double top, usually drawn over the ridgepole, but so extended as to touch the roof of the tent at no other place.

  14. One of the upper screens of a stage in a theater.

  15. The fore flap of a bootee; also, a lap on trousers, overcoats, etc., to conceal a row of buttons.

  16. (Baseball) A batted ball that flies to a considerable distance, usually high in the air; also, the flight of a ball so struck; as, it was caught on the fly. Also called fly ball. ``a fly deep into right field''

  17. (Cotton Manuf.) Waste cotton.

    Black fly, Cheese fly, Dragon fly, etc. See under Black, Cheese, etc. -- Fly agaric (Bot.), a mushroom ( Agaricus muscarius), having a narcotic juice which, in sufficient quantities, is poisonous. -- Fly block (Naut.), a pulley whose position shifts to suit the working of the tackle with which it is connected; -- used in the hoisting tackle of yards. -- Fly board (Printing Press), the board on which printed sheets are deposited by the fly. -- Fly book, a case in the form of a book for anglers' flies.
    --Kingsley. Fly cap, a cap with wings, formerly worn by women. -- Fly drill, a drill having a reciprocating motion controlled by a fly wheel, the driving power being applied by the hand through a cord winding in reverse directions upon the spindle as it rotates backward and forward.
    --Knight. Fly fishing, the act or art of angling with a bait of natural or artificial flies; fishing using a fly[2] as bait.
    --Walton. -- -- Fly fisherman, one who fishes using natural or artificial flies[2] as bait, especially one who fishes exclusively in that manner. -- Fly flap, an implement for killing flies. -- Fly governor, a governor for regulating the speed of an engine, etc., by the resistance of vanes revolving in the air. -- Fly honeysuckle (Bot.), a plant of the honeysuckle genus ( Lonicera), having a bushy stem and the flowers in pairs, as L. ciliata and L. Xylosteum. -- Fly hook, a fishhook supplied with an artificial fly. -- Fly leaf, an unprinted leaf at the beginning or end of a book, circular, programme, etc. -- Fly maggot, a maggot bred from the egg of a fly.
    --Ray.

    Fly net, a screen to exclude insects.

    Fly nut (Mach.), a nut with wings; a thumb nut; a finger nut.

    Fly orchis (Bot.), a plant ( Ophrys muscifera), whose flowers resemble flies.

    Fly paper, poisoned or sticky paper for killing flies that feed upon or are entangled by it.

    Fly powder, an arsenical powder used to poison flies.

    Fly press, a screw press for punching, embossing, etc., operated by hand and having a heavy fly.

    Fly rail, a bracket which turns out to support the hinged leaf of a table.

    Fly rod, a light fishing rod used in angling with a fly.

    Fly sheet, a small loose advertising sheet; a handbill.

    Fly snapper (Zo["o]l.), an American bird ( Phainopepla nitens), allied to the chatterers and shrikes. The male is glossy blue-black; the female brownish gray.

    Fly wheel (Mach.), a heavy wheel attached to machinery to equalize the movement (opposing any sudden acceleration by its inertia and any retardation by its momentum), and to accumulate or give out energy for a variable or intermitting resistance. See Fly, n., 9.

    On the fly (Baseball), still in the air; -- said of a batted ball caught before touching the ground..

Fly

Fly \Fly\, v. t.

  1. To cause to fly or to float in the air, as a bird, a kite, a flag, etc.

    The brave black flag I fly.
    --W. S. Gilbert.

  2. To fly or flee from; to shun; to avoid.

    Sleep flies the wretch.
    --Dryden.

    To fly the favors of so good a king.
    --Shak.

  3. To hunt with a hawk. [Obs.]
    --Bacon.

  4. To manage (an aircraft) in flight; as, to fly an a["e]roplane.

    To fly a kite (Com.), to raise money on commercial notes.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
fly

Old English fleoge "a fly, winged insect," from Proto-Germanic *fleugon "flying insect" (cognates: Old Saxon fleiga, Old Norse fluga, Middle Dutch vlieghe, Dutch vlieg, Old High German flioga, German Fliege "fly"); literally "the flying (insect)" (compare Old English fleogende "flying"), from same source as fly (v.1).\n

\nOriginally any winged insect (moths, gnats, beetles, locusts, hence butterfly, etc.) and long used by farmers and gardeners for any insect parasite. Flies figuratively for "large numbers" of anything is from 1590s. Plural flien (as in oxen, etc.) gradually normalized 13c.-15c. to -s. Fly in the ointment is from Eccles. x:1. Fly on the wall "unseen observer" first recorded 1881. No flies on _____ "no lack of activity or alertness on the part of," is attested by 1866. Meaning "fish-hook dressed to resemble an insect" is from 1580s; Fly-fishing is from 1650s. Fly-catcher "bird which eats insects on the wing" is from 1670s. The fly agaric mushroom (1788) so called because it was used as a poison for flies.\n

\nThe sense of "a flight, flying" is from mid-15c. From the verb and the notion of "flapping as a wing does" comes the noun sense of "tent flap" (1810), which was extended to "strip of material sewn into a garment as a covering for buttons" or some other purpose (1844). Baseball fly ball attested by 1866. To do something on the fly is 1856, apparently from baseball.\n\nWhen the catcher sees several fielders running to catch a ball, he should name the one he thinks surest to take it, when the others should not strive to catch the ball on the fly, but only, in case of its being missed, take it on the bound.

["The American Boys Book of Sports and Games," New York, 1864]

fly

"run away," Old English fleon, flion "fly from, avoid, escape;" essentially a variant spelling of flee (q.v.). In Old English, this verb and fleogan "soar through the air with wings" (modern fly (v.1)) differed only in their present tense forms and often were confused, then as now. In some Middle English dialects they seem to have merged completely. Distinguished from one another since 14c. in the past tense: flew for fly (v.1), fled for fly (v.2).

fly

slang, "clever, alert, wide awake," by 1811, perhaps from fly (n.) on the notion of the insect being hard to catch. Other theories, however, trace it to fledge or flash. Slang use in 1990s might be a revival or a reinvention.

fly

"to soar through air; move through the air with wings," Old English fleogan "to fly, take flight, rise into the air" (class II strong verb; past tense fleag, past participle flogen), from Proto-Germanic *fleugan "to fly" (cognates: Old Saxon fliogan, Old Frisian fliaga, Middle Dutch vlieghen, Dutch vliegen, Old High German fliogan, German fliegen, Old Norse flügja), from PIE *pleuk-, extended form of *pleu- "flowing, floating" (see pluvial).\n

\nMeaning "go at full speed" is from c.1300. In reference to flags, 1650s. Transitive sense "cause to move or float in air" (as a flag, kite, etc.) is from 1739; sense of "convey through the air" ("Fly Me to the Moon") is from 1864. Related: Flew; flied (baseball); flown; flying. Slang phrase fly off the handle "lose one's cool" dates from 1825.

Wiktionary
fly

Etymology 1 n. (context zoology English) Any insect of the order Diptera; characterized by having two wings, also called true fly. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context obsolete English) The action of flying; flight. 2 An act of flying. 3 (context baseball English) A fly ball. 4 (context now historical English) A type of small, fast carriage (sometimes pluralised (term flys English)). vb. (context intransitive English) To travel through the air, another gas(,) or a vacuum, without being in contact with a grounded surface. Etymology 3

  1. 1 (context slang dated English) quick-witted, alert, mentally sharp, smart (in a mental sense). 2 (context slang English) Well dressed, smart in appearance. 3 (context slang English) Beautiful; displaying physical beauty.

WordNet
fly
  1. adj. (British informal) not to be deceived or hoodwinked

  2. [also: flown, flew]

fly
  1. n. two-winged insects characterized by active flight

  2. flap consisting of a piece of canvas that can be drawn back to provide entrance to a tent [syn: tent-fly, rainfly, fly sheet, tent flap]

  3. an opening in a garment that is closed by a zipper or buttons concealed by a fold of cloth [syn: fly front]

  4. (baseball) a hit that flies up in the air [syn: fly ball]

  5. fisherman's lure consisting of a fishhook decorated to look like an insect

  6. [also: flown, flew]

fly
  1. v. travel through the air; be airborne; "Man cannot fly" [syn: wing]

  2. move quickly or suddenly; "He flew about the place"

  3. fly a plane [syn: aviate, pilot]

  4. transport by aeroplane; "We fly flowers from the Caribbean to North America"

  5. cause to fly or float; "fly a kite"

  6. be dispersed or disseminated; "Rumors and accusations are flying"

  7. change quickly from one emotional state to another; "fly into a rage"

  8. pass away rapidly; "Time flies like an arrow"; "Time fleeing beneath him" [syn: fell, vanish]

  9. travel in an airplane; "she is flying to Cincinnati tonight"; "Are we driving or flying?"

  10. display in the air or cause to float; "fly a kite"; "All nations fly their flags in front of the U.N."

  11. run away quickly; "He threw down his gun and fled" [syn: flee, take flight]

  12. travel over (an area of land or sea) in an aircraft; "Lindbergh was the first to fly the Atlantic"

  13. hit a fly

  14. decrease rapidly and disappear; "the money vanished in las Vegas"; "all my stock assets have vaporized" [syn: vanish, vaporize]

  15. [also: flown, flew]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Fly

True flies are insects of the orderDiptera, the name being derived from the Greek di = two, and ptera = wings. Insects of this order use only a single pair of wings to fly, the hindwings being reduced to club-like balancing organs known as halteres. Diptera is a large order containing an estimated 1,000,000 species including horse-flies, crane flies, hoverflies and others, although only about 150,000 species have been described.

Flies have a mobile head, with a pair of large compound eyes, and mouthparts designed for piercing and sucking (mosquitoes, black flies and robber flies), or for lapping and sucking in the other groups. Their wing arrangement gives them great manoeuvrability in flight, and claws and pads on their feet enable them to cling to smooth surfaces. Flies undergo complete metamorphosis; the eggs are laid on the larval food-source and the larvae, which lack true limbs, develop in a protected environment, often inside their source of their food. The pupa is a tough capsule from which the adult emerges when ready to do so; flies mostly have short lives as adults.

Diptera is one of the major insect orders and are of considerable ecological and human importance. Flies are important pollinators, second only to the bees and their Hymenopteran relatives. Flies may have been among the evolutionarily earliest pollinators responsible for early plant pollination. Fruit flies are used as model organisms in research, but less benignly, mosquitoes are vectors for malaria, dengue, West Nile fever, yellow fever, encephalitis, and other infectious diseases, and houseflies spread food-borne illnesses. Flies can be annoyances especially in some parts of the world where they can occur in large numbers, buzzing and settling on the skin or eyes to bite or seek fluids. Larger flies such as tsetse fly and screwworm cause significant economic harm to cattle. Blowfly larvae, known as gentles, and other dipteran larvae, known more generally as maggots, are used as fishing bait and as food for carnivorous animals. They are used in medicine in debridement to clean wounds.

Fly (disambiguation)

A fly is any species of insect of the order Diptera.

Fly may also refer to:

Fly (Archie Comics)

The Fly is a fictional comic book superhero published by Red Circle Comics. He was created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby as part of Archie's "Archie Adventure Series" and later camped up (as Fly Man) as part of the company's Mighty Comics line. He first appeared in The Double Life of Private Strong #1, however his origin story and first "full length" appearance were in Adventures of the Fly #1 (Aug. 1959).

Fly (pentop computer)

The Fly Pentop Computer and FLY Fusion Pentop Computer are personal electronics products manufactured by LeapFrog Enterprises Inc. They are called a "pentop" computer by its manufacturers, because they consist of a pen with a computer inside. The company claims it is the first of its kind.

In 2009, LeapFrog discontinued both the manufacture and support of the device and all accessory products, such as notepads and ink refills which are required for continued use. The inventor of the FLY Pentop, Jim Marggraff, left LeapFrog and founded Livescribe in January 2007.

Fly (Hilary Duff song)

"Fly" is a song recorded by American singer Hilary Duff for her 2004 self-titled third studio album. The song was written by Kara DioGuardi and John Shanks, who also produced the song. The song was first released in the United States on August 10, 2004 by Hollywood Records, as the lead single from Hilary Duff. It was released again by Angel Records on March 13, 2006 in the United Kingdom as the fourth and final single from Duff's first compilation album, Most Wanted (2005).

Fly (Dixie Chicks album)

Fly is the fifth studio album by American country band Dixie Chicks, released in 1999. The album was very successful for the group, debuting at No. 1 on the Billboard 200. It has received diamond status by the RIAA on June 25, 2002 in the United States, for shipments of 10 million units. It has sold 8,396,000 copies in the United States as of October 2013.

The tracks "Ready to Run", "Cowboy Take Me Away", "Without You", "Goodbye Earl", "Cold Day in July", "Heartbreak Town", "Some Days You Gotta Dance" and "If I Fall You're Going Down with Me" were all released as singles; "Sin Wagon" also charted without officially being released. "Some Days You Gotta Dance" was previously recorded by The Ranch, a short-lived country trio founded by Keith Urban in the late 1990s. Urban plays guitar on the Dixie Chicks' rendition.

The album earned 4 Grammy nominations in 2000, and the group won 2: Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal for Ready to Run and Best Country Album. It was also nominated for Album of the Year and the writers of Ready to Run, Marcus Hummon and Martie Seidel were nominated for Best Country Song.

Fly (Yoko Ono album)

Fly is the second album by Yoko Ono, produced by her and John Lennon, and released in 1971. It was a complete avant-garde/ Fluxus package in a gatefold sleeve that came with a full-size poster and a postcard to order Ono's book Grapefruit. Notable songs include the singles "Midsummer New York" and " Mrs. Lennon", "Hirake" aka " Open Your Box" and " Don't Worry, Kyoko (Mummy's Only Looking for Her Hand in the Snow)", dedicated to Ono's daughter Kyoko Cox. "Airmale" is the soundtrack to Lennon's film Erection, showing a building being erected in time lapsed photography, while "Fly" is the soundtrack to Ono's film Fly.

Fly (Sarah Brightman album)

Fly is the fourth album by classical crossover soprano Sarah Brightman. It is her second album with producer Frank Peterson and features collaborations with Tom Jones, Chris Thompson and Andrew Eldritch. Fly boasts a stronger pop and rock influence than Brightman's previous Broadway and operatic albums, and produced several hits in Europe including " A Question of Honour" and " Time to Say Goodbye".

Since its original 1995 release, Fly is one of Brightman's few albums to undergo multiple reissues in different markets. Fly's first reissue was in 1996 to include Brightman's hit single " Time to Say Goodbye" with Andrea Bocelli. Fly II, a two-disc limited edition which featured unreleased b-sides and other material, was later released in 2000 to support Brightman's La Luna World Tour and could only be purchased at participating tour events. In 2006, Fly was re-reissued in Japan with the original 1995 track listing, along with four bonus tracks and new artwork. Although Fly is available in several countries, it has yet to be officially released in the United States.

Fly (Sugar Ray song)

"Fly" is a song by rock band Sugar Ray. It appears on their 1997 album Floored twice: one version with reggae artist Super Cat (Track 4) and the other without (Track 13).

The song became the band's first hit, holding the No. 1 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 Airplay chart for four consecutive weeks and spending eight weeks at the No. 1 spot on the Hot Modern Rock Tracks chart. A physical CD-single was not released commercially in the US, although it was a huge hit on American radio. The song also reached No. 1 on Canada's Singles Chart. "Fly" did not sound anything at all like the rest of the tracks on the album, being the only reggae fusion track. It also sampled a line from Gilbert O'Sullivan's 1972 hit " Alone Again (Naturally)." Sugar Ray's lead singer Mark McGrath explained that this song had a bouncy beat, yet it was about death; "Fly" too seemed like a bright, up-tempo song but "there is this stark imagery in there. There's loss in it. There is loss of a mother, obviously. I thought it was a good way to juxtapose the lyrics with the melody on that, similar to what Gilbert O’Sullivan did on “Alone Again (Naturally).”

As a result of the success of "Fly", Floored sold extremely well and was certified double platinum. However, by the end of 1997, critics skeptical that Sugar Ray could put out another successful song labeled them a one-hit wonder. This assumption was noted and accepted by the band, who in playful defiance, named their next album 14:59 in a reference to Andy Warhol's " 15 minutes of fame"; that album became certified triple-platinum and outsold its predecessor.

The song was included on VH1's countdown of the "100 Greatest Songs of the '90s" at number 52.

Fly (Impact Comics)

The Fly is a fictional character who first appeared in the DC Comics' Impact Comics series, The Fly. The character is loosely based on Archie Comics' character, The Fly.

Fly (Zucchero album)

Fly is the tenth studio album by the Italian blues rock singer-songwriter Zucchero Fornaciari, released on 22 September 2006. The album was mostly recorded in 2006 at the Henson Recording Studios in Hollywood with producer Don Was, and previewed at the historic Ca' Vendramin Calergi in Venice, on 18 September 2006.

Fly (EP)

Fly is the second EP released by rock band Sick Puppies. It was released in 2003 and features 6 tracks; including a remix by Josh Abrahams, an Enhanced CD featuring the making of the "Fly" music video and a rare version of the clip exclusive to the CD. It is the last release to feature Chris Mileski on drums.

Fly (Blind Guardian song)

"Fly" is a single by Blind Guardian from their 2006 release, A Twist in the Myth. Two of the songs are from the album, "Fly" and "Skalds and Shadows", with the latter being an acoustic version only available on the single. The single also includes a cover of Iron Butterfly's " In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida", also available only on the single.

Vocalist Hansi Kürsch has said that while "Fly" is a surprising title for a Blind Guardian song, it fits very well with the lyrics. He added, "This song is about inspirations and how they can influence your art, your life and other people's lives. I, myself, was inspired by the movie Finding Neverland when doing the lyrics."

Fly (tent)

A fly refers to the outer layer of a tent or to a piece of material which is strung up using rope as a minimalist, stand-alone shelter. In basic terms, a fly is a tent without walls. Purpose-made stand-alone flies are also sometimes referred to as bivouacs, bivvies, tarpaulins, or hootchies. Flies are generally used for keeping moisture (such as condensation or rain) or sun off people while they eat, rest or sleep. They can also be used as groundsheets, but this is not recommended since it creates wear and tear which can lead to holes.

A stand-alone fly is a multi-purpose tool and is very flexible. For example, a fly can be put up in a wide variety of shapes depending on the environment and the weather, whereas a tent usually has a pre-set configuration for its structure which can be adjusted somewhat but not substantially. A fly also has the advantage of being particularly light and portable.

Disadvantages of flies include that a person is still exposed to the elements such as mosquitoes and cold weather and that it can be difficult to put a fly up if there are limited natural vertical structures such as trees in the camping area. Flies, however, can be put up using poles or jury-rigged, for example, using paddles.

A fly is also used to create shade as in the desert. Then a traditional tent is erected under the fly.

Fly (American football)

A fly route, also called a streak route or go route, is a pattern run by a receiver in American football, where the receiver runs straight upfield towards the endzone. The goal of the pattern is to outrun any defensive backs and get behind them, catching an undefended pass while running untouched for a touchdown. Generally, the fastest receiver on the team or any receiver faster than the man covering him would be the one to run these routes. When run down the sidelines, a fly can be called a fade route.

Fly patterns can also be used to clear out space for other receivers. Generally, a fly pattern will draw the attention of both the cornerback assigned to the receiver as well as "over the top" help from a safety. This can create a large gap in coverage, allowing another receiver to run a shorter route, but then gain many yards after the catch because the safety committed to the deep man.

The famed " Hail Mary" play generally involves between three and five receivers all running fly routes in order to have the most chance of one of them catching the ball and scoring or at least gaining significant yardage.

Fly (band)

Fly is the cooperative jazz trio of saxophonist Mark Turner, drummer Jeff Ballard and bassist Larry Grenadier.

The group first surfaced as the Jeff Ballard Trio in 2000 on one track of the anthology Originations, curated by Chick Corea (Ballard was Chick’s drummer at the time) and became Fly with the release of their first album, on Savoy, in 2004. Association between the players however goes back much further. Grenadier and Ballard played music together as teenagers in California in the early 1980s and subsequently gigged together often. They both migrated to the US’s East coast in 1990 where they met Turner, and the three musicians have played in diverse permutations and contexts since then. In Fly, Turner, Grenadier and Ballard all write material. Mark Turner: “Sometimes it’s the saxophone carrying the melody. Other times it’s the bass or drums. We spread out the frontline duties among us.

Jazz saxophonist Joe Lovano said about their interplay on the Year of the Snake-album: "Fly is a beautiful trio, they play with a wonderful clarity. And Mark plays with a brilliant execution on his horn. [...] He plays with an amazing range on his instrument. That trio has a classical approach in the way the music is written and the way they come off it in the rhythm and in the attitude they're playing. They're improvising but their dialogue is more classical in nature, the way it feels. [...] That's expression, the waves, the life forms, the wind. Fly sounds lovely and beautiful and their music has a real presence, it captures you."

Fly (Jars of Clay song)

"Fly" is a song written and performed by Jars of Clay. It was the first mainstream single and second Christian radio single from their 2002 studio album, The Eleventh Hour. A live version of the song appears on disc two of the band's 2003 double album, Furthermore: From the Studio, From the Stage.

Fly (Europe Release)
Fly (carriage)

A fly was a horse-drawn public coach or delivery wagon, especially one let out for hire. In Britain, the term also referred to a light covered vehicle, such as a single-horse pleasure carriage or a hansom cab.

Fly (brig)

The Fly was a brig of 100 tons that sailed from Calcutta, India on 14 May 1802 bound for Sydney, Australia.

It was carrying a cargo of 4000 gallons of spirits and was commanded by John Black. It was never heard of again. At the time of its disappearance it was owned by the House of Campbells, Calcutta.

Fly (Nickelback song)

"Fly" is the only single from Nickelback's debut album Curb. A music video was shot for it, also a first for the band. The drums featured in the song were played by their original drummer, Brandon Kroeger. "Fly" was played on local radio stations, but wasn't very successful. The song did not chart.

Fly (exercise)

A Cable fly or Cable flye is a strength training exercise in which the hand and arm move through an arc while the elbow is kept at a constant angle. Flies are used to work the muscles of the upper body. Because these exercises use the arms as levers at their longest possible length, the amount of weight that can be moved is significantly less than equivalent press exercises for the same muscles (the military press and bench press for the shoulder and chest respectively). Due to this leverage, fly exercises of all types have a large potential to damage the shoulder joint and its associated ligaments and the tendons of the muscles connecting to it. They should be done with caution and their effects first tested while using very light weights; which are gradually incremented after more strength is gained.

Fly (clothing)

A fly on clothing is a covering over an opening concealing the mechanism, such as a zip, velcro, or buttons, used to close the opening. The term is most frequently applied to a short opening over the groin in trousers, shorts, and other garments. The term is also used of overcoats, where a design of the same shape is used to hide a row of buttons. This style is common on a wide range of coats, from single-breasted Chesterfields to covert coats.

An open fly is a fly that has been left unzipped or unbuttoned.

Trousers have varied historically in whether or not they have flies. Originally, trousers did not have flies or other openings, being pulled down for sanitary functions. The use of a codpiece, a separate covering attached to the trousers, became popular in 16th-century Europe, eventually evolving into an attached fall-front (or broad fall). The fly-front (split fall) emerged later. The panelled front returned as a sporting option, such as in riding breeches, but is now hardly used, flies being by far the most common fastening. Most flies now use a zip, though button flies continue in use.

Fly (artist)

Fly is a comic book artist and illustrator, whose art has been published in several magazines and fanzines, including Slug and Lettuce, Maximum Rock 'N' Roll, World War 3 Illustrated, Village Voice. She is also a former member of New York band God Is My Co-Pilot.

Fly came to work in New York in the late 1980s, and got involved with ABC No Rio, a social center for punks and artists located at 156 Rivington street in New York City's Lower East Side. She is a member of the World War 3 Illustrated collective, and a contributor to the anthology Juicy Mother 2, edited by Jennifer Camper, which was published by Manic D Press in 2007.

In 2003, Fly had an art show held in the Cartoon Art Museumin California. She has also done cover artwork for Hungry March Band, Adeline Records and Geykido Comet Records. Aside from freelance cover artwork, she has printed many photocopy zines of her artwork and published books. In 1998, Fly had her first book, CHRON!IC!RIOTS!PA!SM!, published by Autonomedia. In 2003, she published a graphic novel-style book named PEOPS, a collection of portraits and stories about people Fly has met. The book was released by Soft Skull Press, and subtitled “Portraits and Stories of People”. In 2006, she was invited as a guest speaker at the Victoria International Arts Symposium. In December this same year, Fly appeared at the Grace Comics showcase alongside Elizabeth Merrick.

Aside from visual arts, Fly also engages in the spoken word and musical collage art of her band Zero Content (named after one of her comic strips) which can be heard on several Geykido Comet Records Compilations. Previously, she played bass and sang for several years with Craig Flanagin in the band God Is My Co-Pilot, with which she went on tours in the 1990s.

Fly (dinghy)

The Fly class is a singlehanded sailing dinghy designed by R. Fillery and later modified by K. Ford. It was intended to be built at home, and appears to have been developed as a youth trainer for the British Moth. The early boats were built from canvas, although that changed and later boats employed a plywood bottom.

It was used as a trainer for the British Moth at the Lea Avon Sailing Club before the club folded in 1971.

Fly (The Angel Song)

"Fly (The Angel Song)" is a song written by Steve Wilkinson and Rory Michael Bourke, and recorded by Canadian country music group The Wilkinsons. It was released in October 1998 as the second single from their album Nothing but Love. The song reached number-one on the Canadian RPM Country Tracks chart in January 1999 and number 15 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart.

Fly (Wanessa song)

"Fly" is a song by Brazilian pop singer Wanessa, featuring American rapper Ja Rule, taken from Wanessa's sixth studio album Meu Momento (2009). It was released as the lead single from the album on April 7, 2009.

Fly (Breaking Bad)

"Fly" is the tenth episode of the third season of the American television drama series Breaking Bad, and the 30th overall episode of the series. Written by Sam Catlin and Moira Walley-Beckett and directed by Rian Johnson, it aired on AMC in the United States and Canada on May 23, 2010.

Fly (play)

Fly is a 2009 play written by Trey Ellis and Ricardo Khan about the Tuskegee Airmen, the first black fliers in the U.S. military during World War II.

Fly (Phillip Phillips song)

"Fly" is a song by American singer-songwriter Phillip Phillips from his second studio album, Behind the Light, which will be released by Interscope Records.

Fly (Nicki Minaj song)

"Fly" is a song by Trinidadian-American rapper-songwriter Nicki Minaj from her debut studio album, Pink Friday (2010). The song was released as the eighth and final single from the album on August 30, 2011. It features additional guest vocals by Barbadian recording artist Rihanna. The track was written by Kevin Hissink, Will Jordan, J.R. Rotem, Clemm Rishad and Minaj herself, while production was helped by Rotem and Hissink. The song is a R&B track which incorporates the hip hop genre. The song is inspired by the emotion of soaring above and overcoming all stereotypes and negativity, to come out victorious.

In the United States, "Fly" reached number 19 on the Billboard Hot 100. It also peaked within the top twenty of the charts in Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. In the latter country, the song became Nicki Minaj's first number one on the UK R&B Chart. Furthermore, "Fly" marked top twenty positions on the US Hot R&B/Hip Hop Songs and Pop Songs charts and reached the top ten of the US Rap Songs chart at number nine.

The song's accompanying music video, directed by Sanaa Hamri, depicts Minaj and Rihanna experiencing the destruction in a post-apocalyptic environment.

Fly (Maddie & Tae song)

"Fly" is a song recorded by American country music duo Maddie & Tae. It was released in January 2015 as the second single from their debut studio album, Start Here. The song, written by the duo and Tiffany Vartanyan, is an inspirational anthem about a girl wanting to find success. It garnered a positive reception from critics praising the production and the girls' vocal performances for elevating the overall theme of the song.

"Fly" peaked at number 9 on both the Billboard Country Airplay and Hot Country Songs charts respectively. It also charted at number 61 on the Hot 100. The song was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), and has sold over 321,000 copies in that country as of November 2015. The song received similar chart success in Canada, peaking at number 18 on the Country chart and number 66 on the Canadian Hot 100.

An accompanying music video for the song, directed by Brian Lazzaro, features the duo writing and performing the song while intercut with images of butterflies, babies playing and children climbing on ropes and ladders. A second video has the duo performing at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt while also showing patients performing on stage and interacting with their doctors.

Fly (Avril Lavigne song)

"Fly" is a song by Canadian recording artist Avril Lavigne. It was released on April 16, 2015, for digital download by the Special Olympics, Inc. Lavigne released the song as a charity single for The Avril Lavigne Foundation to support the 2015 Special Olympics World Summer Games. The song was written by Lavigne, Chad Kroeger and David Hodges. All the proceeds from the single will be contributed to the ongoing work being done by the Avril Lavigne Foundation, which raises funds and provides support to children and youth living with serious illnesses and disabilities.

Usage examples of "fly".

Far aboon, ommost lost to mi view, Aw lang for a pair ov his wings, To fly wi him, an sing like him, too.

It was denominated from Achor, the God of flies, worshipped also under the name of Baal-zebub with the same attribute.

The werewolf to the left of Adeem ducked and the star flew by him, hitting Adeem in the shoulder.

I will here give only the case of a minute fly, naturally caught and still alive, which I found adhering by its delicate feet to the glands on the extreme left side of the central disc.

A small fly was found adhering by its feet to the left side of the disc.

As the sound subsided the French doors flew open across the room, admitting four men and a woman.

Taking hold gently of one of her hands, I told her that she had ignited in my soul a devouring flame, that I adored her, and that, unless some hope was left to me of finding her sensible to my sufferings, I was determined to fly away from her for ever.

It may consist of an advertisement or a series of promotional pieces-a directmail flier, a radio commercial, a TV storyboard or a logo design.

Coral Lorenzen, author of The Great Flying Saucer Hoax and an international director of the Aerial Phenomena Research Organization, immediately followed through on the startling rumors by putting in a call to Terry Clarke of KALG Radio in Alamogordo, nine miles east of Holloman.

Still on the same day, at the Argentine base at Orkney Island, two meteorological observers sighted an aerial object flying at high speed on a parabolic trajectory, course E-W, white luminosity, causing disturbance in the magnetic field registered on geomagnetic instruments with patterns notably out of the normal.

One lone Aerian flew across the cavernous space, his gray wings unfolding beneath colored glass.

Gloucestershire Bert went northward to the British aeronautic park outside Birmingham, in the hope that he might be taken on and given food, for there the Government, or at any rate the War Office, still existed as an energetic fact, concentrated amidst collapse and social disaster upon the effort to keep the British flag still flying in the air, and trying to brisk up mayor and mayor and magistrate and magistrate in a new effort of organisation.

American bicycle-builders had surpassed the Royal Aeronautical Society, because they flew their crafts themselves, lying prone in their own creations, flying, as it was noted, by the seat of their pants.

Again and again he had seen Castle Aldaran under siege, arrows flying, armed men striking, lightnings aflare and striking down on the keep.

Donchez stepped onto the gangway and saluted the American flag flying aft on the deck, then saluted the sentry.