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Crossword clues for time

time
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
time
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a brief period/time
▪ He lived there all his life, apart from a brief period during the war.
a crucial moment/time
▪ At the crucial moment, he withdrew the support of the army.
a delivery date/time
▪ The normal delivery time is 7 – 10 days after you place your order.
a departure time
▪ Do you know your exact departure time?
a good deal of trouble/time/work etc
▪ I went to a good deal of trouble to get this ticket.
a long time ago
▪ She died a long time ago.
a painful time/period
▪ The US is in for a painful period of adjustment.
a period of time
▪ Over a period of time, this pressure can damage the fibres of the carpet.
a record number/level/time etc
▪ Pollution in the lake has reached record levels.
a rough time
▪ My children had a rough time because they were different from the rest.
a sad day/time
▪ I’m really disappointed that this happened. It’s a sad day for football.
a sense of timing (=the ability to choose the right moment to do or say something)
▪ He told the story with an exquisite sense of timing.
a short space of time
▪ They met and married within a short space of time.
a short time
▪ I’ve only been in Brisbane a short time.
a time bomb (=that is set to explode at a particular time)
▪ The terrorists’ time bomb was planned to cause the maximum carnage.
a time limit
▪ The time limit for making a claim is three months.
access time
ahead of time
▪ Can you tell me ahead of time if you’re coming?
ahead of your/its time (=very advanced or new, and not understood or accepted)
▪ Coleridge was in many ways far ahead of his time.
all the time (=very often or continuously)
▪ They were quarrelling all the time.
ample time/evidence/opportunity
▪ You’ll have ample time for questions later.
▪ There is ample evidence that climate patterns are changing.
an exciting time
▪ It was the most exciting time of my life.
appropriate time/place etc
▪ I didn’t feel that this was an appropriate time to mention the subject of money.
arrive on time
▪ He never arrives on time for meetings.
as time goes by
▪ Things will get easier as time goes by.
a...short period of time
▪ Germany achieved spectacular economic success in a relatively short period of time.
at any given time/moment
▪ There are thought to be around 10,000 young homeless Scots in London at any given time.
at the appointed time (=at the time that had been arranged)
▪ Everyone assembled in the hall at the appointed time .
At the present time
At the present time we have no explanation for this.
at the time of
▪ I was at home at the time of the murder.
at this moment in time (=now)
▪ At this moment in time we cannot proceed with the proposal.
at this time of night (=used when something happens very late at night, and you are surprised)
▪ Why are you calling me at this time of night?
at this/that point in timeformal (= used especially in official speeches, announcements etc)
▪ It would be wrong to comment at this point in time.
bang on time
▪ The train arrived bang on time.
bath time (=the time when someone, usually a child, has a bath)
▪ Come on, Lucy, it's bath time.
be worth the time/effort/work
▪ It was a great evening, and definitely worth all the hard work.
biblical times
▪ The disease dates back to biblical times.
big time
▪ Morris messed up big time.
big time
▪ The 46-year-old author has finally hit the big time.
breakfast time
▪ I don’t like talking at breakfast time.
British Summer Time
By the time...rolled around
By the time Wednesday rolled around, I still hadn’t finished.
called time out
▪ With 15.7 seconds left, Washington State called time out.
can’t spare...time
▪ Sorry, I can’t spare the time.
changing times (=a period of time when a lot is changing)
▪ We live in changing times.
closing time
complete waste of time
▪ This is a complete waste of time.
cooking time (=how long you cook something for)
▪ Adjust the cooking time according to the size of the bird.
countless times
▪ a famous film clip which has been shown countless times
day/date/time of purchase
▪ This product should be consumed on the day of purchase.
daylight saving time
devote your time/energy/attention etc to sth
▪ He devoted his energies to writing films.
double time
drinking-up time
elapsed time
▪ The assignment must be completed within an overall elapsed time of one week.
election time
▪ I’m sick of all those political pamphlets that come through my door at election time.
expend energy/effort/time/resources etc
▪ People of different ages expend different amounts of energy.
▪ Manufacturers have expended a lot of time and effort trying to improve computer security.
extended period of time
▪ If you are going abroad for an extended period of time, you should consider renting your house out.
extra time
▪ Beckham scored in extra time.
face time
▪ Here we reward performance, not face time.
fallen on hard times (=did not have much money)
▪ He had clearly fallen on hard times.
fill your time/the days etc (with sth)
▪ I have no trouble filling my time.
for the umpteenth time
▪ ‘This is crazy,’ she told herself for the umpteenth time.
free time
▪ Children these days have very little free time.
from/since time immemorial
▪ Markets have been held here since time immemorial.
full time
▪ As the ball went in, the referee blew his whistle for full time.
good for some time/a hundred miles etc
▪ This old truck is good for another 100,000 miles.
good time
▪ Is this a good time to talk to you?
Greenwich Mean Time
half the time
▪ She seems to be asleep half the time.
halt the march of time
▪ She was desperate to halt the march of time upon her face and figure.
happens all the time
▪ This kind of thing happens all the time.
hardly the time/place/person etc (=a very unsuitable time, place, person etc)
▪ This is hardly the place to discuss the matter.
harvest time
▪ He hired extra workers to help at harvest time.
have a good time/day/weekend etc
▪ Did you have a good vacation?
have a good/terrible etc time
▪ Thanks for everything – we had a great time.
have a hard time doing sth (=be difficult for someone to do something)
▪ You’ll have a hard time proving that.
▪ I had a hard time persuading him to accept the offer.
have a hard time of it
▪ Vegetarians still often have a hard time of it when it comes to eating out.
have a tough time (of it) (=face a lot of difficult problems)
▪ The family has had a tough time of it these last few months.
have an easy time of it
▪ You can have an easy time of it now that the kids have all left home.
hit the big time
▪ The 46-year-old author has finally hit the big time.
if time permits (=if it finishes early enough)
▪ I’ll see you after the meeting, if time permits.
in days/times/years etc gone by (=in the past)
▪ These herbs would have been grown for medicinal purposes in days gone by.
in double-quick time
▪ Lunch was produced in double-quick time.
in recent years/months/times etc
▪ The situation has improved in recent years.
in times of hardship
▪ In times of hardship, your family may be the only people you can go to for help.
in/during term time
▪ Parents need permission to take their children on holiday during term time.
injury time
it’s payback time
▪ I guess it’s payback time.
(it’s) time for bed
▪ She sat and sewed until it was time for bed.
lead time
leisure time
▪ They spend much of their leisure time with their grandchildren.
limited number/amount/time etc
▪ There are only a limited number of tickets available.
local time
▪ We’ll arrive in Boston at 4 o'clock local time.
long ago/a long time ago
▪ He should have finished at university long ago, but he kept taking extra courses.
long period of time
▪ a long period of time
long stretches of time
▪ She doesn’t leave the house for long stretches of time.
lose all sense of time/direction/proportion etc
▪ When he was writing, he lost all sense of time.
lose no time in doing sth (=do something immediately)
▪ Murdock lost no time in taking out a patent for his invention.
lose time/2 days/3 hours etc
▪ Vital minutes were lost because the ambulance took half an hour to arrive.
▪ In 1978, 29 million days were lost in industrial action.
lost...track of time
▪ I just lost all track of time.
many a time (=often)
▪ I’ve sat here many a time and wondered what happened to her.
modern times
▪ It was one of the greatest disasters of modern times.
most of the time/most days etc (=usually)
▪ Most of the time it’s very quiet here.
▪ Most evenings we just stay in and watch TV.
nap time
▪ You can always tell when it's a baby's nap time because they start getting irritable.
nearer the time
▪ They should send us more details nearer the time of the concert.
nice time?
▪ Did you have a nice time?
Not for the first time
Not for the first time she wondered how he coped with so many children.
on short time
▪ Most of the workers were put on short time.
opening time
▪ We arrived at the pub just before opening time.
peak times
▪ Extra buses run at peak times.
planned/timed/arranged to coincide
▪ The show is timed to coincide with the launch of a new book.
prime time
▪ a prime time entertainment programme
quality time
▪ Do you spend enough quality time with your children?
race against time/the clock
▪ The astronauts are racing against time to repair the spaceship.
running time
serve time/five years etc in jail (=spend time in jail)
▪ He was finally released after serving 27 years in jail.
serving time (=is in prison)
▪ Did you know that Les is serving time?
set a date/time
▪ No date has been set for the election.
some time ago (=a fairly long time ago)
▪ They moved to a new house some time ago.
some time
▪ It was some time before they managed to turn the alarm off.
space/time is at a premium
▪ Foldaway furniture is the answer where space is at a premium.
spend time etc doing sth
▪ Stacey spends all her free time painting.
spend time etc in/at sth
▪ We’ll have to spend the night in a hotel.
▪ His childhood was spent in Brazil.
spend time etc with sb
▪ I want to spend more time with my family.
spend time/three months/six years etc in jail
▪ Griffiths spent three days in jail after pushing a policeman.
stalling for time
▪ He was just stalling for time.
stand the test of time (=stay popular)
▪ His poetry will stand the test of time.
standard time
standby time
stoppage time (=extra time played in a sports match because of pauses)
▪ We had five minutes of stoppage time at the end of the first half.
take time off (work/school)
▪ I rang my boss and arranged to take some time off.
talk time
▪ The battery allows approximately 135 minutes of talk time.
testing time
▪ It’s been a testing time.
the boom years/times
▪ the boom years of the late 1980s
the day/time/afternoon etc when
▪ She remembered the day when Paula had first arrived.
the exact time/moment
▪ At that exact moment, the phone rang.
the first thing/time/day etc
▪ The first time I flew on a plane I was really nervous.
▪ In the first year, all students take five courses.
▪ He said the first thing that came into his head.
▪ the first step towards achieving a peace agreement
▪ There’s a meeting on the first Monday of every month.
the first time in history (=the first time something has ever happened)
▪ For the first time in history, an American president resigned his office.
the flight time (=how long it takes to fly somewhere)
▪ Our estimated flight time is three hours and fifteen minutes.
the last time (=the most recent occasion)
▪ Things have changed since the last time you were here.
the longest timeAmerican Englishspoken (= a very long time)
▪ It took me the longest time to figure out how to open the windows.
the mood of the time/moment (=the way people in general feel at a particular time)
▪ The movie captured the mood of the moment.
(the) next time
▪ Next time I go skiing, I’ll wear warmer clothes.
the ravages of time
▪ a building that has survived the ravages of time
the time of the month
▪ This is the busiest time of the month.
the time or the inclination
▪ Teachers simply do not have the time or the inclination to investigate these matters.
the whole time (=the only thing we did was watch television)
▪ We just sat around and watched TV the whole time .
there’s no time to lose (=do not waste time)
▪ Come on, there’s no time to lose.
time and a half
▪ We get time and a half for working on Sunday.
time and motion study
time bomb
▪ Cutting down the rainforest is an environmental time bomb.
time capsule
time card
time clock
time constraints (=the limited amount of time that is available)
▪ Exams are always done under strict time constraints.
time flies when you’re having fun
▪ ‘Is it midnight already?’ ‘Well, you know what they say – time flies when you’re having fun!’
time frame
▪ There is a ten year time frame for the implementation of the new policies.
Time is tight
Time is tight, and she has another meeting to go to this afternoon.
time lag
▪ a time lag
time lag
▪ There is generally a two-year time lag in the information being made available.
time lapse
▪ The usual time lapse between request and delivery is two days.
time limit
▪ The time limit for applications is three weeks.
time machine
time off
▪ Have you ever had to take time off for health reasons?
time out
▪ In between jobs, Liz always took time out to return to her first love – travelling.
time sheet
time signal
time signature
time slot
▪ A new comedy is scheduled for the 9 pm time slot.
time span
▪ It’ll be difficult to hire that many new staff in such a short time span.
time span
▪ It’s difficult to imagine a time span of a million years.
time switch
time travel
time warp
▪ The house seemed to be stuck in a 19th-century time warp.
time zone
time
▪ My time is precious, and I don't want to waste it.
time/reason/trouble etc enoughold-fashioned
▪ Come on – there’ll be time enough to chat later.
times in a row
▪ I’ve beaten her three times in a row.
times table
▪ Do you know the eleven times table?
Times were hard
Times were hard and they were forced to sell their house.
time/speed is of the essence (=it is very important to do something quickly)
Time...stood still
Time seems to have stood still in this lovely hotel.
time...taken up
▪ The little time I had outside of school was taken up with work.
to pass the time (=to help us stop feeling bored)
▪ We played cards to pass the time.
took...long time
▪ It took a long time to get everything ready.
troubled times
▪ These are troubled times for the coal industry.
trying time
▪ The beginning of the show is often a trying time because of latecomers.
turn up late/early/on time etc
▪ Steve turned up late, as usual.
turnaround times
▪ We must reduce costs and shorten turnaround times.
twice/three times etc as many
▪ The company now employs four times as many women as men.
went into extra time
▪ The match went into extra time.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
full
▪ That maximum should be as low as 1300 to 1500 patients per full time principal.
▪ Khader works full time now at nation-building, sometimes logging 16 hours of work in a day.
▪ Among men of working age, 78 percent were in employment with 63 percent working full time and 2 percent part time.
▪ But among those with children under 18, 44 percent said they would choose to work part time rather than full time.
▪ Everyone was working full time and doing campaign work on the side.
▪ Many women work full time for the same reason many men do-they need the money for their families.
▪ She is a clinical lecturer, University of Oxford and back at full time work as Consultant Dermatologist after maternity leave.
▪ The center employs 24 people full time.
good
▪ Finlayson thought for a good long time, while he stared at Callaghan's bright new buttons.
▪ Economically, a good time to drain and refill a pool is after mid-April and before June.
▪ One of these days Sam is going to come up against a good old time proper door.
▪ Spring is a good time to start.
▪ During practice the best time logged was twenty minutes.
▪ You are simply there to have a good time or pursue a particularly delicious passion, when suddenly-it happens.
▪ Her school is very good with time as well and she manages to get most of her work done.
▪ I try to have a good time doing it.
hard
▪ Mr Antonis is having a hard time getting his message of openness across to all the citizens of Antwerp.
▪ He may have a hard time persuading lawmakers.
▪ Interestingly, though, the bottom 10 includes many household names fallen on hard times.
▪ The merry old woman had a hard time not laughing as they carried her into the coach.
▪ Responding to hard times, the world's biggest advertising agency is reshuffling its management.
▪ Two days before Easter and the week after Easter have been our hardest time since John came back home.
▪ The 1930s were hard times, so I think they will be forgiven for this slight oversight.
▪ Problems he had a hard time learning how to solve.
long
▪ The scars of Bosnia will take a long time to heal.
▪ Career mismatches usually take a long time to acknowledge and an even longer time to put behind you.
▪ It was a long time after that before I regained my confidence.
▪ I learned a long time ago that any success coaches have is directly attributed to the players.
▪ It is a long time ago and what matters now is the future.
▪ A century of confrontation and conflict can be a long time, but also an emphatic teacher.
▪ I was thinking, for a long time after you left.
▪ P would like to see the debt spread out over a longer length of time.
present
▪ At the present time, 27 colleges are providing courses, with a record enrolment of 690 students.
▪ Deferred imitation is the imitation of objects and events that have not been present for some time.
▪ At the present time some of the old Airey houses are being demolished and rebuilt.
▪ It is as comprehensive as is possible at the present time.
▪ At the present time there is only the public house left.
▪ There seems to be far more scope at the present time for the two generations to become friends.
▪ Filtration At the present time there is considerable concern about concentrations of nitrogen compounds in water containing goldfish.
▪ Comparative education Everyone is aware that the teaching profession is under stress at the present time.
short
▪ Communications are short and publication is rapid, providing information on new avenues of research in the shortest possible time.
▪ It lasted a very short time.
▪ In a short time, his appointment has come to look like a poisoned chalice.
▪ They sat there for a short time without saying anything.
▪ She had achieved all that, in such a short time.
▪ They will become tame enough after a relatively short period of time, to take food from your fingers.
▪ Cut short that hanging time and the meat will be tough and flavourless, regardless of its pedigree and upbringing.
▪ Improved performance will overcome these in a short time.
■ VERB
change
▪ Of course, the rules of games do change over time.
▪ How come the social worker had had to change the time?
▪ The older adult How relationships may have changed by this time!
▪ The property went into foreclosure and changed hands several times.
▪ It is recognised that observed statistical relationships may change over time due to changes in financial markets.
▪ This revamping is geared toward helping workers adapt to changing times.
▪ The mean labelling indices did not change significantly over time regardless of whether or not there were recurrences.
▪ Before the light changed half a dozen times she disposed of the entire batch.
save
▪ Now, no one could claim that a television set saves time.
▪ Anderson sometimes took two of his students on a demonstration ride, to save time.
▪ Order, order Always plan ahead to save time and unnecessary effort.
▪ Airplanes, promoted to save travel time, increase it as people spend more time traveling than ever before.
▪ You can also save time by deciding what is essential for your horse's comfort and what is dictated by tradition.
▪ Perhaps he could save time by collecting the money now.
▪ Understanding your address book's capabilities will save you time and tedium in the long run.
▪ It seems we use more time and energy on the technology that was supposed to save us time and energy.
spend
▪ Thus they spent much of their time debating the validity of various evaluation procedures as potential responses.
▪ He has begun composing again, so he spends a lot of time in the drawing room.
▪ They now spend a lot of time exchanging stories about the week's events.
▪ He takes me places and spends time with me.
▪ I spent my time, for as long as I stayed, cheering for the bulls.
▪ Deborah preferred that her sons spend as little time with Tom as possible.
▪ To this end, he spent much of his time personally constructing dams and pipelines.
▪ Like many Westerners, he spent so much time on horseback when he was little that he grew up bowlegged.
take
▪ Their acquisition takes time, problems arise, children become puzzled, and they have to consider possibilities and alternatives.
▪ Every move requires a person to take the time and fight the hassle to register to vote.
▪ It's a massive work and has obviously taken a great deal of your time and trouble.
▪ You must take time off the clock and make it a short game.
▪ Male speaker I've had to take time off work to get my ticket.
▪ Food shopping takes time, a commodity of which most of us have precious little.
▪ The vector graphics are well-executed, although it takes time for your eyes to adjust to what's going on.
▪ But Wolfe admits that less than 1 percent of listeners take time to phone the station with opinions.
waste
▪ Try to keep mealtimes positive and relaxed and don't waste time and energy forcing your child to eat.
▪ What was I doing wasting my time like this?
▪ You're wasting your time with me.
▪ We were both convinced that it would be silly for me to waste time commuting to the suburbs.
▪ Don't waste precious time stating the obvious.
▪ I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.
▪ But Rufus has held them close, and I can't tell him he's wasting his time.
▪ Ringwald wastes no time wedging herself between McGaw and his coed girlfriend, Sarah Lassez.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bad time/moment etc
▪ And it was still a bad time for the people in the middle.
▪ And then uh, he was the homecoming king and oh, gosh, that was a bad time in my life.
▪ Calls to assistant general manager Mike Port came at a bad time.
▪ I thought it would be great down there, but I started having a bad time so I went back to Newcastle.
▪ It was a bad time to have chosen for confrontation.
▪ Strawberry had had a bad time.
▪ The prolonged federal government shutdown could not have come at a worse time for businessman Herb Stein.
▪ While I have no problem with this, the issue is that my friends are giving me a bad time about it.
a bumpy ride/time
▪ Euro Disney had a bumpy ride as the market digested its results, sinking to a low of 813p down 35p.
▪ It had been a bumpy ride, through the tail end of a thunderstorm.
▪ It is therefore going to be, at best, a bumpy ride.
▪ It was the same man who had jostled her repeatedly during a bumpy ride on the Lexington Avenue Express subway.
▪ Since the programme was announced in 1998, like previous eradication campaigns, it has had a bumpy ride.
▪ The plant had had a bumpy ride since Cellatex was sold off by the chemicals giant Rhne-Poulenc in 1991.
a devil of a time/job etc
▪ But I've always found the Flying V and its derivatives a devil of a job to sit down with and play.
▪ He was taking a devil of a time to change.
▪ If he filled those in they'd have a devil of a job lifting them!
▪ It took me a devil of a time to find it I can tell you.
a short space of time
▪ I had to find out a lot of things about you in a short space of time.
▪ In old age several major losses may occur within a short space of time.
▪ In such a short space of time, he had plunged from the pinnacle of success to the depths of defeat.
▪ Just how much things can change in a short space of time.
▪ Still, he had been knocked out twice in a short space of time and would appreciate some rest.
▪ That was an extraordinarily fine achievement in such a short space of time.
▪ The problem is getting the material under control in order to reach ambitious learning goals in a short space of time.
▪ The problem was more one of having to absorb a vast amount of information in a short space of time.
a stitch in time (saves nine)
a/one bit at a time
▪ The text can be put on an overhead and revealed a bit at a time.
again and again/time and (time) again/over and over again
all in good time
▪ "When are we going to open the presents?" "All in good time."
▪ "When are you going to pay me?" "All in good time."
▪ But don't fret, you shall have a puppy all in good time.
an opportune moment/time
▪ For those who are waiting for the most opportune time to invest in a home, this is an excellent time to do that.
▪ This seemed like an opportune moment to ask the government to mount a tree-planting program.
▪ His work - and his mission - comes at an opportune time.
▪ I waited, hoping for an opportune moment to discuss the possibility of my earning a little money.
▪ Meanwhile, he would take up the matter with Archbishop Perier at an opportune time.
▪ Porter bought Goat Island and Preserved it at an opportune moment.
▪ The announcement Tuesday may have come at an opportune time.
▪ To her now he was just a young fellow who happened to be in the house at an opportune time.
▪ Would this be an opportune time to suggest a move to help reduce the fragmentation of the industry?
any old thing/place/time etc
▪ He could play with Orlando any old time.
▪ If you believed that, then you'd believe any old thing.
as good a time/place etc as any
at the best of times
▪ Even at the best of times the roads are dangerous.
▪ A salmon is slippery enough to handle at the best of times, but one of this size ....
▪ But reason told her it was a precarious business at the best of times.
▪ In fact Polanski, unconventional at the best of times, takes us to the limit - and beyond.
▪ It was run on a shoestring at the best of times and Kelly was merely adding to his problems.
▪ Listening is a difficult and complex skill at the best of times.
▪ Memory was mischievously selective at the best of times Trivia stuck limpet-like and the useful filtered away.
▪ Rising living standards and well-being are ambiguously related at the best of times, and not simply for ecological reasons.
▪ The mind was a delicate mechanism that he disliked interfering with at the best of times.
at the same time
▪ Are you supposed to press these two buttons at the same time?
▪ Charlie and I arrived at the same time.
▪ His wife had a baby at the same time as Elaine.
▪ Karl and I were hired at the same time.
▪ So you want to talk to them, identify that they are a candidate, and then give them the test all at the same time?
▪ The media's criticism can be hard to take. But at the same time, we've got to keep doing our jobs.
▪ We've launched an appeal, and at the same time we are sending out supplies, shelters, and blankets.
▪ We both started talking at the same time.
▪ You must have been at Harvard at the same time as I was.
▪ And there was firing and screaming and hollering at the same time.
▪ But at the same time most people find the expression of their individuality through work.
▪ Each document is at the same time unique and existing in a thousand places.
▪ I wanted to throw up, pass out, scream and cry at the same time.
▪ Once we had five homicides on trial at the same time.
▪ Remarkably, they can still swill and swagger at the same time, weaving toward an exit.
▪ She felt an absolute wreck, yet at the same time she felt acutely self-aware.
▪ So a television picture changed at the same time as you saw your ex-lover walking down the road opposite.
be (caught/locked/stuck) in a time warp
be a long time/10 years etc in the making
be a waste of time/money/effort etc
▪ An unrealistically low offer is a waste of time.
▪ As I said, many of these divisions of investigation will be a waste of time.
▪ But it was a waste of time.
▪ He may protest to the auditor that this is a waste of time.
▪ I feel annoyed, it is a waste of time.
▪ Marx thought that scholarly contemplation was a waste of time.
▪ Which was a waste of time really, because all I wanted to do was join Granpa on the barrow.
▪ While some thought that they did a good job, a substantial minority felt that they were a waste of time.
be having a thin time (of it)
be in the right place at the right time
▪ "You did well to get that contract.'' "Not really, I just happened to be in the right place at the right time.''
▪ An off--duty cop happened to be in the right place at the right time to stop a robbery.
▪ Being a successful news photographer is all about being in the right place at the right time.
▪ He could be in the right place at the right time when top jobs come up for grabs next summer.
▪ He was in the right place at the right time and hustling as he usually does.
▪ If we do not provide sufficient places, the necessary skill will not be in the right place at the right time.
▪ It was in the right place at the right time.
▪ They just happened to be in the right place at the right time.
▪ You have to be in the right place at the right time with the right partner and the right judges.
be in the wrong place at the wrong time
▪ Kambule claims he was just a bystander when the shooting occurred, a kid in the wrong place at the wrong time.
▪ The driver was drunk and hit her as she was crossing the road. She was just in the wrong place at the wrong time.
be living on borrowed time
▪ As long as Moira was around, Tamar was living on borrowed time.
▪ But now, as long as they existed, he was living on borrowed time.
be marking time
▪ Parkinson's Disease seems to be marking time at the moment.
be old before your time
be pressed for time/cash etc
be pressed for time/money etc
be pushed for time/money etc
beat time
▪ a conductor beating time with his baton
▪ At one stage, he joined her, pacing with her, beating time with one hand.
▪ In employment systems, after all, people are not mustered to play together as their manager beats time.
▪ It is not true that elsewhere they obey it without beating it, since one beats time wherever choruses are sung.
▪ Significantly, he follows the use of conducteur by recalling more recent occasions on which he beat time.
▪ The lord began to tap his foot and beat time with his hand against his thigh.
better luck next time
▪ Ah well, better luck next time, Andy.
▪ And if you didn't win, better luck next time.
▪ Back to the West Indies with it, and better luck next time.
bide your time
▪ Investors are biding their time, trying to figure out what the next successful stock will be.
Bide your time, Lissa, she told herself, bide your time.
▪ Be patient, tolerant and bide your time.
▪ He has bided his time, and now he feels he has arrived.
▪ Keenan certainly bided his time before coming forward to lodge his complaints.
▪ Or wiser than we are; silent and strong, biding their time?
▪ Some say they're biding their time before becoming more aggressive again.
▪ The nurse was biding her time till another idea came to her that would put her on top again.
▪ Where does it bide its time?
buy (sb) time
▪ But he bought himself family time and independence.
▪ Jack tipped him five and got behind the wheel of his Lincoln, which he was buying on time.
▪ Meanwhile, their opponents are busy taking out newspaper advertisements, buying air time and working the telephones.
▪ Obviously, you only score the points of any player you buy from the time you get him.
▪ The advantages are that it can be bought at any time, changed without penalty and fully refunded.
▪ The diversion bought him some time.
▪ There would be water from the sink to quench his thirst, and that would buy him some time.
▪ Why did they buy at that time?
call time (on sb/sth)
▪ Besides the unlimited license to overcharge, the prosecutor has a crowbar called time to hold over your head.
▪ It is tempting, then, to call time on G8 summits.
▪ Read in studio Britain's most exclusive clockmaker is about to call time on his business - because of the recession.
▪ Survey calls time on fears Government concerns that the 1988 Licensing Act would encourage greater consumption of alcohol have been proved unfounded.
▪ This is called time-dating.
▪ Washington State called time out, then had three chances from inside 10 feet but could not convert.
every time
Every time it rains we get a flood in the bedroom.
Every time she sees me she says looks away.
Every time we talk about money, we get into an argument.
▪ Don't ask me for money every time you want to buy a drink.
▪ It seems like every time I play basketball, I get hurt.
▪ My neck hurts every time I turn my head.
▪ Fernandez, a Miami native, was not packing the place every time he pitched.
▪ He would remember every time he had been humiliated at school or home, exaggerating the feeling and circumstances involved.
▪ I don't want to have to take out a new mortgage every time I move up the ladder.
▪ I shudder with embarrassment every time I think about it.
▪ It just works so perfectly every time they start laughing at him.
▪ That latency will get you every time.
▪ The price looks higher every time you speak, Captain Owen.
▪ Tired of getting leaves and debris caught in your roof gutters and clogging them every time it rains?
every time sb turns around
fall on hard/bad times
▪ At 21 she is set for stardom, but she still finds time for people who have fallen on hard times.
▪ Even by political standards, Gingrich very quickly fell on hard times.
▪ I assumed that if a person fell on hard times some one else in the wider family would rescue them.
▪ Interestingly, though, the bottom 10 includes many household names fallen on hard times.
▪ The Cambridge University Automobile Club had clearly fallen on hard times, too.
▪ The model cities program fell on hard times soon after it began.
▪ With the outbreak of war, the shop fell on harder times.
▪ Worse, because of Jack the father has fallen on hard times and must meet all kinds of debts.
fill in time
▪ Evening Today I had four baths to fill in time and I invented you.
▪ Recreational reading can be defined as a pastime by which the reader fills in time pleasantly.
▪ Tip-top young fellow, filling in time before Cambridge.
fix a time/date/place etc
▪ Before fixing a date do some research.
▪ Employers generally fix a time limit on the payment of these allowances.
▪ He added that while Yeltsin is breathing somewhat easier than he had been, there is no fixed date for his discharge.
▪ She said she loved him, they said they loved him, but somehow nobody would fix a date for a marriage.
▪ The court will either grant the request on written application or fix a date for hearing.
▪ The court will then fix a date for consideration and serve notice on the applicant.
▪ The court will usually fix a time limit for service when making directions and this must be complied with.
▪ They fixed a date for the weekend and he kissed her goodbye.
flexible/short-time etc working
▪ An outside problem can sometimes be helped by, say, more flexible working hours and so be resolved at management level.
▪ Earnings might vary because of piece-work, overtime or short-time working.
▪ Flexible Hours Question: Has consideration been given to the introduction of flexible working hours?
▪ Meanwhile, solicitors were last week urged to consider flexible working for staff in line with the government's family friendly policies.
▪ Recruitment procedures focus on individual skills and potential for flexible working.
▪ Through grants to local authorities, we are financing schemes to introduce more flexible working practices - such as job sharing.
▪ Vauxhall bosses admit that the threat of short-time working at Ellesmere Port still remains a possibility.
▪ Wage freezes have been brought in across most of the company and some short-time working introduced.
for old times' sake
▪ A slight drizzle appeared, just for old times' sake.
▪ I just thought it might have been kinda fun, you know, for old times' sake.
▪ Or even, for old times' sake, one of the left splinter parties.
▪ Then one day, just for old times' sake, I paid a visit to Winston Street.
▪ This was really just for old times' sake, just for fun.
for the first time
▪ At present, Akeakamai can understand sentences of up to five words, and can understand commands even when hearing them for the first time.
▪ By hearing them, we recognise them and we also, perhaps for the first time, see them as strange.
▪ It rained for the first time since we arrived in Sian today.
▪ Remember, these twelve artistic masterpieces are now on collectors' plates for the first time.
▪ She leans forward-and, for the first time since the first time-she kisses him.
▪ That day, the skies had clouded and, for the first time, the weather was cooler.
▪ The Federal Communications Commission began to regulate rates for the first time.
from that/this day/time/moment etc forward
▪ It was resolved that from this day forward they shall be called by the name of the Veterinary College, London.
gain time
▪ "Well, let me see," he said slowly, trying to gain time before answering the question.
▪ Dexter wondered if his vagueness was due to the shock of his wife's murder or an attempt to gain time.
▪ I accepted a chair and asked for a glass of water instead of the brandy, trying to gain time.
give me sth (any day/time)
▪ I don't like those fancy French desserts. Give me a bowl of chocolate ice cream any day.
▪ And so this rural scene to which we had escaped gave me a frame of reference to understand my parents.
▪ Half an hour later, I was in a forest eating the bread they had given me.
▪ I gave her your number and told her to give me five minutes to warn you first.
▪ Just give me the one with 80 percent meat, 20 percent filler.
▪ Minna pulled away and gave me a look that was part triumph and part astonishment.
▪ Thelma, haggard and overly lipsticked, gave me a refill.
▪ They'd be sorry for me, they'd give me whisky and aspirins and send me to a psychiatrist.
▪ This gave me more information about the teams than any of the other committee members had.
give sb a hard time
▪ My mother gave me a really hard time about Freddy. She couldn't stand him.
▪ She left the company because her boss was giving her a really hard time.
▪ Stop giving me such a hard time. I'm doing my best.
▪ When I first came here everyone gave me a really hard time, because I was the first woman to run a department.
▪ Her boss, Detective Hineline, is always giving her a hard time and she never gets really mad at him.
▪ If you wonder why people give you a hard time, it's because you write shit like this.
▪ Maybe Modigliani gave them a hard time, I don't know.
▪ The crew gave him a hard time, and even the cast was cautious about him.
▪ The laughter had stopped a while ago and, ever since, Lydia's imagination had been giving her a hard time.
▪ Tom gave him a hard time.
▪ Watson had been given a hard time from the Wednesday crowd before those goals but is now hoping the tide has turned.
▪ Yet Wakefield gave them a hard time throughout.
give sb time/a few weeks/all day etc
have a hard time
▪ A lot of people are having a hard time making ends meet.
▪ Anyone calling the 202 area code this weekend had a hard time getting through.
▪ I'm still having a hard time getting the company to pay me.
▪ I tried to find the house but I had such a hard time, I decided to give up.
▪ Premature babies have a hard time even under the best of circumstances.
▪ By contrast, books such as Randi's have a hard time finding enthusiastic editors.
▪ Cynics will have a hard time taking this seriously.
▪ Even the birds have a hard time of it, and you and Mr..
▪ He may have a hard time persuading lawmakers.
▪ I have a hard time eating meals when I should.
▪ The innovation of Private Eye ensured that deference, if not quite dead, would henceforth have a hard time.
▪ We have a hard time pulling off one conference.
▪ Your boy have a hard time getting it across?
have a whale of a time
have an easy time (of it)
▪ She hasn't had an easy time of it since Jack left.
▪ Hu did not have an easy time of it at first.
hit the big time
▪ But his interest in the farm grew, even after he hit the big time.
▪ I know he talked to her about what it was like before Jett hit the big time.
▪ Sandier hits the big time as the loveable three killer sharks to increase their brain mass.
▪ Still, even session men can hit the big time.
in (the) course of time
▪ A literal offering of bread and wine has in the course of time been included in the eucharistic ritual.
▪ As new species in the course of time are formed through natural selection, others will become rarer.
▪ It has also been clearly established that in the course of time evaluation of particular variants can change or even be reversed.
▪ Physical death follows in the course of time.
▪ The critical question was: Why has life undergone this progressive development in the course of time?
in former times/years
▪ No rocks, to our knowledge, are untouched by life in former times.
in good time (for sth/to do sth)
in less than no time
in no time
▪ And in no time at all, they see their dreams come true.
▪ He got back to normal in no time.
▪ He made Tracy in no time.
▪ If Sien went back with them, she would be driven back to her old life in no time.
▪ If you're telling the truth, Peter, you can be back here in no time.
▪ The thick pungent smoke from the spliff filled the car in no time as Firebug took long leisurely tokes and sat back.
▪ We were off the tanks in no time.
▪ Your house will be sold in no time at all!
in record time
▪ During these years she made her journeys in record time.
▪ Everyone in Knockglen heard about it in record time, but what they heard bore little relation to the facts.
▪ No question, and he did it in record time.
▪ She shifts into high gear and gets out of the house, down the hill and over to Starbucks in record time.
▪ The human species has probably not undergone much genetic change in recorded time.
▪ We got home in record time.
▪ We had finished the drive back down to the highway from Can-yon de Chelly in record time.
▪ We pulled out all the stops and gave the company a response in record time.
in the fullness of time
▪ I'm sure he'll tell us everything in the fullness of time.
▪ And in the fullness of Time the seed S grew into a beautiful Tree, which is what T stands for.
▪ Doubtless their minds are uncluttered by the thought that in the fullness of time they themselves will appear on the list.
▪ The rules allowed them this 2:1 majority but in the fullness of time it would become unacceptable to members.
in the nick of time
▪ Radio contact was established in the nick of time and we managed to transmit a message to the ship.
▪ She escaped from her smoke-filled home just in the nick of time.
▪ The money came through just in the nick of time.
▪ But all was well in the nick of time.
▪ But better in the nick of time than not at all.
▪ Enter Taligent with its promised solution for rapid applications prototyping and customization in a hardware-independent environment just in the nick of time.
▪ He did, however, in the nick of time, and I was issued uneventfully into the governance of Calvin Coolidge.
▪ It finally happened -- and just in the nick of time.
▪ Patience, she counselled herself, and turned the chicken in the nick of time.
▪ Those doughty editorial professionals at the Star have once again helped us avert a foolish mistake just in the nick of time!
▪ With repairs completed in the nick of time she sailed for the operation with a depleted crew.
in your own good time
▪ He would do what had to be done in his own good time; she must leave him to it.
▪ Once the rabbit is dead it can be retrieved in your own good time.
▪ The problems are the normal ones of adolescence and will pass in their own good time.
▪ Tina had felt let down, but knowing Bobby, he would tell them in his own good time what had happened.
▪ Whatever Jack wanted to do or say he would do or say in his own good time.
in your own sweet way/time
▪ Did he think he was so important that he could finish the cottage in his own sweet time?
▪ I'd rather carry on in my own sweet way, and I'd rather be in Stockholm.
▪ I probably love him, in my own sweet way.
▪ You can just sit back and read the responses and decide the winner in your own sweet time.
it is high time sb did sth
▪ It's high time we pulled together and got the job done right.
it's only/just a matter of time
▪ It was only a matter of time before Lynn found out Phil's secret.
▪ You'll learn how to do it eventually -- it's only a matter of time.
▪ Your father is dying and there's nothing we can do. I'm afraid it's just a matter of time.
▪ But they believe it's only a matter of time before the disease crosses the county boundary.
▪ If he hasn't already killed somebody, then it's only a matter of time.
▪ They think it's only a matter of time before he breaks.
it's time I was moving/we ought to get moving etc
kill time/an hour etc
let the good times roll
long time no see
▪ Uh, and says, uh, long time no see,.
lost in the mists of time
▪ And, for some reason lost in the mists of time, we need to do that.
▪ What actually transpired upon the outbreak of the Civil War is lost in the mists of time it would seem.
make up for lost time
▪ He's girl crazy! He went to a boys' school and now he's making up for lost time.
▪ The bus driver was speeding to make up for lost time.
▪ After a century or so of political apathy, Hong Kong's young people were making up for lost time.
▪ He was eager to make up for lost time and published prolifically.
▪ Meanwhile Keith and Mae are settling down to married life, making up for lost time.
▪ None the less, we immediately started our other meetings to make up for lost time.
▪ Once I settled into my new life, I did everything I could to make up for lost time.
▪ Time to make up for lost time.
many's the time/day etc (that/when)
mark time
▪ Investors are marking time, waiting for evidence that the market is growing.
▪ Amusing, but Ackroyd marking time.
▪ Gaultier has remained true to himself, and must therefore mark time until fashion comes back around to his idiosyncratic viewpoint.
▪ The clock apparently marks time by carrying out a predictable and elaborate process of synthesizing and destroying molecules within living cells.
▪ The deep tones of the cannon marked time to the incessant roll of musketry...
▪ The hind legs have to mark time while the forelegs cross over, making the outer ring of a wheel.
▪ We marked time at Po Ti Island for a day hoping that the north-east head wind would change in our favour.
▪ We have to lie still for five minutes, while the teachers whisper to each other as they mark time.
▪ Yet computer cuts in the services sector mean that, for now, it can do little more than mark time.
me time
money/time etc to spare
▪ All those below were too busy and had not time to spare to comfort him with a few minutes' companionship.
▪ But with time to spare, we rummaged around.
▪ I do not have the time to spare to meander through mountains.
▪ They maintain the government will have money to spare by 2011.
▪ Unfortunately, I haven't very much time to spare.
▪ We don't smoke or drink, so we have some money to spare.
▪ With time to spare, the Age Bulgers dominated all levels of politics and made sure their special interests came first.
money/time/space etc to play with
▪ He had time for his garden, time to talk to his Stratford friends, time to play with his granddaughter Elizabeth.
▪ Lennie knows he hasn't any time to play with if Boro are to stay in the big time.
▪ Then it's time to play with the topper dinghies!
move with the times
▪ You move with the times, or you fail, in this business.
▪ But even Rolls-Royce must be seen to be moving with the times.
▪ Hugh Puddephat, she discovered, had certainly moved with the times.
▪ Male speaker We've got to move with the times.
▪ Mrs Bottomley told them the health service had to move with the times and some closures were inevitable.
▪ Nowadays, he said, prisons had moved with the times like everything else.
▪ Still, I suppose we must move with the times.
▪ They haven't moved with the times, and nor, perhaps, could they.
nine times out of ten
Nine times out of ten I just skip breakfast and have a coffee.
Nine times out of ten we can beat them, but last night they creamed us.
Nine times out of ten, jobs that become vacant are filled from inside the organization.
now's the time (for sb) to do sth
once upon a time
Once upon a time children did what they were told.
▪ After all, it is once upon a time.
▪ However, once upon a time the mathematician was a child too.
▪ I'd have done anything for you once upon a time.
▪ One could spend a lifetime learning a small range of mountains, and once upon a time people did.
▪ Perhaps objects like these had been fashionable in churches once upon a time, but no longer, hence the attic.
▪ She might never have ironed shirts, but she too had once upon a time brought Jacob little surprises, little presents.
▪ There was, once upon a time, another book from which this kind of scientific certainty was derived.
pass the time of day (with sb)
play for time
▪ Stop playing for time and give us an answer.
▪ The rebel's current ceasefire doesn't amount to much more than playing for time.
▪ The U.S. strategy over the past weeks has been to play for time.
▪ Edmond Herv is a close friend and he tells me that sometimes you have to play for time to solve a problem.
▪ He decides, literally, to play for time and makes a debut at Nero's banquet that evening.
▪ Henry's only plan at this moment was to play for time.
▪ Mr Kasyanov seems now to be playing for time, hoping to get through January without ferocious clashes with creditors.
▪ The confused evidence suggests they are acting on their own initiative, not on directives from East Berlin to play for time.
▪ The government is playing for time.
▪ The governments, nervous, are playing for time.
▪ Truman played for time by appointing a brains trust of three to advise him.
price-wise/time-wise etc
quite a/some time
▪ For quite some time he lived with the expectation that he was going to die.
▪ He found out we had been pulling the wool over his eyes for quite some time.
▪ If the skin and gills are kept moist they can remain out of water for quite some time.
▪ In other words, it Adll be quite some time before the kinks are worked out of the system.
▪ It must have taken quite a time.
▪ It was brought to her before I really got to know her, but it was with her for quite some time.
▪ Judging the competition has taken quite some time and was no easy matter.
▪ Uh I have no for quite some time.
run late/early/on time
▪ Don called - he's running late, so we'll start without him.
▪ He makes our trains run on time.
▪ In other words: - Keep the job running on time.
▪ Maybe she could get the London Underground to run on time?
▪ Passenger trains never ran on time now.
▪ Station refurbishment seems a mere insult when the trains don't run on time.
sb puts his pants on one leg at a time
short time
▪ Employees may try working at the new location for a short time and then decide not to continue.
▪ In this way a carcass can draw vultures from far away in a short time.
▪ Just a short time ago the forest was impenetrable ... and safe.
▪ Now that he's on short time he's doing more round the house.
▪ One year is a very short time.
▪ Police arrested a male juvenile a short time later.
▪ The forest has reclaimed the fields even in this short time since I was last there.
sign of the times
▪ At the time, I took this decay merely as a sign of the times.
▪ But in a sign of the times, Army Chief Gen.
▪ But Reagan read the signs of the times.
▪ Is this a sign of the times?
▪ It was a sign of the times. 1956.
▪ That we owe this to the vast reach of cyberspace is indeed a sign of the times.
▪ This is a real sign of the times and completely eclipses global fears about ecology or famine.
sort of price/time/speed etc
▪ But it was the key sort of time, wasn't it?
▪ Got to call opposite number in Coventry office about outstanding claim ... 16.22 Meeting time not like any other sort of time.
▪ It was the sort of price any commander had to pay for hoped-for victory.
▪ It was the sort of time and place where poems flourished along with the vegetation.
▪ Most of us do not have that sort of time to spare.
▪ Of course, a tactless dealer irritated him even more at this sort of time.
▪ Of course, there were other sorts of times too.
spare time/moment/hour etc
▪ Darby was a cheerfully relaxed young man who compiled cryptic crosswords for a monthly magazine in his spare time.
▪ In her spare time she makes and decorates cakes of different shapes and sizes for all occasions.
▪ In his spare time, Grigsby gave legal advice to the Black Panthers.
▪ In many schools, teachers are spending their spare time fund-raising and making equipment to support the new Curriculum.
▪ Q: What do you do in your spare time?
▪ Q: When you have spare time, what do you do?
▪ We had some spare time, so we started messing around with samples and sequencers and stuff.
take time out (to do sth)
▪ A: I am going to take time out and go to college.
▪ Actress Beverley D'Angelo is taking time out from her screen career to perform a risqué country set across the Bible belt.
▪ At the product's launch, the company took time out to damn 3Com's boundary routing scheme with faint praise.
▪ Despite his increasingly hectic schedule, Haden graciously took time out to be interviewed about the Quartet and the Jazzfest tour.
▪ I shall take time out to call at Aurae Phiala.
▪ If you actually worked for Jobs, he took time out from preaching the Mac gospel to meddle in your life.
▪ Nurses in Training Questions: Do nurse teachers take time out to discuss their teaching methods with their peers?
▪ The 73-year-old Republican standard-bearer took time out of his busy campaign schedule last week to search for those roots.
tell the time
▪ After all, you have been telling the time for years, haven't you?
▪ Because it is inexpensive, burning incense-sticks to tell the time continued to be used down to the present century.
▪ But her hand was shaking so much that she could not tell the time.
▪ Functional rather than ostentatious, for telling the time rather than for telling others who he was.
▪ So your watch should tell the time accurately.
▪ The clock did a lot more besides telling the time of day.
▪ These star charts were provided to enable the deceased to tell the time of night or the date in the calendar.
▪ Time Be able to tell the time and understand times expressed in terms of 12- and 24-hour clocks.
the big time
▪ He played in clubs for years before making it to the big time.
the dawn of civilization/time etc
▪ Once, long ago, at the dawn of time, he had persuaded man to disobey in a garden.
▪ Since the dawn of time, roughly a hundred billion human beings have walked the planet Earth.
the march of time/history/progress etc
▪ At present these are banned, as are crossbows, but will these eventually be admitted with the march of progress?
▪ But in 1874-not ten years earlier or later-city and nation endured a painful pause in the march of progress.
▪ Like Franco, Arrese was trying to hold back the march of history.
▪ New discoveries have opened up all kinds of possibilities for holding back the march of time.
▪ They succeeded because they brought hope to the losers whom the march of progress had left behind.
▪ This little community is still in existence, largely untouched by the march of time.
the passage of time
▪ If anything, fashion is moving closer to the context of his style with the passage of time.
▪ Increased and improved communication plus the passage of time and more frequent face-to-face contacts should greatly improve understanding.
▪ Quite simply, the passage of time and new techniques had taken their toll.
▪ She knew she ought to report the death, but felt she could not because of the passage of time.
▪ They are lonely, sitting in quiet living rooms with clocks that loudly announce the passage of time with each tick.
▪ This balance changes with the passage of time as experience fashions these blueprints into more serviceable guides.
▪ Under these circumstances the future details of a transaction can be settled only when uncertainty is resolved by the passage of time.
▪ We were oblivious of the passage of time.
the passing of time/the years
▪ The passing of the years has not weakened his artistic ability.
the sands of time
the time is ripe (for sth)
▪ Amato thinks the time is ripe for educational reform.
▪ The time was ripe for change in the company.
▪ As with acupuncture, this is a difficult field for research, but the time is ripe for active scientific investigations.
▪ So the time is ripe for a major overhaul of the sixth form.
the wheel of fortune/life/time etc
▪ And, as the wheel of fortune continues on its inexorable cycle, values are likely to start going up again soon.
▪ Then the wheel of fortune turned.
third time lucky
▪ Barcelona, having lost the 1961 and 1986 finals, hope it will be third time lucky.
▪ Everyone is praying that this time it will be third time lucky.
▪ Maybe he's out there thinking: third time lucky.
▪ Odds-on favourite last time at Haydock, he was narrowly beaten into third place, but tomorrow should prove third time lucky.
three years/five times etc running
time flies
▪ "Hasn't the afternoon passed quickly?" said Carol. "Time flies when you're having fun."
▪ Is it 5:30 already? Boy, time sure flies!
▪ Is Richard eight already? Doesn't time fly?
▪ Dearest Jeanette How time flies especially when one is meant to be writing lots of letters.
▪ There are so many diversions here that the time flies by on wings.
▪ Think how time flies in periods of intense, purposeful activity.
time hangs/lies heavy on your hands
time is moving on
time marches on
▪ All of us face identity crises as time marches on.
time/money/energy waster
▪ Although it is easy to dismiss meetings as time wasters, the above indicates why you should take them seriously.
▪ Cons: Writing with pen and paper is perhaps one of the greatest time wasters in the business world.
▪ FoE pinpointed fridges, light bulbs, washing machines, dishwashers, televisions, and tumble driers as energy wasters.
▪ Good experience and dedication, no time wasters.
▪ Romantic as it may be, a fireplace without glass doors is a real energy waster.
times table
▪ And I don't really know my Two Times Table.
▪ For Peter, puzzles are great fun; he likes to learn such details as state capitals and the times tables.
▪ I expect to recycle our work on the times tables.
▪ She knew her times tables and her Catechism.
to the end of time
▪ He could be followed to the end of time, and still nothing would happen.
twice over/three times over etc
unearthly hour/time etc
waste no time (in) doing sth
▪ Peter wasted no time finding himself another girlfriend.
▪ Additionally, less electricity is used and the chef wastes no time waiting for the correct temperature to be reached.
▪ Emil, the crew and I wasted no time watching.
▪ If it demurred, the Corps might waste no time in trying to build it instead.
▪ Lee wasted no time entering Maryland, the men being in high spirits as the bold move was made.
▪ Ringwald wastes no time wedging herself between McGaw and his coed girlfriend, Sarah Lassez.
▪ Shouting to Wemyss to cope with this situation, Douglas wasted no time.
▪ The man's wife had wasted no time going through his closets picking up worn and odd pairs.
▪ The Right was wasting no time, meanwhile.
watch the time
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ After a time, I began to feel more relaxed.
▪ All systems settle down after a time.
▪ At one time, Hakami was ranked 32nd in the world.
▪ Bill had lost his job, and it was a difficult time for him.
▪ Check with the museum for opening times at www.musart.co.
▪ Could I have the times of the trains to Birmingham please?
▪ Do you remember that time Tim got really drunk at Sarah's party?
▪ Do you remember the time when Dad lost the car keys?
▪ Drugs can alter our understanding of time and space.
▪ Entrance fees to the exhibit have been reduced for the time being.
▪ Every time I met her, she asked me about the children.
▪ For a time, the 1,600 seater hall was home to a Saturday night film show, before being converted to a night club.
▪ Give us a call next time you're in town.
▪ He chatted to us for a time, then left.
▪ He played for Barcelona for four years, and during that time they won two major competitions.
▪ How much time do you think they'll need to paint the house?
▪ I've got to get this to the video store by closing time.
▪ I've heard Jessie play a number of times, and I think he's great.
▪ I didn't really enjoy my time in Boston.
▪ I really enjoyed my time at university.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
arrival
▪ Success hinged on timing their arrival just as the last fat slice of sun slid below the horizon.
▪ He had timed their arrival for early evening with few people around.
▪ He had timed his arrival for shortly after midday in the hope that lunchtime would find the staff free of commitments.
▪ We had timed our arrival well as the local Highland Games took place the next day.
▪ In fact, I saw from the station clock that I had timed my arrival just about perfectly.
departure
▪ Dickey would not be the first coach to time his departure with the graduation of a key group of seniors.
dozen
▪ I was in their house there a dozen times.
▪ He turned his head nervously half a dozen times to see if anybody was watching.
▪ He pounded down in me a few dozen times, quickly.
▪ And yet those who have seen it a dozen times will come out and watch a dozen more.
▪ In the next decade, the newspaper was bombed more than a dozen times.
▪ I pummel myself with my fists, hard, a dozen times.
▪ We Elwoods must have seen him a dozen times.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bad time/moment etc
▪ And it was still a bad time for the people in the middle.
▪ And then uh, he was the homecoming king and oh, gosh, that was a bad time in my life.
▪ Calls to assistant general manager Mike Port came at a bad time.
▪ I thought it would be great down there, but I started having a bad time so I went back to Newcastle.
▪ It was a bad time to have chosen for confrontation.
▪ Strawberry had had a bad time.
▪ The prolonged federal government shutdown could not have come at a worse time for businessman Herb Stein.
▪ While I have no problem with this, the issue is that my friends are giving me a bad time about it.
a bumpy ride/time
▪ Euro Disney had a bumpy ride as the market digested its results, sinking to a low of 813p down 35p.
▪ It had been a bumpy ride, through the tail end of a thunderstorm.
▪ It is therefore going to be, at best, a bumpy ride.
▪ It was the same man who had jostled her repeatedly during a bumpy ride on the Lexington Avenue Express subway.
▪ Since the programme was announced in 1998, like previous eradication campaigns, it has had a bumpy ride.
▪ The plant had had a bumpy ride since Cellatex was sold off by the chemicals giant Rhne-Poulenc in 1991.
a devil of a time/job etc
▪ But I've always found the Flying V and its derivatives a devil of a job to sit down with and play.
▪ He was taking a devil of a time to change.
▪ If he filled those in they'd have a devil of a job lifting them!
▪ It took me a devil of a time to find it I can tell you.
a short space of time
▪ I had to find out a lot of things about you in a short space of time.
▪ In old age several major losses may occur within a short space of time.
▪ In such a short space of time, he had plunged from the pinnacle of success to the depths of defeat.
▪ Just how much things can change in a short space of time.
▪ Still, he had been knocked out twice in a short space of time and would appreciate some rest.
▪ That was an extraordinarily fine achievement in such a short space of time.
▪ The problem is getting the material under control in order to reach ambitious learning goals in a short space of time.
▪ The problem was more one of having to absorb a vast amount of information in a short space of time.
a stitch in time (saves nine)
a/one bit at a time
▪ The text can be put on an overhead and revealed a bit at a time.
again and again/time and (time) again/over and over again
all in good time
▪ "When are we going to open the presents?" "All in good time."
▪ "When are you going to pay me?" "All in good time."
▪ But don't fret, you shall have a puppy all in good time.
an opportune moment/time
▪ For those who are waiting for the most opportune time to invest in a home, this is an excellent time to do that.
▪ This seemed like an opportune moment to ask the government to mount a tree-planting program.
▪ His work - and his mission - comes at an opportune time.
▪ I waited, hoping for an opportune moment to discuss the possibility of my earning a little money.
▪ Meanwhile, he would take up the matter with Archbishop Perier at an opportune time.
▪ Porter bought Goat Island and Preserved it at an opportune moment.
▪ The announcement Tuesday may have come at an opportune time.
▪ To her now he was just a young fellow who happened to be in the house at an opportune time.
▪ Would this be an opportune time to suggest a move to help reduce the fragmentation of the industry?
any old thing/place/time etc
▪ He could play with Orlando any old time.
▪ If you believed that, then you'd believe any old thing.
as good a time/place etc as any
at the best of times
▪ Even at the best of times the roads are dangerous.
▪ A salmon is slippery enough to handle at the best of times, but one of this size ....
▪ But reason told her it was a precarious business at the best of times.
▪ In fact Polanski, unconventional at the best of times, takes us to the limit - and beyond.
▪ It was run on a shoestring at the best of times and Kelly was merely adding to his problems.
▪ Listening is a difficult and complex skill at the best of times.
▪ Memory was mischievously selective at the best of times Trivia stuck limpet-like and the useful filtered away.
▪ Rising living standards and well-being are ambiguously related at the best of times, and not simply for ecological reasons.
▪ The mind was a delicate mechanism that he disliked interfering with at the best of times.
at the same time
▪ Are you supposed to press these two buttons at the same time?
▪ Charlie and I arrived at the same time.
▪ His wife had a baby at the same time as Elaine.
▪ Karl and I were hired at the same time.
▪ So you want to talk to them, identify that they are a candidate, and then give them the test all at the same time?
▪ The media's criticism can be hard to take. But at the same time, we've got to keep doing our jobs.
▪ We've launched an appeal, and at the same time we are sending out supplies, shelters, and blankets.
▪ We both started talking at the same time.
▪ You must have been at Harvard at the same time as I was.
▪ And there was firing and screaming and hollering at the same time.
▪ But at the same time most people find the expression of their individuality through work.
▪ Each document is at the same time unique and existing in a thousand places.
▪ I wanted to throw up, pass out, scream and cry at the same time.
▪ Once we had five homicides on trial at the same time.
▪ Remarkably, they can still swill and swagger at the same time, weaving toward an exit.
▪ She felt an absolute wreck, yet at the same time she felt acutely self-aware.
▪ So a television picture changed at the same time as you saw your ex-lover walking down the road opposite.
be (caught/locked/stuck) in a time warp
be a long time/10 years etc in the making
be a waste of time/money/effort etc
▪ An unrealistically low offer is a waste of time.
▪ As I said, many of these divisions of investigation will be a waste of time.
▪ But it was a waste of time.
▪ He may protest to the auditor that this is a waste of time.
▪ I feel annoyed, it is a waste of time.
▪ Marx thought that scholarly contemplation was a waste of time.
▪ Which was a waste of time really, because all I wanted to do was join Granpa on the barrow.
▪ While some thought that they did a good job, a substantial minority felt that they were a waste of time.
be having a thin time (of it)
be in the right place at the right time
▪ "You did well to get that contract.'' "Not really, I just happened to be in the right place at the right time.''
▪ An off--duty cop happened to be in the right place at the right time to stop a robbery.
▪ Being a successful news photographer is all about being in the right place at the right time.
▪ He could be in the right place at the right time when top jobs come up for grabs next summer.
▪ He was in the right place at the right time and hustling as he usually does.
▪ If we do not provide sufficient places, the necessary skill will not be in the right place at the right time.
▪ It was in the right place at the right time.
▪ They just happened to be in the right place at the right time.
▪ You have to be in the right place at the right time with the right partner and the right judges.
be in the wrong place at the wrong time
▪ Kambule claims he was just a bystander when the shooting occurred, a kid in the wrong place at the wrong time.
▪ The driver was drunk and hit her as she was crossing the road. She was just in the wrong place at the wrong time.
be old before your time
be pressed for time/money etc
be pushed for time/money etc
better luck next time
▪ Ah well, better luck next time, Andy.
▪ And if you didn't win, better luck next time.
▪ Back to the West Indies with it, and better luck next time.
every time
Every time it rains we get a flood in the bedroom.
Every time she sees me she says looks away.
Every time we talk about money, we get into an argument.
▪ Don't ask me for money every time you want to buy a drink.
▪ It seems like every time I play basketball, I get hurt.
▪ My neck hurts every time I turn my head.
▪ Fernandez, a Miami native, was not packing the place every time he pitched.
▪ He would remember every time he had been humiliated at school or home, exaggerating the feeling and circumstances involved.
▪ I don't want to have to take out a new mortgage every time I move up the ladder.
▪ I shudder with embarrassment every time I think about it.
▪ It just works so perfectly every time they start laughing at him.
▪ That latency will get you every time.
▪ The price looks higher every time you speak, Captain Owen.
▪ Tired of getting leaves and debris caught in your roof gutters and clogging them every time it rains?
flexible/short-time etc working
▪ An outside problem can sometimes be helped by, say, more flexible working hours and so be resolved at management level.
▪ Earnings might vary because of piece-work, overtime or short-time working.
▪ Flexible Hours Question: Has consideration been given to the introduction of flexible working hours?
▪ Meanwhile, solicitors were last week urged to consider flexible working for staff in line with the government's family friendly policies.
▪ Recruitment procedures focus on individual skills and potential for flexible working.
▪ Through grants to local authorities, we are financing schemes to introduce more flexible working practices - such as job sharing.
▪ Vauxhall bosses admit that the threat of short-time working at Ellesmere Port still remains a possibility.
▪ Wage freezes have been brought in across most of the company and some short-time working introduced.
for old times' sake
▪ A slight drizzle appeared, just for old times' sake.
▪ I just thought it might have been kinda fun, you know, for old times' sake.
▪ Or even, for old times' sake, one of the left splinter parties.
▪ Then one day, just for old times' sake, I paid a visit to Winston Street.
▪ This was really just for old times' sake, just for fun.
for the first time
▪ At present, Akeakamai can understand sentences of up to five words, and can understand commands even when hearing them for the first time.
▪ By hearing them, we recognise them and we also, perhaps for the first time, see them as strange.
▪ It rained for the first time since we arrived in Sian today.
▪ Remember, these twelve artistic masterpieces are now on collectors' plates for the first time.
▪ She leans forward-and, for the first time since the first time-she kisses him.
▪ That day, the skies had clouded and, for the first time, the weather was cooler.
▪ The Federal Communications Commission began to regulate rates for the first time.
from that/this day/time/moment etc forward
▪ It was resolved that from this day forward they shall be called by the name of the Veterinary College, London.
give sb a hard time
▪ My mother gave me a really hard time about Freddy. She couldn't stand him.
▪ She left the company because her boss was giving her a really hard time.
▪ Stop giving me such a hard time. I'm doing my best.
▪ When I first came here everyone gave me a really hard time, because I was the first woman to run a department.
▪ Her boss, Detective Hineline, is always giving her a hard time and she never gets really mad at him.
▪ If you wonder why people give you a hard time, it's because you write shit like this.
▪ Maybe Modigliani gave them a hard time, I don't know.
▪ The crew gave him a hard time, and even the cast was cautious about him.
▪ The laughter had stopped a while ago and, ever since, Lydia's imagination had been giving her a hard time.
▪ Tom gave him a hard time.
▪ Watson had been given a hard time from the Wednesday crowd before those goals but is now hoping the tide has turned.
▪ Yet Wakefield gave them a hard time throughout.
have a hard time
▪ A lot of people are having a hard time making ends meet.
▪ Anyone calling the 202 area code this weekend had a hard time getting through.
▪ I'm still having a hard time getting the company to pay me.
▪ I tried to find the house but I had such a hard time, I decided to give up.
▪ Premature babies have a hard time even under the best of circumstances.
▪ By contrast, books such as Randi's have a hard time finding enthusiastic editors.
▪ Cynics will have a hard time taking this seriously.
▪ Even the birds have a hard time of it, and you and Mr..
▪ He may have a hard time persuading lawmakers.
▪ I have a hard time eating meals when I should.
▪ The innovation of Private Eye ensured that deference, if not quite dead, would henceforth have a hard time.
▪ We have a hard time pulling off one conference.
▪ Your boy have a hard time getting it across?
have a whale of a time
have an easy time (of it)
▪ She hasn't had an easy time of it since Jack left.
▪ Hu did not have an easy time of it at first.
in (the) course of time
▪ A literal offering of bread and wine has in the course of time been included in the eucharistic ritual.
▪ As new species in the course of time are formed through natural selection, others will become rarer.
▪ It has also been clearly established that in the course of time evaluation of particular variants can change or even be reversed.
▪ Physical death follows in the course of time.
▪ The critical question was: Why has life undergone this progressive development in the course of time?
in former times/years
▪ No rocks, to our knowledge, are untouched by life in former times.
in good time (for sth/to do sth)
in less than no time
in no time
▪ And in no time at all, they see their dreams come true.
▪ He got back to normal in no time.
▪ He made Tracy in no time.
▪ If Sien went back with them, she would be driven back to her old life in no time.
▪ If you're telling the truth, Peter, you can be back here in no time.
▪ The thick pungent smoke from the spliff filled the car in no time as Firebug took long leisurely tokes and sat back.
▪ We were off the tanks in no time.
▪ Your house will be sold in no time at all!
in record time
▪ During these years she made her journeys in record time.
▪ Everyone in Knockglen heard about it in record time, but what they heard bore little relation to the facts.
▪ No question, and he did it in record time.
▪ She shifts into high gear and gets out of the house, down the hill and over to Starbucks in record time.
▪ The human species has probably not undergone much genetic change in recorded time.
▪ We got home in record time.
▪ We had finished the drive back down to the highway from Can-yon de Chelly in record time.
▪ We pulled out all the stops and gave the company a response in record time.
in the fullness of time
▪ I'm sure he'll tell us everything in the fullness of time.
▪ And in the fullness of Time the seed S grew into a beautiful Tree, which is what T stands for.
▪ Doubtless their minds are uncluttered by the thought that in the fullness of time they themselves will appear on the list.
▪ The rules allowed them this 2:1 majority but in the fullness of time it would become unacceptable to members.
in the nick of time
▪ Radio contact was established in the nick of time and we managed to transmit a message to the ship.
▪ She escaped from her smoke-filled home just in the nick of time.
▪ The money came through just in the nick of time.
▪ But all was well in the nick of time.
▪ But better in the nick of time than not at all.
▪ Enter Taligent with its promised solution for rapid applications prototyping and customization in a hardware-independent environment just in the nick of time.
▪ He did, however, in the nick of time, and I was issued uneventfully into the governance of Calvin Coolidge.
▪ It finally happened -- and just in the nick of time.
▪ Patience, she counselled herself, and turned the chicken in the nick of time.
▪ Those doughty editorial professionals at the Star have once again helped us avert a foolish mistake just in the nick of time!
▪ With repairs completed in the nick of time she sailed for the operation with a depleted crew.
in your own good time
▪ He would do what had to be done in his own good time; she must leave him to it.
▪ Once the rabbit is dead it can be retrieved in your own good time.
▪ The problems are the normal ones of adolescence and will pass in their own good time.
▪ Tina had felt let down, but knowing Bobby, he would tell them in his own good time what had happened.
▪ Whatever Jack wanted to do or say he would do or say in his own good time.
in your own sweet way/time
▪ Did he think he was so important that he could finish the cottage in his own sweet time?
▪ I'd rather carry on in my own sweet way, and I'd rather be in Stockholm.
▪ I probably love him, in my own sweet way.
▪ You can just sit back and read the responses and decide the winner in your own sweet time.
it is high time sb did sth
▪ It's high time we pulled together and got the job done right.
it's only/just a matter of time
▪ It was only a matter of time before Lynn found out Phil's secret.
▪ You'll learn how to do it eventually -- it's only a matter of time.
▪ Your father is dying and there's nothing we can do. I'm afraid it's just a matter of time.
▪ But they believe it's only a matter of time before the disease crosses the county boundary.
▪ If he hasn't already killed somebody, then it's only a matter of time.
▪ They think it's only a matter of time before he breaks.
long time no see
▪ Uh, and says, uh, long time no see,.
lost in the mists of time
▪ And, for some reason lost in the mists of time, we need to do that.
▪ What actually transpired upon the outbreak of the Civil War is lost in the mists of time it would seem.
many's the time/day etc (that/when)
me time
nine times out of ten
Nine times out of ten I just skip breakfast and have a coffee.
Nine times out of ten we can beat them, but last night they creamed us.
Nine times out of ten, jobs that become vacant are filled from inside the organization.
now's the time (for sb) to do sth
once upon a time
Once upon a time children did what they were told.
▪ After all, it is once upon a time.
▪ However, once upon a time the mathematician was a child too.
▪ I'd have done anything for you once upon a time.
▪ One could spend a lifetime learning a small range of mountains, and once upon a time people did.
▪ Perhaps objects like these had been fashionable in churches once upon a time, but no longer, hence the attic.
▪ She might never have ironed shirts, but she too had once upon a time brought Jacob little surprises, little presents.
▪ There was, once upon a time, another book from which this kind of scientific certainty was derived.
price-wise/time-wise etc
quite a/some time
▪ For quite some time he lived with the expectation that he was going to die.
▪ He found out we had been pulling the wool over his eyes for quite some time.
▪ If the skin and gills are kept moist they can remain out of water for quite some time.
▪ In other words, it Adll be quite some time before the kinks are worked out of the system.
▪ It must have taken quite a time.
▪ It was brought to her before I really got to know her, but it was with her for quite some time.
▪ Judging the competition has taken quite some time and was no easy matter.
▪ Uh I have no for quite some time.
sb puts his pants on one leg at a time
short time
▪ Employees may try working at the new location for a short time and then decide not to continue.
▪ In this way a carcass can draw vultures from far away in a short time.
▪ Just a short time ago the forest was impenetrable ... and safe.
▪ Now that he's on short time he's doing more round the house.
▪ One year is a very short time.
▪ Police arrested a male juvenile a short time later.
▪ The forest has reclaimed the fields even in this short time since I was last there.
sign of the times
▪ At the time, I took this decay merely as a sign of the times.
▪ But in a sign of the times, Army Chief Gen.
▪ But Reagan read the signs of the times.
▪ Is this a sign of the times?
▪ It was a sign of the times. 1956.
▪ That we owe this to the vast reach of cyberspace is indeed a sign of the times.
▪ This is a real sign of the times and completely eclipses global fears about ecology or famine.
sort of price/time/speed etc
▪ But it was the key sort of time, wasn't it?
▪ Got to call opposite number in Coventry office about outstanding claim ... 16.22 Meeting time not like any other sort of time.
▪ It was the sort of price any commander had to pay for hoped-for victory.
▪ It was the sort of time and place where poems flourished along with the vegetation.
▪ Most of us do not have that sort of time to spare.
▪ Of course, a tactless dealer irritated him even more at this sort of time.
▪ Of course, there were other sorts of times too.
spare time/moment/hour etc
▪ Darby was a cheerfully relaxed young man who compiled cryptic crosswords for a monthly magazine in his spare time.
▪ In her spare time she makes and decorates cakes of different shapes and sizes for all occasions.
▪ In his spare time, Grigsby gave legal advice to the Black Panthers.
▪ In many schools, teachers are spending their spare time fund-raising and making equipment to support the new Curriculum.
▪ Q: What do you do in your spare time?
▪ Q: When you have spare time, what do you do?
▪ We had some spare time, so we started messing around with samples and sequencers and stuff.
take time out (to do sth)
▪ A: I am going to take time out and go to college.
▪ Actress Beverley D'Angelo is taking time out from her screen career to perform a risqué country set across the Bible belt.
▪ At the product's launch, the company took time out to damn 3Com's boundary routing scheme with faint praise.
▪ Despite his increasingly hectic schedule, Haden graciously took time out to be interviewed about the Quartet and the Jazzfest tour.
▪ I shall take time out to call at Aurae Phiala.
▪ If you actually worked for Jobs, he took time out from preaching the Mac gospel to meddle in your life.
▪ Nurses in Training Questions: Do nurse teachers take time out to discuss their teaching methods with their peers?
▪ The 73-year-old Republican standard-bearer took time out of his busy campaign schedule last week to search for those roots.
the big time
▪ He played in clubs for years before making it to the big time.
the dawn of civilization/time etc
▪ Once, long ago, at the dawn of time, he had persuaded man to disobey in a garden.
▪ Since the dawn of time, roughly a hundred billion human beings have walked the planet Earth.
the march of time/history/progress etc
▪ At present these are banned, as are crossbows, but will these eventually be admitted with the march of progress?
▪ But in 1874-not ten years earlier or later-city and nation endured a painful pause in the march of progress.
▪ Like Franco, Arrese was trying to hold back the march of history.
▪ New discoveries have opened up all kinds of possibilities for holding back the march of time.
▪ They succeeded because they brought hope to the losers whom the march of progress had left behind.
▪ This little community is still in existence, largely untouched by the march of time.
the passage of time
▪ If anything, fashion is moving closer to the context of his style with the passage of time.
▪ Increased and improved communication plus the passage of time and more frequent face-to-face contacts should greatly improve understanding.
▪ Quite simply, the passage of time and new techniques had taken their toll.
▪ She knew she ought to report the death, but felt she could not because of the passage of time.
▪ They are lonely, sitting in quiet living rooms with clocks that loudly announce the passage of time with each tick.
▪ This balance changes with the passage of time as experience fashions these blueprints into more serviceable guides.
▪ Under these circumstances the future details of a transaction can be settled only when uncertainty is resolved by the passage of time.
▪ We were oblivious of the passage of time.
the passing of time/the years
▪ The passing of the years has not weakened his artistic ability.
the sands of time
the time is ripe (for sth)
▪ Amato thinks the time is ripe for educational reform.
▪ The time was ripe for change in the company.
▪ As with acupuncture, this is a difficult field for research, but the time is ripe for active scientific investigations.
▪ So the time is ripe for a major overhaul of the sixth form.
the wheel of fortune/life/time etc
▪ And, as the wheel of fortune continues on its inexorable cycle, values are likely to start going up again soon.
▪ Then the wheel of fortune turned.
third time lucky
▪ Barcelona, having lost the 1961 and 1986 finals, hope it will be third time lucky.
▪ Everyone is praying that this time it will be third time lucky.
▪ Maybe he's out there thinking: third time lucky.
▪ Odds-on favourite last time at Haydock, he was narrowly beaten into third place, but tomorrow should prove third time lucky.
three years/five times etc running
time hangs/lies heavy on your hands
time/money/energy waster
▪ Although it is easy to dismiss meetings as time wasters, the above indicates why you should take them seriously.
▪ Cons: Writing with pen and paper is perhaps one of the greatest time wasters in the business world.
▪ FoE pinpointed fridges, light bulbs, washing machines, dishwashers, televisions, and tumble driers as energy wasters.
▪ Good experience and dedication, no time wasters.
▪ Romantic as it may be, a fireplace without glass doors is a real energy waster.
times table
▪ And I don't really know my Two Times Table.
▪ For Peter, puzzles are great fun; he likes to learn such details as state capitals and the times tables.
▪ I expect to recycle our work on the times tables.
▪ She knew her times tables and her Catechism.
to the end of time
▪ He could be followed to the end of time, and still nothing would happen.
twice over/three times over etc
unearthly hour/time etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I'm going to run to the corner and back - time me.
▪ Stephen timed his arrival for exactly six o'clock.
▪ The fastest big cat, the cheetah, has been timed at over 60 mph.
▪ The first track race is timed for 11.15.
▪ The meditation class will be timed so that it does not coincide with the noisier exercise classes.
▪ The release of the document was shrewdly timed.
▪ The swimming teacher always times us over 100 metres.
▪ Walker timed the pass perfectly.
▪ We timed how long it took us to get there.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ They timed the call to coincide with the attack on the Cokleys'.
▪ Those chords of searching bewilderment in the finale were timed to a microsecond and projected an awesome tingle of fear.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Time

Time \Time\, v. i.

  1. To keep or beat time; to proceed or move in time.

    With oar strokes timing to their song.
    --Whittier.

  2. To pass time; to delay. [Obs.]

Time

Time \Time\ (t[imac]m), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Timed (t[imac]md); p. pr. & vb. n. Timing.]

  1. To appoint the time for; to bring, begin, or perform at the proper season or time; as, he timed his appearance rightly.

    There is no greater wisdom than well to time the beginnings and onsets of things.
    --Bacon.

  2. To regulate as to time; to accompany, or agree with, in time of movement.

    Who overlooked the oars, and timed the stroke.
    --Addison.

    He was a thing of blood, whose every motion Was timed with dying cries.
    --Shak.

  3. To ascertain or record the time, duration, or rate of; as, to time the speed of horses, or hours for workmen.

  4. To measure, as in music or harmony.

Time

Time \Time\, n.; pl. Times. [OE. time, AS. t[=i]ma, akin to t[=i]d time, and to Icel. t[=i]mi, Dan. time an hour, Sw. timme. [root]58. See Tide, n.]

  1. Duration, considered independently of any system of measurement or any employment of terms which designate limited portions thereof.

    The time wasteth [i. e. passes away] night and day.
    --Chaucer.

    I know of no ideas . . . that have a better claim to be accounted simple and original than those of space and time.
    --Reid.

  2. A particular period or part of duration, whether past, present, or future; a point or portion of duration; as, the time was, or has been; the time is, or will be.

    God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets.
    --Heb. i. 1.

  3. The period at which any definite event occurred, or person lived; age; period; era; as, the Spanish Armada was destroyed in the time of Queen Elizabeth; -- often in the plural; as, ancient times; modern times.

  4. The duration of one's life; the hours and days which a person has at his disposal.

    Believe me, your time is not your own; it belongs to God, to religion, to mankind.
    --Buckminster.

  5. A proper time; a season; an opportunity.

    There is . . . a time to every purpose.
    --Eccl. iii. 1.

    The time of figs was not yet.
    --Mark xi. 13.

  6. Hour of travail, delivery, or parturition.

    She was within one month of her time.
    --Clarendon.

  7. Performance or occurrence of an action or event, considered with reference to repetition; addition of a number to itself; repetition; as, to double cloth four times; four times four, or sixteen.

    Summers three times eight save one.
    --Milton.

  8. The present life; existence in this world as contrasted with immortal life; definite, as contrasted with infinite, duration.

    Till time and sin together cease.
    --Keble.

  9. (Gram.) Tense.

  10. (Mus.) The measured duration of sounds; measure; tempo; rate of movement; rhythmical division; as, common or triple time; the musician keeps good time. Some few lines set unto a solemn time. --Beau. & Fl. Note: Time is often used in the formation of compounds, mostly self-explaining; as, time-battered, time-beguiling, time-consecrated, time-consuming, time-enduring, time-killing, time-sanctioned, time-scorner, time-wasting, time-worn, etc. Absolute time, time irrespective of local standards or epochs; as, all spectators see a lunar eclipse at the same instant of absolute time. Apparent time, the time of day reckoned by the sun, or so that 12 o'clock at the place is the instant of the transit of the sun's center over the meridian. Astronomical time, mean solar time reckoned by counting the hours continuously up to twenty-four from one noon to the next. At times, at distinct intervals of duration; now and then; as, at times he reads, at other times he rides. Civil time, time as reckoned for the purposes of common life in distinct periods, as years, months, days, hours, etc., the latter, among most modern nations, being divided into two series of twelve each, and reckoned, the first series from midnight to noon, the second, from noon to midnight. Common time (Mil.), the ordinary time of marching, in which ninety steps, each twenty-eight inches in length, are taken in one minute. Equation of time. See under Equation, n. In time.

    1. In good season; sufficiently early; as, he arrived in time to see the exhibition.

    2. After a considerable space of duration; eventually; finally; as, you will in time recover your health and strength. Mean time. See under 4th Mean. Quick time (Mil.), time of marching, in which one hundred and twenty steps, each thirty inches in length, are taken in one minute. Sidereal time. See under Sidereal. Standard time, the civil time that has been established by law or by general usage over a region or country. In England the standard time is Greenwich mean solar time. In the United States and Canada four kinds of standard time have been adopted by the railroads and accepted by the people, viz., Eastern, Central, Mountain, and Pacific time, corresponding severally to the mean local times of the 75th, 90th, 105th, and 120th meridians west from Greenwich, and being therefore five, six, seven, and eight hours slower than Greenwich time. Time ball, a ball arranged to drop from the summit of a pole, to indicate true midday time, as at Greenwich Observatory, England. --Nichol. Time bargain (Com.), a contract made for the sale or purchase of merchandise, or of stock in the public funds, at a certain time in the future. Time bill. Same as Time-table. [Eng.] Time book, a book in which is kept a record of the time persons have worked. Time detector, a timepiece provided with a device for registering and indicating the exact time when a watchman visits certain stations in his beat. Time enough, in season; early enough. ``Stanly at Bosworth field, . . . came time enough to save his life.'' --Bacon. Time fuse, a fuse, as for an explosive projectile, which can be so arranged as to ignite the charge at a certain definite interval after being itself ignited. Time immemorial, or Time out of mind. (Eng. Law) See under Immemorial. Time lock, a lock having clockwork attached, which, when wound up, prevents the bolt from being withdrawn when locked, until a certain interval of time has elapsed. Time of day, salutation appropriate to the times of the day, as ``good morning,'' ``good evening,'' and the like; greeting. To kill time. See under Kill, v. t. To make time.

      1. To gain time.

      2. To occupy or use (a certain) time in doing something; as, the trotting horse made fast time. To move against time, To run against time, or To go against time, to move, run, or go a given distance without a competitor, in the quickest possible time; or, to accomplish the greatest distance which can be passed over in a given time; as, the horse is to run against time. True time.

        1. Mean time as kept by a clock going uniformly.

        2. (Astron.) Apparent time as reckoned from the transit of the sun's center over the meridian.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
time

Old English tima "limited space of time," from Proto-Germanic *timon- "time" (cognates: Old Norse timi "time, proper time," Swedish timme "an hour"), from PIE *di-mon-, suffixed form of root *da- "cut up, divide" (see tide (n.)).\n

\nAbstract sense of "time as an indefinite continuous duration" is recorded from late 14c. Personified since at least 1509 as an aged bald man (but with a forelock) carrying a scythe and an hour-glass. In English, a single word encompasses time as "extent" and "point" (French temps/fois, German zeit/mal) as well as "hour" (as in "what time is it?" compare French heure, German Uhr). Extended senses such as "occasion," "the right time," "leisure," or times (v.) "multiplied by" developed in Old and Middle English, probably as a natural outgrowth of such phrases as "He commends her a hundred times to God" (Old French La comande a Deu cent foiz).\n to have a good time ( = a time of enjoyment) was common in Eng. from c 1520 to c 1688; it was app. retained in America, whence readopted in Britain in 19th c.

[OED]

\nTime of day (now mainly preserved in negation, i.e. what someone won't give you if he doesn't like you) was a popular 17c. salutation (as in "Good time of day vnto your Royall Grace," "Richard III," I.iii.18). The times "the current age" is from 1590s. Behind the times "old-fashioned" is recorded from 1831. Times as the name of a newspaper dates from 1788.\n

\nTime warp first attested 1954; time-traveling in the science fiction sense first recorded 1895 in H.G. Wells' "The Time Machine." Time capsule first recorded 1938, in reference to the one "deemed capable of resisting the effects of time for five thousand years preserving an account of universal achievements embedded in the grounds of the New York World's fair."\n\nJones [archaeologist of A.D. 5139] potters about for a while in the region which we have come to regard as New York, finds countless ruins, but little of interest to the historian except a calcified direction sheet to something called a "Time Capsule." Jones finds the capsule but cannot open it, and decides, after considerable prying at the lid, that it is merely evidence of an archaic tribal ceremony called a "publicity gag" of which he has already found many examples.

["Princeton Alumni Weekly," April 14, 1939]

\nTo do time "serve a prison sentence" is from 1865. Time frame is attested by 1964; time-limit is from 1880. About time, ironically for "long past due time," is recorded from 1920.
time

Old English getimian "to happen, befall," from time (n.). Meaning "to appoint a time" (of an action, etc.) is attested from c.1300; sense of "to measure or record the time of" (a race, event, etc.) is first attested 1660s. Related: Timed; timing.

Wiktionary
time

interj. (context tennis English) (non-gloss definition: Reminder by the umpire for the players to continue playing after their pause.) n. 1 (context uncountable English) The inevitable progression into the future with the passing of present events into the past. 2 A duration of time. 3 # (context uncountable English) A quantity of availability of duration. 4 # (context countable English) A measurement of a quantity of time; a numerical or general indication of a length of progression. vb. 1 To measure or record the time, duration, or rate of. 2 To choose when something begins or how long it lasts. 3 (context obsolete English) To keep or beat time; to proceed or move in time. 4 (context obsolete English) To pass time; to delay. 5 To regulate as to time; to accompany, or agree with, in time of movement. 6 To measure, as in music or harmony.

WordNet
time
  1. v. measure the time or duration of an event or action or the person who performs an action in a certain period of time; "he clocked the runners" [syn: clock]

  2. assign a time for an activity or event; "The candidate carefully timed his appearance at the disaster scene"

  3. set the speed, duration, or execution of; "we time the process to manufacture our cars very precisely"

  4. regulate or set the time of; "time the clock"

  5. adjust so that a force is applied an an action occurs at the desired time; "The good player times his swing so as to hit the ball squarely"

time
  1. n. an instance or single occasion for some event; "this time he succeeded"; "he called four times"; "he could do ten at a clip" [syn: clip]

  2. an indefinite period (usually marked by specific attributes or activities); "he waited a long time"; "the time of year for planting"; "he was a great actor is his time"

  3. a period of time considered as a resource under your control and sufficient to accomplish something; "take time to smell the roses"; "I didn't have time to finish"; "it took more than half my time"

  4. a suitable moment; "it is time to go"

  5. the continuum of experience in which events pass from the future through the present to the past

  6. the time as given by a clock; "do you know what time it is?"; "the time is 10 o'clock" [syn: clock time]

  7. the fourth coordinate that is required (along with three spatial dimensions) to specify a physical event [syn: fourth dimension]

  8. a person's experience on a particular occasion; "he had a time holding back the tears"; "they had a good time together"

  9. rhythm as given by division into parts of equal time [syn: meter, metre]

  10. the period of time a prisoner is imprisoned; "he served a prison term of 15 months"; "his sentence was 5 to 10 years"; "he is doing time in the county jail" [syn: prison term, sentence]

Gazetteer
Time, IL -- U.S. village in Illinois
Population (2000): 29
Housing Units (2000): 14
Land area (2000): 0.436141 sq. miles (1.129599 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.436141 sq. miles (1.129599 sq. km)
FIPS code: 75419
Located within: Illinois (IL), FIPS 17
Location: 39.561160 N, 90.722947 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Time, IL
Time
Wikipedia
Time (disambiguation)

Time is a common term for the experience of duration and a fundamental quantity of measuring systems.

Time also may refer to:

Time (Unix)

'''time''' is a command in the Unix operating systems. It is used to determine the duration of execution of a particular command.

Time (Mercyful Fate album)

Time is the fourth studio album by the Danish heavy metal band Mercyful Fate. It was released on 25 October 1994 by Metal Blade Records.

Time (The Young Ones)

"Time" was the tenth episode of British sitcom The Young Ones. It was written by Ben Elton, Rik Mayall and Lise Mayer, and directed by Paul Jackson. It was first aired on BBC Two on 5 June 1984.

Time

Time is the indefinite continued progress of existence and events that occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future. Time is a component quantity of various measurements used to sequence events, to compare the duration of events or the intervals between them, and to quantify rates of change of quantities in material reality or in the conscious experience. Time is often referred to as the fourth dimension, along with the three spatial dimensions.

Time has long been a major subject of study in religion, philosophy, and science, but defining it in a manner applicable to all fields without circularity has consistently eluded scholars. Nevertheless, diverse fields such as business, industry, sports, the sciences, and the performing arts all incorporate some notion of time into their respective measuring systems. Two contrasting viewpoints on time divide many prominent philosophers. One view is that time is part of the fundamental structure of the universe—a dimension independent of events, in which events occur in sequence. Sir Isaac Newton subscribed to this realist view, and hence it is sometimes referred to as Newtonian time. The opposing view is that time does not refer to any kind of "container" that events and objects "move through", nor to any entity that "flows", but that it is instead part of a fundamental intellectual structure (together with space and number) within which humans sequence and compare events. This second view, in the tradition of Gottfried Leibniz and Immanuel Kant, holds that time is neither an event nor a thing, and thus is not itself measurable nor can it be travelled.

Time in physics is unambiguously operationally defined as "what a clock reads." Time is one of the seven fundamental physical quantities in both the International System of Units and International System of Quantities. Time is used to define other quantities—such as velocity—so defining time in terms of such quantities would result in circularity of definition. An operational definition of time, wherein one says that observing a certain number of repetitions of one or another standard cyclical event (such as the passage of a free-swinging pendulum) constitutes one standard unit such as the second, is highly useful in the conduct of both advanced experiments and everyday affairs of life. The operational definition leaves aside the question whether there is something called time, apart from the counting activity just mentioned, that flows and that can be measured. Investigations of a single continuum called spacetime bring questions about space into questions about time, questions that have their roots in the works of early students of natural philosophy.

Furthermore, it may be that there is a subjective component to time, but whether or not time itself is "felt", as a sensation, or is a judgment, is a matter of debate.

Temporal measurement has occupied scientists and technologists, and was a prime motivation in navigation and astronomy. Periodic events and periodic motion have long served as standards for units of time. Examples include the apparent motion of the sun across the sky, the phases of the moon, the swing of a pendulum, and the beat of a heart. Currently, the international unit of time, the second, is defined by measuring the electronic transition frequency of caesium atoms (see below). Time is also of significant social importance, having economic value (" time is money") as well as personal value, due to an awareness of the limited time in each day and in human life spans.

Time (The Revelator)

Time (The Revelator) is the third full-length album by Gillian Welch. All songs were written by Welch together with David Rawlings and were recorded in Nashville, Tennessee. "I Want To Sing That Rock and Roll" was recorded live at the Ryman Auditorium as part of the sessions for the concert film, Down from the Mountain, all the rest of the tracks were recorded at RCA Studio B, Nashville, Tennessee.

Time (metadata)

Under some metadata standards, time is a representation term used to specify a time of day in the ISO 8601 time format.

Note that Time should not be confused with the DateAndTime representation term which requires that both the date and time to be supplied.

Time (magazine)

Time (styled within the magazine as TIME) is an American weekly news magazine published in New York City. It was founded in 1923 and for decades was dominated by Henry Luce, who built a highly profitable stable of magazines.

A European edition (Time Europe, formerly known as Time Atlantic) is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition (Time Asia) is based in Hong Kong. The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands, is based in Sydney, Australia. In December 2008, Time discontinued publishing a Canadian advertiser edition.

Time has the world's largest circulation for a weekly news magazine, and has a readership of 26 million, 20 million of which are based in the United States.

As of 2012, it had a circulation of 3.3 million making it the eleventh most circulated magazine in the United States reception room circuit, and the second most circulated weekly behind People. As of 2015, its circulation was 3,036,602.

Richard Stengel was the managing editor from May 2006 to October 2013, when he joined the U.S. State Department. Nancy Gibbs has been the managing editor since October 2013.

Time (Electric Light Orchestra album)

Time is the ninth studio album by English rock band Electric Light Orchestra (credited as ELO), released in 1981 through Jet Records. It topped the UK Albums Chart for two weeks. Time is a concept album written about a man from the 1980s who is taken to the year 2095, where he is confronted by the dichotomy between technological advancement and a longing for past romance.

As a work of synthpop, Time signaled a departure from the band's sound by emphasizing electronics over its usual orchestra. It is also the band's second concept album, the first being Eldorado in 1974. The music video created for its lead single " Hold On Tight" was the most expensive ever made to that point, with a budget of approximately £40,000. Four more singles followed the album's release: " Twilight", " Ticket to the Moon" (backed with " Here Is the News"), " Rain Is Falling", and " The Way Life's Meant to Be".

According to the book The Time Traveler's Almanac, Time is the first major concept album devoted entirely to time travel. In later years, the album attracted a cult following from those interested in retrofuturism, becoming the subject of admiration for some popular musicians. In 2001, a CD reissue included three additional tracks that were originally left off the album.

Time (Pink Floyd song)

"Time" is the fourth track from the English progressive rock band Pink Floyd's 1973 album The Dark Side of the Moon, and the only song on the album credited to all four members of the band, though the lyrics were written by Roger Waters. It is the final Pink Floyd song credited to all four members and the last to feature Richard Wright on lead vocals until " Wearing the Inside Out" on The Division Bell. This song is about how time can slip by, but many people do not realise it until it is too late. Roger Waters got the idea when he realised he was no longer preparing for anything in life, but was right in the middle of it. He has described this realisation taking place at ages 28 and 29 in various interviews. It is noted for its long introductory passage of clocks chiming and alarms ringing, recorded as a quadrophonic test by Alan Parsons, not specifically for the album.

Time (Yugoslav band)

Time was a rock band from Yugoslavia that was formed in 1971 by Dado Topić ( vocals) after leaving his previous band Korni Grupa. The original lineup consisted of, in addition to Topić, Tihomir Pop Asanović ( organ), Vedran Božić ( guitar), Mario Mavrin ( bass), Ratko Divjak ( drums) and Brane Lambert Živković ( piano and flute). Time frequently changed lineup and after three albums and many tours disbanded in late 1977 and Dado Topić started his solo career. In 1998 and 2001, Time reunited to play a limited number of live concerts. Now they still play together as a rock trio.

Time played a style of progressive rock with some jazz influences, perhaps similar to musical notions expressed by King Crimson, Genesis or Steely Dan. The first album has a prominent Hammond organ, piano and flute. "Time II" has a harder sound and includes several ballads. The third album may be considered to have a jazz- funk production style. The most popular songs were "Da li znaš da te volim", "Rock 'n' roll u Beogradu", "Istina mašina" and others.

Time (David Bowie song)

"Time" is a song by David Bowie. Written in New Orleans in November 1972 during the American leg of Bowie's first Ziggy Stardust tour, it was recorded in London in January 1973 and released as the opening track on side two of the album Aladdin Sane that April. An edited version of the song supplanted the release of the single " Drive-In Saturday" in the United States and Japan.

Time (TV series)

Time is a 2006 documentary television series first broadcast on BBC Four in the United Kingdom. It is written and presented by Michio Kaku.

Time (bicycles)

TIME Sport International is a French manufacturer of bicycles and cycling equipment, including bicycle frames, cycling shoes, clipless bicycle pedals, cranksets, and gloves.

Time (2006 film)

Time is the thirteenth feature film by South Korean director Kim Ki-duk. It premiered at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival on June 30, 2006.

Time (Fleetwood Mac album)

Time is the 16th studio album by British/ American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released in 1995. This album features a unique line-up for the band featuring the addition of former Traffic guitarist Dave Mason and country vocalist Bekka Bramlett (daughter of Delaney and Bonnie). Lindsey Buckingham, who had left Fleetwood Mac in 1987, makes an appearance as a backing vocalist on one track, but Time is the first and only Fleetwood Mac album since 1974's Heroes Are Hard to Find not to feature any contribution from Stevie Nicks. The album also featured drummer Mick Fleetwood's first lead vocal on the seven-minute "These Strange Times", produced by Duran Duran producer John Jones, and written with Beach Boys co-writer Ray Kennedy. The band did not tour following the album's release in October 1995, but had (without Christine McVie) toured from July to December 1994, and again from April to September 1995.

Within a year this band line-up had split, with Mason, Bramlett and Billy Burnette all leaving the band. Bramlett and Burnette recorded the Bekka & Billy album together in 1997, the same year Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks rejoined Fleetwood Mac.

The album peaked at #47 in the UK, but failed to chart on the US Billboard Top 200 (the band's first album to do so).

Time (Third Day album)

Time is the third studio album from Christian rock band Third Day. It was released on August 24, 1999 by Essential Records.

The album features ten songs chosen from more than 30 the band had managed to write during their tour the previous year. Some of the songs left out can be heard in the album Southern Tracks, which was released with limited copies of Time.

The album is also a return to the band's original southern rock roots, after their departure to a grungier style on their previous album. According to their website "with Conspiracy No. 5, we were really setting out to prove something. With Time, we just tried to be ourselves."

Time (Lionel Richie album)

Time is Lionel Richie's fifth solo album, released on June 23, 1998. It was a commercial disappointment and selling far fewer copies than any of his previous material.

Time (Steeleye Span album)

Time is an album by Steeleye Span. The album was released in 1996, after a seven-year hiatus. The impetus for the album was a 25th anniversary reunion tour the year before, during which most of the former members of the band performed together. Maddy Prior was experiencing voice problems so she spoke to Gay Woods, a founding member who had left the band after the first album, to rejoin. Woods initially resisted this move, since she had not performed publicly for some time, but Prior eventually prevailed and Woods returned to the band. The result was only the second Steeleye Span album to feature two female singers, which was used to very good effect on the ironic "Old Maid in the Garrett" and to a lesser extent on "The Prickly Bush" and "The Cutty Wren". Both, Prior and Woods, provide lead vocals on different songs. Priors' voice troubles are reflected in her musical choices on this album; she generally sings less powerfully and in a lower range, but still effectively. Woods also introduced a few Irish elements to the bands' repertoire, including the "Old Maid in the Garrett/Tam Lin reel" and her Bodhran. This album was to be Priors' last album with Steeleye Span until 2004’s They Called Her Babylon.

In some ways, the album represents a revival of Steeleye Span. After a 16-year period, during which the band released only three albums, the band entered a more productive phase that continues down the present; producing an album once every two years, including two in 2004.

The song "Corbies" is a remake of " Twa Corbies", which appears on Hark! The Village Wait. The theme of "The Cutty Wren" had also been explored before, in the song "The King" on Please to See the King, as well in "Hunting the Wren" on Live at Last. In this version, the band experimented with a complex scheme of vocal and instrumental placement, which is best appreciated with headphones. Overall, this version is much darker than "The King" and somewhat menacing.

The album's sound is rather fuller and more lush than their earlier albums, thanks in part to the addition of Harries' keyboards on several sounds, most notably "Corbies" and "The Elf Knight".

Time (Peter Andre album)

Time is the third album released by Australian singer-songwriter Peter Andre.

Time (Marion song)

Time is a single by Marion released early 1996.

Time (Richard Carpenter album)

Time is the first solo album by American musician Richard Carpenter. Dionne Warwick and Dusty Springfield sang on the album, on the songs "In Love Alone" and "Something in Your Eyes", respectively. The song "When Time Was All We Had" is dedicated to Richard's sister, Karen. It was later included on the 3-CD compilation The Ultimate Collection.

Time (Kim Wilde song)

"Time" is the second single from Love Moves, the 1990 album by Kim Wilde.

The song was slightly remixed from the version on the album for its release as a single and was extended for the 12" and CD-single formats. It was released exclusively in the United Kingdom where it stalled at the bottom end of the chart, but managed to remain there for three weeks.

Time (musical)

Time is a musical with a book and lyrics by Dave Clark and David Soames, music by Jeff Daniels, and additional songs by David Pomeranz.

Time (Arashi album)

Time is the seventh studio album of the Japanese boy band Arashi. The album was released on July 11, 2007 in Japan under their record label J Storm in two editions: a limited 2CD version and a regular CD version.

Time (The Alan Parsons Project song)

"Time" is a song released in 1981 as a single by the Alan Parsons Project. It was from their 1980 album The Turn of a Friendly Card. In the U.S., the song peaked at #15 on the Billboard and spent two weeks at #14 on Cash Box, making it the group's second most successful single. Cash Box ranked it as the 94th biggest hit of 1981. In Canada, the song peaked at #30.

The song was the first Alan Parsons Project song (and single) to feature Eric Woolfson as lead vocalist, and one of the group's few songs in which Alan Parsons' own voice can be heard singing (background/counterpoint vocals).

TIME (command)

In computing, TIME is a command in DOS, OS/2 and Windows that is used to display and set the current system time of the operating system. This command is available in command line interpreters ( shells) such as [[COMMAND.COM]], [[CMD.EXE]], 4DOS, 4OS2 and 4NT.

The command is also available in the DEC RT-11 operating system. In Unix, the [[Date (Unix)|date]] command displays and sets both the time and date, in a similar manner.

Time (rapper)

Chris Steele, better known by his stage nameTime, is an American indie hip hop artist from Denver, Colorado. He is one of the original members of Dirty Laboratory Productions. He is also one half of the hip hop group Calm. Aside from music, Steele is also an investigative journalist.

Time (Clock of the Heart)

"Time (Clock of the Heart)" is a song by the British new wave band Culture Club, released as a stand-alone single in most of the world and as the second single from their debut album Kissing to Be Clever in North America. Following on the heels of the band's global #1, " Do You Really Want to Hurt Me", "Time (Clock of the Heart)" peaked at number three on the UK Singles Chart, selling over 500,000 copies in the UK. In the United States, the song matched the #2 peak of its predecessor on the Billboard Hot 100, kept from #1 by " Flashdance... What a Feeling" by Irene Cara.

In Europe and United Kingdom, it was a stand-alone single, released in November 1982. For this market, its first inclusion on a Culture Club album was on their 1987 compilation, called This Time: The First Four Years.

In a retrospective review of the song, Allmusic journalist Stewart Mason wrote: "Of all of Culture Club's early hits, Time (Clock of the Heart) has probably aged the best. Boy George drops the cryptic self-mythology long enough to deliver a tender, heartfelt lyric on lost love."

The music video has been released in two versions. The only difference was a scene where the group is watching TV, along with vocalist Helen Terry. In one version, a Christmas tree is shown. In the other, the tree is removed. This was because of the date of release for certain markets. The "Christmas" version (which is on the 2005 DVD "Greatest Hits"), was for European countries and the "regular version" was for the other markets, where the song was released in spring 1983.

The US single was released with the B-side being an instrumental version of the song called "Romance Beyond the Alphabet", which not only removed the vocals but at least one layer of melody as well.

Time (Bibi Zhou album)

Time is the fourth studio album from Chinese singer and songwriter Bibi Zhou. It was released simultaneously in mainland China and Taiwan on July 8, 2009.

Time (INXS song)

"Time" is the third single from the 1993 album Full Moon, Dirty Hearts, by Australian rock band INXS. The song was written by Andrew Farriss and Michael Hutchence.

The single was only ever released in Japan and Australia as a "Souvenir EP" to coincide with the "Dirty Honeymoon Tour" in Australia and the Southern Hemisphere.

Time (1999 film)

Time (1999) is a Tamil film directed by Geetha Krishna. The film stars Prabhu Deva, Simran and Radhika Chaudhry in the lead roles. The film's score and soundtrack are composed by Ilaiyaraaja.

Time (Atlantic Starr album)

Time is the eleventh album by R&B band Atlantic Starr, released in 1994. The album was a commercial disappointment and the single "I'll Remember You" only made it to the fifties on Billboard's R&B and pop singles charts.

Time (Hootie & the Blowfish song)

"Time" is a song by American rock group Hootie & the Blowfish. It was released in November 1995 as the fourth single from their breakthrough album, Cracked Rear View.

Time (2007 film)

Time is a 2007 Malayalam film directed by Shaji Kailas. The movie features Suresh Gopi in a double role together with Vimala Raman, Padmapriya Janakiraman in the lead roles. The music and background score were composed by Rahulraj. The film didn't do well at the box office. The film was dubbed into Telugu as Police ante Veedera and Hindi as Time - Maut Ki Ghadi.

Time (Music for Pleasure song)

"Time" is a single by the new wave band Music for Pleasure. It was released in 1983 on Polydor.

Time (Steve Howe album)

Time is an instrumental album released by Steve Howe in 2011.

Time (Jakob Bro album)

Time is a studio album by Danish jazz guitarist Jakob Bro. The album is the second part of a trilogy which also includes Balladeering (2009) and December Song (2013). The trilogy was nominated for the Nordic Council Music Prize 2014.

Time (Chase & Status song)

"Time" is the fourth overall, and third official, single taken from British drum-and-bass duo Chase & Status' second studio album, No More Idols. The single features vocals from British singer Delilah. The single was released in the United Kingdom as a digital download on 29 April 2011. During March 2011, Chase & Status ran an online competition for fans to remix the track, with the winner's remix appearing on the digital bundle extended play. It was revealed on 31 March 2011 that the Kev Willow Remix had been crowned the winner of the competition, with the Primus Palas Remix and Enei Remix serving as the runners up.

Time (Freddie Mercury song)

"Time" is a 1986 song recorded by Freddie Mercury, along with " In My Defence", for Dave Clark's musical of the same name. Even though Mercury did not appear in the musical itself, both songs were included on the cast album, and "Time" was also released as a separate single, backed by an instrumental version of the song, and reached #32 on the UK Singles Chart. The single version was later included in the 2000 box set The Solo Collection and the 2006 compilation album Lover of Life, Singer of Songs: The Very Best of Freddie Mercury Solo.

The song video was shot at the Dominion Theatre, London, where the play was being staged since the world premiere of 9 April 1986. Since a matinée and evening performance were scheduled, the only time left for shooting was the early morning: so Mercury and Austrian producer Rudi Dolezal had to meet there at 6.00 in the morning.

Time (Dave Clark album)

Dave Clark's "Time" is a concept album based on Dave Clark's 1986 musical Time. It was released in vinyl as a double LP (Catalog number: AMPM 1, EQ 5003) and in cassette format. It sold over two million copies and spawned four hit singles. Another song, " In My Defence", became a posthumous hit for Freddie Mercury in 1992.

The album had never been transferred onto digital format until May 8th, 2012, when a restored edition of the soundtrack, remastered by Adam Vanryne and produced by Dave Clark, was released on iTunes to commemorate the musical's 25th anniversary. This reissue also features a 20-page color booklet.

Time (Izabo song)

Time is a song by Israeli band Izabo. The song represented Israel at the Eurovision Song Contest 2012, but did not make it to the final. The song is described as a pop song with an oriental influence.

Two versions of the song exist. One version is in English with the chorus in Hebrew and it was the version which was used in the Eurovision Song Contest. The other version is entirely in English. There are also two versions of the video. There is a preview video which is set in a circus where the band perform the song and are joined by various circus acts and a stop motion video which gives the effect of various facial images of the band being put up and taken down at such a high speed that it looks like they are being animated.

Time (Bunny Rugs album)

Time is a studio album by Jamaican musician Bunny Rugs, the lead singer of reggae band Third World. The album is released on September 11, 2012 by Raw Edge Productions/ VPAL.

Time is Bunny's sixth solo album and it contains 15 tracks. According to Bunny, Time is a mixture of lover's rock and social commentary.

The album title Time came from Bunny's own belief which is, "if you don't have respect for time, you don't have respect for yourself." In an interview in April 2011, Bunny Rugs stated that he had already been working on the album for three years.

"Land We Love", this song shows that Bunny’s tribute to his homeland Jamaica, its 50th year of independence. Not only reggae lovers, “It’s Time”, “Just Deny”, “We’ve Got The Formula” and “Settling Down”, these plaintive love songs in the album are attractive to soul aficionados as well.

Time (Time album)

Time is the debut studio album by the Yugoslavian rock group Time, released in 1972 by Jugoton.

The album was polled in 1998 as the 3rd on the list of 100 greatest Yugoslav rock and pop albums in the book YU 100: najbolji albumi jugoslovenske rok i pop muzike (YU 100: The Best albums of Yugoslav pop and rock music).

Time (EP)

Time (stylized as TiME) is the seventh EP by South Korean boy band Beast. It was released on October 20, 2014, as a special mini-album to commemorate the 5th anniversary of the group's debut. It won Record of the Year award at the 2015 Seoul Music Awards.

Time (Uzari & Maimuna song)

"Time" is a song performed by Belarusian singer-songwriter Uzari and violinist Maimuna. The song represented Belarus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2015.

Time (Tom Waits song)

Time is a song by Tom Waits appearing on his eighth studio album Rain Dogs. It was written by Waits and was recorded in 1985 at RCA Studios in New York City.

It was covered by Tori Amos for her 2001 concept album Strange Little Girls.

Time (K. Michelle song)

"Time" is a song by American R&B recording artist K. Michelle from her third studio album More Issues Than Vogue (2016). It was released to YouTube and the iTunes Store on February 25, 2016, by Atlantic Records as the second promotional single from the album.

Time (TVXQ album)

Time (stylized as TIME) is the sixth Japanese studio album (twelfth overall) by South Korean pop duo Tohoshinki, released by Avex Trax on March 6, 2013. The record was released in four physical versions, each with a theme cover – Version A (Past), a CD+DVD version with music videos; Version B (Present), another CD+DVD version with off-shot movies and live performances; Version C (Future), a CD only version with two bonus tracks; and Version D, a Bigeast fan club limited edition. Musically, Time is primarily an electropop album, with dubstep, electronic dance music, and R&B influences.

Time was Tohoshinki's fastest-selling studio album, selling over 160,000 copies on the first day and over 240,000 copies within the first week of release. The album was also Tohoshinki's third consecutive album to debut at the top of the Oricon Albums Chart and the Billboard Japan Top Albums.

The album spawned four hit singles, all of which peaked within the Top 2 on the Oricon Weekly Charts and sold over 150,000 copies each.

Time (Rod Stewart album)

Time is the twenty-eighth studio album by Rod Stewart, it was released on 3 May 2013 in the UK, on 8 May 2013 in Japan under the title , and on 7 May 2013 in the US and Canada. The album entered the top 10 in the US and entered the UK Albums Chart at No. 1, setting a new British record for the longest gap between chart-topping albums by an artist, as his last studio album to reach the top spot was A Night on the Town in 1976. On 16 August 2013, the album was certified Platinum in the UK. Overall, the album was the No. 7 best-selling album of 2013 in the UK. In the United States, the album has sold 141,000 copies as of September 2015.

Time (xkcd)

"Time" is the 1,190th strip of Randall Munroe's webcomic xkcd. Beginning with a single frame published at midnight on March 25, 2013, the image was updated every 30 minutes until March 30, 2013, where it was updated periodically every hour for 118 days (123 days in total), ending on July 26 with a total of 3,099 unique images. Each image represented a single frame in a larger story, essentially making the comic a video with an extremely low frame rate.

The strip's story, set 11,000 years in the future in the basin of the Mediterranean Sea during a supposed recurrence of the Zanclean flood, features two characters journeying up-hill in order to discover where the rising water is originating from. By the end of the story, the characters return home in order to save their people. Referred to by Glen Tickle of Geekosystem as Munroe's "magnum opus", "Time" attracted significant attention and was well received online, and several projects, wikis and web communities were built about it. In 2014, it won the Hugo Award in the Best Graphic Story category.

Time (Mikky Ekko album)

Time is the debut studio album by American recording artist Mikky Ekko. The album was released worldwide on January 16, 2015 by RCA Records, except for the United States where it was released on January 20. Mikky Ekko rose to fame with his 2013 Rihanna collaboration " Stay". Following the release of "Stay", RCA Records wanted to capitalize on its success, said Mikky Ekko: "From the label, people on Rihanna's side. I think we speculated a little bit about going out on the tour with Rih, and I ultimately felt like the songs weren't there. And I said I'm not gonna go out to promote an album that could be better. And I know the sort of the endless tweaking that can happen, but I feel like we took the time to put together a really, really strong album full of songs that at least for me represents exactly where I am." The song ’Smile' was used in the closing parts of season two episode four of American supernatural drama 'The Originals'

Usage examples of "time".

Scott Velie commenced his prepared speech as he sat, holding in abeyance his moment for rising, which was timed to occur at the delivery of a key sentence halfway into his brief statement.

CHAPTER 12 Winter Amidst of the Mountains In all this they had enough to be busy with, so that time hung not heavy on their hands, and the shadow of the Quest was nowise burdensome to them, since they wotted that they had to abide the wearing of the days till spring was come with fresh tidings.

It took time for them to respond to the commands and directives of those abiding within them.

David waited silently, allowing Abie all the time she needed to answer his question.

At the same time, the desperation I heard in some voices made me wonder if Natch had been right to question our ability to make changes.

Will pegged as physically being able to visit those other realms, he had a hard time accepting their existence and his ability to travel to them.

He did manage to use his fire magic on a few of them, setting their shirts and hair ablaze, and that forced the rest to reconsider their attack for a time.

It was only natural that once everyone had had time to adjust to the tragic void created by his departure, they would turn to that one person who could so ably fill the gap, that one person whose standards of excellence were above reproach, that one person whom they could rely upon to continue the noble traditions of the fair-Irina Stoddard!

In offering a few hints for the domestic management of these abnormal conditions, we would at the same time remark, that, while health may be regained by skillful treatment, recovery will be gradual.

For a long time the abnormality was not believed to exist, and some of the observers denied the proof by postmortem examination of any of the cases so diagnosed, but there is at present no doubt of the fact,--three, four, and five testicles having been found at autopsies.

He turned to his brother, to include him by explanation, aware that at a time like this he was reminded forcefully that he had no function aboard the ship.

And in those times it was well to have the strong arms and sharp blades of any fighters available, for the Lowlands to the north were all aboil and the border was all aflame from end to end.

Then all the satisfaction she had derived from what she had heard Madame Bourdieu say departed, and she went off furious and ashamed, as if soiled and threatened by all the vague abominations which she had for some time felt around her, without knowing, however, whence came the little chill which made her shudder as with dread.

Munday the 25 being Christmas day, we began to drinke water aboord, but at night, the Master caused vs to have some Beere, and so on board we had diverse times now and then some Beere, but on shore none at all.

At that time, the Aboriginal allowance exceeded the allowance most students got.