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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
beat
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
beat a hasty retreat
▪ I saw my aunt coming and beat a hasty retreat.
beat crime
▪ new measures to beat car crime
beat its wings (=move them in a regular way while flying)
▪ The female beats her wings as fast as 500 times a second.
beat off/fight off competition
▪ She beat off competition from dozens of other candidates to get the job.
beaten senseless
▪ He had been beaten senseless.
beating drums
▪ 1,000 people marched, beating drums and carrying flags.
beat/overcome/defy the odds (=succeed despite great difficulties)
▪ The baby, born sixteen weeks too early, defied the odds and is celebrating her first birthday.
break/beat a record (=do better or be greater than an existing record)
▪ He broke the world record twice.
deservedly beaten
▪ Arsenal were deservedly beaten 2–1 by Leeds.
fat/phat beats (=music that sounds good)
▪ Check out these fat beats.
force/frighten/beat etc sb into submission
▪ Napoleon threatened to starve the country into submission.
knock/beat sb unconscious
▪ Levin was knocked unconscious by the impact.
let yourself be beaten/persuaded/fooled etc
▪ I stupidly let myself be persuaded to take part in a live debate.
pulse beat
▪ The rhythm was steady, as regular as a pulse beat.
sb's pulse beats
▪ His pulse began to beat with a fierce rhythm.
sb’s heart beats
▪ Her heart was beating fast.
set/break/beat a world record
▪ He set a new world record for the marathon.
stab/beat/kick sb to death
▪ He was stabbed to death in an attack outside his home.
take a hammering/beating (=be forced to accept defeat or a bad situation)
▪ Small businesses took a hammering in the last recession.
the rain beats/lashes (=it falls or hits something with a lot of force)
▪ Isabel listened to the rain beating down.
the sun beats down/blazes down (=shines with a lot of light and heat)
▪ The sun beats down on us as we work.
whip/whisk/beat the cream (=make it thicker by beating it)
▪ Whip the cream until it is thick and light.
wings beat
▪ Their great wings beat slowly.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
bush
▪ Don't beat about the bush.
▪ A whole army of Girl Scouts out beating the bush.
▪ Eliot did not beat about the bush.
▪ Neither will beat the bushes for new ways to earn or save money.
▪ She winced at their infelicities, at the clumsy way they beat about the bush.
▪ It was Moua who organized housing for Hmong newcomers, Moua who beat the bushes for jobs.
▪ I am not a person to beat about the bush.
▪ Let us stop beating about the bush.
death
▪ Women are told it's prostitution or a beating, or death.
▪ Why, given what had happened, I might as well have beaten Papa to death with a club.
▪ So she locked them in a coat closet where they beat each other half to death in the dark for twenty minutes.
▪ In the minutes that followed, McDuffie was beaten to death by a group of Dade County police officers.
▪ We don't see gays being beaten to death in our country because of their sexuality.
▪ In Westport, a 3-year-old boy was beaten to death after wetting his pants, authorities allege.
▪ The 76 year old pensioner was beaten to death last Thursday in the pet shop where he worked part time.
▪ And when he himself was nearly beaten to death.
drum
▪ Now, when Tallis listened hard, she could hear a drum being beaten as a warning.
▪ Gary reaches for a drum and beats it briefly and harshly.
▪ Trumpets sounded, drums beat, whips cracked, mules squealed, and teamsters cursed.
▪ The jungle drums were beating again.
▪ Trumpets blew all the time, and drums were beating.
▪ In every village drums were beating, soldiers marching.
egg
▪ Make a well in the centre of the mixture and add the melted margarine and the beaten egg.
▪ Add the remaining flour mixture to the shortening mixture alternating with the beaten egg.
▪ Sieve the cottage cheese, or pur e in a food processor or liquidiser and beat in the egg and milk.
▪ Combine beaten egg with mayonnaise in small bowl.
▪ Season, remove from the heat and beat in the egg. 7.
▪ At medium speed, beat in eggs, one at a time, beating for two minutes after each addition.
▪ Cream the margarine and sugar and beat in the eggs.
▪ Brush lightly with beaten egg white and sprinkle with sugar, if desired.
head
▪ And you can't do that by beating them over the head with clichéd, didactic behaviour.
▪ The members know perfectly well that they will be beaten over the head with any yes vote at the next election.
▪ Talking to Rourke Deveraugh was like beating her head against a hard wooden post.
▪ Passing beneath it, Crevecoeur was reminded of a violent storm of hail beating upon his head.
▪ Elsewhere, individual protesters were being held down while Mosley's guards beat them over the head and about the face.
▪ They skimmed low, passing so close to Simon that their wings beat at his head.
▪ She said he tied her up and beat her in the head with a hammer.
heart
▪ Piers took a step towards her, and she felt her body tense and her heart begin to beat quickly.
▪ Just being there made my heart beat faster.
▪ People can take part by doing any physical activity that makes the heart beat faster and lasts for 15 minutes.
▪ My head was resting against his chest and I felt his heart beating against my eye and cheek.
▪ The heart beats thick, Big trout muscle out of the dead cold.
▪ His heart beat dully at the very thought of what he was about to do.
▪ And in Dusseldorf police said a member of the Republican party suffered a heart attack after being beaten up by demonstrators.
▪ Tots fell silent; birds stopped chirping; you could hear hearts beating amid the chattering teeth.
path
▪ The students - and their professors - beat a path to his door.
▪ Most of the sites the company has in mind to visit are far off any beaten path.
▪ It has become such an attraction that local tour operators are beating a path to its door.
▪ Soon it is not going to be so easy to get off the beaten path.
▪ The company is now just waiting for the world to beat a well-worn path to its door.
▪ To say that Crenshaw is off the beaten path is an understatement.
▪ They were beating a clear path.
▪ I called on the Birth Grandmother to help me beat a path through the honyaek to the windows.
record
▪ If the backs had taken all their chances, Quins might have beaten Gloucester's record 80-point Cup win over Exeter.
▪ You hear the first two beats of a record and you kind of get a sense of it.
▪ We want to beat his record and any others that are going ... and to win for his family.
▪ History is taking a beating and sacrosanct tour records are being kept in pencil.
▪ It took more than a thousand participants to make it happen, beating the previous record by thirty-five.
▪ The 11-month total beats the previous full-year record, set in 1993.
▪ Jurassic Park beat the record set by Batman Returns, which took £31.8m in its first four days.
▪ He cleared 2.68m to beat the previous record of 2.67m set by Paul Parker of Cumbria.
retreat
▪ Then, thanking him, I beat a hasty retreat to the sacristy door and knocked.
▪ Appointees interviewed repeated a familiar theme: They all loved their jobs but are beating a retreat without regret.
▪ Any females which are not ripe will either stay away or beat a hasty retreat.
▪ With decks awash with diesel we beat a hasty retreat back to Lerwick.
▪ They were forced to beat a hasty retreat and arrived at their rendezvous with Morris's patrol on time.
▪ Objects and fantasy are then used not as a means of venturing out, but to beat a retreat.
▪ He beat a hasty retreat when he spotted me approaching, but it was not hasty enough.
team
▪ The home team has not beaten the Scarlets for some dozen matches and should still have their work cut out to win.
▪ But UMass still won on the road against a team that should have beaten it.
▪ In another very close team event Wallasey just beat the Menai Straits one design club by a quarter point.
▪ The team that beat them by a point at the Forum on Jan. 2.
▪ Look at the teams we've beaten - nothing special, any of them.
▪ White acknowledged his team simply beat itself, in all areas of the game.
▪ With everyone emerging from the League Cup tie unscathed Coyle will no doubt field the team that beat Monaghan.
▪ On any given Sunday, the regular teams can beat you.
wife
▪ I had a case of a Pathan family where the husband used to beat his wife all the time.
▪ It doesn't matter if they beat their wife.
▪ For instance, it's the custom to beat the wife.
▪ And Symington stopped beating his wife, too.
▪ Another top star of the seventies, David Soul, beat up his wife.
▪ Edward Laufer did not testify, but has denied beating his wife.
▪ The court was told that he beat his wife unconscious before pushing her and her car into a river.
▪ A man who beats his wife is still human.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a stick to beat sb with
bang/beat the drum for sb/sth
beat a retreat
▪ Officials beat a hasty retreat as reporters shouted questions.
▪ Appointees interviewed repeated a familiar theme: They all loved their jobs but are beating a retreat without regret.
▪ Objects and fantasy are then used not as a means of venturing out, but to beat a retreat.
beat sb at their own game
beat sb to a pulp
▪ Attempting to beat some one to a pulp would be described in these terms.
▪ But when Alvin came back I thought he was going to beat me to a pulp.
beat sb/sth to the punch
▪ Hitachi has beaten their competition to the punch with a new line of mainframe computers.
▪ Bernie, it might be a good idea if you beat them to the punch.
▪ Master Yehudi had beaten me to the punch again.
beat the pants off sb
▪ She beat the pants off me last time we played.
▪ He is aware of his competitors-and he beats the pants off them.
beat the rap
beat/kick etc the shit out of sb
▪ I had to pretend, because he was beating the shit out of me.
▪ Like in the Teamsters, where they beat the shit out of people in parking lots.
beat/knock the (living) daylights out of sb
beat/surprise/scare the hell out of sb
▪ And I said, beats the hell out of me.
▪ Eddie knows this, and it scares the hell out of her.
▪ It scared the hell out of me.
▪ Just to make the move scared the hell out of me.
▪ Statistics like that scare the hell out of me, and they must scare a lot of CEOs too.
▪ There is no stopping planned randomness, and that scares the hell out of us.
▪ Today, he scares the hell out of a lot of Republicans.
▪ Tornadoes are not fascinating to me; they scare the hell out of me.
beat/thrash etc sb to within an inch of their life
keep/beat time
▪ At one stage, he joined her, pacing with her, beating time with one hand.
▪ In employment systems, after all, people are not mustered to play together as their manager beats time.
▪ It is not true that elsewhere they obey it without beating it, since one beats time wherever choruses are sung.
▪ It starts lean and mean, just a slash of overdriven guitar with tambourine keeping time.
▪ The lord began to tap his foot and beat time with his hand against his thigh.
▪ They are likened by Leibniz to a series of clocks that manage to keep time without being connected.
▪ They were often unable to keep time to within fifteen minutes a day and were frequently out of order.
▪ Tidy time keep time on your side and all your bills in order with this hand clip clock.
knock/beat sb/sth into a cocked hat
▪ Cavalli had no difficulty knocking the work of other composers into a cocked hat.
off the beaten track/path
▪ Appenzell really is off the beaten track.
▪ Away from the Algarve, it's not hard to get off the beaten track.
▪ Soon it is not going to be so easy to get off the beaten path.
▪ They are off the beaten track.
▪ To say that Crenshaw is off the beaten path is an understatement.
▪ Unusual interests, off the beaten track experiences should be of interest.
▪ We kept off the beaten track, away from those traders who fixed high prices, for Shallot knew where to go.
▪ Yet for most visitors from overseas, Windisch with its treasure is definitely off the beaten track.
sb's heart misses/skips a beat
soundly defeated/beaten/thrashed
▪ In Hayward, a proposed library improvement tax was soundly defeated.
▪ Synthonia are now the only side without a win after they were soundly beaten at Blackhall.
▪ The Republicans were soundly defeated in the South, even in places where there were voting black majorities.
▪ They were led by a fanatical chieftain named Yusuf and Alfonso was soundly defeated at the battle of Sagrajas.
▪ When it came up for a vote in March, it was soundly defeated.
take a beating
▪ `I hear you took a bit of a beating last night.' 'Yeah, we lost 12 -2.'
▪ The Mets took a real beating last Saturday.
▪ A principle as old as ancient tribes and almost as remotely understood, diplomatic immunity is taking a beating this week.
▪ But since then, software stocks have taken a beating.
▪ He took a beating today but he played his butt off.
▪ History is taking a beating and sacrosanct tour records are being kept in pencil.
▪ Liverpool was taking a beating, and rumours were free for the asking on every street corner and in every food queue.
▪ Looks like egg-laying has taken a beating.
▪ Technology stocks of all sizes continued to take a beating.
▪ They took a beating on the Mudchute.
turn/beat swords into ploughshares
turn/beat swords into ploughshares
win (sth)/beat sb fair and square
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Beat the cream into the fruit puree, pour into bowls, and chill.
Beat the eggs and pour in the milk.
▪ Back then, girls were told that they could never beat a boy at tennis.
▪ Brazil beat Italy in the final.
▪ Carry on beating the eggs with a fork until they're light and fluffy.
▪ Children were beating on different kinds of drums.
▪ Do you think the Socialists will beat the Liberals in the election?
▪ He used to come home drunk and beat my mother.
▪ In a separate bowl, beat together the oil and flour.
▪ It's not a particularly good job, but it certainly beats being unemployed.
▪ It was clear that she had been badly beaten by her husband.
▪ Jake's home-made burgers beat anything you can get at fast-food restaurants.
▪ Lewis was a tough boxer, and a hard man to beat.
▪ My Father used to let me beat him at chess.
▪ No one has figured out how to beat the problem of rodents eating the crops.
▪ On the ultrasound machine, I could see the baby's heart beating strongly.
▪ Osborne wanted to beat the living daylights out of Flanagan.
▪ Police officers had beaten the man with their batons.
▪ Slaves were sometimes beaten with sticks or even whipped.
▪ Teachers are no longer allowed to beat students who misbehave.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But UMass still won on the road against a team that should have beaten it.
▪ Convention delegates were beaten, stabbed, and shot promiscuously by the police.
▪ Following the incident with the boy a Dig Daddy style man had gone to his door and beaten him up.
▪ Hey, it beats a bake sale.
▪ My torso and my wrists felt as though Edna had beaten them with sticks.
▪ Whatever Messrs Mondale, Foot and Kinnock said about raising taxes in the 1980s, they were going to be beaten anyway.
II.noun
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
beat sb/sth to the punch
▪ Hitachi has beaten their competition to the punch with a new line of mainframe computers.
▪ Bernie, it might be a good idea if you beat them to the punch.
▪ Master Yehudi had beaten me to the punch again.
beat/kick etc the shit out of sb
▪ I had to pretend, because he was beating the shit out of me.
▪ Like in the Teamsters, where they beat the shit out of people in parking lots.
beat/knock the (living) daylights out of sb
beat/surprise/scare the hell out of sb
▪ And I said, beats the hell out of me.
▪ Eddie knows this, and it scares the hell out of her.
▪ It scared the hell out of me.
▪ Just to make the move scared the hell out of me.
▪ Statistics like that scare the hell out of me, and they must scare a lot of CEOs too.
▪ There is no stopping planned randomness, and that scares the hell out of us.
▪ Today, he scares the hell out of a lot of Republicans.
▪ Tornadoes are not fascinating to me; they scare the hell out of me.
beat/thrash etc sb to within an inch of their life
keep/beat time
▪ At one stage, he joined her, pacing with her, beating time with one hand.
▪ In employment systems, after all, people are not mustered to play together as their manager beats time.
▪ It is not true that elsewhere they obey it without beating it, since one beats time wherever choruses are sung.
▪ It starts lean and mean, just a slash of overdriven guitar with tambourine keeping time.
▪ The lord began to tap his foot and beat time with his hand against his thigh.
▪ They are likened by Leibniz to a series of clocks that manage to keep time without being connected.
▪ They were often unable to keep time to within fifteen minutes a day and were frequently out of order.
▪ Tidy time keep time on your side and all your bills in order with this hand clip clock.
knock/beat sb/sth into a cocked hat
▪ Cavalli had no difficulty knocking the work of other composers into a cocked hat.
off the beaten track/path
▪ Appenzell really is off the beaten track.
▪ Away from the Algarve, it's not hard to get off the beaten track.
▪ Soon it is not going to be so easy to get off the beaten path.
▪ They are off the beaten track.
▪ To say that Crenshaw is off the beaten path is an understatement.
▪ Unusual interests, off the beaten track experiences should be of interest.
▪ We kept off the beaten track, away from those traders who fixed high prices, for Shallot knew where to go.
▪ Yet for most visitors from overseas, Windisch with its treasure is definitely off the beaten track.
sb's heart misses a beat
▪ When Caroline smiled at Eddie, his heart missed a beat.
sb's heart misses/skips a beat
soundly defeated/beaten/thrashed
▪ In Hayward, a proposed library improvement tax was soundly defeated.
▪ Synthonia are now the only side without a win after they were soundly beaten at Blackhall.
▪ The Republicans were soundly defeated in the South, even in places where there were voting black majorities.
▪ They were led by a fanatical chieftain named Yusuf and Alfonso was soundly defeated at the battle of Sagrajas.
▪ When it came up for a vote in March, it was soundly defeated.
the stress/accent/beat falls on sth
▪ In the word "spoken," the stress falls on the first syllable.
turn/beat swords into ploughshares
turn/beat swords into ploughshares
walk the beat
▪ Sympathetic typifications of Catholics do little to lessen the obvious problem of being attacked while walking the beat.
▪ You'd be walking the beat and you'd see some kid with his backside hanging out of his trousers.
win (sth)/beat sb fair and square
without missing a beat
▪ Cuomo answered the reporters' questions without missing a beat.
▪ They can present, explain, and deliver our solutions without missing a beat.
▪ Woody Harrelson came in for the late Nicholas Colasanto without missing a beat.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Jessica moved her hips to the beat of the music.
▪ journalists covering the political beat
▪ Their new song has a good beat that you can dance to.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But beat duty was of course not the only punitive experience for the rank-and-file policeman.
▪ But for some beat constables, there was another possibility.
▪ I could hear the rapid beat of his heart and him breathing all funny.
▪ Multiply the number of beats by six to get the number of heart beats per minute.
▪ My heart lurched and seemed to miss a beat, but I went on reading calmly, though the print was blurred.
▪ Police on the beat are feeling increasingly vulnerable.
▪ The beat was the only genuinely musical element in it, of course.
▪ The more rum punch, the better the beat!
III.adjective
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a stick to beat sb with
bang/beat the drum for sb/sth
beat a retreat
▪ Officials beat a hasty retreat as reporters shouted questions.
▪ Appointees interviewed repeated a familiar theme: They all loved their jobs but are beating a retreat without regret.
▪ Objects and fantasy are then used not as a means of venturing out, but to beat a retreat.
beat sb at their own game
beat sb to a pulp
▪ Attempting to beat some one to a pulp would be described in these terms.
▪ But when Alvin came back I thought he was going to beat me to a pulp.
beat sb/sth to the punch
▪ Hitachi has beaten their competition to the punch with a new line of mainframe computers.
▪ Bernie, it might be a good idea if you beat them to the punch.
▪ Master Yehudi had beaten me to the punch again.
beat the pants off sb
▪ She beat the pants off me last time we played.
▪ He is aware of his competitors-and he beats the pants off them.
beat the rap
beat/kick etc the shit out of sb
▪ I had to pretend, because he was beating the shit out of me.
▪ Like in the Teamsters, where they beat the shit out of people in parking lots.
beat/knock the (living) daylights out of sb
beat/surprise/scare the hell out of sb
▪ And I said, beats the hell out of me.
▪ Eddie knows this, and it scares the hell out of her.
▪ It scared the hell out of me.
▪ Just to make the move scared the hell out of me.
▪ Statistics like that scare the hell out of me, and they must scare a lot of CEOs too.
▪ There is no stopping planned randomness, and that scares the hell out of us.
▪ Today, he scares the hell out of a lot of Republicans.
▪ Tornadoes are not fascinating to me; they scare the hell out of me.
beat/thrash etc sb to within an inch of their life
keep/beat time
▪ At one stage, he joined her, pacing with her, beating time with one hand.
▪ In employment systems, after all, people are not mustered to play together as their manager beats time.
▪ It is not true that elsewhere they obey it without beating it, since one beats time wherever choruses are sung.
▪ It starts lean and mean, just a slash of overdriven guitar with tambourine keeping time.
▪ The lord began to tap his foot and beat time with his hand against his thigh.
▪ They are likened by Leibniz to a series of clocks that manage to keep time without being connected.
▪ They were often unable to keep time to within fifteen minutes a day and were frequently out of order.
▪ Tidy time keep time on your side and all your bills in order with this hand clip clock.
knock/beat sb/sth into a cocked hat
▪ Cavalli had no difficulty knocking the work of other composers into a cocked hat.
sb's heart misses a beat
▪ When Caroline smiled at Eddie, his heart missed a beat.
sb's heart misses/skips a beat
soundly defeated/beaten/thrashed
▪ In Hayward, a proposed library improvement tax was soundly defeated.
▪ Synthonia are now the only side without a win after they were soundly beaten at Blackhall.
▪ The Republicans were soundly defeated in the South, even in places where there were voting black majorities.
▪ They were led by a fanatical chieftain named Yusuf and Alfonso was soundly defeated at the battle of Sagrajas.
▪ When it came up for a vote in March, it was soundly defeated.
take a beating
▪ `I hear you took a bit of a beating last night.' 'Yeah, we lost 12 -2.'
▪ The Mets took a real beating last Saturday.
▪ A principle as old as ancient tribes and almost as remotely understood, diplomatic immunity is taking a beating this week.
▪ But since then, software stocks have taken a beating.
▪ He took a beating today but he played his butt off.
▪ History is taking a beating and sacrosanct tour records are being kept in pencil.
▪ Liverpool was taking a beating, and rumours were free for the asking on every street corner and in every food queue.
▪ Looks like egg-laying has taken a beating.
▪ Technology stocks of all sizes continued to take a beating.
▪ They took a beating on the Mudchute.
the stress/accent/beat falls on sth
▪ In the word "spoken," the stress falls on the first syllable.
turn/beat swords into ploughshares
turn/beat swords into ploughshares
walk the beat
▪ Sympathetic typifications of Catholics do little to lessen the obvious problem of being attacked while walking the beat.
▪ You'd be walking the beat and you'd see some kid with his backside hanging out of his trousers.
win (sth)/beat sb fair and square
without missing a beat
▪ Cuomo answered the reporters' questions without missing a beat.
▪ They can present, explain, and deliver our solutions without missing a beat.
▪ Woody Harrelson came in for the late Nicholas Colasanto without missing a beat.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
beat

Scoop \Scoop\, n. [OE. scope, of Scand. origin; cf. Sw. skopa, akin to D. schop a shovel, G. sch["u]ppe, and also to E. shove. See Shovel.]

  1. A large ladle; a vessel with a long handle, used for dipping liquids; a utensil for bailing boats.

  2. A deep shovel, or any similar implement for digging out and dipping or shoveling up anything; as, a flour scoop; the scoop of a dredging machine.

  3. (Surg.) A spoon-shaped instrument, used in extracting certain substances or foreign bodies.

  4. A place hollowed out; a basinlike cavity; a hollow.

    Some had lain in the scoop of the rock.
    --J. R. Drake.

  5. A sweep; a stroke; a swoop.

  6. The act of scooping, or taking with a scoop or ladle; a motion with a scoop, as in dipping or shoveling.

  7. a quantity sufficient to fill a scoop; -- used especially for ice cream, dispensed with an ice cream scoop; as, an ice cream cone with two scoops.

  8. an act of reporting (news, research results) before a rival; also called a beat. [Newspaper or laboratory cant]

  9. news or information; as, what's the scoop on John's divorce?. [informal]

    Scoop net, a kind of hand net, used in fishing; also, a net for sweeping the bottom of a river.

    Scoop wheel, a wheel for raising water, having scoops or buckets attached to its circumference; a tympanum.

beat

Undulation \Un`du*la"tion\, n. [Cf. F. ondulation.]

  1. The act of undulating; a waving motion or vibration; as, the undulations of a fluid, of water, or of air; the undulations of sound.

  2. A wavy appearance or outline; waviness.
    --Evelyn.

  3. (Mus.)

    1. The tremulous tone produced by a peculiar pressure of the finger on a string, as of a violin.

    2. The pulsation caused by the vibrating together of two tones not quite in unison; -- called also beat.

  4. (Physics) A motion to and fro, up and down, or from side to side, in any fluid or elastic medium, propagated continuously among its particles, but with no translation of the particles themselves in the direction of the propagation of the wave; a wave motion; a vibration.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
beat

Old English beatan "inflict blows on, thrash" (class VII strong verb; past tense beot, past participle beaten), from Proto-Germanic *bautan (cognates: Old Norse bauta, Old High German bozan "to beat"), from PIE root *bhau- "to strike" (see batter (v.)). Of the heart, c.1200, from notion of it striking against the breast. Meaning "to overcome in a contest" is from 1610s (the source of the sense of "legally avoid, escape" in beat the charges, etc., attested from c.1920 in underworld slang).\n

\nPast tense beat is from c.1500, probably not from Old English but a shortening of Middle English beted. Dead-beat (originally "tired-out") preserves the old past participle. Meaning "strike cover to rouse or drive game" (c.1400) is source of beat around the bush (1570s), the metaphoric sense of which has shifted from "make preliminary motions" to "avoid, evade." Command beat it "go away" first recorded 1906 (though "action of feet upon the ground" was a sense of Old English betan). To beat off "masturbate" is recorded by 1960s. For beat generation see beatnik.

beat

"defeated, overcome by effort," c.1400, from past tense of beat (v.). Meaning "tired, exhausted," is by 1905, American English.

beat

c.1300, "a beating, whipping; the beating of a drum," from beat (v.). As "throb of the heart" from 1755. Meaning "regular route travelled by someone" is attested from 1731, also "a track made by animals" (1736), from the sense of the "beat" of the feet on the ground (late Old English), or perhaps that in beat the bushes to flush game (c.1400), or beat the bounds (1560s). Extended to journalism by 1875. Musical sense is by 1842, perhaps from the motion of the conductor and the notion of "beating the time":\n\nIt is usual, in beating the time of a piece of music, to mark or signalize the commencement of every measure by a downward movement or beat of the hand, or of any other article that may be used for the purpose ....

["Godfrey Weber's General Music Teacher," 1842]

\nEarlier in music it meant a sort of grace note:\n\nBEAT, in music, a transient grace note, struck immediately before the note it is intended to ornament. The beat always lies half a note beneath its principal, and should be heard so closely upon it, that they may almost seem to be struck together.

["The British Encyclopedia," London, 1809]

\n
Wiktionary
beat

Etymology 1

  1. 1 (context US slang English) exhausted 2 dilapidated, beat up 3 (context gay slang English) fabulous 4 (context slang English) boring 5 (context slang of a person English) ugly n. 1 A stroke; a blow. 2 A pulsation or thro

  2. 3 A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece. 4 A rhythm. 5 (context music English) A transient grace note, struck immediately before the one it is intended to ornament. 6 The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency 7 A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect. 8 The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard. 9 (context by extension English) An area of a person's responsibility, especially 10 # In journalism, the primary focus of a reporter's stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business et

  3. ). 11 (cx dated English) An act of reporting news or scientific results before a rival; a scoop. 12 (cx colloquial dated English) That which beats, or surpasses, another or others. 13 (context dated English) A place of habitual or frequent resort. 14 (context archaic English) A low cheat or swindler. 15 The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music. 16 (cx hunting English) The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively. 17 (cx fencing English) A smart tap on the adversary's blade. vb. (context transitive English) To hit; to knock; to pound; to strike. Etymology 2

    n. A beatnik.

WordNet
beat
  1. adj. very tired; "was all in at the end of the day"; "so beat I could flop down and go to sleep anywhere"; "bushed after all that exercise"; "I'm dead after that long trip" [syn: all in(p), beat(p), bushed(p), dead(p)]

  2. [also: beaten]

beat
  1. n. a regular route for a sentry or policeman; "in the old days a policeman walked a beat and knew all his people by name" [syn: round]

  2. the rhythmic contraction and expansion of the arteries with each beat of the heart; "he could feel the beat of her heart" [syn: pulse, pulsation, heartbeat]

  3. the basic rhythmic unit in a piece of music; "the piece has a fast rhythm"; "the conductor set the beat" [syn: rhythm, musical rhythm]

  4. a single pulsation of an oscillation produced by adding two waves of different frequencies; has a frequency equal to the difference between the two oscillations

  5. a member of the beat generation; a nonconformist in dress and behavior [syn: beatnik]

  6. the sound of stroke or blow; "he heard the beat of a drum"

  7. (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse [syn: meter, metre, measure, cadence]

  8. a regular rate of repetition; "the cox raised the beat"

  9. a stroke or blow; "the signal was two beats on the steam pipe"

  10. the act of beating to windward; sailing as close as possible to the direction from which the wind is blowing

  11. [also: beaten]

beat
  1. v. come out better in a competition, race, or conflict; "Agassi beat Becker in the tennis championship"; "We beat the competition"; "Harvard defeated Yale in the last football game" [syn: beat out, crush, shell, trounce, vanquish]

  2. give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression; "Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night"; "The teacher used to beat the students" [syn: beat up, work over]

  3. hit repeatedly; "beat on the door"; "beat the table with his shoe"

  4. move rhythmically; "Her heart was beating fast" [syn: pound, thump]

  5. shape by beating; "beat swords into ploughshares"

  6. make a rhythmic sound; "Rain drummed against the windshield"; "The drums beat all night" [syn: drum, thrum]

  7. glare or strike with great intensity; "The sun was beating down on us"

  8. move with a thrashing motion; "The bird flapped its wings"; "The eagle beat its wings and soared high into the sky" [syn: flap]

  9. sail with much tacking or with difficulty; "The boat beat in the strong wind"

  10. stir vigorously; "beat the egg whites"; "beat the cream" [syn: scramble]

  11. strike (a part of one's own body) repeatedly, as in great emotion or in accompaniment to music; "beat one's breast"; "beat one's foot rhythmically"

  12. be superior; "Reading beats watching television"; "This sure beats work!"

  13. avoid paying; "beat the subway fare" [syn: bunk]

  14. make a sound like a clock or a timer; "the clocks were ticking"; "the grandfather clock beat midnight" [syn: tick, ticktock, ticktack]

  15. move with a flapping motion; "The bird's wings were flapping" [syn: flap]

  16. indicate by beating, as with the fingers or drumsticks; "Beat the rhythm"

  17. move with or as if with a regular alternating motion; "the city pulsated with music and excitement" [syn: pulsate, quiver]

  18. make by pounding or trampling; "beat a path through the forest"

  19. produce a rhythm by striking repeatedly; "beat the drum"

  20. strike (water or bushes) repeatedly to rouse animals for hunting

  21. beat through cleverness and wit; "I beat the traffic"; "She outfoxed her competitors" [syn: outwit, overreach, outsmart, outfox, circumvent]

  22. be a mystery or bewildering to; "This beats me!"; "Got me--I don't know the answer!"; "a vexing problem"; "This question really stuck me" [syn: perplex, vex, stick, get, puzzle, mystify, baffle, pose, bewilder, flummox, stupefy, nonplus, gravel, amaze, dumbfound]

  23. wear out completely; "This kind of work exhausts me"; "I'm beat"; "He was all washed up after the exam" [syn: exhaust, wash up, tucker, tucker out]

  24. [also: beaten]

Wikipedia
Beat

Beat or beats may refer to:

Beat (album)

Beat is the ninth studio album by the British rock band King Crimson, released in 1982 by record label E.G. It is the first King Crimson studio album to feature a band line-up identical to that of their previous album.

Beat (charity)

Beat is the UK's leading charity supporting those affected by eating disorders and campaigning on their behalf. Founded in 1989 as the Eating Disorders Association, it celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2014.

The charity is dedicated to helping people with anorexia nervosa, bulimia, binge eating disorder, emotional overeating, EDNOS and other eating disorders, and providing information to the public about these conditions.

Beat (drink)

BEAT is a citrus-flavored soft drinkby The Coca-Cola Company released in Mexico in 2002. It was a Mexican version of citrus soft drinks like Mello Yello or Surge and a response to the release in Mexico of Mountain Dew by PepsiCo. Beat was discontinued in 2005. In 2009, it was re-launched in South Africa.

Category:Coca-Cola brands

Beat (music)

In music and music theory, the beat is the basic unit of time, the pulse (regularly repeating event), of the mensural level (or beat level). The beat is often defined as the rhythm listeners would tap their toes to when listening to a piece of music, or the numbers a musician counts while performing, though in practice this may be technically incorrect (often the first multiple level). In popular use, beat can refer to a variety of related concepts including: tempo, meter, specific rhythms, and groove.

Rhythm in music is characterized by a repeating sequence of stressed and unstressed beats (often called "strong" and "weak") and divided into bars organized by time signature and tempo indications.

Metric levels faster than the beat level are division levels, and slower levels are multiple levels. See Metric structure. Beat has always been an important part of music.

Beat (acoustics)

In acoustics, a beat is an interference pattern between two sounds of slightly different frequencies, perceived as a periodic variation in volume whose rate is the difference of the two frequencies.

When tuning instruments that can produce sustained tones, beats can readily be recognized. Tuning two tones to a unison will present a peculiar effect: when the two tones are close in pitch but not identical, the difference in frequency generates the beating. The volume varies like in a tremolo as the sounds alternately interfere constructively and destructively. As the two tones gradually approach unison, the beating slows down and may become so slow as to be imperceptible.

Beat (filmmaking)

A beat is the timing and movement of a film or play. In the context of a screenplay, it usually represents a pause in dialogue. In the context of the timing of a film, a beat refers to an event, decision, or discovery that alters the way the protagonist pursues his or her goal.

Beat (band)

Beat were a Finnish band who represented their country in Eurovision Song Contest 1990. The group performed the song Fri? (Free?) in Swedish and finished 21st out of 22 countries, scoring 8 points. The group was composed of members Janne Engblom, Kim Engblom, Tina Krausen and Tina Petersson.

The song was also recorded in Finnish and English.

Beat (2000 film)

Beat is a 2000 American drama film written and directed by Gary Walkow, concerning the period of writer William S. Burroughs's life that he spent with his wife, Joan Vollmer, leading up to her accidental killing in 1951.

The film stars Kiefer Sutherland as Burroughs, Courtney Love as Joan, Norman Reedus as Lucien Carr, and Ron Livingston as Allen Ginsberg. It premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2000 and was entered into the 22nd Moscow International Film Festival.

Beat (song)

"Beat" is the fourth single from Japanese pop singer Kaela Kimura. It was released as the second single from her album, Circle, on October 5, 2005. It peaked at #7 on the Oricon charts.

Beat (1998 film)

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Beat is a Japanese movie released in its country of origin in 1998. Directed by Amon Miyamoto, the film's narrative is set in Okinawa in the 1960s, during the military occupation by the American government. The plot was inspired by Naminoue no Maria, a novel by the Okinawan writer Eiki Matayoshi.

Beat was screened during Critics' Week at the 1998 Venice International Film Festival.

Beat (name)

Beat (pronounced "BEH-awe-t") is a German male given name, derived from the Latin name Beatus, which means "blessed". The name is common in German-speaking Switzerland because of St Beatus of Lungern, considered a patron saint. The female variant is Beate. The name Beat may refer to:

  • Beat Bosch (born 1971), Swiss athlete
  • Beat Breu (born 1957), Swiss cyclist
  • Beat Fehr (1943–1967), Swiss racing driver
  • Beat Feuz (born 1987), Swiss alpine skier
  • Beat Forster (born 1983), Swiss ice hockey player
  • Beat Furrer (born 1954), Austrian composer
  • Beat Gähwiler (born 1965), Swiss athlete
  • Beat Gerber (born 1982), Swiss ice hockey player
  • Beat Hefti (born 1978), Swiss bobsledder
  • Beat Koch (born 1972), Swiss cross country skier
  • Beat Kuert (born 1946), Swiss film director
  • Beat Mändli (born 1969), Swiss equestrian
  • Beat Müller (born 1978), Swiss sport shooter
  • Beat Raaflaub (born 1946), Swiss conductor
  • Beat Richner (born 1947), Swiss doctor
  • Beat Rüedi (1920–2009), Swiss ice hockey player
  • Beat Schwerzmann (born 1966), Swiss rower
  • Beat Seitz (born 1973), Swiss bobsledder
  • Beat Streuli (born 1957), Swiss artist
  • Beat Sutter (born 1962), Swiss football player
  • Beat Wyss (born 1947), Swiss art historian
  • Beat Zberg (born 1971), Swiss cyclist
Beat (1997 film)

Beat is 1997 South Korean gangster film directed by Kim Sung-su and written by Sam Shin about a high school dropout who is forced into gang life. Jung Woo-sung played the lead Min and Ko So-young his love interest Romy. The plot is based on a bestselling graphic novel by Huh Young-man.

The role solidified Jung as a leading Korean actor and was also based on his real-life experience as a high school dropout. This was the third and final film pairing Jung and Ko, but the director would later work with Jung again in Musa (2001).

Beat (Ricky Dillon song)

BEAT is a song recorded by American singer and YouTube personality Ricky Dillon. The track was recorded in Los Angeles, California at Create Studios.

Beat (Bowery Electric album)

Beat is the second studio album by Bowery Electric. It was released on November 12, 1996 by Kranky and Beggars Banquet Records.

Beat (police)

In police terminology, a beat is the territory and time that a police officer patrols. Beat policing is based on traditional policing (late 19th century) and utilises the close relationship with the community members within the assigned beat to strengthen police effectiveness and encourage cooperative efforts to make a safer community. Beat police typically patrol on foot or bicycle which provides more interaction between police and community members.

Before the advent of personal radio communications, beats were organised in towns and cities to cover specific areas, usually shown on a map in the police station and given some sort of name or number. Officers reporting on duty would be allocated a beat by their sergeant and sometimes given a card indicating that the officer should be at a particular point at set times, usually half an hour, or forty-five minutes apart. The points would usually be telephone kiosks, police pillars or boxes, or perhaps public houses where it would be possible to phone the officer should he be needed to respond to an incident. The officer would remain at the point for five minutes and then patrol the area gradually making his way to the next point.

Beats in town centres would be relatively small areas but in the suburbs much larger. A shortfall in manpower would mean that one or more beats would be left unpatrolled at the discretion of the duty sergeant.

Sometime during an officer's shift, he could expect a supervisory officer to meet him at one of the points. This ensured the beat patrol was being correctly carried out and was an opportunity to discuss problems. The supervisory officer would sign the officer or constable's pocket book, ensuring that it was up to date.

It was expected that a constable would learn all about each beat he covered, even though they would not necessarily be the same one each shift. A new constable would usually be shown around the beats by an experienced constable who would point out important considerations. These would include vulnerable premises such as banks and post offices, perhaps showing the officer where a peephole would give a view of a safe. A constable was expected to learn where known criminals resided or resorted and which public houses might be the source of problems or keeping late hours.

The same principles extended to beats patrolled on bicycles or in motor vehicles. Even with radio communication, the patrol vehicle would be expected to visit and remain at certain points at particular times, enabling supervisors to meet up with the patrolling officer or to give a visible police presence at times when this was deemed particularly needed.

Missing a point without good reason was regarded very seriously and was often the cause of disciplinary action against an officer. Beat officers were commonly used in the 1800s.

Usage examples of "beat".

Heart beating too fast, Abrim suited up and stepped into the personnel lock.

Beats on his struggling form, which sinks at length Prone, and the aereal ice clings over it.

It worked, up until he tried to beat some Afghani smugglers at their own game.

Our great Washington found that out, and the British officer that beat Bonaparte, the bread they gave him turned sour afore he got half through the loaf.

Marks and Charlie Akers hauled Nash into Module Three, the storage compartment across the corridor from the command center, and there they beat the shit out of him.

There was still a beaten way between the tree-boles, though not overwide, albeit, a highway, since it pierced the wood.

A series of loud crashes from behind it quickly followed as Alec and Wethis beat a hasty retreat.

And it said that the men had beaten its ayah, but that the havildar Ben Allar had sent it down the road to ask its way to the house of the Nawab.

As usual, when I used the loo I found that someone with pubic alopecia had beaten me to it.

And in those same dreams she would dance naked before Amir Bedawi, moving ever closer and closer to him, drawn like a moth beating its wings too close to the flame.

Laura could neither stop the beating, nor get it across to Masri that Amir was in danger.

I beat the bush to flush out whoever was behind my amnesia, I got you.

Emaa had tried to force her into living in Niniltna, the womb to which she had fled from the stifling, swarming confines of college, the place waiting for her on long weekends and vacations between time on the job in Anchorage, the one place in the world able to heal the wounds inflicted by five and a half years of casework featuring raped and beaten women and abused children, her home, her center, her sanctuary, her refuge.

Life, ordered irregularity, aperiodic crystal, signal in a field of noise, required that wonder and reverence, both coded for, beat out success if anything is to survive.

He saw that he was on the highest point of the island,a statue on this vast pedestal of granite, nothing human appearing in sight, while the blue ocean beat against the base of the island, and covered it with a fringe of foam.