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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
pound
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a throbbing/pounding/blinding headache (=a very bad headache)
▪ He had a throbbing headache, behind his nose and his eyes.
be 5 kilos/20 pounds etc overweight
▪ I’m about 15 pounds overweight right now.
billions of pounds/dollars etc
▪ Airlines have lost billions of dollars.
grey pound
half a mile/pound/hour etc
▪ half a pound of butter
▪ It’s about half a mile down the road.
▪ She drank half a bottle of wine.
half a million dollars
hundreds of people/years/pounds etc
▪ Hundreds of people were reported killed or wounded.
millions of pounds/dollars etc
▪ Millions of pounds were lost in Western aid.
pink pound
▪ Companies are trying to attract the pink pound.
pound cake
pound key
pound sign
pound sterling
sb’s heart pounds/thuds/thumps (=it beats very strongly)
▪ He reached the top, his heart pounding.
shed pounds/kilos (=to lose this amount of weight)
▪ I needed to shed a few pounds.
trillions of pounds/dollars etc
▪ the trillions of dollars in the bond markets
waves pound (=hit something hard)
▪ The waves pounded the rocks.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
extra
▪ Over the next three years, those items will account for only 17p of every extra pound spent.
▪ Foyle is still carrying a good 15 extra pounds.
▪ On her own at the till, Rachaela removed the extra pound and kept it.
▪ Do people get sick and die because of the extra pounds they carry on their frames?
▪ What is beyond question is that it must be carried round as extra pounds.
▪ Oxfordshire council now hopes to find the extra five million pounds from other budgets.
▪ She usually piles on some extra pounds too.
▪ He's announced that an extra seventeen million pounds is to be pumped into care over the next six years.
■ NOUN
cake
▪ His plate held the last few crumbs of a generous slice of pound cake.
▪ She made potato salad and deviled eggs and tea and I brought green beans and a pound cake.
▪ After ripening, use as a topping for pudding, pound cake or ice cream.
▪ She had been in the midst of baking a pound cake and it had come out too heavy.
▪ I got a pound cake from Patience mailed in September.
▪ He puts butter on already buttery things like croissants and pound cake.
note
▪ Dollar bills, pound notes, they're suicide notes.
▪ But when we arrived home, we found the stranger had given me two pound notes as well as the coin.
▪ My sister thought it must have been a mistake, and kept the pound notes in case he came back for them.
▪ I notice that her paper cylinder is a rolled-up five pound note.
▪ So I've got eight crisp ten pound notes and one five pound note.
▪ Counting out seven pound notes, he laid them carefully on the table.
▪ He selected four records and paid for them in pound notes, and there were more where those came from.
sterling
▪ The rate for the pound sterling was 1,650,000 roubles in January 1922 and 71,730,000 by October.
worth
▪ Nearly fifty thousand pounds worth of a growth hormone called Genotropin has disappeared from a warehouse.
▪ The Reverend Derek Sawyer needs to make nine thousands pounds worth of savings, so these cuts are just the start.
▪ The sprawling house needed at least thirty thousand pounds worth of work to be spent across its four floors.
▪ Thousands of pounds worth of smoke and water damage reclaiming the family home from chaos.
▪ The Dowty group will provide twenty five million pounds worth of fuel systems and landing gear for the Tornado.
▪ It's estimated that half a million pounds worth have been smuggled out of the country already this year.
▪ They were there for a motoring festival, with more than two hundred million pounds worth of classic cars on show.
■ VERB
buy
▪ If we buy half a pound we tend to eat either half a pound - or half that quantity.
▪ An undercover trading standards officer bought a pound of bananas for 34p from Mr Thoburn's stall last summer.
▪ He then went back several days later and bought two more pounds for $ 1, 800.
▪ At midnight on Tuesday, he told his share dealers to start buying - confident the pound would be devalued.
▪ Meredith bought two pounds of satsumas and retired defeated.
▪ The Wise Woman wouldn't buy another half pound of toffees in Birdie Mac's because she'd get spots.
cause
▪ Read in studio An investigation is under way into a fire which caused thousands of pounds of damage to a plastics factory.
▪ Incendiary devices have caused millions of pounds in damage.
▪ Read in studio A school fire in Buckinghamshire which has caused fifty thousand pounds damage is being treated as arson.
▪ A stained glass window was recently kicked in - causing fifteen hundred pounds worth of damage.
▪ Businessmen fear a Labour victory would cause the pound to fall in value even though they would probably benefit.
▪ No one was hurt in the crash, which caused thousands of pounds damage to the train and destroyed the Ford Transit.
▪ Drunken brawls have also caused thousands of pounds worth of damage.
▪ It spread to the roof causing thousands of pounds worth of damage.
cost
▪ A longer pair for waders and which are prevented from slipping down by an elasticated band, cost a pound more.
▪ They cost just a pound a copy to produce, so why do we pay so much for them in the shops?
▪ The National Rivers Authority says the clear up will take several days and will cost thousands of pounds.
▪ Supercomputing - High-performance computers costing millions of pounds can not be sited at every university that needs their computational power.
▪ That hadn't cost a couple of pounds - it can cost a small fortune.
▪ It costs thousands of pounds to draw up the documentation.
▪ It cost two million pounds, and includes the latest in video technology, as Adrian Britton reports.
▪ A complex dedicated simulator can cost several million pounds and it needs its own crew of skilled operators.
lose
▪ During this time I lost 8 ¾ pounds and came away feeling a new woman!
▪ Be slimmer and trimmer! Lose ugly pounds systematically!
▪ In ten days Nutty had lost another eight pounds.
▪ It got me to laughing so hard, I believe I might have lost a pound or two.
▪ You'd probably benefit from losing a few pounds or taking more exercise.
▪ And it must be prepared to lose a few million pounds in the process.
▪ So can losing a few pounds if you are overweight.
▪ After two weeks I felt better in myself and I had lost several pounds.
pay
▪ Using leftovers and store cupboard items, you will have made a meal that many people pay several pounds for in restaurants.
▪ But two weeks ago he signed this contract with the Sun and was paid five thousand pounds.
▪ Jacqui had paid out a thousand pounds for something that could be reproduced at will.
▪ They were conditionally discharged but each was ordered to pay costs of 750 pounds.
▪ She paid ninety pounds for it.
▪ Tuition Fees must be paid in pounds sterling.
▪ He was ordered to pay ten pounds costs.
raise
▪ They are expected to raise hundreds of pounds in sponsorship for the special care baby unit at the Friarage Hospital, Northallerton.
▪ It also raises thousands of pounds which are distributed to charities and worthy groups and individuals of the area.
▪ As well as raising several thousand pounds for charity, the Crusaders also won 24-14.
▪ Organisers are hoping to raise millions of pounds to turn the centre into a living museum.
▪ Despite sore feet and blisters, they completed the 26 and bit miles to raise thousands of pounds for charity.
▪ It superseded the very successful Coalville open days which have raised thousands of pounds for charity over the last nine years.
▪ But unless the children's parents raise twenty thousand pounds within the next few days it will close.
save
▪ It could save you thousands of pounds, not to mention hours of anguish.
▪ She could save up to eight pounds - yes!
▪ This often means great economy too, for eliminating draughts and adding insulation will save pounds on energy bills.
▪ And the high-tech scheme could save thousands of pounds.
▪ The council which owns the pool needs to save a million pounds, because it's been charge capped by the government.
▪ Amazingly we saved thousands of pounds that way!
▪ The council must save a million pounds after being charge capped by the Government.
▪ Prompt action by local people can not only prevent ultimate demolition, but also save many thousands of pounds in repair costs.
spend
▪ Go to Boots. Spend a pound.
▪ He spends hundreds of pounds on me.
▪ The Aga Khan has spent millions of pounds on the Aliysa case.
▪ The council is planning to spend ten million pounds more than government guidelines next year.
▪ In nineteen ninety we spent fifty two million pounds on vitamin supplements.
▪ The country has spent millions of pounds this year on advertising to attract visitors.
steal
▪ But while one kept her talking, the other stole the five thousand pounds she had hidden in her wardrobe.
▪ Read in studio A man armed with a handgun has stolen around a thousand pounds from an estate agents.
▪ Bank break-in: Burglars have stolen several thousand pounds after breaking into a bank at Rowlands Gill, near Gateshead.
▪ Read in studio Thieves have raided a widow's home and stolen ten thousand pounds of her late husband's jewellery.
▪ It replaces an earlier charge of stealing more than six thousand pounds after she was arrested last month.
weigh
▪ It was fair-sized, four feet long and weighing twenty-five to thirty pounds.
▪ Since then it has banned the public from placing stamped parcels weighing more than 1 pound in mail collection boxes.
▪ He now weighs twenty nine pounds ... week old lambs would normally turn the scales at around fifteen pounds.
▪ Heather was the smallest baby of all, weighing in under six pounds.
▪ Among the objects salvaged were gold dishes, weighing a pound each, with the image of the emperor on them.
▪ It weighs seven pounds twelve ounces, is ten and a half inches long and nine inches wide.
▪ Chilperic also showed Gregory a gold salver covered with gems, weighing fifty pounds.
▪ He thought suddenly of Antony Royd, weighed in at four pounds, doing eleven lengths in four minutes.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a run on the dollar/pound etc
an ounce of prevention (is worth a pound of cure)
be down to your last pound/dollar/litre etc
in for a penny, in for a pound
multimillion-pound/multimillion-dollar etc
pile on the pounds
▪ Most comfort eaters enjoy it while they're eating, but the downside is they soon start to pile on the pounds.
▪ She did slim down a couple of years ago but has piled on the pounds again.
▪ To his relief the producers didn't want him to pile on the pounds.
pound/hit the pavement
▪ For months, Garcia pounded the pavement for jobs.
▪ And if my next fifteen years are spent pounding the pavement in search of a job without a handset in it - too bad.
▪ He turned and saw a lithe figure in a track suit pounding the pavement towards him.
▪ I wrenched the wheel round in a tight turn, hitting the pavement as I went.
▪ It began to rain when she was half way along Gloucester Road, big spots like buttons hitting the pavement.
▪ Or pull out your own wheels and hit the pavement.
▪ The brown paper bag tied with white string hit the pavement, split and corn went all over the place.
▪ When he's not on the track competing, you will find Paul out pounding the pavements.
ten pounds' worth/$500 worth etc of sth
the grey pound
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Enter your five-digit code, and then press pound.
▪ I've gained 10 pounds since Thanksgiving.
▪ Navel oranges are only 39 cents a pound.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A week later a cheque for twenty-five thousand pounds arrived on the churchman's desk.
▪ Customers can ask for a pound of bananas, but traders are obliged to weigh them in metric units.
▪ Just 200 extra calories each day add up to one-half pound of extra body fat each week.
▪ The council is planning to spend ten million pounds more than government guidelines next year.
▪ The Government gets its pound of flesh, doesn't it.
▪ This often means great economy too, for eliminating draughts and adding insulation will save pounds on energy bills.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
along
▪ He pounded along the street and round two corners, losing his way.
▪ Then they set off at a run, Jim and Louise leading the way, Jube pounding along behind them.
away
▪ By August of 1824 the stamps were pounding away and 50 tons of concentrate were ready for market.
▪ They used a power strategy of persistence, pounding away until they won on every point.
▪ The slaves continued to pound away.
▪ Top scientists around the country are pounding away at different parts of the puzzle.
▪ Good old Simon, pounding away and probably thinking about his golf handicap to keep himself going.
▪ Perhaps he was still sitting in his cellar pounding away.
▪ The smell was bad enough to turn the strongest stomach, and his heart was pounding away like a road drill.
▪ He was pounding away, and. 1 was wondering if he would ever finish.
down
▪ Clinton said as rain pounded down at the air base, where he landed.
▪ He pounded down in me a few dozen times, quickly.
▪ He and Kemp pound down the stairway, exchanging words.
out
▪ Lungs pounding out torrents of frozen breath, we speed down narrow forest corridors, then burst into dazzling clearings.
▪ I leave a few voice mails and pound out a few more pages.
▪ Yet he staged an amazing comeback to pound out a points win.
▪ Two of the men were in shirts, sweating, pounding out beer after beer.
▪ When he's not on the track competing, you will find Paul out pounding the pavements.
▪ I pound out articles now and then.
▪ The keyboarder5 particularly hate him, pounding out anger with every stroke.
still
▪ Caroline, heart still pounding with anger and confusion, did the same.
▪ We finally rescued our wounded, and, with the artillery still pounding, we called in for an air strike.
▪ Then, with her heart still pounding madly, she looked back over her shoulder.
▪ And I bought the pill box I had wanted in the first place, heading home with my heart still pounding.
▪ Metal was still pounding against metal in a distant forward compartment, but soon that also stopped.
■ NOUN
billion
▪ Sales of single premium products dropped 8 percent to 2. 03 billion pounds.
▪ Net gilt sales were 245 million pounds in November, down from 3. 8 billion pounds a month earlier.
▪ Lloyds reported fiscal 1995 sales of 1. 08 billion pounds, a 15. 1 percent rise over the year earlier.
▪ The value of the transactions was 9. 4 billion pounds.
▪ Net lending secured by property was 1. 233 billion pounds in November, up from 947 million in October.
▪ Since then, housing associations raised 8. 5 billion pounds in private financing.
▪ The fund manages about 9. 5 billion pounds in fixed-income securities.
chest
▪ John's heart was pounding out of his chest.
▪ The Cowboys will sense it and start to pound their chests and dig in.
▪ My heart was pounding in my chest, the mosquitoes and everything else forgotten.
▪ Her heart was pounding in her chest.
▪ Why did her mouth go dry and her treacherous heart start pounding away inside her chest like war drums in the jungle?
door
▪ She pounded on the door, shouted at the top of her voice, and yelled threats at Julius.
▪ He pounded at their door, and Mandy came to it, her head in a towel.
▪ He is on the porch already, pounding on the door.
▪ Jim winced, then pounded the door panel with his fist, cursing under his breath.
▪ He pounded on the storm door, and waited.
▪ He might have been pounding on the door of a tomb.
▪ Sometimes they misread the house numbers, and they pound on our door, demanding to be let in.
fist
▪ When she stayed put, the men began pounding their fists on the tables as well.
▪ Daley turned purple and pounded his fist on the lecterns when he later denied the rumor.
▪ Stevenson has long since taken his towering presence and pounding fists into retirement.
▪ He pounded his fist on the desk.
foot
▪ But he did not turn, he did not even falter, because his head was up and his feet were pounding.
▪ The whole place reverberated with noise, feet pounding up and down stairs, children yelling, women shouting, doors banging.
▪ Throughout the hotel, doors slammed, and feet could be heard pounding the length of corridors.
head
▪ They had their heads down and were pounding across the ground with one aim in mind.
▪ My head began to pound as soon as I got there.
▪ Her head pounded, forcing her to come to some decision.
▪ The consequences: You feel nauseated again and your head is pounding.
▪ I skidded into the forecourt and ran behind a pump, gasping and belching and feeling my head pound.
▪ Her head was pounding, her hands wanted to be claws.
heart
▪ In the long silence that stretched between them she could almost hear her heart pounding like a sledge-hammer in her chest.
▪ I jumped, a small, involuntary hop in place, my heart pounding.
▪ My heart was pounding, my stomach spinning like a child's top.
▪ He wanted to pretend cool detachment, but his heart was pounding.
▪ She forced her eyes open, and at once her heart was pounding.
▪ I felt my own blouse sticking to my back, my heart pounding fast.
▪ Corbett suddenly remembered his last meeting with the nuns at Godstowe and his heart began to pound.
hundred
▪ I drove to Saltcoats, then Prestwick, a hundred pounds here, forty there.
▪ I pictured myself picking at least three hundred pounds a day and took the job.
▪ Weston is now the vicar of a parish two miles away, with three hundred pounds a year.
▪ He opens the door unto a crumbling Tatica, two hundred pounds going limp in his arms.
key
▪ With a sinking sensation in her stomach, she heard the trooper's fingers pound the keys again.
▪ Most of all, her eyes lingered on tIe thick, short fingers as they pounded the keys.
million
▪ Lloyds pretax profit dropped 28 percent to 42. 2 million pounds from 58. 3 million pounds a year earlier.
▪ Quilter employs 236 people and had estimated revenues of 18. 5 million pounds in 1995.
▪ Braithwaite employees 51 people and had revenues of 4. 5 million pounds last year.
▪ Eight analysts surveyed Friday had predicted pretax profit of between 130 million pounds and 127 million pounds.
▪ Sales at the unit rose 13 percent to 235. 4 million pounds.
▪ The initial forecast was for 2. 5 million pounds a year, but consumers were clamoring for more.
▪ D., a provider of online information, lost 3. 0 million pounds on revenues of 9. 6 million.
pavement
▪ He turned and saw a lithe figure in a track suit pounding the pavement towards him.
▪ And if my next fifteen years are spent pounding the pavement in search of a job without a handset in it - too bad.
▪ When he's not on the track competing, you will find Paul out pounding the pavements.
year
▪ Typically, however, the savings from this convenience will be small, probably no more than a few pounds a year.
▪ Lloyds pretax profit dropped 28 percent to 42. 2 million pounds from 58. 3 million pounds a year earlier.
▪ Braithwaite employees 51 people and had revenues of 4. 5 million pounds last year.
▪ Weston is now the vicar of a parish two miles away, with three hundred pounds a year.
▪ The initial forecast was for 2. 5 million pounds a year, but consumers were clamoring for more.
■ VERB
begin
▪ Corbett suddenly remembered his last meeting with the nuns at Godstowe and his heart began to pound.
▪ My head began to pound as soon as I got there.
▪ He dragged himself back, anxious now, and began to pound the life back into his legs.
▪ When she stayed put, the men began pounding their fists on the tables as well.
▪ His hear began to pound against his ribs, and his hands trembled.
▪ She took up her cleaver and began to pound on some veal, making Moza flinch.
▪ As she turned the corner into Perry Street her heart began to pound.
▪ Manion felt his heart begin to pound as Lynne got up to leave.
hear
▪ In the long silence that stretched between them she could almost hear her heart pounding like a sledge-hammer in her chest.
▪ I could hear my blood pounding.
▪ She could hear the sea pounding on the rocks far below.
▪ From above he heard the pounding of planks.
▪ His hear began to pound against his ribs, and his hands trembled.
▪ The din set up by dry corn leaves nearly paralyzed her with fear and she could hear the pounding of her heart.
▪ Throughout the hotel, doors slammed, and feet could be heard pounding the length of corridors.
▪ He had heard the pounding, too, and thought a storm shutter had torn loose.
weigh
▪ Not computer programmer Kevin Kennedy, 38, who weighs nearly 400 pounds.
▪ The handset looks like an elongated remote control and weighs only 1 pound.
▪ Supply packets weighed 20 to 50 pounds an item, and if you drop that from 40 feet, you kill people.
▪ Weightlifting overview: He weighed 220 pounds at the age of 10.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a run on the dollar/pound etc
an ounce of prevention (is worth a pound of cure)
be down to your last pound/dollar/litre etc
in for a penny, in for a pound
multimillion-pound/multimillion-dollar etc
pound/hit the pavement
▪ For months, Garcia pounded the pavement for jobs.
▪ And if my next fifteen years are spent pounding the pavement in search of a job without a handset in it - too bad.
▪ He turned and saw a lithe figure in a track suit pounding the pavement towards him.
▪ I wrenched the wheel round in a tight turn, hitting the pavement as I went.
▪ It began to rain when she was half way along Gloucester Road, big spots like buttons hitting the pavement.
▪ Or pull out your own wheels and hit the pavement.
▪ The brown paper bag tied with white string hit the pavement, split and corn went all over the place.
▪ When he's not on the track competing, you will find Paul out pounding the pavements.
take a pounding
▪ Our football team took a real pounding.
▪ Advertising revenue has taken a pounding from the consolidation among retailers.
▪ But if the choppers took a pounding, the ground troops also suffered.
▪ But in order to do that you have to take a pounding.
▪ Quarterback Gus Frerotte took a pounding behind a line that has undergone yet another injury-induced shuffle.
▪ Referee Rudy Battle had seen enough soon after and called it off as Dixon took a pounding.
▪ The older kids get, the more your home takes a pounding.
ten pounds' worth/$500 worth etc of sth
the grey pound
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Army cannons continued to pound the city from the hillsides.
▪ He pounded some garlic and ginger and put it in the pan.
▪ Here the loose earth had been pounded flat by thousands of feet.
▪ Jessica felt her heart pounding but forced herself to remain calm.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A sweeping attack peaked when Greenwood played a one-two with Healey before pounding in for his hat-trick.
▪ Before this defeat, their lowest point was a 25-10 pounding from San Diego on Oct. 5.
▪ He pounded along the street and round two corners, losing his way.
▪ Her heart was pounding, and she felt sick.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Pound

Pound \Pound\, v. i.

  1. To strike heavy blows; to beat.

  2. (Mach.) To make a jarring noise, as in running; as, the engine pounds.

Pound

Pound \Pound\, n. [AS. pund an inclosure: cf. forpyndan to turn away, or to repress, also Icel. pynda to extort, torment, Ir. pont, pond, pound. Cf. Pinder, Pinfold, Pin to inclose, Pond.]

  1. An inclosure, maintained by public authority, in which cattle or other animals are confined when taken in trespassing, or when going at large in violation of law; a pinfold.
    --Shak.

  2. A level stretch in a canal between locks.

  3. (Fishing) A kind of net, having a large inclosure with a narrow entrance into which fish are directed by wings spreading outward.

    Pound covert, a pound that is close or covered over, as a shed.

    Pound overt, a pound that is open overhead.

Pound

Pound \Pound\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pounded; p. pr. & vb. n. Pounding.] [OE. pounen, AS. punian to bruise. Cf. Pun a play on words.]

  1. To strike repeatedly with some heavy instrument; to beat.

    With cruel blows she pounds her blubbered cheeks.
    --Dryden.

  2. To comminute and pulverize by beating; to bruise or break into fine particles with a pestle or other heavy instrument; as, to pound spice or salt.

Pound

Pound \Pound\, v. t. To confine in, or as in, a pound; to impound.
--Milton.

Pound

Pound \Pound\, n.; pl. Pounds, collectively Pound or Pounds. [AS. pund, fr. L. pondo, akin to pondus a weight, pendere to weigh. See Pendant.]

  1. A certain specified weight; especially, a legal standard consisting of an established number of ounces.

    Note: The pound in general use in the United States and in England is the pound avoirdupois, which is divided into sixteen ounces, and contains 7,000 grains. The pound troy is divided into twelve ounces, and contains 5,760 grains. 144 pounds avoirdupois are equal to 175 pounds troy weight. See Avoirdupois, and Troy.

  2. A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value.

    Note: The pound sterling was in Saxon times, about a. d. 671, a pound troy of silver, and a shilling was its twentieth part; consequently the latter was three times as large as it is at present.
    --Peacham.

Pound

Pound \Pound\, n.; pl. Pounds, collectively Pound or Pounds. [AS. pund, fr. L. pondo, akin to pondus a weight, pendere to weigh. See Pendant.]

  1. A certain specified weight; especially, a legal standard consisting of an established number of ounces.

    Note: The pound in general use in the United States and in England is the pound avoirdupois, which is divided into sixteen ounces, and contains 7,000 grains. The pound troy is divided into twelve ounces, and contains 5,760 grains. 144 pounds avoirdupois are equal to 175 pounds troy weight. See Avoirdupois, and Troy.

  2. A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value.

    Note: The pound sterling was in Saxon times, about a. d. 671, a pound troy of silver, and a shilling was its twentieth part; consequently the latter was three times as large as it is at present.
    --Peacham.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
pound

"enclosed place for animals," late 14c., from a late Old English word attested in compounds (such as pundfald "penfold, pound"), related to pyndan "to dam up, enclose (water)," and thus from the same root as pond. Ultimate origin unknown; some sources indicate a possible root *bend meaning "protruding point" found only in Celtic and Germanic.

pound

"hit repeatedly," from Middle English pounen, from Old English punian "crush, pulverize, beat, bruise," from West Germanic *puno- (cognates: Low German pun, Dutch puin "fragments"). With intrusive -d- from 16c. Sense of "beat, thrash" is from 1790. Related: Pounded; pounding.

pound

measure of weight, Old English pund "pound" (in weight or money), also "pint," from Proto-Germanic *punda- "pound" as a measure of weight (source of Gothic pund, Old High German phunt, German Pfund, Middle Dutch pont, Old Frisian and Old Norse pund), early borrowing from Latin pondo "pound," originally in libra pondo "a pound by weight," from pondo (adv.) "by weight," ablative of *pondus "weight" (see span (v.)). Meaning "unit of money" was in Old English, originally "pound of silver."\n

\nAt first "12 ounces;" meaning "16 ounces" was established before late 14c. Pound cake (1747) so called because it has a pound, more or less, of each ingredient. Pound of flesh is from "Merchant of Venice" IV.i. The abbreviations lb., £ are from libra, and reflect the medieval custom of keeping accounts in Latin.

Wiktionary
pound

Etymology 1 n. 1 A unit of mass equal to 16 avoirdupois ounces (= 453.592 37 g). Today this value is the most common meaning of "pound" as a unit of weight. 2 A unit of mass equal to 12 troy weights (≈ 373.242 g). Today, this is a common unit of weight when measuring precious metals, and is little used elsewhere. 3 (context US English) The symbol (unsupported: #) (octothorpe, hash) 4 The unit of currency used in the United Kingdom and its dependency. It is divided into 100 pence. 5 Any of various units of currency used in Cyprus, Egypt, Lebanon, and formerly in the Republic of Ireland and Israel. 6 Any of various units of currency formerly used in the United States. 7 (plural of pound nodot=1 English)Category:English plurals (unit of currency) 8 Abbreviation for pound-force, a unit of force/weight. Using this abbreviation to describe pound-force is inaccurate and unscientific. Etymology 2

n. 1 A place for the detention of stray or wandering animals. 2 A place for the detention of automobiles that have been illegally parked, abandoned, etc. 3 The part of a canal between two locks, and therefore at the same water level. 4 A kind of fishing net, having a large enclosure with a narrow entrance into which fish are directed by wings spreading outward. vb. To confine in, or as in, a pound; to impound. Etymology 3

alt. (label en transitive) To strike hard, usually repeatedly. n. A hard blow. vb. (label en transitive) To strike hard, usually repeatedly.

WordNet
pound
  1. n. 16 ounces; "he tried to lift 100 pounds" [syn: lb]

  2. the basic unit of money in Great Britain; equal to 100 pence [syn: British pound, pound sterling, quid]

  3. the basic unit of money in Syria; equal to 100 piasters [syn: Syrian pound]

  4. the basic unit of money in the Sudan; equal to 100 piasters [syn: Sudanese pound]

  5. the basic unit of money in Lebanon; equal to 100 piasters [syn: Lebanese pound]

  6. formerly the basic unit of money in Ireland; equal to 100 pence [syn: Irish pound, Irish punt, punt]

  7. the basic unit of money in Egypt; equal to 100 piasters [syn: Egyptian pound]

  8. the basic unit of money in Cyprus; equal to 100 cents [syn: Cypriot pound]

  9. a nontechnical unit of force equal to the mass of 1 pound with an acceleration of free fall equal to 32 feet/sec/sec [syn: lbf.]

  10. United States writer who lived in Europe; strongly influenced the development of modern literature (1885-1972) [syn: Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound]

  11. a public enclosure for stray or unlicensed dogs; "unlicensed dogs will be taken to the pound" [syn: dog pound]

  12. the act of pounding (delivering repeated heavy blows); "the sudden hammer of fists caught him off guard"; "the pounding of feet on the hallway" [syn: hammer, hammering, pounding]

pound
  1. v. hit hard with the hand, fist, or some heavy instrument; "the salesman pounded the door knocker"; "a bible-thumping Southern Baptist" [syn: thump, poke]

  2. strike or drive against with a heavy impact; "ram the gate with a sledgehammer"; "pound on the door" [syn: ram, ram down]

  3. move heavily or clumsily; "The heavy man lumbered across the room" [syn: lumber]

  4. move rhythmically; "Her heart was beating fast" [syn: beat, thump]

  5. partition off into compartments; "The locks pound the water of the canal" [syn: pound off]

  6. shut up or confine in any enclosure or within any bounds or limits; "The prisoners are safely pounded" [syn: pound up]

  7. place or shut up in a pound; "pound the cows so they don't stray" [syn: impound]

  8. break down and crush by beating, as with a pestle; "pound the roots with a heavy flat stone"

Gazetteer
Pound, WI -- U.S. village in Wisconsin
Population (2000): 355
Housing Units (2000): 174
Land area (2000): 0.815422 sq. miles (2.111934 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.815422 sq. miles (2.111934 sq. km)
FIPS code: 64750
Located within: Wisconsin (WI), FIPS 55
Location: 45.093795 N, 88.032899 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 54161
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Pound, WI
Pound
Pound, VA -- U.S. town in Virginia
Population (2000): 1089
Housing Units (2000): 516
Land area (2000): 2.607964 sq. miles (6.754595 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 2.607964 sq. miles (6.754595 sq. km)
FIPS code: 64272
Located within: Virginia (VA), FIPS 51
Location: 37.123820 N, 82.607859 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 24279
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Pound, VA
Pound
Wikipedia
Pound (mass)

The pound or pound-mass (abbreviations: lb, lb, lbm, ) is a unit of mass used in the imperial, United States customary and other systems of measurement. A number of different definitions have been used, the most common today being the international avoirdupois pound which is legally defined as exactly , and which is divided into 16 avoirdupois ounces.

The unit is descended from the Roman libra (hence the abbreviation "lb"). The English word pound is cognate with, among others, GermanPfund, Dutchpond, and Swedishpund. All ultimately derive from a borrowing into Proto-Germanic of the Latin expression lībra pondō ("a pound by weight"), in which the word pondō is the ablative case of the Latin noun pondus ("weight").

Usage of the unqualified term pound reflects the historical conflation of mass and weight. This accounts for the modern distinguishing terms pound-mass and pound-force.

Pound (force)

The pound-force (symbol: lb, or lbf) is a unit of force used in some systems of measurement including English Engineering units and the British Gravitational System. Pound force should not to be confused with foot-pounds or pound-feet, which are units of torque, and may be written as "lb·ft" or "lb·ft". They should not be confused with avoirdupois pound (symbol: lb), often simply called pounds, which are a unit of mass.

Pound (band)

Pound (later Flywheel) was an American rock band from Poughkeepsie, New York.

Pound (film)

Pound is a 1970 film directed and written by Robert Downey, Sr., it was based on The Comeuppance, an Off-Off Broadway play written by Downey in 1961. It is about several dogs, along with a Siamese cat and a penguin, at a pound, as they await being euthanised; the animals are played by human actors. It was the film debut of Robert Downey, Jr., the director's 5-year-old son, as a puppy.

Pound (magazine)

Pound is a Toronto-based hip hop magazine that is distributed for free across Canada. Founded in 1998 and beginning publication in December 1999, Pound is published quarterly. As of July 2009, the magazine had published 42 issues.

Pound (currency)

The pound is a unit of currency in some nations. The term originated in Great Britain as the value of a pound (weight) of silver.

The English word pound is cognate with, among others, GermanPfund, Dutchpond, and Swedishpund. All ultimately derive from a borrowing into Proto-Germanic of the Latin expression lībra pondō ("a pound by weight"), in which the word pondō is the ablative case of the Latin noun pondus ("weight"). The English word "pound" first referred to a unit of mass or weight; the monetary pound originated as a pound (by weight) of silver.

The currency's symbol is £, a stylised representation of the letter L, standing for livre or lira. Historically, £1 worth of silver coins were a troy pound in weight; in April 2011 this amount of silver was worth approximately £300 sterling.

Today, the term may refer to a number of (primarily British and related) currencies and a variety of obsolete currencies. Some of them, those official in former Italian states and in countries formerly belonging to the Ottoman Empire, are called pound in English, while in the local languages their official name is lira.

Pound (networking)

Pound is a lightweight open source reverse proxy program and application firewall suitable to be used as a web server load balancing solution. Developed by an IT security company, it has a strong emphasis on security. The original intent on developing Pound was to allow distributing the load among several Zope servers running on top of ZEO (Zope Extensible Object). However, Pound is not limited to Zope-based installations. Using regular expression matching on the requested URLs, Pound can pass different kinds of requests to different backend server groups. A few more of its most important features:

  • detects when a backend server fails or recovers, and bases its load balancing decisions on this information: if a backend server fails, it will not receive requests until it recovers
  • decrypts https requests to http ones
  • IPv6 support
  • can load balance from IPv6 clients to IPv4 servers and vice versa
  • rejects incorrect requests
  • can be used in a chroot environment
  • has no special requirements concerning which web server software or browser to use
  • supports virtual hosts
  • Server Name Indication (SNI) for SSL/TLS certificate negotiation
  • configurable

Pound is distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License and can be used free of charge even in business environments.

Pound

Pound or Pounds may refer to:

Pound (surname)

Pound is the surname of:

  • Albert Pound (1831-?), American politician and businessman
  • Cuthbert Winfred Pound (1864–1935), American lawyer and politician from New York
  • Dick Pound (born 1942), Canadian lawyer
  • Dudley Pound (1877–1943), British naval officer
  • Ezra Pound (1885–1972), American expatriate poet and critic
  • Glenn Simpson Pound (1914-2010), American educator
  • James Pound (1669–1724), English clergyman and astronomer
  • Jessie Brown Pounds (1861–1921), American writer of gospel songs
  • Louise Pound (1872–1958), American folklorist and college professor
  • Omar Pound (1926–2010), Anglo-American writer, teacher, and translator
  • Robert Pound (1919–2010), American physicist
  • Roscoe Pound (1870–1964), American legal scholar and educator
  • Stephen Pound (born 1948), British Labour Party politician
  • Stephen Bosworth Pound (1833–1911), lawyer, senator and judge
  • Thaddeus C. Pound (1833–1914), American politician and businessman, brother of Albert Pound and grandfather of Ezra Pound

Usage examples of "pound".

James abetted him in saying that fifty pounds was not a penny too much to lend on such a treasure.

Her heart pounding so violently she physically shook, Abigail clawed at his arm.

With bestial grace, the Scylvendi pounded the abomination, pressing him back.

Knackstedt has seen an abscess of the thigh which contained eight pounds of milk.

Also, that he wanted papers to be drawn up to the effect that one thousand pounds a year was to be allotted to acertain lady in support of herself and her son.

The house having addressed the king for a particular and distinct account of the distribution of two hundred and fifty thousand pounds, charged to have been issued for securing the trade and navigation of the kingdom, and preserving and restoring the peace of Europe, he declined granting their request, but signified in general that part of the money had been issued and disbursed by his late majesty, and the remainder by himself, for carrying on the same necessary services, which required the greatest secrecy.

Commander Kurt Lennox stood aft of the tall pile of clutter, heart pounding.

Syrinx watched in utter fascination as the two passed within fifty metres of the boat, rocking it alarmingly in their pounding wake.

Time after time the watchers on the ship saw the stiff rod bend suddenly as he braced himself to heave a struggling albacore of thirty or forty pounds into the canoe.

A word, a heave in unison, and the albacore lay gasping in the bilges -- a magnificent fish of a hundred pounds or more.

You can take Madame Alp home with you for only one-fifteenth of a cent per pound!

Huskisson rightly asked whether this amercement of five pounds, and this subscription of one shilling a week to the funds of the association, which every member was called upon to pay and contribute, would not produce to each of the parties, if placed in a saving-bank, far more beneficial and advantageous results?

Castilian Amoroso its name is - and then you get them to buy it, and then you write to the people and tell them the other people want the wine, and then for every dozen you sell you get two shillings from the wine people, so if you sell twenty dozen a week you get your two pounds.

The East India Company paid him the cost of his trial, amounting to more than seventy thousand pounds sterling, and conferred upon him a pecuniary donation.

Her heart pounding, Angelique stood motionless where he had set her down.