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Crossword clues for picture

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
picture
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a clear picture/idea (=a good understanding)
▪ Some work experience should give you a clear idea of what the job involves.
a comprehensive picture
▪ The police still do not have a comprehensive picture of what happened.
a picture dictionary (=containing a lot of pictures, especially for children or beginners in a language)
▪ The advantage of a picture dictionary is that you don't have lengthy definitions.
a picture/portrait gallery
▪ The picture gallery is full of treasures.
a wedding photograph/picture
▪ my mother’s old wedding photographs
an exclusive report/interview/picture (=appearing in only one newspaper or magazine)
▪ The newspaper featured exclusive pictures of the couple’s new baby.
build (up) a picture of sb/sth (=form a clear idea about someone or something)
▪ We’re trying to build up a picture of what happened.
compromising letter/photograph/picture etc
conjure up images/pictures/thoughts etc (of sth)
▪ Dieting always seems to conjure up images of endless salads.
door/window/picture frame
mental picture/image (=a picture that you form in your mind)
▪ I tried to get a mental picture of him from her description.
motion picture
▪ the motion picture industry
moving picture
paint a grim/rosy/gloomy picture of sb/sth
▪ Dickens painted a grim picture of Victorian life.
painted a rosy picture
▪ Letters to relatives in Europe painted a rosy picture of life in the United States.
paints a gloomy picture
▪ The report paints a gloomy picture of the economy.
picture book
picture card
picture messaging
picture postcard
picture quality (also image quality)
▪ Does this type of TV set have a better picture quality?
picture rail
picture window
take a picture/photograph/photo
▪ Would you mind taking a photo of us together?
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
accurate
▪ The artist was determined to present an accurate picture.
▪ You can't get an accurate picture off television.
▪ To assess whether this is an accurate picture it is necessary to address the question as to whether crime itself is predominantly working-class.
▪ By doing so, he would more easily be able to form an accurate picture of his father as well.
▪ This reduces the workload and helps in the production of a more comprehensive and accurate picture.
▪ It hopes this will give it a more accurate picture of the actual casualty rate.
▪ By simply questioning informants it is difficult to get an accurate picture of where and when Creole is actually used at home.
▪ Rangers have been shot and no one has an accurate picture of what has happened to the wildlife there.
big
▪ On the wall there was a big picture of Sir Anthony at the piano.
▪ No one in the boats has the luxury of seeing the big picture, of viewing Fuji majestic in the distance.
▪ Stand back from time to time and take a look at the big picture.
▪ This is no longer a team involved in the big picture.
▪ It was part of their mystique: total command of the big picture combined with the ability to delegate technical details.
▪ Yet it was not until researchers extended the same effort to the oceans that the bigger tectonic picture fell into place.
▪ Tough it may be, but you have to rise above it and appreciate the bigger picture.
▪ But Stack is a big idea, big picture kind of guy.
clear
▪ By applying a set of pragmatic guidelines to software choice a clearer picture of the more attractive options emerges.
▪ The Guttmacher study does not paint a clear statistical picture.
▪ I personally doubt whether any clear evolutionary picture would emerge if we were to base ourselves simply on Formen.
▪ Attempts to gain a clearer picture of this boundary layer floundered for several decades.
▪ A team at University College, London, produced the first clear pictures of interiors, using microchips as the specimens.
▪ At last, a clear picture of music lovers and lovers.
▪ Governors will have a clearer picture of what actually takes place in school.
▪ I need you to paint me a clear picture of the changes you expect to see three months down the road.
complete
▪ Often, the media convey a fairly complete picture of the events in question.
▪ Those who want a more complete picture of Kelly must consult the hefty, liberally illustrated catalog.
▪ It helps management build a complete picture of various types of absence, and to identify potential abuses.
▪ Time spent building a complete picture of your ideal position will be well spent.
▪ Inventories, therefore, do not give a complete picture of a person's wealth.
▪ I gave him a more complete picture of my risk profile.
▪ But he talked so damn much, let slip a lot of details that added up to a fairly complete picture.
▪ Every month the Shell Gold Card provides a series of reports which give you a complete picture of your fleet's performance.
different
▪ Your brain gets two slightly different pictures of the pencil - one from each eye.
▪ Goodman presents quite a different picture.
▪ The number of passives produced in response to the different pictures varied considerably.
▪ However, if shown a new and different picture, they demonstrate renewed inter-est.
▪ Your brain uses the slightly different pictures from each eye to judge distance accurately.
▪ Powell's visit last month as secretary of state presented a vastly different picture.
▪ I want to defend a radically different picture, which takes a much broader historical perspective.
▪ Shift the frame ever so slightly, and you get a completely different picture.
gloomy
▪ No doubt that was too gloomy a picture.
▪ He brings a book of verse with a few gloomy pictures.
▪ It is not a particularly gloomy financial picture for you, just a rather unstable one.
▪ Malthus' gloomy picture of human life seems to many contemporary commentators much too atomistic and adversarial.
▪ All of this seems to have painted a rather gloomy picture.
▪ There was one solitary corrective to this gloomy picture.
▪ Domestic economic factors further complicated this gloomy picture.
▪ They objected to being given an unnecessarily gloomy picture at first.
good
▪ Lee must win best foreign-language picture Oscar this spring-or indeed best picture.
▪ In this eccentric Oscar year, will the simple virtues prevail when it comes to the best picture category?
▪ It might have been a better picture.
▪ Babe G A best picture Oscar nominee.
▪ It was a good picture before it became a bad picture.
▪ This single episode gave me a very good picture of Harold Wilson's qualities and defects.
▪ And for once there is no lack of likely names for the final two best picture slots.
main
▪ Our main picture shows an Ancistrus described as a Chubby Bristlenose.
▪ The male is to the front. Main picture: The female takes a breather.
mental
▪ Disappointment followed, the lurid projector of mental pictures shut down and I was left feeling I ought to have known better.
▪ As they crossed Park Avenue, he had a mental picture of what an ideal pair they made.
▪ This is in order to provide the reader with a mental picture of the house as the technical options are discussed.
▪ They learn to let words create a mental picture and to then make a replica of their vision.
▪ She had a mental picture of Samuel Roberts' fine, hard face.
▪ Somewhere between the event and the sentence is a mental picture.
▪ When she switched on the light her cosy mental picture was shattered by crude reality.
▪ They make a funny mental picture because she is so short and he is so tall, just for starters.
overall
▪ The overall world picture shows: The basic modes of transmission have not changed.
▪ Herodotos gives mainly an account of single ships' actions; he adds details, but gives no overall picture.
▪ The overall picture today, however, is of a decreasing number of musically-skilled people.
▪ Using distance, parsimony and maximum-likelihood methods the overall picture of eukaryote small-subunit rRNA phylogeny remains unchanged.
▪ What is the overall picture of the process of addictive disease?
▪ It is the overall picture that matters.
▪ The graph provides an overall picture of the data which makes spotting trend or correlation of data in your spreadsheet.
▪ The overall picture, however, is of a lack of systematic training in church music for ordinands.
pretty
▪ Individuals painted a pretty grim picture of the pressures within social security offices.
▪ Not a pretty picture, is it?
▪ All in all, it is a pretty unconvincing picture.
▪ This is not going to be a pretty picture.
▪ And the charter made a pretty picture.
▪ She wanted more than the two dimensions of pretty pictures, more than the garbled pidgin of kitchen natives.
▪ But the countryside is more than just a pretty picture.
▪ Bright blue hyperlinks. Pretty pictures.
vivid
▪ There are extraordinarily vivid and exuberant pictures which are countered by others which have an almost penitential mood to them.
▪ But from the log books of 100 years ago, there is a very vivid picture of school life in Bentley.
▪ Nice vivid pictures, despite working on old computers.
▪ He also describes vivid pictures with extreme detail and.
▪ Her imagination conjured up an erotically vivid picture and she knew a hectic flush had risen to her cheeks.
▪ Memories tumbled out, dancing past her closed eyes in a vivid string of pictures.
▪ But he had a vivid picture of her in his mind, lean and hungry in her scarlet bathing suit.
▪ Their attention to the minor details of everyday life paints a far more vivid picture of bygone days than any history book.
whole
▪ So the whole picture comes together.
▪ However, although we can keep this association in mind, it does not give us the whole picture.
▪ He may additionally, by dream mechanisms and current computation, try to fashion in a whole technicolor picture of the scenery.
▪ Essentially, creativity, as Coleridge sees it, comes down to the ability to perceive the whole picture.
▪ We never really get the whole picture.
▪ But it is not the whole picture.
■ NOUN
book
▪ Bodiam is a picture book castle and a favourite with children of all ages.
▪ They listen to stories, memorize nursery rhymes, look at picture books and gain other experiences that prepare them to read.
▪ Roald Dahl's last picture book tells how Billy rescued the tiny Minpins from the smoke belching Gruncher.
▪ A five-page picture book is needed to explain the steps required to release and lift the hood of army vehicles.
▪ Apparently she often approached him with a picture book or toy to engage him in play with her.
▪ One of the greatest historians for children is the author Jean Fritz who has written historical novels and picture books.
▪ Colouring books help their writing skills ... picture books help their reading skills ... counting books help them with their numbers.
▪ One-night picture books require parents to select and begin a new story every night.
frame
▪ She was appalled when he explained to her she would be required to pose in a picture frame.
▪ He regilded picture frames, glued back together broken cups and plates.
▪ Burst walls, the marks of picture frames, the shadow of a crucifix.
▪ It was empty apart from a round wooden table, a large golden picture frame on one wall and a cupboard.
▪ The tube is a flat glass panel like a thick picture frame.
▪ It will all look so much nicer than bits of tied drying holly tucked into picture frames.
▪ Each door had two handles on either side and on walls hung wooden and metal picture frames.
▪ In distinguishing between these two, Gombrich uses the picture frame as an example of design.
motion
▪ It is possible to teach every branch of human knowledge with the motion picture.
▪ Those who invest with him get the motion picture -- meaning his ongoing judgment, including when to sell.
▪ What had to be done was that motion pictures had to be made respectable.
▪ As per above, but for motion pictures.
▪ On a motion picture I have a team of anywhere from one hundred to two hundred people.
▪ Creativity is required, then, for the banker as well as the motion picture director.
▪ The revolution began with the invention of motion picture film early in the twentieth century.
▪ She became adept at filming with a motion picture camera as well as still camera.
postcard
▪ Anyone who can help with old picture postcards or other memorabilia can contact Chris on Darlington.
▪ She had not even sent me a picture postcard.
▪ Since then it has been many times re-invented and used for 3D picture postcards.
▪ It was too perfect; a picture postcard blown up to the scale of real life.
▪ A few picture postcards casually sent could not be considered remembering in any serious sense.
▪ It's a picture postcard brought to life.
▪ For Katherine the landscape bore none of the familiarity of a picture postcard.
▪ They could have been painted from picture postcards and probably were.
window
▪ Now, at the Mirage, Ali stands and walks stiffly towards the picture windows overlooking Las Vegas.
▪ Some one looking through the picture window spotted Lois before she got more than half way up the front walk.
▪ The picture windows shattered, and the bar cracked apart where the bullets went in.
▪ Although it is July, the house has a Christmas wreath hung in its picture window.
▪ Next door, where Ed Preston lived, somebody is watching me from the picture window.
▪ All staterooms are outside with large picture windows and private bathroom facilities.
▪ He was standing in the dark, in front of a picture window, fireworks exploding silently behind him.
▪ He fixed the bedroom and picture windows, glazing the edges of the glass with care.
■ VERB
build
▪ How do you build up the picture in a regression session?
▪ In Vera Cruz, a mob gathered in front of the government building and demanded a picture of Santa Anna.
▪ These shapes are built into moving pictures which are inspired by those drawn by Blake to illustrate stories from the Bible.
▪ Time spent building a complete picture of your ideal position will be well spent.
▪ It helps management build a complete picture of various types of absence, and to identify potential abuses.
▪ Often we have only fragments of bones to build up a mental picture of the final complete skeleton.
▪ By using overlays, one can build up a picture stage by stage.
▪ You might argue that such an investigation, though time-consuming, would enable you to build up the picture you want.
draw
▪ Repeated commissions and zemstvo investigations drew a grim picture of peasant destitution and growing frustration.
▪ You might encourage them by drawing a picture of a playground slide.
▪ I was drawing these pictures in my head of walking across a tightrope and falling into a chasm.
▪ How does it look now? Draw a picture of what you actually see.
▪ To help you complete this plan, try to draw a picture that you will associate with your goal.
▪ As the students are drawing, walk around to be sure that they are drawing an exact picture of the hanging hammer.
▪ Yet all of the children could draw a picture of themselves and their shadow.
▪ He drew some pictures for me, holding the marker awkwardly.
emerge
▪ A similar picture emerges in relation to the distribution of gross earnings among female manual workers.
▪ A similar tax preparation picture emerges at the California state level.
▪ I personally doubt whether any clear evolutionary picture would emerge if we were to base ourselves simply on Formen.
▪ It may be some time before a clear picture of economic activity emerges, analysts said.
▪ Despite the limitations of the available data, the picture which emerges from this review is complex and interesting.
▪ A contrasting picture emerged from Gen.
▪ At the regional scale a much more varied picture of bus services emerges.
▪ A similar picture emerges in the case of women except that women's earnings at all levels are only two-thirds of men's.
give
▪ The absolute size of population gains and losses gives a slightly different picture of regional change.
▪ A longer view can give us a clearer picture.
▪ Herodotos gives mainly an account of single ships' actions; he adds details, but gives no overall picture.
▪ It gives a dynamic picture of science rather than the static account of the most naive falsificationists.
▪ To give a full picture of this past is a daunting task, not within the scope of this book.
▪ They used a thermal imaging camera which gives a picture like this of bodies on the ground.
▪ However, although we can keep this association in mind, it does not give us the whole picture.
▪ First, you must decide on the sort of atmosphere that you wish to give your picture.
look
▪ She looked a picture of health as she was cuddled by her relieved mum Michelle and dad David.
▪ Find a page with a picture. Look at the picture.
▪ But yesterday, she looked a picture of gloom.
▪ Application With your students, read the paragraph and look at the labeled picture on the application sheet.
▪ There was, however, nothing phony about his powers of connoisseurship, and looking at pictures with him was fascinating.
▪ Application With the class, look at some pictures of different animals.
▪ He was looking closely at the picture in his hand.
▪ Rufus had not looked at the picture for years.
paint
▪ Mr Howard painted a picture of industrial unrest under Labour rivalling the worst days of the 1970s.
▪ In recent weeks and months, the headlines have painted a picture of an industry in crisis.
▪ The final story began when Jane painted a picture.
▪ Their thinking may include negative self-talk that paints a picture of current and future failure.
▪ All of this seems to have painted a rather gloomy picture.
▪ Do all these dealings paint a picture of a couple who have maintained sole and separate property, as they have maintained?
▪ I do not understand how the Government can paint the picture that they have.
▪ You need to compose your career the way you would write a piece of music or paint a picture.
present
▪ The most up-to-date figures present a less black picture than was thought to be the case at the time.
▪ Goodman presents quite a different picture.
▪ The artist was determined to present an accurate picture.
▪ To present such a picture of a typical abusive marriage is misleading.
▪ Other counties present a similar picture.
▪ Powell's visit last month as secretary of state presented a vastly different picture.
▪ But in order to keep the argument as clear as possible we presented a fairly static picture of the class structure.
▪ Alternatively, the students could draw pictures rather than write stories and present their pictures to the class.
produce
▪ These electrical pulses are then analysed and used to produce detailed pictures of a patient's internal organs.
▪ But the magazine hit back by producing a picture of Mrs Barantes with one of their journalists.
▪ Two photographers have produced pictures of Simpson wearing the shoes at a November 1993 Buffalo Bills football game.
▪ Heat detection produces pictures at night.
▪ Indeed, that is certainly true, but we must bear in mind the way that the computer actually produces these pictures.
▪ Another use is to produce pictures of an unborn baby by reflecting ultrasonic waves off its body.
▪ Class based analyses which exclude them therefore produce a misleading picture of inequalities in child health.
provide
▪ Environmental forecasting Scanning and monitoring provide a picture of what has already taken place and what is happening.
▪ The spate of incidents may provide a clearer picture of changes that might be needed in those regulations.
▪ The graph provides an overall picture of the data which makes spotting trend or correlation of data in your spreadsheet.
▪ Today, the other fast-food chains provide the pictures too.
▪ This is operating normally, providing pictures with the usual 80 m resolution.
▪ They have a wide view to help them look out for the hunters. Provide the students with pictures of animals.
▪ This provides a very clear picture of the total activity although the order of doing things may not be obvious.
▪ Now, videotape provides instant pictures, which solves the problem of processing delays.
see
▪ These styles can be seen in the pictures of mod rallies at seaside towns.
▪ On the Cover they saw the picture of a Negro author, and they commented on that.
▪ There were two easels in the room and on one she saw an unfinished picture.
▪ Strangely, I have never seen pictures of smiling persons with shopping carts standing over piles of steak.
▪ Hindelang reviewed a series of such studies to see how different a picture they gave from arrest or court data.
▪ I saw a picture of that boat last week.
show
▪ A tree is shown in the Niobid picture, trees and small plants in the vase illustrated in figs. 109 and 116.
▪ Make contact. Show them pictures of your hometown.
▪ This miracle shows a picture of the Church.
▪ He did not attempt to show those pictures to the jury.
▪ I showed them a picture of a sheep and they didn't believe that it existed.
▪ For instance, why is showing an unflattering picture of Bob Dole in a television commercial such a terrible crime?
▪ Journalists were shown reassuring pictures aimed at proving how technology helps control natural phenomena.
▪ The flowers alone had cost five thousand, and the paper showed pictures of father and daughter.
take
▪ Younis told me that they'd taken my picture because I'd hidden it.
▪ My father is taking a picture of us on this very important day.
▪ She took her pictures down from the wall.
▪ Now I understand, as I back away, claiming to need a better angle from which to take a picture.
▪ But when the paparazzi responded by taking pictures of Buckingham Palace-based Mr Arbiter, he angrily demanded their names.
▪ What do they take from these pictures?
▪ Setting up the picture Briefing To take really good pictures photographers need to be properly briefed.
▪ He took some still pictures of them with his Leica, and they immediately formed groups, asking him to take more.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
cloud the issue/picture etc
▪ These comments should not be allowed to cloud the picture too much.
library pictures/footage
pretty as a picture
▪ Francesca was as pretty as a picture and apparently glowing with health.
▪ Property: Not quite as pretty as a picture A house committed to canvas is a house that's easy to sell.
▪ Rachel looked as pretty as a picture, her lovely body warmly covered by a grey riding cloak lined with miniver fur.
▪ She looked surprised, and threw up her hands, pretty as a picture, then began to set the chessmen afresh.
the larger issues/question/problem/picture
▪ But the larger picture is systematically distorted by the military and political calculations concerning the strategic uses of information and disinformation.
▪ Here we are concerned with the larger problem of the relationship between men as a class and other animals as a class.
▪ It has come to have a bearing on the larger questions of civilized survival.
▪ Mission-driven budgets relieve legislators of micromanagement decisions, freeing them to focus on the larger problems they were elected to solve.
▪ She was blind to the larger picture that involves building and maintaining good relationships with both fellow-workers and superiors.
▪ That ignorance is at the root of geophysicists' struggle with the larger problem of how the whole earth works.
▪ Too much, and the larger picture might become apparent.
▪ You failed to connect the various elements together or to move through the detail to the larger issues of the painting.
the wider context/issues/picture etc
▪ As ever, context is important, particularly the wider context of New Testament teaching.
▪ Both require standing back from the day-to-day running of the organisation and examining the wider picture.
▪ It is now necessary to situate these in the wider context of the social formation and in particular class structure.
▪ More broadly, it was placed in the wider context of the continuing ambitions of central government to control local independence.
▪ That fact must be put in the wider context.
▪ The change depended upon changes in the wider context of controversy, which provoked the development of formerly implicit attitudinal aspects.
▪ We would expect leaders at all levels to be aware of the wider context of their work.
▪ What interpretations of the wider issues should it consider?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Pictures of her family covered the coffee table.
▪ an early picture by the French Impressionist painter Claude Monet
▪ By the 1930s, Garbo was reportedly earning $250,000 a picture.
▪ Daisy did a lovely picture of a cat at school today.
▪ I didn't know the word in Japanese so I drew a little picture.
▪ I still have a vivid picture in my head of my first day in Paris.
▪ Leo's picture is in the paper today.
▪ The picture's all fuzzy.
▪ The house belonged to the Duke of Wellington, and his picture hangs in the hall.
▪ There was a picture of a windmill on the bedroom wall.
▪ To get a better picture of how the company is doing, look at sales.
▪ Van Gogh's "Sunflowers' is one of the most famous pictures in the world.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After all this rigmarole, they were to write a story to fit the words and pictures they had chosen.
▪ An alarming picture encapsulated a false belief.
▪ Lee must win best foreign-language picture Oscar this spring-or indeed best picture.
▪ My picture of Saja was correct only in the fact that he was a glutton.
▪ The media are merely the messengers, sometimes further sensationalizing and then passing along the false picture that has been painted.
▪ They posed for pictures with him in the tunnel outside the clubhouse.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
above
▪ A liver version of their personalised pennant is pictured above.
▪ She's pictured above, relaxing in a simple but effective room with beams and bare brickwork.
▪ Mrs Scott, pictured above, first took the plunge in 1993 when she converted a house into two flats.
▪ The young boy pictured above is 13 years old and works a minimum of 12 hours a day.
▪ They are pictured above with Albert Lee.
▪ Some of the principal speakers who took part in the Council's 21st International Forum are pictured above.
▪ Jasper Carrott and Phil pictured above are the comedians in question.
here
▪ They're pictured here in their brand new packs.
▪ A mild whitefish fillet can be substituted for the tuna pictured here.
▪ The Manzi brothers, pictured here, are unafraid of clothes that suggest they need ironing.
▪ Lady fern, pictured here, has an elegant appearance with graceful fronds up to three feet in length.
▪ You can add a touch of floral style to your correspondence with the attractive Lady Margaret stationery pictured here.
▪ Mr Beechey, pictured here a few days after the body of his neighbour was discovered, said nothing during the hearing.
▪ Robert's grandfather, Thomas, created the marvellous cake pictured here to celebrate George V's coronation in 1911.
right
▪ Her eyes lit up as she spotted Spartacus hunk Kirk-at 83 just a year her junior and pictured right.
■ NOUN
man
▪ I pictured a man taking leave of his motor; wobbling from the fast lane towards the hard shoulder.
▪ He kept picturing an old man with a hoe, how the poor guy went skidding through the powdery red dust.
▪ She pictured the man stamping down through his pub, irate and duty-bound.
▪ For a moment he pictured the man in his civilian life.
mind
▪ If a story was written skillfully enough to include vivid descriptions, Louisa pictured them in her mind.
▪ He pictured them in his mind, and recoiled from the thought.
▪ Nutty, picturing in her mind the agility required of the cross-country performer, ground her teeth with frustration.
scene
▪ He could picture the scene as if it were yesterday.
▪ I can picture the romantic scene now.
▪ She smiled involuntarily as she pictured the scene.
woman
▪ He'd pictured her as a woman willing to trade physical favours in exchange for her goals.
▪ We, on the other hand, picture a serenely content woman with a baby in her arms.
▪ They pictured Soviet women as hammer-throwers, brawny six-footers who work in brick factories.
▪ They picture women gathered together to dance or perform some apparently ritualistic act of worship.
■ VERB
try
▪ When I wake up, at almost half past eight, I try to picture Agnes.
▪ She tried to picture Benedict thus, but the image would not form.
▪ Close your eyes and try to picture them.
▪ She bowed her head in pain as she tried to picture the face of her husband.
▪ I try to picture the basilica and the beautiful little medieval town of Assisi, tucked into the side of Mount Subasio.
▪ She must not try to picture Ruth in that house.
▪ I tried picturing Detroit, Michigan.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
library pictures/footage
pretty as a picture
▪ Francesca was as pretty as a picture and apparently glowing with health.
▪ Property: Not quite as pretty as a picture A house committed to canvas is a house that's easy to sell.
▪ Rachel looked as pretty as a picture, her lovely body warmly covered by a grey riding cloak lined with miniver fur.
▪ She looked surprised, and threw up her hands, pretty as a picture, then began to set the chessmen afresh.
the larger issues/question/problem/picture
▪ But the larger picture is systematically distorted by the military and political calculations concerning the strategic uses of information and disinformation.
▪ Here we are concerned with the larger problem of the relationship between men as a class and other animals as a class.
▪ It has come to have a bearing on the larger questions of civilized survival.
▪ Mission-driven budgets relieve legislators of micromanagement decisions, freeing them to focus on the larger problems they were elected to solve.
▪ She was blind to the larger picture that involves building and maintaining good relationships with both fellow-workers and superiors.
▪ That ignorance is at the root of geophysicists' struggle with the larger problem of how the whole earth works.
▪ Too much, and the larger picture might become apparent.
▪ You failed to connect the various elements together or to move through the detail to the larger issues of the painting.
the wider context/issues/picture etc
▪ As ever, context is important, particularly the wider context of New Testament teaching.
▪ Both require standing back from the day-to-day running of the organisation and examining the wider picture.
▪ It is now necessary to situate these in the wider context of the social formation and in particular class structure.
▪ More broadly, it was placed in the wider context of the continuing ambitions of central government to control local independence.
▪ That fact must be put in the wider context.
▪ The change depended upon changes in the wider context of controversy, which provoked the development of formerly implicit attitudinal aspects.
▪ We would expect leaders at all levels to be aware of the wider context of their work.
▪ What interpretations of the wider issues should it consider?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Can you picture it? Lying in the sun, sipping cocktails -- it would be paradise!
▪ I can still picture her lovely brown eyes.
▪ I had never met Graham but I pictured him as a pale, thin young man wearing glasses.
▪ Miguel could still picture the children laughing and joking, and chasing each other around the garden.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Both pictured a glamorous brunette, at least a dozen years older than herself.
▪ He wrote that it was not as he had pictured it as the weather was bitterly cold and wet with some snow.
▪ I pictured her trying to eke out her money - for I was sure there was not much.
▪ I pictured myself picking at least three hundred pounds a day and took the job.
▪ It is frighteningly easy to picture our children bald-gummed, big-headed as the babies they sprang out of.
▪ They have been pictured as the ultimate wealth of the community.
▪ When a child learns to picture and verbalize his feelings, he has the opportunity to reason and make intelligent choices.
▪ Whichever, it seems that Arsenio isn't quite the sort of cultural diplomat I had optimistically pictured.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Picture

Picture \Pic"ture\, n. [L. pictura, fr. pingere, pictum, to paint: cf. F. peinture. See Paint.]

  1. The art of painting; representation by painting. [Obs.]

    Any well-expressed image . . . either in picture or sculpture.
    --Sir H. Wotton.

  2. A representation of anything (as a person, a landscape, a building) upon canvas, paper, or other surface, produced by means of painting, drawing, engraving, photography, etc.; a representation in colors. By extension, a figure; a model.

    Pictures and shapes are but secondary objects.
    --Bacon.

    The young king's picture . . . in virgin wax.
    --Howell.

  3. An image or resemblance; a representation, either to the eye or to the mind; that which, by its likeness, brings vividly to mind some other thing; as, a child is the picture of his father; the man is the picture of grief. My eyes make pictures when they are shut. --Coleridge. Note: Picture is often used adjectively, or in forming self-explaining compounds; as, picture book or picture-book, picture frame or picture-frame, picture seller or picture-seller, etc. Animated picture, a moving picture. Picture gallery, a gallery, or large apartment, devoted to the exhibition of pictures. Picture red, a rod of metal tube fixed to the walls of a room, from which pictures are hung. Picture writing.

    1. The art of recording events, or of expressing messages, by means of pictures representing the actions or circumstances in question.
      --Tylor.

    2. The record or message so represented; as, the picture writing of the American Indians.

      Syn: Picture, Painting.

      Usage: Every kind of representation by drawing or painting is a picture, whether made with oil colors, water colors, pencil, crayons, or India ink; strictly, a painting is a picture made by means of colored paints, usually applied moist with a brush.

Picture

Picture \Pic"ture\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pictured; p. pr. & vb. n. Picturing.] To draw or paint a resemblance of; to delineate; to represent; to form or present an ideal likeness of; to bring before the mind. ``I . . . do picture it in my mind.''
--Spenser.

I have not seen him so pictured.
--Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
picture

early 15c., "drawing, painting," from Latin pictura "painting," from pictus, past participle of pingere "to make pictures, to paint, to embroider," (see paint (v.)). Picture window is from 1938. Picture post-card first recorded 1899. Phrase every picture tells a story first attested 1900, in advertisements for an illustrated life of Christ. To be in (or out of) the picture in the figurative sense dates to 1900.\n

\nExpression a picture is worth a thousand words, attested from 1918, probably was from the publication trade (the notion that a picture was worth 1,000 words is in printers' publications by 1911). The phrase also was in use in the form worth a million words, the form used by American newspaper editor Arthur Brisbane (1864-1936) in an editorial much-read c.1916 titled "What is a Good Newspaper" in the "New York Evening Journal." In part it read, "After news and humor come good pictures. In this day of hurry we learn through the eye, and one picture may be worth a million words." It seems to have emerged into general use via the medium of advertising (which scaled down the number and also gave the expression its spurious origin story as "a Japanese proverb" or some such thing, by 1919). Earlier various acts or deeds (and in one case "the arrow") were said to be worth a thousand words.

picture

late 15c. in the literal sense; 1738 in the mental sense, from picture (n.). Related: Pictured; picturing.

Wiktionary
picture

n. A representation of anything (as a person, a landscape, a building) upon canvas, paper, or other surface, by drawing, painting, printing, photography, etc. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To represent in or with a picture. 2 (context transitive English) To imagine or envision. 3 (context transitive English) To depict.

WordNet
picture
  1. v. imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind; "I can't see him on horseback!"; "I can see what will happen"; "I can see a risk in this strategy" [syn: visualize, visualise, envision, project, fancy, see, figure, image]

  2. show in, or as in, a picture; "This scene depicts country life"; "the face of the child is rendered with much tenderness in this painting" [syn: depict, render, show]

picture
  1. n. a visual representation (of an object or scene or person or abstraction) produced on a surface; "they showed us the pictures of their wedding"; "a movie is a series of images projected so rapidly that the eye integrates them" [syn: image, icon, ikon]

  2. graphic art consisting of an artistic composition made by applying paints to a surface; "a small painting by Picasso"; "he bought the painting as an investment"; "his pictures hang in the Louvre" [syn: painting]

  3. a clear and telling mental image; "he described his mental picture of his assailant"; "he had no clear picture of himself or his world"; "the events left a permanent impression in his mind" [syn: mental picture, impression]

  4. a situation treated as an observable object; "the political picture is favorable"; "the religious scene in England has changed in the last century" [syn: scene]

  5. illustrations used to decorate or explain a text; "the dictionary had many pictures" [syn: pictorial matter]

  6. a form of entertainment that enacts a story by a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movement; "they went to a movie every Saturday night"; "the film was shot on location" [syn: movie, film, moving picture, moving-picture show, motion picture, motion-picture show, picture show, pic, flick]

  7. the visible part of a television transmission; "they could still receive the sound but the picture was gone" [syn: video]

  8. a graphic or vivid verbal description; "too often the narrative was interrupted by long word pictures"; "the author gives a depressing picture of life in Poland"; "the pamphlet contained brief characterizations of famous Vermonters" [syn: word picture, word-painting, delineation, depiction, characterization, characterisation]

  9. a typical example of some state or quality; "the very picture of a modern general"; "she was the picture of despair"

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Picture (string theory)

In superstring theory, each state may be represented in many ways, depending on how the ground state is defined. Each representation is called a picture, and is denoted by a number, such as 0 picture or −1 picture.

The difference between the ground states is according to the action of the superghosts oscillators on them, and the number of the picture (plus 1/2) reflects the highest superghost oscillator which does not annihilate the ground state.

Picture (band)

Picture is one of the first Dutch heavy metal bands. Formed in 1979, they were especially popular in the Netherlands, Germany and Italy for their live performances, and still have a fan base in South America, Mexico and Japan.

Picture supported AC/DC, Ted Nugent and Saxon in the Netherlands. With Saxon, they did a full European tour in 1981. Later on they toured with Rose Tattoo in Germany and headlined tours in Italy and Israel.

Picture (song)

"Picture" is a song by American singer Kid Rock, recorded with Sheryl Crow. The song is taken from Kid Rock's album Cocky. It was released as a single by Kid Rock featuring Allison Moorer on November 12, 2002. It was the first song for the artists to be nominated for Vocal Event of The Year at the 2003 Country Music Association awards.

Picture (disambiguation)

A picture, or image, is an artifact that depicts or records visual perception.

Picture(s) may also refer to:

Picture (album)

Picture is the debut album by British progressive rock band Kino.

Picture (mathematics)

In combinatorial mathematics, a picture is a bijection between skew diagrams satisfying certain properties, introduced by in a generalization of the Robinson–Schensted correspondence and the Littlewood–Richardson rule.

Usage examples of "picture".

I was staring up at the stars, thinking of the Gibson and McIlroy and that abo walking out alive, trying to picture what had really happened, my thoughts ranging and the truth elusive.

The people hauled in to testify about why they voted absentee offered a vivid picture of the fierce loyalties, rough politics, and economic pressures that shaped the lives of Arkansas hill people.

She ached to be outside in the fresh air, to be dressed in her oldest jeans, turning over spades full of soft loamy earth, feeling the excitement and pleasure of siting the bulbs, of allowing her imagination to paint for her the colourful picture they would make in the spring, in their uniform beds set among lawn pathways and bordered by a long deep border of old-fashioned perennial plants.

He pictured to himself the moment when he must advance to meet her, and could not help thinking of his little tutor Chufu, above whom he towered by two heads while he was still a boy, and who used to call up his admonitions to him from below.

She forced herself to leave that idyllic picture to examine the rest of the adobe house.

Each frame utilized one of the pictures in order to give the advertiser an idea as to what the finished commercial will look like.

Any picture would have been acceptable to them, and that day many of them even went far afield to obtain a copy of that newspaper.

Clearly, the picture the old sailor had aken of them was the best one.

Dincrist was the picture of a patrician-sportsman, even taller than Alacrity and very fit, white-haired and deeply tanned.

That, at any rate, was the picture Alsa had painted in her piece about him.

Gray pictured the cylinder containing the super-conducting amalgam, how it had levitated.

I painted our amorous combats in a lively and natural manner, for, besides my recollections, I had her living picture before my eyes, and I could follow on her features the various emotions aroused by my recital.

The pictures with which the closet where we breakfasted was adorned were admirable more from the colouring and the design than from the amorous combats they represented.

The fusion of images in this anaglyph requires a memory of 10,000 picture elements.

For some reason he was reminded of pictures of church sanctuaries the anchorite had shown him.