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Crossword clues for man

man
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
man
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a delivery man (=man who delivers goods to people)
▪ He got a job as a delivery man for a hardware store.
a free man
▪ He walked out of the courtroom a free man.
a lucky man/woman/boy/girl
▪ Your son’s a lucky man, having a father like you.
a man of honour
▪ I know Tom to be a man of honour and integrity.
a man of the people (=someone in power who understands or is like ordinary people)
▪ The party try to portray the prime minister as a man of the people.
a man/woman etc named sth (=someone with a particular name)
▪ some guy named Bob Dylan
a man/woman of principle (=someone with strong moral ideas)
▪ He is the only candidate who has demonstrated that he is a man of principle.
a married man/woman
▪ By 1957 a third of married women were working.
armed men
▪ The Minister was kidnapped by armed men on his way to the airport.
bald-headed man (=having no hair)
▪ a bald-headed man in a shiny suit
best man
Big Man on Campus
blind man's buff
delivery man
die a hero/rich man etc
▪ He died a hero on the battlefield.
dirty old man
dustbin man
enlisted men
▪ officers and enlisted men
family man
fancy man
front man
garbage man
gingerbread man (=a piece of gingerbread in the shape of a man)
hard man
▪ Jones was known as soccer’s hard man.
hatchet man
hit man
ladies' man
lady's man
like a man/woman possessedliterary (= with a lot of energy or violence)
macho man
▪ He’s sick of being cast as the hard macho man in films.
maintenance crew/man/staff (=someone who looks after buildings and equipment for a school or company)
man boobs
man of letters
man of the match (=the best player in a match)
▪ Henri was named man of the match.
medicine man
men's room
modern man (=people today)
▪ Modern man gets much less exercise in his daily life than his ancestors.
mystery man/woman
▪ Who was the mystery woman spotted on board the yacht with the prince?
Neanderthal man
New Man
odd-job man
old man
▪ I heard her old man beats her.
point man
▪ the administration’s point man on health care
remarkable man
▪ He’s a remarkable man.
removal company/man etc
▪ The removal men have been in and out all day.
Renaissance man
repo man
right-hand man
▪ John is Bill’s right-hand man and has put a lot of time into the team.
self-made man/millionaire/businessman
stick man
straight man
stunt man
the bin men (=the people who take your rubbish away)
▪ Which day do the bin men come?
the common man (=ordinary people)
▪ The 20th century was called the century of the common man.
the man/woman/house etc of your dreams (=the perfect one for you)
▪ We can help you find the house of your dreams.
trigger man
▪ Even if the trigger men are caught, those who ordered the killing escape punishment.
us women/men/teachers etc
▪ Life is hard for us women.
wanted men
▪ one of the most wanted men in China
white van man
women/men/residents etc only
▪ The car park is for staff only.
working man/people/folk
▪ the ordinary working man
work/writer/man etc of genius
▪ Wynford was an architect of genius.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ Hafpor is a big man, nearly two metres tall and weighing over 100 kilograms.
▪ A big young man came out of the plane with a short, thin, grey-haired one - Harald and Carl.
▪ He always wanted to show that he was as good as the big man.
▪ So his wicked sister's vanished and now he's big man on campus.
▪ Finally Ishmael starts shouting at Queequeg and nudging him and finally awakes the big man.
▪ The big man appeared, suddenly.
▪ I be big man past him.
black
▪ From under the dark, dried porch roof, we are watched with unease by two old black men.
▪ The check the black man put into his own pocket.
▪ I took a tramcar a second time; when it stopped I saw a long queue of mostly Black men.
▪ I had never, ever, ever seen a black man kill a white man.
▪ Fought low, can this ageing black man rise and escape the curse of his anger?
▪ Ralph Ellison captured it perfectly for the black man with the metaphor of invisibility.
▪ As they drank tea, with Evans out of the room, a black man burst in.
▪ One smart thing these sisters did was lay down the burden of protecting the endangered black man.
gay
▪ In addition, it is an unfortunate fact that some gay men are paedophiles, however few in comparison with heterosexual men.
▪ It was advice that very large numbers of gay men, desperate for leadership, willingly followed.
▪ Are lesbians and gay men born or made?
▪ For many gay men such integration certainly took place.
▪ A little voice deep within her asks if going there with five gay men is the best way to achieve this.
▪ If gay men had been forming efficient cores, this would almost certainly not have been the case.
old
▪ Pacino demonstrates how well he can play a very old man.
▪ This again portrays Cassius as a hero, and Caesar as a feeble old man in comparison.
▪ No, the old men were the real radicals, the ones who corrupted us all.
▪ Table 12.3 shows the inequalities in net income between older women and men.
▪ Son, Isuppose you expect me to go put the old man in his place?
▪ It had all happened one Sunday morning when an old man in London decided that that was how it would be.
▪ The other day, I almost ran down an old man in a crosswalk.
other
▪ The qualities that make a poet are not different in kind from what other men have.
▪ Another man was standing up behind a chair on which one of the other men was sitting.
▪ To John Coffin's eye the other man still seemed nervous.
▪ He made off, with the other man, in a silver metro type car with distinctive red stripes.
▪ The other man had brown hair and a wispy moustache and wore faded denim jeans and a grey woollen jumper.
▪ He had repeatedly demonstrated that he had a greater tolerance of G-forces than most other men.
▪ Women seem to be currently more prone to seek longer-term close relationships with other women than men are with other men.
▪ Two other men in white ran out behind him.
rich
▪ She doesn't understand him, but I do - he's a rich young man with a beautiful body.
▪ After all, men smoke cigars. Rich men.
▪ The politics of deference - the rich man in his castle the poor man at his gate - held change in check.
▪ Although he wielded enormous economic power, Park never became a rich man and was not personally corrupt.
▪ Then, as now, a town council was so dazzled they rubber-stamped all this terribly rich man asked of them.
▪ Third is the distinction or esteem that accrues to the rich man as the result of his wealth.
white
▪ That means our discussion programmes, for example, should not simply consist of white able-bodied men.
▪ The colored in any number makes the white man nervous.
▪ They all represent the obsessional, neurotic and fetishistic sexuality of a gay scene, created by and for white men.
▪ They became involved in an altercation with two white men, Ronald Ebens and Michael Nitz, at a topless club.
▪ In the experience of friends who canvass for the Labour party, old, white, middle-class men are the rudest.
▪ After refreshing himself at the bar, Isaac came back for him, prescient to the altered expectations of official white men.
▪ You ask me to cut grass and make hay and sell it and be rich like white men.
▪ Gasa is a black woman; her attacker reportedly is a white man.
young
▪ A younger man leaned against the wall and fingered a guitar.
▪ The young man could watch Theresa walk past a window.
▪ Kirov had opened himself up so that the younger man would trust him enough to confide his deepest thoughts.
▪ They were all babies, and he was a young man again.
▪ Three young men had got out and were looking at them.
▪ He shook his head to drive away some bottleneck flies straying from the vile puddle in front of the horse-faced young man.
▪ Sir Henry was a young and healthy man.
▪ A young man who overestimated his ability got himself badly hurt.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
England expects that every man will do his duty
Invisible Man
Man proposes, God disposes
Mondeo man
The Invisible Man
a changed man/woman
▪ Marley said he was sorry for his crimes and insists he's a changed man.
▪ My father came back from the war a changed man.
▪ She returned from her travel a changed woman.
▪ But when he came home he was a changed man.
▪ He's a changed man since Mum went into hospital.
▪ He emerged from the opera house a changed man.
▪ He lives only for the moment, and he is already a changed man.
▪ Ian says from then on Robert has been a changed man - withdrawn and completely unapproachable.
▪ Meanwhile, the master strategist, off in Los Angeles, was sixty-nine years old and a changed man.
a fine figure of a man/woman
▪ Vellios was a fine figure of a man.
a fine figure of a man/woman
a fine man/woman etc
▪ And he was a fine man, a good man.
▪ Aye, a fine man, Elizabeth thought admiringly.
▪ Ben's a fine man, but he does talk so much.
▪ He was a fine man, Con Meredith-Lee.
▪ I travelled in and they did an interview which a fine man called Peter Canham heard on his car radio.
▪ Really sad case, that, because he'd been a fine man.
▪ She was a fine woman, unspoilt by childbirth, her body hardened by fieldwork.
▪ You're a fine woman when you're roused, my darling.
a man/woman etc after my own heart
a man/woman etc of few words
▪ Bill Templeman was a man of few words.
▪ Blitherdick, usually a man of few words, had become lachrymose about Blenkinsop's enjoyment of a good wine.
▪ He had a clear scientific mind but was self-effacing, modest, and a man of few words.
▪ He was a man of few words but many graphic gestures.
▪ He was a man of few words in any case, Maggie noted.
▪ I am therefore a man of few words and I have been very brief throughout my professional career.
as the next man/person
▪ After a while, everybody will have the technology to make a movie look as cool as the next person.
▪ All you need to know about Flaubert to know as much as the next person!
▪ Now Glover himself was as female as the next man, keeping an eagle eye on boys.
▪ She figured the guys could see for themselves then that he could be as vulnerable as the next man.
be a man/woman of the world
▪ Look, Ray, you're a man of the world - I'm sure you've been in situations like this before.
be all things to all men/people
▪ I finally realized I could not be all things to all people.
▪ Andrea felt tremendous pressure to succeed, to continue to be all things to all people.
▪ Anyway, these compendiums try to be all things to all people.
▪ For years, the stores had managed to be all things to all people.
▪ In this sense many of the international firms will try to be all things to all people.
▪ It is all things to all men ... and this is perhaps its number one axiom.
▪ No-one is all things to all people, and Anthea is no exception.
▪ Politicians have to be all things to all people.
▪ The single truck was all things to all men and women.
be your own man/woman
▪ She didn't want to quarrel with him, but made it plain that she was her own woman now, with her own life to lead.
▪ Sheila is very much her own woman. She'll listen to everyone and then make up her mind for herself.
▪ Stan was intellectual, confident and above all, his own man.
▪ At the same time, both here and in Hawksmoor, Ackroyd, too, is his own man.
▪ But Erlich was his own man.
▪ He turned out to be his own man, and a leader.
▪ He was his own man, after all.
▪ Major's first chance to show that he is his own man has been squandered on favours.
▪ Mobile I was my own man and played the way I believed because we lacked talent in certain areas.
▪ The latest reshuffle, immediately following victory, was supposed to confirm, once and for all, that Major was his own man.
▪ You can be your own man.
be/feel like a new man/woman
grown man/woman
Grown men in three-piece suits were playing video games.
▪ Elsie had never seen a grown man cry before.
▪ He' s a grown man - he should be able to cook for himself!
▪ She's crazy -- a grown woman letting a girl order her around like that.
▪ And the old Porsche 911 which has the same effect, but for very different reasons, on grown men.
▪ I was fourteen, but I guess I looked like a grown woman.
▪ In this story about Shep, he is a grown man and the prosperous owner of a silk mill.
▪ Nearly twenty years ago that was, and now you re a grown woman.
▪ No wonder that many grown women rebel against them.
▪ Not one grown man, aristocrat or peasant, is worthy of respect when you really know him.
▪ Several that I saw were very old, bearded, emaciated and grim and deathlike, instead of babies, grown men.
▪ She was a grown woman, she was entitled to take a bit of comfort as and when she pleased.
leading lady/man
▪ But being in a wheelchair doesn't stop them having fun - or falling for the leading man.
▪ Corbin Timbrook, a handsome leading man-type, has been tending Downtown's best bar for three years now.
▪ Davis became a genius by turning bit actors into leading men.
▪ Oh, some one always asks who my favorite leading lady was or who was the best kisser.
▪ Questioner2 Is your decision to take a year off anything to do with the rumours about Jeff and his present leading lady?
▪ The initial structure of the show had kind of a leading man figure: John Kelly.
▪ They came at full speed, the leading man aiming to Sharpe's left, the other pulling to his right.
▪ Tuesday night's opening had to be cancelled and on Wednesday night the leading lady was ill.
low man on the totem pole
man of the cloth
▪ For a man of the cloth to spend so much of his time there suggested all manner of things.
▪ He was in every sense a man of the cloth.
▪ Smith and fellow men of the cloth conducted nocturnal sorties, gathering ammunition against the wicked.
▪ Surely a man of the cloth wouldn't look at her with the same sort of craving as James Halden.
▪ Their seduction had long been used on men of the cloth, often with rewarding results for the cook.
man/woman of many parts
man/woman of substance
▪ Aristeides represented the land forces, the men of substance, who provided their own armour and were not paid.
▪ But Miss Close's father was a man of substance, and he finally bought the picture for a rather large sum.
▪ He accepted the semi-political duties of a man of substance in his county.
▪ He was a man of substance.
▪ His will, executed on 12 December 1760, shows him to have been a man of substance.
▪ I am not worried about the men of substance.
▪ I was a man of substance now, I had arrived.
▪ The lowest officials on the administrative tier were the village headmen, who were normally men of substance.
marked man/woman
▪ But Chennault was a marked man.
▪ Ever since his luncheon with Katherine Fisher, Jim had felt like a marked man whenever he was in the office complex.
▪ From that time he was dedicated, a marked man.
▪ He thus became a marked man.
▪ In his defence, Souness believes his no-nonsense approach has made him a marked man.
▪ It was well known that the younger Beaumont twin was a marked man.
▪ Mark Gallagher - marked man today Much ado about nothing!
▪ Without Young, forward Andy Poppink is a marked man.
matchstick men/figures
▪ More like troubled at mill Salford says there's more to its patron saint than pictures of matchstick men.
not just any (old) man/woman/job etc
▪ And a T'ang is not just any man.
one man's meat is another man's poison
our fellow man/men
▪ It is this that prompts a deep feeling of compassion for the sub-human world and for all our fellow men.
▪ That is, better an unattainable ideal than a limited attainable goal when it comes to the welfare of our fellow men.
professional person/man/woman etc
▪ A mature spinster, a professional woman, might.
▪ About 80 percent of its clients are business and professional women.
▪ As far as childcare is concerned, professional women have to rely on paid care.
▪ Glossy, high-powered soap opera about four black professional women helping one another through a bad year in Phoenix.
▪ Of those executive and professional women who did marry, most chose not to have children or deferred them until very late.
▪ The result is that the practical definition of obscenity has been decided by middle-aged-to-elderly professional men.
▪ There may be a willing volunteer or a professional person specially appointed, but this may not be easy to find.
▪ These are very well-educated professional women in Fog Bank who felt insecure about investing.
separate the men from the boys
straw man
▪ And, like Sir Geoffrey and Mr Heseltine, he routinely sets up federalism as a straw man to knock down.
▪ The creationist position in the Origin is never merely a straw man to be knocked down.
▪ The half-hour show uses these to the fullest, setting up straw man after straw man for Daria to demolish.
▪ Whether Lorenz's critics were firing a straw man is unimportant.
take your medicine (like a man)
▪ Come on, Ragtime Cowboy Joe, take your medicine.
▪ Conradin hated her with all his heart, but he obeyed her quietly and took his medicine without arguing.
▪ He and his grandpa took their medicine together, at the same time.
▪ He hadn't been changed or taken his medicine.
▪ He shut his eyes, held his nose like a kid about to take his medicine, and started to drink.
▪ His major problem is that he misses taking his medicine, and he travels too much.
▪ Like some one recovering from the flu, she quit taking her medicine as soon as she felt better.
▪ Soon after she left the hospital, with a clearer mind, she again stopped taking her medicine.
that's life/men/politics etc (for you)
the Grand Old Man of sth
▪ That is, apart from the grand old man of Les Bleus.
▪ What would the grand old man of travel have made of the thirty nine days scheduled for the 1991 world tour?
the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo
the man/woman in the street
▪ The advertising industry has to know exactly what the man in the street is thinking.
▪ This latest legislation will not really affect the man or woman in the street.
▪ But the man in the street will say: how can it get worse?
▪ He picked up the women in the street.
▪ Like most of the women in the street, Pat Johnstone had been angered by it all.
▪ One of the men in the street ran to open the door, then another man pushed him.
▪ That's what the man in the street wants.
▪ The Alliance Party had a slightly Roman Catholic image with the man in the street.
▪ Then comes the whip, the sudden vicious reminder of the man in the street.
the odd man/one out
▪ I was always the odd man out in my class at school.
▪ And Joe Bowie remains the odd man out, uncoupled at the end.
▪ At each stage of the story, Britain has been the odd man out.
▪ He was the odd one out in a gifted family.
▪ Others are widowed or divorced, and hate being the odd one out among friends who are all couples.
▪ Unless Spencer is traded, the latter seems to be the odd man out despite showing improvement in the preseason.
▪ Which of the following grape varieties is the odd one out? 4.
▪ Why is it always the odd man out?
the poor man's sb
the poor man's sth
▪ No one could have been more sympathetic to the detail of the poor man's need, or more capable of vicarious imagination.
the thinking man's/woman's etc sth
the woman/man/girl etc in your life
▪ He was a tough little kid, Esteban, the women in his life say.
▪ Michael: Who are the men in your life?
▪ My doctor is the man in my life.
▪ Nevertheless, he felt abandoned and betrayed by the women in his life.
▪ Recent books have revealed the unacknowledged literary debts that writers such as Brecht and Joyce owed to the women in their lives.
▪ To clarify things that may be confusing the men in their lives.
▪ Was that why she found the men in her life all so boring?
▪ Why was it that the men in her life seemed to have found some other woman to give them an heir?
woman/man etc of independent means
woman/man with a mission
▪ A man with a mission who suddenly loses his faith.
▪ How can a 77-year-old man with a mission admit that he was wrong all along?
▪ Powered by a man with a mission.
young lady/man
▪ Now, you listen to me, young man!
▪ He certainly got his money's worth, that young man.
▪ He was a very beautiful young man, a bit like a girl, perhaps - but still very good-looking.
▪ If Southend police could run in some young man who picked up the car on the Foulness road yesterday afternoon.
▪ Their captors are equally enthralled with the two young men.
▪ This is a young man's play, and it feels like one.
▪ This social and hormonal dilemma of young men was illuminated by a series of experiments with Rhesus monkeys in Atlanta.
▪ Was the future of the Rabari incarnate in this young man?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A real man wouldn't be scared of commitment.
▪ Any other soldier would have told him to pull himself together and be a man.
▪ Are you man enough to admit that you've been lying?
▪ Ask the men to meet here at 11:00 for a briefing.
▪ Bush was a Yale man.
▪ He's a meat-and-potatoes man.
▪ He had a very successful business and died a rich man.
▪ Hey, what's happening, man?
▪ If I were a gambling man, I'd put money on the Saints.
▪ In an effort to prove his manhood he had taken to stealing cars and drinking alcohol.
▪ Jericho is the oldest continuously inhabited city known to man.
▪ Many of the men said they would vote for the strike.
▪ Tania was at the party with her new man.
▪ The Dutch reclamation of their land is a classic case of man's struggle against nature.
▪ The gas man came by to read the meter.
▪ The grandeur of the mountains is a constant reminder of man's insignificance.
▪ You never see Fuller Brush men any more.
▪ You wouldn't understand how she feels -- you're a man!
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ I was getting ready to leave when a man opened the door.
▪ If men alone had the vote, President Bob Dole would now be running for re-election.
▪ It was a tall man with an aquiline nose and thick dark hair.
▪ Prescriptions for men cost more than for women aged between 25 and 84 years.
▪ There the man held Sammler against the wall with his forearm.
▪ They want to know, Who is this man?
▪ Two men so different in appearance and manner, yet both prepared to sacrifice her feelings on the altar of their ambition.
▪ When I arrived at the shelter, I found the right man.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
barricade
▪ In the early morning of May 18, police manning barricades were replaced by army paratroopers who opened fire with machine guns.
▪ But no one is likely to man the barricades on our ancient behalf.
▪ They manned the barricades - did a good job, but survival was down to luck at times.
▪ For some of those manning the barricades in Quebec, this is irrelevant.
mission
▪ The Nova will have unmanned launches next year followed by a manned mission, which Bennett himself wants to pilot.
▪ For manned lunar-landing missions, an even larger booster was required.
▪ In all there were eleven manned Apollo missions, of which nine flew to the Moon.
▪ Further, no nation on Earth presently has the ability to launch manned lunar missions.
▪ At that stage the engines were being developed with a manned Mrs mission in mind.
▪ By this stage, the groundwork necessary for manned missions has been accomplished.
▪ It is now far more acceptable to start talking about a manned mission to Mars.
▪ Manned visits to the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos often figure as parts of manned missions to the surface of Mars.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
England expects that every man will do his duty
Invisible Man
Man proposes, God disposes
Mondeo man
The Invisible Man
a changed man/woman
▪ Marley said he was sorry for his crimes and insists he's a changed man.
▪ My father came back from the war a changed man.
▪ She returned from her travel a changed woman.
▪ But when he came home he was a changed man.
▪ He's a changed man since Mum went into hospital.
▪ He emerged from the opera house a changed man.
▪ He lives only for the moment, and he is already a changed man.
▪ Ian says from then on Robert has been a changed man - withdrawn and completely unapproachable.
▪ Meanwhile, the master strategist, off in Los Angeles, was sixty-nine years old and a changed man.
a fine figure of a man/woman
▪ Vellios was a fine figure of a man.
a fine figure of a man/woman
a fine man/woman etc
▪ And he was a fine man, a good man.
▪ Aye, a fine man, Elizabeth thought admiringly.
▪ Ben's a fine man, but he does talk so much.
▪ He was a fine man, Con Meredith-Lee.
▪ I travelled in and they did an interview which a fine man called Peter Canham heard on his car radio.
▪ Really sad case, that, because he'd been a fine man.
▪ She was a fine woman, unspoilt by childbirth, her body hardened by fieldwork.
▪ You're a fine woman when you're roused, my darling.
a man/woman etc after my own heart
a man/woman etc of few words
▪ Bill Templeman was a man of few words.
▪ Blitherdick, usually a man of few words, had become lachrymose about Blenkinsop's enjoyment of a good wine.
▪ He had a clear scientific mind but was self-effacing, modest, and a man of few words.
▪ He was a man of few words but many graphic gestures.
▪ He was a man of few words in any case, Maggie noted.
▪ I am therefore a man of few words and I have been very brief throughout my professional career.
as the next man/person
▪ After a while, everybody will have the technology to make a movie look as cool as the next person.
▪ All you need to know about Flaubert to know as much as the next person!
▪ Now Glover himself was as female as the next man, keeping an eagle eye on boys.
▪ She figured the guys could see for themselves then that he could be as vulnerable as the next man.
be a man/woman of the world
▪ Look, Ray, you're a man of the world - I'm sure you've been in situations like this before.
be all things to all men/people
▪ I finally realized I could not be all things to all people.
▪ Andrea felt tremendous pressure to succeed, to continue to be all things to all people.
▪ Anyway, these compendiums try to be all things to all people.
▪ For years, the stores had managed to be all things to all people.
▪ In this sense many of the international firms will try to be all things to all people.
▪ It is all things to all men ... and this is perhaps its number one axiom.
▪ No-one is all things to all people, and Anthea is no exception.
▪ Politicians have to be all things to all people.
▪ The single truck was all things to all men and women.
be your own man/woman
▪ She didn't want to quarrel with him, but made it plain that she was her own woman now, with her own life to lead.
▪ Sheila is very much her own woman. She'll listen to everyone and then make up her mind for herself.
▪ Stan was intellectual, confident and above all, his own man.
▪ At the same time, both here and in Hawksmoor, Ackroyd, too, is his own man.
▪ But Erlich was his own man.
▪ He turned out to be his own man, and a leader.
▪ He was his own man, after all.
▪ Major's first chance to show that he is his own man has been squandered on favours.
▪ Mobile I was my own man and played the way I believed because we lacked talent in certain areas.
▪ The latest reshuffle, immediately following victory, was supposed to confirm, once and for all, that Major was his own man.
▪ You can be your own man.
be/feel like a new man/woman
grown man/woman
Grown men in three-piece suits were playing video games.
▪ Elsie had never seen a grown man cry before.
▪ He' s a grown man - he should be able to cook for himself!
▪ She's crazy -- a grown woman letting a girl order her around like that.
▪ And the old Porsche 911 which has the same effect, but for very different reasons, on grown men.
▪ I was fourteen, but I guess I looked like a grown woman.
▪ In this story about Shep, he is a grown man and the prosperous owner of a silk mill.
▪ Nearly twenty years ago that was, and now you re a grown woman.
▪ No wonder that many grown women rebel against them.
▪ Not one grown man, aristocrat or peasant, is worthy of respect when you really know him.
▪ Several that I saw were very old, bearded, emaciated and grim and deathlike, instead of babies, grown men.
▪ She was a grown woman, she was entitled to take a bit of comfort as and when she pleased.
leading lady/man
▪ But being in a wheelchair doesn't stop them having fun - or falling for the leading man.
▪ Corbin Timbrook, a handsome leading man-type, has been tending Downtown's best bar for three years now.
▪ Davis became a genius by turning bit actors into leading men.
▪ Oh, some one always asks who my favorite leading lady was or who was the best kisser.
▪ Questioner2 Is your decision to take a year off anything to do with the rumours about Jeff and his present leading lady?
▪ The initial structure of the show had kind of a leading man figure: John Kelly.
▪ They came at full speed, the leading man aiming to Sharpe's left, the other pulling to his right.
▪ Tuesday night's opening had to be cancelled and on Wednesday night the leading lady was ill.
low man on the totem pole
man of the cloth
▪ For a man of the cloth to spend so much of his time there suggested all manner of things.
▪ He was in every sense a man of the cloth.
▪ Smith and fellow men of the cloth conducted nocturnal sorties, gathering ammunition against the wicked.
▪ Surely a man of the cloth wouldn't look at her with the same sort of craving as James Halden.
▪ Their seduction had long been used on men of the cloth, often with rewarding results for the cook.
man/woman of many parts
man/woman of substance
▪ Aristeides represented the land forces, the men of substance, who provided their own armour and were not paid.
▪ But Miss Close's father was a man of substance, and he finally bought the picture for a rather large sum.
▪ He accepted the semi-political duties of a man of substance in his county.
▪ He was a man of substance.
▪ His will, executed on 12 December 1760, shows him to have been a man of substance.
▪ I am not worried about the men of substance.
▪ I was a man of substance now, I had arrived.
▪ The lowest officials on the administrative tier were the village headmen, who were normally men of substance.
marked man/woman
▪ But Chennault was a marked man.
▪ Ever since his luncheon with Katherine Fisher, Jim had felt like a marked man whenever he was in the office complex.
▪ From that time he was dedicated, a marked man.
▪ He thus became a marked man.
▪ In his defence, Souness believes his no-nonsense approach has made him a marked man.
▪ It was well known that the younger Beaumont twin was a marked man.
▪ Mark Gallagher - marked man today Much ado about nothing!
▪ Without Young, forward Andy Poppink is a marked man.
matchstick men/figures
▪ More like troubled at mill Salford says there's more to its patron saint than pictures of matchstick men.
not just any (old) man/woman/job etc
▪ And a T'ang is not just any man.
one man's meat is another man's poison
our fellow man/men
▪ It is this that prompts a deep feeling of compassion for the sub-human world and for all our fellow men.
▪ That is, better an unattainable ideal than a limited attainable goal when it comes to the welfare of our fellow men.
professional person/man/woman etc
▪ A mature spinster, a professional woman, might.
▪ About 80 percent of its clients are business and professional women.
▪ As far as childcare is concerned, professional women have to rely on paid care.
▪ Glossy, high-powered soap opera about four black professional women helping one another through a bad year in Phoenix.
▪ Of those executive and professional women who did marry, most chose not to have children or deferred them until very late.
▪ The result is that the practical definition of obscenity has been decided by middle-aged-to-elderly professional men.
▪ There may be a willing volunteer or a professional person specially appointed, but this may not be easy to find.
▪ These are very well-educated professional women in Fog Bank who felt insecure about investing.
straw man
▪ And, like Sir Geoffrey and Mr Heseltine, he routinely sets up federalism as a straw man to knock down.
▪ The creationist position in the Origin is never merely a straw man to be knocked down.
▪ The half-hour show uses these to the fullest, setting up straw man after straw man for Daria to demolish.
▪ Whether Lorenz's critics were firing a straw man is unimportant.
take your medicine (like a man)
▪ Come on, Ragtime Cowboy Joe, take your medicine.
▪ Conradin hated her with all his heart, but he obeyed her quietly and took his medicine without arguing.
▪ He and his grandpa took their medicine together, at the same time.
▪ He hadn't been changed or taken his medicine.
▪ He shut his eyes, held his nose like a kid about to take his medicine, and started to drink.
▪ His major problem is that he misses taking his medicine, and he travels too much.
▪ Like some one recovering from the flu, she quit taking her medicine as soon as she felt better.
▪ Soon after she left the hospital, with a clearer mind, she again stopped taking her medicine.
that's life/men/politics etc (for you)
the Grand Old Man of sth
▪ That is, apart from the grand old man of Les Bleus.
▪ What would the grand old man of travel have made of the thirty nine days scheduled for the 1991 world tour?
the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo
the man/woman in the street
▪ The advertising industry has to know exactly what the man in the street is thinking.
▪ This latest legislation will not really affect the man or woman in the street.
▪ But the man in the street will say: how can it get worse?
▪ He picked up the women in the street.
▪ Like most of the women in the street, Pat Johnstone had been angered by it all.
▪ One of the men in the street ran to open the door, then another man pushed him.
▪ That's what the man in the street wants.
▪ The Alliance Party had a slightly Roman Catholic image with the man in the street.
▪ Then comes the whip, the sudden vicious reminder of the man in the street.
the odd man/one out
▪ I was always the odd man out in my class at school.
▪ And Joe Bowie remains the odd man out, uncoupled at the end.
▪ At each stage of the story, Britain has been the odd man out.
▪ He was the odd one out in a gifted family.
▪ Others are widowed or divorced, and hate being the odd one out among friends who are all couples.
▪ Unless Spencer is traded, the latter seems to be the odd man out despite showing improvement in the preseason.
▪ Which of the following grape varieties is the odd one out? 4.
▪ Why is it always the odd man out?
the poor man's sb
the poor man's sth
▪ No one could have been more sympathetic to the detail of the poor man's need, or more capable of vicarious imagination.
the thinking man's/woman's etc sth
the woman/man/girl etc in your life
▪ He was a tough little kid, Esteban, the women in his life say.
▪ Michael: Who are the men in your life?
▪ My doctor is the man in my life.
▪ Nevertheless, he felt abandoned and betrayed by the women in his life.
▪ Recent books have revealed the unacknowledged literary debts that writers such as Brecht and Joyce owed to the women in their lives.
▪ To clarify things that may be confusing the men in their lives.
▪ Was that why she found the men in her life all so boring?
▪ Why was it that the men in her life seemed to have found some other woman to give them an heir?
woman/man etc of independent means
woman/man with a mission
▪ A man with a mission who suddenly loses his faith.
▪ How can a 77-year-old man with a mission admit that he was wrong all along?
▪ Powered by a man with a mission.
young lady/man
▪ Now, you listen to me, young man!
▪ He certainly got his money's worth, that young man.
▪ He was a very beautiful young man, a bit like a girl, perhaps - but still very good-looking.
▪ If Southend police could run in some young man who picked up the car on the Foulness road yesterday afternoon.
▪ Their captors are equally enthralled with the two young men.
▪ This is a young man's play, and it feels like one.
▪ This social and hormonal dilemma of young men was illuminated by a series of experiments with Rhesus monkeys in Atlanta.
▪ Was the future of the Rabari incarnate in this young man?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The booths are manned by customs officials.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ In the early morning of May 18, police manning barricades were replaced by army paratroopers who opened fire with machine guns.
▪ It's no wonder the counter isn't manned half the time.
▪ On the Bulevard Republicii there are a number of road- blocks, formerly manned by militias and now by troops.
III.interjection
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Man, your refrigerator makes a lot of noise.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Man

Man \Man\ (m[a^]n), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Manned (m[a^]nd); p. pr. & vb. n. Manning.]

  1. To supply with men; to furnish with a sufficient force or complement of men, as for management, service, defense, or the like; to guard; as, to man a ship, boat, or fort.

    See how the surly Warwick mans the wall !
    --Shak.

    They man their boats, and all their young men arm.
    --Waller.

  2. To furnish with strength for action; to prepare for efficiency; to fortify. ``Theodosius having manned his soul with proper reflections.''
    --Addison.

  3. To tame, as a hawk. [R.]
    --Shak.

  4. To furnish with a servant or servants. [Obs.]
    --Shak.

  5. To wait on as a manservant. [Obs.]
    --Shak.

    Note: In ``Othello,'' V. ii. 270, the meaning is uncertain, being, perhaps: To point, to aim, or to manage.

    To man a yard (Naut.), to send men upon a yard, as for furling or reefing a sail.

    To man the yards (Naut.), to station men on the yards as a salute or mark of respect.

Man

Man \Man\ (m[a^]n), n.; pl. Men (m[e^]n). [AS. mann, man, monn, mon; akin to OS., D., & OHG. man, G. mann, Icel. ma[eth]r, for mannr, Dan. Mand, Sw. man, Goth. manna, Skr. manu, manus, and perh. to Skr. man to think, and E. mind.

  1. A human being; -- opposed to beast.

    These men went about wide, and man found they none, But fair country, and wild beast many [a] one.
    --R. of Glouc.

    The king is but a man, as I am; the violet smells to him as it doth to me.
    --Shak.

    'Tain't a fit night out for man nor beast!
    --W. C. Fields

  2. Especially: An adult male person; a grown-up male person, as distinguished from a woman or a child.

    When I became a man, I put away childish things.
    --I Cor. xiii. 11.

    Ceneus, a woman once, and once a man.
    --Dryden.

  3. The human race; mankind.

    And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness, and let them have dominion.
    --Gen. i. 26.

    The proper study of mankind is man.
    --Pope.

  4. The male portion of the human race.

    Woman has, in general, much stronger propensity than man to the discharge of parental duties.
    --Cowper.

  5. One possessing in a high degree the distinctive qualities of manhood; one having manly excellence of any kind.
    --Shak.

    This was the noblest Roman of them all . . . the elements So mixed in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world ``This was a man!''
    --Shak.

  6. An adult male servant; also, a vassal; a subject.

    Like master, like man.
    --Old Proverb.

    The vassal, or tenant, kneeling, ungirt, uncovered, and holding up his hands between those of his lord, professed that he did become his man from that day forth, of life, limb, and earthly honor.
    --Blackstone.

  7. A term of familiar address at one time implying on the part of the speaker some degree of authority, impatience, or haste; as, Come, man, we 've no time to lose! In the latter half of the 20th century it became used in a broader sense as simply a familiar and informal form of address, but is not used in business or formal situations; as, hey, man! You want to go to a movie tonight?.

  8. A married man; a husband; -- correlative to wife.

    I pronounce that they are man and wife.
    --Book of Com. Prayer.

    every wife ought to answer for her man.
    --Addison.

  9. One, or any one, indefinitely; -- a modified survival of the Saxon use of man, or mon, as an indefinite pronoun.

    A man can not make him laugh.
    --Shak.

    A man would expect to find some antiquities; but all they have to show of this nature is an old rostrum of a Roman ship.
    --Addison.

  10. One of the piece with which certain games, as chess or draughts, are played. Note: Man is often used as a prefix in composition, or as a separate adjective, its sense being usually self-explaining; as, man child, man eater or maneater, man-eating, man hater or manhater, man-hating, manhunter, man-hunting, mankiller, man-killing, man midwife, man pleaser, man servant, man-shaped, manslayer, manstealer, man-stealing, manthief, man worship, etc. Man is also used as a suffix to denote a person of the male sex having a business which pertains to the thing spoken of in the qualifying part of the compound; ashman, butterman, laundryman, lumberman, milkman, fireman, repairman, showman, waterman, woodman. Where the combination is not familiar, or where some specific meaning of the compound is to be avoided, man is used as a separate substantive in the foregoing sense; as, apple man, cloth man, coal man, hardware man, wood man (as distinguished from woodman). Man ape (Zo["o]l.), a anthropoid ape, as the gorilla. Man at arms, a designation of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries for a soldier fully armed. Man engine, a mechanical lift for raising or lowering people through considerable distances; specifically (Mining), a contrivance by which miners ascend or descend in a shaft. It consists of a series of landings in the shaft and an equal number of shelves on a vertical rod which has an up and down motion equal to the distance between the successive landings. A man steps from a landing to a shelf and is lifted or lowered to the next landing, upon which he them steps, and so on, traveling by successive stages. Man Friday, a person wholly subservient to the will of another, like Robinson Crusoe's servant Friday. Man of straw, a puppet; one who is controlled by others; also, one who is not responsible pecuniarily. Man-of-the earth (Bot.), a twining plant ( Ipom[oe]a pandurata) with leaves and flowers much like those of the morning-glory, but having an immense tuberous farinaceous root. Man of sin (Script.), one who is the embodiment of evil, whose coming is represented (--2 Thess. ii. 3) as preceding the second coming of Christ. [A Hebraistic expression] Man of war.

    1. A warrior; a soldier.
      --Shak.

    2. (Naut.) See in the Vocabulary.

    3. See Portuguese man-of-war under man-of-war and also see Physalia.

      Man-stopping bullet (Mil.), a bullet which will produce a sufficient shock to stop a soldier advancing in a charge; specif., a small-caliber bullet so modified as to expand when striking the human body, producing a severe wound which is also difficult to treat medically. Types of bullets called hollow-nosed bullets, soft-nosed bullets and hollow-point bullets are classed as man-stopping. The dumdum bullet or dumdum is another well-known variety. Such bullets were originally designed for wars with savage tribes.

      To be one's own man, to have command of one's self; not to be subject to another.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
man

Old English man, mann "human being, person (male or female); brave man, hero; servant, vassal," from Proto-Germanic *manwaz (cognates: Old Saxon, Swedish, Dutch, Old High German man, German Mann, Old Norse maðr, Danish mand, Gothic manna "man"), from PIE root *man- (1) "man" (cognates: Sanskrit manuh, Avestan manu-, Old Church Slavonic mozi, Russian muzh "man, male").\n

\nPlural men (German Männer) shows effects of i-mutation. Sometimes connected to root *men- "to think" (see mind), which would make the ground sense of man "one who has intelligence," but not all linguists accept this. Liberman, for instance, writes, "Most probably man 'human being' is a secularized divine name" from Mannus [Tacitus, "Germania," chap. 2], "believed to be the progenitor of the human race."\n\nSo I am as he that seythe, `Come hyddr John, my man.'

[1473]

\nSense of "adult male" is late (c.1000); Old English used wer and wif to distinguish the sexes, but wer began to disappear late 13c. and was replaced by man. Universal sense of the word remains in mankind and manslaughter. Similarly, Latin had homo "human being" and vir "adult male human being," but they merged in Vulgar Latin, with homo extended to both senses. A like evolution took place in Slavic languages, and in some of them the word has narrowed to mean "husband." PIE had two stems: *uiHro "freeman" (source of Sanskrit vira-, Lithuanian vyras, Latin vir, Old Irish fer, Gothic wair) and *hner "man," a title more of honor than *uiHro (source of Sanskrit nar-, Armenian ayr, Welsh ner, Greek aner).\n\nMANTRAP, a woman's commodity.

[Grose, "Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," London, 1785]

\nMan also was in Old English as an indefinite pronoun, "one, people, they." The chess pieces so called from c.1400. As an interjection of surprise or emphasis, first recorded c.1400, but especially popular from early 20c. Man-about-town is from 1734; the Man "the boss" is from 1918. To be man or mouse "be brave or be timid" is from 1540s. Men's Liberation first attested 1970.At the kinges court, my brother, Ech man for himself. [Chaucer, "Knight's Tale," c.1386]
man

Old English mannian "to furnish (a fort, ship, etc.) with a company of men," from man (n.). Meaning "to take up a designated position on a ship" is first recorded 1690s. Meaning "behave like a man, act with courage" is from c.1400. To man (something) out is from 1660s. Related: Manned; manning.

Wiktionary
man

interj. (non-gloss definition: Used to place emphasis upon something or someone; sometimes, but not always, when actually addressing a man.) n. 1 An adult male human. 2 (lb en collective) All human males collectively: mankind. 3 A human, a person of either gender, usually an adult. (qualifier: See usage notes.) 4 (lb en collective) All humans collectively: mankind, humankind, humanity. (qualifier: Sometimes capitalized as ''Man''.) 5 (lb en anthropology archaeology paleontology) A member of the genus ''Homo'', especially of the species ''Homo sapiens''. 6 (lb en obsolete) A sentient being, whether human or supernatural. 7 An adult male who has, to an eminent degree, qualities considered masculine, such as strength, integrity, and devotion to family; a mensch. 8 (lb en uncountable obsolete uncommon) manliness; the quality or state of being manly. 9 A husband. 10 A lover; a boyfriend. 11 A male enthusiast or devotee; a male who is very fond of or devoted to a specified kind of thing. (qualifier: Used as the last element of a compound.) 12 A person, usually male, who has duties or skills associated with a specified thing. (qualifier: Used as the last element of a compound.) 13 A person, usually male, who can fulfill one's requirements with regard to a specified matter. 14 A male who belongs to a particular group: an employee, a student or alumnus, a representative, etc. 15 An adult male servant. (lb en historical) A vassal. A subject. 16 A piece or token used in board games such as chess. 17 (lb en Multicultural London English slang) (non-gloss definition: Used to refer to oneself or one's group): I, we; (non-gloss definition: construed in the third person). 18 (non-gloss definition: A term of familiar address often implying on the part of the speaker some degree of authority, impatience, or haste.) vb. 1 (context transitive English) To supply (something) with staff or crew (of either sex). 2 (context transitive English) To take up position in order to operate (something). 3 (lb en reflexive possibly dated) To brace (oneself), to fortify or steel (oneself) in a manly way. (qualifier: Compare ''man up''.) 4 (lb en transitive obsolete) To wait on, attend to or escort. 5 (lb en transitive obsolete) To accustom (a hawk or other bird) to the presence of men.

WordNet
man
  1. v. take charge of a certain job; occupy a certain work place; "Mr. Smith manned the reception desk in the morning"

  2. provide with men; "We cannot man all the desks"

  3. [also: manning, manned, men (pl)]

man
  1. n. an adult male person (as opposed to a woman); "there were two women and six men on the bus" [syn: adult male] [ant: woman]

  2. someone who serves in the armed forces; a member of a military force; "two men stood sentry duty" [syn: serviceman, military man, military personnel] [ant: civilian]

  3. the generic use of the word to refer to any human being; "it was every man for himself"

  4. all of the inhabitants of the earth; "all the world loves a lover"; "she always used `humankind' because `mankind' seemed to slight the women" [syn: world, human race, humanity, humankind, human beings, humans, mankind]

  5. any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae [syn: homo, human being, human]

  6. a male subordinate; "the chief stationed two men outside the building"; "he awaited word from his man in Havana"

  7. an adult male person who has a manly character (virile and courageous competent); "the army will make a man of you"

  8. a male person who plays a significant role (husband or lover or boyfriend) in the life of a particular woman; "she takes good care of her man" [ant: woman]

  9. a manservant who acts as a personal attendant to his employer; "Jeeves was Bertie Wooster's man" [syn: valet, valet de chambre, gentleman, gentleman's gentleman]

  10. one of the British Isles in the Irish Sea [syn: Isle of Man]

  11. game equipment consisting of an object used in playing certain board games; "he taught me to set up the men on the chess board"; "he sacrificed a piece to get a strategic advantage" [syn: piece]

  12. [also: manning, manned, men (pl)]

Gazetteer
Man, WV -- U.S. town in West Virginia
Population (2000): 770
Housing Units (2000): 363
Land area (2000): 0.586412 sq. miles (1.518800 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.027985 sq. miles (0.072481 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.614397 sq. miles (1.591281 sq. km)
FIPS code: 50932
Located within: West Virginia (WV), FIPS 54
Location: 37.742776 N, 81.875168 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Man, WV
Man
Wikipedia
Man (disambiguation)

A man is an adult male human. "Man" may also mean the entire human species, see also man (word).

Man or MAN may also refer to:

Man (band)

Man are a rock band from South Wales whose style is a mixture of West Coast psychedelia, progressive rock, blues and pub rock. Formed in 1968 as a reincarnation of Welsh rock harmony group ‘’The Bystanders’’, Man are renowned for the extended jams in their live performances.

Man (Middle-earth)

In J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, the terms Man and Men refer to humankind – in contrast to Elves, Dwarves, Orcs and other humanoid races – and does not denote gender.

The Elves call the race of Men Atani in Quenya, literally meaning "Second People" (the Elves being the First), but also Hildor (Followers), Apanónar (After-born), and Fírimar or Firyar (Mortals). Less charitably they were called Engwar (The Sickly), owing to their susceptibility to disease and old age, and their generally unlovely appearance in the Elves' eyes. The name Atani becomes Edain in Sindarin, but this term is later applied only to those tribes of Men who are friendly to the Elves. Other names appear in Sindarin as Aphadrim, Eboennin, and Firebrim or Firiath.

Man (Neneh Cherry album)

Man is the third solo album by Swedish singer Neneh Cherry, released in 1996. The first single, " 7 Seconds" was released two years earlier and was a duet with Youssou N'Dour, a famous Senegalese singer who helped make the musical style mbalax popular in Africa. Cherry was nominated for a Grammy in 1994 for the duet.

Man (word)

The term man (from Proto-Germanic*mannaz or *manwaz "man, person") and words derived from it can designate any or even all of the human race regardless of their sex or age. The word developed into Old Englishman, mann meaning primarily "adult male human" but secondarily capable of designating a person of unspecified gender, "someone, one" or humanity at large (see also Germanman, Old Norsemaðr, Gothicmanna "man"). More restricted English terms for an adult male were wer (cognate: Latin vir; survives as the first element in "werewolf") and guma (cognate: Latin homo; survives as the second element in "bridegroom").

However, man in traditional usage refers to the species, to humanity, or "mankind", as a whole. The usage persists in all registers of English although it has an old-fashioned tone.

Equating the term for the male with the whole species is common in many languages, for example in French (l'Homme). On the other hand, some languages have a general word for 'human individual' which can apply to people of either gender. German has the general word Mensch (although the grammatical gender is masculine), next to Mann for (adult) male person. Modern Standard Chinese has 人 (/rén/), analogous to the German Mensch, not English Man; the words 男人 (man) and 女人 (woman) are both diglyphs with the gender designations of individuals prefixed before 人.

*Mannaz or *Manwaz is also the Proto-Germanic reconstructed name of the m-rune .

Man (Francis Dunnery album)

Man is an album from British musician Francis Dunnery, released in 2001. It saw Francis experimenting with new sounds, most notably programmed drum beats - a departure from what had been the norm in his studio work up to this point. Vocalist/keyboardist Erin Moran (of A Girl Called Eddy) features heavily on the album.

Man (Vidhan Sabha constituency)

Man (Vidhan Sabha constituency) of Maharashtra Vidhan Sabha is one of the constituencies located in the Satara district.

It is a part of the Madha (Lok Sabha constituency), along with five other assembly constituencies, namely Phaltan in the Satara district and Karmala, Madha, Sangole, Malsiras in the Solapur district

Man (Skepta song)

"Man" is a song performed by English rapper Skepta. It was released as an instant grat single from Skepta's fourth album Konnichiwa (2016) on 14 April 2016 through Boy Better Know. The song peaked to number 34 on the UK Singles Chart and number 7 on the UK R&B Singles Chart. The song was written and produced by Joseph Adenuga. The songs main riff is sampled from the song "Regular John" by American stoner rock band Queens of the Stone Age.

Man

A man is a male human. The term man is usually reserved for an adult male, with the term boy being the usual term for a male child or adolescent. However, the term man is also sometimes used to identify a male human, regardless of age, as in phrases such as " men's basketball".

Like most other male mammals, a man's genome typically inherits an X chromosome from his mother and a Y chromosome from his father. The male fetus produces larger amounts of androgens and smaller amounts of estrogens than a female fetus. This difference in the relative amounts of these sex steroids is largely responsible for the physiological differences that distinguish men from women. During puberty, hormones which stimulate androgen production result in the development of secondary sexual characteristics, thus exhibiting greater differences between the sexes. However, there are exceptions to the above for some intersex and transgender men.

Man (Man album)

Man is the third studio album by the Welsh psychedelic/progressive rock band Man and was released March 1971. It was the first album by this line-up, Terry Williams having replaced Jeff Jones on drums, while Martin Ace replaced Ray Williams on bass.

As well as a change in personnel, the album also represented a change in record label from Pye to United Artists (released under the UA stable "Liberty" imprint) with whom the band would remain until 1976. Reviews were mixed, particularly regarding the long tracks "Would the Christians...." and "Alchemist" which were an attempt to recreate some of the longer improvised jams that the band performed on stage, but which did not have the same impact on vinyl.

The album contained three shorter tunes: "Country Girl" that showed a clash of direction but showcases some fine Welsh harmonies. "Daughter of the Fireplace", a Leonard-penned rocker, which became a stage favourite (and highlight of Man's 1972 live LP Live at the Padget Rooms, Penarth) while "Romain", a bluesy-shuffle, was written as a reaction to Martin Ace's treatment by a Belgian police officer of the same name when he attempted to intervene in a situation at a music festival; the song remains in the Man live set to the present day.

Man (name)

Man is both a surname and a given name. Notable people with the name include:

Surname:

  • Che Man, King of Champa (in present day Vietnam) between 1288 and 1307
  • Man Chong (died 242), a government official in the state of Cao Wei
  • Henry Man (died 1556), English Bishop of Sodor and Man
  • John Man (1512–1569), English churchman, college head and diplomat
  • Man Pei Tak (born 1982), Hong Kong footballer

Given name:

  • Man Mohan Adhikari (1920-1999), Prime Minister of Nepal
  • Man Parrish (born 1958), American composer, songwriter, vocalist and producer
  • Man Ray (1890-1976), American modernist artist
  • Man Singh I (1550-1614), King of Amber (now Jaipur) and Mughal general
  • Yip Man (1893-1972), Chinese martial artist
  • Zhong Man (born 1983), Chinese saber fencer and 2008 Olympic gold medalist
  • Man Haron Monis (1964-2014) Iranian-Australian Muslim cleric and criminal, perpetrator of 2014 Sydney siege

Usage examples of "man".

And he has to answer for much more than aiding and abetting you with your plot to fool the old man.

The fables of Atreus, Thiestes, Tereus and Progne signifieth the wicked and abhominable facts wrought and attempted by mortall men.

Now Ralph, he and his, being known for friends, these wild men could not make enough of them, and as it were, compelled them to abide there three days, feasting them, and making them all the cheer they might.

The monstrosities abiding within the smaller man could not molest him or they would certainly already have done so.

But whatever may be the phases of the arts, there is the abiding principle of symmetry in the body of man, that goes erect, like an upright soul.

But for the most part, the kisses the men bestowed upon the customers were deeper than Abie would have considered appropriate after a first date.

Was he man or devil, Abie asked herself as she watched the dancer take command of the stage.

Moira had simply joined them uninvited, though where either of the MacInnes men were concerned, Abigail looked upon Moira as a welcome interloper.

Beyond that, I have no knowledge of how my father managed to enhance psychic ability in the men.

These protected the main bodies by a process of ablation so that to the opposition each man appeared to flare up under fire like a living torch.

Church of England or of Rome as the medium of those superior ablutions described above, only that I think the Unitarian Church, like the Lyceum, as yet an open and uncommitted organ, free to admit the ministrations of any inspired man that shall pass by: whilst the other churches are committed and will exclude him.

Winfield Scott, the veteran General-in-Chief, rightly revered by the whole service as a most experienced, farsighted, and practical man, was ably assisted by W.

All the while the shaft of phosphorescence from the well was getting brighter and brighter, bringing to the minds of the huddled men, a sense of doom and abnormality which far outraced any image their conscious minds could form.

And when I asked him how an abo could possibly have known what copper looked like in the ground, he said the man had been employed at one of the mines near Nullagine.

The water boiled around Abo as the shark thrashed, but Abo stayed on and, holding the stick like handlebars, he pulled back to keep the shark from diving and steered him into the shallow water of the reef, where the other men waited with their knives drawn.