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Crossword clues for mind

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
mind
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a load off...mind (=I felt less worried)
▪ Knowing he was safe was a load off my mind.
a thought crosses sb’s mind (=someone has a thought)
▪ The thought never crossed my mind that I could be wrong.
an academic/practical etc turn of mind
▪ youngsters with an independent turn of mind
an active mind (=when someone is able to think quickly and clearly)
▪ A fit body is crucial if you want an active mind.
an attitude of mindBritish English (= a way of thinking)
▪ Being young is simply an attitude of mind.
be bored out of your mind (=extremely bored)
▪ In some of the lessons, I was bored out of my mind.
broadens...mind (=helps you to understand and accept other people’s beliefs, customs etc)
▪ Travel broadens the mind.
closed mind
▪ You’re facing this situation with a closed mind.
cloud sb’s judgement/mind/vision etc
▪ Don’t let your personal feelings cloud your judgement.
▪ Fear had clouded his vision.
concentrate your efforts/attention/energy/mind etc on sth
▪ I’m concentrating my efforts on writing my autobiography.
drive sb up the wall/round the bend/out of their mindspoken informal (= make someone feel very annoyed)
▪ That voice of hers drives me up the wall.
erase sth from your mind/memory
▪ He couldn’t erase the image from his mind.
▪ She had tried to erase the memory of that day.
exercised...minds
▪ It’s an issue that’s exercised the minds of scientists for a long time.
filthy mind (=you are always thinking about sex)
▪ Your problem is you’ve got a filthy mind.
find yourself/your mind etc doing sth
▪ When he left, Karen found herself heaving a huge sigh of relief.
▪ She tried to concentrate, but found her mind drifting back to Alex.
focus (sb’s) mind/attention (on sth) (=make people give their attention to something)
▪ We need to focus public attention on this issue.
focus your attention/mind/efforts on sth
▪ She tried to focus her mind on her work.
fresh in her mind
▪ The accident was still fresh in her mind.
have a dirty mindBritish English (= think about sex a lot)
I don’t mind admitting sth
▪ I’m scared and I don’t mind admitting it.
I hope you don’t mind
I hope you don’t mind me asking, but why are you moving?
imprint sth on your mind/memory/brain etc
▪ The sight of Joe’s dead body was imprinted on his mind forever.
It didn’t cross...mind that
It didn’t cross her mind that she might be doing something illegal.
it never entered sb’s head/mind (=used to say that someone never considered a particular idea, especially when this is surprising)
▪ It never entered his head that she might be seeing someone else.
keep an open mind
▪ It’s important to keep an open mind as you study the topic.
let your gaze/eyes/thoughts/mind etc drift
▪ Idly she let her eyes drift over his desk.
mind reader
mind your manners (also remember your manners British English) (= used for telling a child to behave politely)
▪ I frowned at him and told him to mind his manners.
of like mind
▪ They get on well together because they are of like mind.
of unsound mind (=people who are mentally ill)
▪ people of unsound mind
one-track mind
poisoning...minds
▪ Television violence is poisoning the minds of young people.
presence of mind
▪ I’m glad she had the presence of mind to take down the car’s registration number.
put/push sth to the back of your mind
▪ He tried to push these uncomfortable thoughts to the back of his mind.
sb’s state of mind
▪ What was his state of mind at the time of the attack?
strength of purpose/mind (=determination to do something)
▪ In pursuing this ambition, William showed remarkable strength of purpose.
the human mind/brain
▪ Distances in space are too great for the human mind to comprehend.
the thought has (never) crossed my mind (=used to tell someone you have thought of the thing they are suggesting, or have never thought of it)
the workings of...mind (=how he thinks)
▪ I shall never understand the workings of his mind.
to the untutored eye/ear/mind
▪ To the untutored ear, this music sounds as if it might have been written by Beethoven.
weighing on...mind
▪ I’m sure there’s something weighing on his mind.
with an easy mind
▪ I can leave the children with my mother with an easy mind.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
clear
▪ This statement should be absolutely clear in the minds of everyone concerned.
▪ Fenella turned back to the treadmills and half closed her eyes, the words of the Robemaker still clear in her mind.
▪ Soon after she left the hospital, with a clearer mind, she again stopped taking her medicine.
▪ Step 9 Be quite clear in your mind how your child must change in order for the situation to improve.
▪ The layout of the house was still clear in his mind.
▪ He would get to the bottom of all this, just as soon as he could get it all clear in his mind.
fresh
▪ She seemed calm enough but the fit she had thrown on first wakening was fresh in his mind.
▪ I did my shopping Sunday afternoon while it was fresh on my mind.
▪ With Amantani fresh in my mind it seemed to me that more than the cattle were tethered here.
▪ There was no doubt that the tragedy was as fresh in his mind as the day it had happened.
▪ I wrote it while the text was still fresh in my mind.
▪ He thinks this is more important than a high turnover of staff, despite the fresh minds and attitudes this may encourage.
▪ The memory of empty bellies because their father had gambled away all the National Assistance was still fresh in their minds.
▪ With this unhappy enterprise fresh in their minds, Kennedy and Khrushchev met in Vienna in June 1961.
human
▪ But the human mind selects as well as stores.
▪ Can they be other than mere arbitrary constructions of the human mind?
▪ His response is to abandon the troubled human mind, and delve into the animal world instead.
▪ But maybe total understanding of everything is a bit much to ask of a tiny human mind.
▪ I deny such an idea; the human mind if it desires something strongly enough will achieve anything.
▪ At present, computers are a useful aid in research, but they have to be directed by human minds.
▪ Or was the human mind ready for being stretched, and perhaps into the next stage of development?
▪ Modern developments in artificial intelligence are bringing a new light to past perceptions of how the human mind interacts with nature.
open
▪ He insists he has an open mind on the players he wants to keep.
▪ In interviews after their inaugural meeting last Thursday, all vowed to keep an open mind on whoever comes before the panel.
▪ Still, it was as well to keep an open mind.
▪ And later she was going to try to get herself to that meeting with an open mind.
▪ An open school is characterised by open minds as well as open doors.
▪ We must keep an open mind about the possible presence of ores.
▪ In this situation it is vital to keep an open mind and consider any possibilities and evaluate them carefully.
▪ Police Commission members have vowed to keep an open mind on the finalists.
right
▪ This in turn puts him in the right frame of mind to be helped to overcome the problem once and for all.
▪ Who in their right mind would save any money, under these circumstances?
▪ No one in his right mind would want to start a fight in such a place as this.
▪ Eurydice Druitt Saltonstall was in her right mind when she wrote this will.
▪ The ease with which they fell from her tongue would have horrified her, had she been in her right mind.
▪ He might be more in his right mind than you are.
▪ No one in his right mind would call the Delinquents a memorable piece of work.
▪ No one in their right mind should believe such a terrifying thought.
■ VERB
bear
▪ You should also bear in mind that social security payments might be higher abroad.
▪ And while that would seem to leave Jen open to offers, bear in mind that she can be a difficult customer.
▪ This is to be expected, bearing in mind the way in which insertion is handled.
▪ That is also an outcome to bear in mind.
▪ There are some very basic psychological principles for you to bear in mind.
▪ You must bear in mind the need to safeguard public funds and observe security requirements.
▪ There are a number of points to bear in mind.
▪ Finally governments have also to bear in mind taxation rates in other countries when framing their own policies.
borne
▪ Film is something that has been edited and this should always be borne in mind when using it.
▪ The tactic is mined with dangers and difficulties and can not be successfully carried out unless these are constantly borne in mind.
▪ Distributional factors should always be borne in mind when considering the effects of changes in aggregate variables.
▪ This relationship should be borne in mind when we examine monetary policy in the next two chapters.
▪ But as was stated above, it must always be borne in mind that these models are ideal types.
▪ Given the quality of much tap water in recent years this point should be borne in mind when considering keeping this fish.
▪ The possibility of progression to modules requiring higher levels of competence should also be borne in mind when designing programmes.
▪ This dulled incentive to enhance productivity is a cost of integration that must be borne in mind when amalgamation is contemplated.
change
▪ Two days before the lunch John Lawrence rang to say he had changed his mind and would after all be present.
▪ The couple had considered buying the house, where they had lived for several years, but they changed their minds.
▪ He was convinced Jeopardy would hate him for ever, change his mind about the performance, change his mind about his prowess.
▪ Time to recall the smallest moment, time to revise your story, time to change your mind.
▪ But when she accompanies Diana to the ancient Tower Abbey, she begins to change her mind.
▪ But no one directly changes a mind.
▪ The attempt to change his mind proved futile.
concentrate
▪ The cash crisis in the Third World will help concentrate the minds of lenders.
▪ Robyn lay, eyes closed, and concentrated on keeping her mind blank and her body relaxed.
▪ I think that might concentrate his mind wonderfully as to the validity of different world views!
▪ But the prospect of an early general election has concentrated minds.
▪ It concentrated my mind at our interviews again.
▪ A hefty fine would help concentrate the mind and could save the lives of commuters.
▪ It concentrates the mind better than anything I know.
cross
▪ And anyway, what about all the other equally correct continuations which never crossed our mind until we came to them?
▪ In fact, it had hardly crossed her mind at all for days now.
▪ It crosses my mind, briefly, that a new bottle would be a welcome gift.
▪ For some idiotic reason it had never crossed her mind that she might be doing something illegal.
▪ When museum planning began in 1991, officials were so focused on exhibits that souvenirs never crossed their minds.
▪ I think of so many things, so many sad and bitter thoughts cross my mind.
▪ Retirement has crossed his mind, Aikman said.
enter
▪ And it entered his mind uninvited to wonder about the strangeness of human relationships.
▪ It began entering my mind when I was putting.
▪ They have entered your mind and there they add to the charge with which you are writing your book.
▪ Going to college, by the way, just never entered my mind.
▪ Every thought and feeling that had entered Ace's mind had appeared simultaneously on her face.
▪ And here a niggling doubt enters the mind.
▪ And then the word Agnes entered my mind.
▪ Absolut Vodka has used its bottle shape to enter the minds of millions.
flash
▪ The one occasion which was flashing through Yanto's mind at this moment involved just three of the local water babies.
▪ Probably nothing will flash into your mind, I said.
▪ This was staggering new information, and all kinds of ideas were flashing through our minds.
▪ At that moment a plan flashed into her mind, perfect, down to the last detail.
▪ The picture of Christopher Court driving away from Church Row flashed into his mind.
▪ The past twenty-two months flashed through my mind like film run at high speed, and suddenly I felt rather tired.
▪ It flashed through my mind that I was close.
▪ Each time I see one of these cocoons hanging from a tree, all of these marvels flash through my mind.
keep
▪ To pull this off, the government should keep in mind some first principles.
▪ There are other factors that companies need to keep in mind.
▪ However, although we can keep this association in mind, it does not give us the whole picture.
▪ If the limitations of the 24-hour recall are kept in mind, gross calculations of nutrient intake are valid.
▪ Whilst the latter is not always possible it should be kept in mind.
▪ I think you should keep an open mind and enjoy being with people.
▪ That'd keep her mind off herself quick enough.
▪ And I always keep in mind the global nature of the organization.
make
▪ Mr le Carr can't seem to make up his mind whether he's writing a thriller or an expos.
▪ A man is what he makes up his mind to be.
▪ George was a superb dean, not least because of his capacity to listen to colleagues and then make up his mind decisively.
▪ He had made up his mind to be offended.
▪ Before she had made up her mind she heard the roar of the jets.
▪ Gore reportedly has a knack of forcing the president to make up his mind and move on.
▪ Be grown up and make up your own mind.
▪ Her parents felt they were too young, but that ultimately the two young people had to make up their own minds.
occupy
▪ They had other problems now to occupy their minds, as well as Balliol's whereabouts.
▪ But ah, how I need some more engaging puzzle to occupy my mind today.
▪ There are very many ways of course to occupy the mind and the techniques we describe are only a few suggestions for practice.
▪ K... Occupy you minds with good thoughts, or the enemy will find the bad ones.
▪ So the season continued and the World Championships in Rome began more and more to occupy my mind.
▪ It occupied his mind, too, shrinking his vision of the sea clock.
▪ She also had enough at Usher to occupy her mind without fretting about future possibilities.
▪ I feel it was important that the men had work to do that occupied their minds and bodies.
put
▪ He put Jane out of his mind and concentrated on the task ahead of him.
▪ I think this group can do anything it wants to if it puts its mind to it.
▪ Despite speculation that the campaign, produced by Hoare Wilkins, was put together with privatisation in mind.
▪ Nick spotted it by the sudden flash of light on its chassis, then put it from his mind.
▪ Brian, although fascinated by psychology, always wanted to sort himself out, not put his mind into another's hands.
▪ The Professor couldn't help thinking that he put him in mind of a young Jack Palance.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ She put it out of her mind.
read
▪ Surely he hadn't somehow read her mind and shared that foolish thought that stress and tiredness had put into her head?
▪ You must have read my mind.
▪ She knows he can read her mind, she knows her thoughts are open to him.
▪ He might have been rather less relieved if he could have read her mind.
▪ It may respond to voice commands or it may read minds.
▪ As if she reads his mind, she moans encouragingly.
speak
▪ He spoke his mind and he rarely smiled, and he was getting, at best, a C from me.
▪ He dawdled, afraid to say no or resist her or speak his mind.
▪ They reflect a tough tradition among rural women of shouldering a heavy economic burden and speaking their mind.
▪ What does one say in a culture that hesitates to speak its mind?
▪ Lucy Lane, on the point of speaking, changed her mind.
▪ Even if they disagree sometimes with what he says, they like a candidate who speaks his mind.
stick
▪ I think those types of things stick in children's minds, so I didn't want her there.
▪ Yet the one small doubt stuck in her mind like a burr in tweed.
▪ But it stuck in my mind.
▪ It must have stuck in her mind, that an honest person might act out of character when severely threatened.
▪ It is not surprising that phrases do not stick in the mind.
▪ One incident that has always stuck in my mind was when I dove for my foxhole at the opening mortar round.
▪ One boy,, really sticks out in my mind.
▪ Perhaps the image is just so startling that it sticks in our minds.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fertile imagination/mind/brain
▪ Even now no-one seems quite certain whether this was a fact, a half-fact or the product of a fertile imagination.
▪ He is said to have been convivial, widely knowledgeable, with a fertile imagination and a whimsical sense of humour.
a fevered imagination/mind/brain
a nimble mind/brain/wit
a tidy mind
▪ Henry had a tidy mind, and he was practical.
an inquiring mind
an open mind
▪ And later she was going to try to get herself to that meeting with an open mind.
▪ Before he resolves a problem, he keeps an open mind on how that problem might be resolved.
▪ But officially as least the police are still keeping an open mind.
▪ He insists he has an open mind on the players he wants to keep.
▪ In interviews after their inaugural meeting last Thursday, all vowed to keep an open mind on whoever comes before the panel.
▪ Police say they're keeping an open mind.
▪ Until the Profitboss makes a decision, he keeps an open mind as to what that decision might be.
▪ While keeping an open mind, most archaeologists remain extremely doubtful.
at/in the back of your mind
▪ I was hurt that she'd left, but I guess at the back of my mind I always knew she would.
▪ There was always a slight feeling of fear at the back of his mind.
be engraved in/on your memory/mind/heart
▪ The date was engraved on his heart.
be etched on/in your memory/mind
be in two minds (about sth)
▪ As ever, he was in two minds about Clarac's value to the project.
▪ Do you know, he was in two minds about accepting?
▪ For a second he was in two minds about it.
▪ I am in two minds whether to change the engine or repair it.
▪ In her own cottage a few miles away the witch Agnes Nitt was in two minds about her new pointy hat.
▪ Please be warned: they are capable of getting through that gap which you are in two minds about bothering to block.
▪ They were not to be in two minds.
▪ This time she seemed to be in two minds about what to do.
be in/at/to the forefront of sb's mind/attention etc
▪ The risks of a court case also have to be in the forefront of your mind.
▪ This meant that fund-raising news and any other news about the deaf was in the forefront of everyone's attention.
be minded to do sth
▪ At about this time the plaintiff became suspicious that the appellants were minded to sell the property at Westbourne Grove.
be uppermost in your mind
▪ Succeeding in her career was uppermost in her mind.
▪ In fact, financial problems may not be uppermost in her mind.
▪ In fact, they brought up the question before I could do so because it was uppermost in their minds.
▪ It was only natural that that thought should be uppermost in her mind.
▪ Nor was there the slightest need to tell her of the thoughts that were uppermost in his mind.
▪ She was certain, however, that it was not the weather that was uppermost in his mind.
▪ Still, the aspect of that news which affected himself was uppermost in his mind, threatening to swamp such minor worries.
▪ The one which was uppermost in her mind was Maurin.
▪ Two thoughts were uppermost in my mind.
bear (sth) in mind
▪ Thanks, I'll bear that in mind.
▪ Tourists must bear in mind that they are visitors in another country.
▪ I said I would bear his suggestion in mind.
▪ If he had ... no conclusions yet, just bear it in mind.
▪ It is important that we bear these differences in mind when we attempt to analyse the formal nature of public sector organisations.
▪ Mr. Clarke Any intelligent parent, intelligent governor or intelligent newspaper person will bear it in mind that various factors influence results.
▪ My right hon. Friend should bear that in mind.
▪ The Prime Minister I will certainly bear that in mind.
▪ The problem is largely an insuperable one, and all we can do at this stage is to bear it in mind.
▪ Thus, firms entering overseas markets must bear this in mind when introducing new products or services.
bend your mind/efforts to sth
▪ But Mrs Totteridge was clearly bending her mind to other things.
blow sb's mind
call sth to mind
▪ Can you call to mind when you last saw her?
▪ Fresno and Modesto are cities that call to mind the words "hot" and "dry."
carry sth in your head/mind
▪ The amount of knowledge Lee carries in her head is amazing.
▪ He must remember the word and carry it in his head for some time, and so is writing from an image.
cast your mind back
Cast you mind back a few weeks to the Athletics Championship in Armagh.
▪ He frowned, casting his mind back over the conversation they had held.
▪ Henry cast his mind back to the fateful evening.
▪ Lisa, if you cast your mind back, I think you'll recall that it was your idea.
▪ Again, more in control of matters, he cast his mind back.
▪ He cast his mind back to his homecoming earlier that evening.
▪ He racked his brains, he cast his mind back.
▪ I cast my mind back to our excited departure from Gatwick airport.
▪ Let us cast our minds back to the referendum.
change your mind
▪ At first the doctor said I was suffering from a virus, but now he's changed his mind.
▪ Barry hadn't changed his mind about leaving.
▪ Everyone has a right to change their mind.
▪ I'm hoping Dad will change his mind about Louise after he meets her tonight.
▪ I've changed my mind about the Riviera. I do like it after all.
▪ If you change your mind about the job, just give me a call.
▪ No, I'm not going out tonight. I've changed my mind.
▪ Use a pencil so you can erase it if you change your mind.
▪ What if she changes her mind and doesn't turn up?
▪ But if students actively dislike school, higher standards and better assessments are not going to change their minds.
▪ But why Zeus changed his mind and whether Prometheus revealed the secret when he was freed, we do not know.
▪ Carruthers, I don't know what will happen now, but I have changed my mind.
▪ Good software gives you the power to change your mind.
▪ He knew what he had to do and he got up and did it before he changed his mind.
▪ Pete lifted his knight but changed his mind and put it back on the board.
▪ Schlesinger first thought him wrong for Ratso, but changed his mind when they met in New York.
▪ When he met Lee the next morning at nine, he said he had changed his mind about going back.
clear your head/mind
▪ I go for a long walk at lunchtime to clear my head.
▪ Gao Yang recalled that the wall barely cleared his head at the time.
▪ He leaned against the wall desperately trying to clear his mind but the memory proved elusive.
▪ He wants a few days to clear his head.
▪ His meeting with the Holtzes seemed to have refreshed Alvin and cleared his mind.
▪ If not, the cold would clear his head.
▪ She cleared her head of Rory, all that nonsense.
▪ She needed the hot draught of caffeine to clear her head.
▪ So, clear your mind, get out your No. 2 pencils and do your best: 1.
close your mind to/against sth
▪ Academic interpretations held off the shame for a while, but then he could no longer close his mind to it.
▪ Bambi's closed her mind to it.
▪ He could tell by her eyes that she had closed her mind to him.
▪ I closed my ears and tried to close my mind to what was happening.
▪ Memories of her grandmother's judgements obtruded themselves and she closed her mind against them.
▪ She had immediately closed her mind to all thought, not even realising how tightly she had been gripping fitzAlan's hand.
▪ She stretched out on the bed, closing her mind to the sounds and waited.
cross sb's mind
▪ "It never crossed my mind to give up," he said. "It became an obsession."
▪ "Why didn't you call me?" "The thought did cross my mind while I was shopping this afternoon, but then I forgot all about it.
▪ It crossed my mind that I was the only female coach on the committee, but that made me more determined than ever.
▪ Several times it had crossed his mind to check on the car, but he never actually did it.
ease sb's mind
▪ Knowing that he's getting good medical care does ease my mind.
fix your attention/eyes/mind etc on sb/sth
▪ I gulped, and fixed my eyes on the blood-red pen on the desk.
▪ She fixed her eyes on Mr Hollins's face and waited for his answer.
▪ She fixed her eyes on the jagged line of rocks to which she had to climb.
▪ She fixed her eyes on the street in an attempt to calm herself.
▪ She couldn't turn round so she fixed her eyes on her two brothers on the altar.
flash through sb's mind/head/brain
▪ Each time I see one of these cocoons hanging from a tree, all of these marvels flash through my mind.
▪ Her body seemed determined to ignore the danger signals now at last flashing through her brain.
▪ It flashed through my mind that I was close.
▪ The image of the guard in his elaborate flowering prison flashes through her head.
▪ The one occasion which was flashing through Yanto's mind at this moment involved just three of the local water babies.
▪ The only idea that flashed through my head was that some one had broken into the house and was attacking Master Yehudi.
▪ The past twenty-two months flashed through my mind like film run at high speed, and suddenly I felt rather tired.
▪ This was staggering new information, and all kinds of ideas were flashing through our minds.
give sb a piece of your mind
▪ I was so mad that I called back and gave her a piece of my mind.
▪ If one of the kids is being sassy, Inez gives them a piece of her mind.
▪ Boy, am I going to give him a piece of my mind when I see him.
▪ But it was worth it, to give Hilda Machin a piece of her mind.
▪ I begin to pronounce the sequence of words and numbers that will prevent her from giving him a piece of her mind.
▪ Ready to give somebody a piece of her mind, Aunt Pat strode to the front door and flung it open.
▪ She'd give Gloria a piece of her mind when she got home!
▪ She managed to manoeuvre into the remaining space and got out to give somebody a piece of her mind.
great minds (think alike)
Great visions are the signs of great minds and there were few greater visions than those of Newton and Einstein.
▪ Alas, there is no space to give a proper account of the thoughts of these great minds.
▪ Some of the confusion would certainly have been lessened if the two great minds had had opportunities to exchange ideas.
▪ That presents no danger if our great minds are in Paris or London or the United States.
▪ The excitement of the intellectual revolution produced some great minds and some important discoveries.
habit of thought/mind
▪ And such habits of mind survive the passage of time.
▪ But a habit of mind, something much more important, will stay with young people.
▪ Has this become a habit of mind?
▪ If views are similar it's because habits of thought are the same.
▪ The care of the interior demands an obsessive habit of mind.
▪ These habits of thought and action enable a business or work group to take full credit for the triumphs it achieves.
▪ This was his habit of mind.
▪ What habits of thought could matter more?
have a lot on your mind
▪ I'm sorry I wasn't paying attention, I have a lot on my mind at the moment.
▪ Since the divorce, Linda's had a lot on her mind.
▪ Stacy didn't go to the party on Saturday because she had a lot on her mind.
have a one-track mind
▪ That guy has a one-track mind.
have half a mind to do sth
▪ I have half a mind to just go home.
▪ I have half a mind to tell her what I really think of her.
▪ I have half a mind to make you take this right back.
know your own mind
▪ I'm in my mid-thirties and ought to know my own mind by now, but I'm scared of getting married.
▪ Though not yet 15, Sara knows her own mind, and has already decided on a career.
▪ All of which suggests a person who knows his own mind and makes his own decisions.
▪ He hardly knew his own mind, they said candidly among their own intimates.
▪ People often didn't know their own minds.
▪ Shirley giggled and said I was a woman who knew her own mind, wasn't I, Jim?
▪ You don't know your own mind.
literal-minded
lose your mind
▪ What are you doing on the roof? Have you lost your mind?
▪ Either she was losing her mind, or she'd followed the wrong man.
▪ Is Roberto correct when he insists that he is innocent and she has lost her mind?
▪ Obviously she was losing her mind.
▪ PipThe Negro cabin boy who loses his mind when abandoned temporarily in the sea.
▪ Some victims feel they are losing their minds or are about to die.
▪ The musicians are completely losing their minds.
▪ There came a day shortly afterwards when I could no longer ignore the fact that he was losing his mind.
▪ What is not bogus is the position Selda Soyturk is in today because a guy lost his mind behind the wheel.
meeting of minds
▪ Also there would be no meeting of minds in such a procedure.
▪ But scriptwriter and narrator Indra Sinha said the video emphasised the meeting of minds as well as bodies.
▪ He says that he hopes that there will be a meeting of minds on how to deal with traffic problems.
▪ Only if I used the example of all mankind's progress towards Paradise was there any meeting of minds.
▪ There was just no meeting of minds on the weapons issue.
▪ There was no trust between them, no meeting of minds.
▪ Why such a strange meeting of minds?
mind/brain candy
my mind's a blank
nothing could be/is further from sb's mind/thoughts
occupy sb's mind/thoughts/attention
▪ While she waited, she tried to occupy her mind with pleasant thoughts of the vacation.
open your mind (to sth)
▪ As the days go by open your mind to what is going on around you - what are other people's goals?
▪ He opened his mind to the sounds of the city.
▪ If you open your mind, then you see it really does have feeling.
▪ Television is a powerful force to bring people together to entertain, to educate, to open our minds and hearts.
▪ The overall influence of Seattle opened his mind on a few things.
▪ Very soon the research opened my mind to more subtle ideas.
▪ We are duty-bound to search, question, open our minds.
▪ We must break down the barriers of conditioning and open our minds to far higher goals.
out of sight, out of mind
▪ I tucked it in the back of a drawer, figuring out of sight, out of mind.
plant an idea/doubt/suspicion (in sb's mind)
▪ Their conversation had planted doubts in Dennis' mind about the partnership.
pollute sb's mind
pop into your head/mind
▪ A line from an old drinking song popped into his head.
▪ And Arnie was the first lie that popped into her head.
▪ Funny, the sort of things which popped into your head.
▪ List these assets and liabilities at random as they pop into your mind or as they are suggested to you by others.
▪ Whenever the question of whether or not she needed him popped into her head, Constance conveniently ducked it.
prey on sb's mind
▪ But his main preoccupation was with the unfinished Requiem, which had begun to prey on his mind.
▪ Important items which are left have a habit of preying on the mind.
▪ It began to prey on my mind so much that I went to the casualty department of Charing Cross Hospital.
▪ It was Tatiana preying on his mind.
push sth out of your mind
put/set sb's mind at rest
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
read sb's mind/thoughts
▪ Don't expect your spouse to be able to read your mind.
sb's cast of mind
▪ Interpreting the stories depends on the reader's own cast of mind.
▪ But does he have the right cast of mind for a post-cold-war world now in its second decade?
▪ It became a cast of mind, a framework for existence.
▪ It was rooted in a cast of mind raised to an ethic in the professions.
▪ Moreover, it raises an interesting question about the cast of mind of the government as a whole as it seeks re-election.
▪ Nor, if we are in civilised cast of mind, because we wish to become drunk.
▪ This cast of mind is easily recognizable as the outlook of the traditional ruling class.
▪ This cast of mind survived for decades.
sb's mind is wandering
▪ My mind is wandering, as Isabel has said, I forget things.
▪ Paul finds his mind is wandering, thinking about the poll tax program again.
serious-minded/evil-minded etc
set your heart/mind/sights on (doing) sth
▪ But where there are sellers there are buyers, and it was this latter rare species we had set our sights on.
▪ Gazing intently into her computer screen, Christine Montgomery has set her sights on the next generation of electronic language translators.
▪ He knew he was bound to pull any girl he set his mind on - he always had.
▪ Heath had set her sights on the U. S. Senate seat from Colorado.
▪ Her youth and beauty elicited a predictable reaction from my father, who set his sights on her at once.
▪ Sofa Head's greatest asset is the realisation that you don't have to set your sights on one target.
▪ Wagner set his sights on a degree in electrical engineering, and he followed his star with a fervid intensity.
▪ Yes, she thought, if Tamar had set her mind on something she would never rest until it was accomplished.
slip your mind/memory
▪ He had seemed thrown for a moment, as though it had genuinely slipped his mind that he was about to be married.
▪ I can't believe it has slipped my mind.
▪ It slipped my mind because of the tragedy that followed.
▪ It completely slipped my mind I was going to be accused of theft!
▪ It had slipped his mind entirely that today.
▪ Jean hadn't even asked Helen what she had said; the entire episode had slipped her mind.
▪ Yes, that had slipped her mind.
▪ You think something as important as that would slip my mind?
speak your mind
▪ Larry isn't afraid to speak his mind, even in front of the boss.
▪ Sam has never been shy about speaking his mind.
▪ She's very direct and believes in speaking her mind.
▪ She believes in speaking her mind, which makes her very unpopular.
▪ We thought that the process of filming might stop people from speaking their minds.
▪ Dean Shearer was a man of compassion, humility and integrity who was never afraid to speak his mind.
▪ Even if they disagree sometimes with what he says, they like a candidate who speaks his mind.
▪ He dawdled, afraid to say no or resist her or speak his mind.
▪ Nizan generally spoke his mind and refused to pull his punches.
▪ The company insists Vinik spoke his mind at the time comments were made and he simply changed his opinions.
▪ What does one say in a culture that hesitates to speak its mind?
▪ With Freemantle Leapor could easily speak her mind; to have the same confidence with new readers would take time.
spring to (sb's) mind
▪ Dell and Elonex immediately spring to mind.
▪ Faded was the word that sprang to mind - everything had a rather tired quality about it.
▪ If we think of the ways in which the term research is used, a variety of activities spring to mind.
▪ Impressive was the first word that sprang to mind.
▪ Noble was the word which sprang to Amabel's mind.
▪ Some comic examples spring to mind.
▪ That written, qualifications immediately spring to mind.
sth concentrates the mind
▪ Equally the Tender concentrates the mind wonderfully in a way that a final offer by letter from the insurer can not.
▪ It concentrates the mind better than anything I know.
stick in sb's mind
▪ My uncle told me the story when I was little, and it's always stuck in my mind.
▪ But it stuck in my mind.
▪ I think those types of things stick in children's minds, so I didn't want her there.
▪ It is not surprising that phrases do not stick in the mind.
▪ It must have stuck in her mind, that an honest person might act out of character when severely threatened.
▪ One incident that has always stuck in my mind was when I dove for my foxhole at the opening mortar round.
▪ Perhaps the image is just so startling that it sticks in our minds.
▪ The whole weekend had been unsettling, which was perhaps why the game had stuck in her mind.
▪ Yet the one small doubt stuck in her mind like a burr in tweed.
stick out to sb/stick out in sb's mind
the hearts and minds of sb
the/your mind boggles,
time out of mind
turn of mind
▪ He is a very intelligent man with a scientific turn of mind.
▪ Certainly there were Gallo-Romans of an independent turn of mind in the south.
▪ She was a plain girl, with straight hair and thin limbs and a mathematical turn of mind.
▪ Very often students' inventive turn of mind can be useful at such formats, and they will largely be absent.
wipe sth from your mind/memory
▪ And when he had done with her, she could wipe him from her mind, obliterate him.
▪ He cared nothing for his wife and daughter and they must wipe him from their minds.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ At the back of my mind I had the funny feeling that I'd met her somewhere before.
▪ Cuomo is one of our foremost political minds.
▪ Dave struggled hard to push these worries out of his mind.
▪ Grandma's body is wearing out, but her mind is as sharp as ever.
▪ His mind was full of big ideas for developing the company.
▪ I don't really have a scientific mind.
▪ I made up my mind I was going to retire.
▪ I never know what's going on in her mind.
▪ It's hard to understand what's going on in Susanna's mind.
▪ It was an interesting idea. Jeff turned it over in his mind on the way to work.
▪ O'Rourke has a very devious mind.
▪ Peacher has an incredibly good mind.
▪ She had a picture of him in her mind - tall, blond and handsome.
▪ The same thoughts kept going through my mind and I couldn't get to sleep.
▪ The teacher talked on and on and my mind began to wander.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ At night, while he slept, his mind was still full of music.
▪ But planners changed their mind as they realized the channels would have to be bigger and bigger.
▪ But those wines give only momentary pleasure and thereafter the senses are dulled and the mind is clouded.
▪ He is reputed to have been an able administrator with a keen mind for commerce.
▪ In his mind, Jim could vividly picture the red bulb of the thermometer in the relaxation exercise Miller had given him.
▪ Keep that in mind because without it all the fine planning in the world will never be translated into action.
▪ Then, since the reality of my situation could hardly be worse, my mind turned once again to philosophy.
▪ We can not see them or turn our minds from them.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
never
Never mind that Prime Ministers do not actually own the Elgin marbles.
Never mind that it just might provide a superior education to those who choose to attend.
▪ We don't know were your dad is and he's lost altogether I suppose but never mind him.
Never mind that Jair is a force in Pop Warner football, whose weight limit he also is about to outgrow.
▪ But never mind the trash shops and the coach lamps.
Never mind that he does run on a bit.
▪ How could any man want to lay a finger on her, never mind father her children?
▪ But never mind, he would send for Basha.
■ NOUN
business
▪ Then I felt a fool and decided to leave it and mind my own business.
▪ He also fired his lawyer and told civil libertarians to mind their own business.
▪ His life had been well-ordered and reasonably happy, he thought, by minding his own business.
▪ He had not minded his own business as a man of seventy in New York should do.
▪ She hoped he didn't interpret them as telling him to mind his own business.
▪ Needless to say, Lleland became enraged at the idea and told me to mind my own business.
▪ In Havana in April, Fidel Castro politely told him to mind his own business.
▪ Here nobody else minded your business.
fact
▪ Never mind the fact that some of us remember individual offices and desks first time around.
▪ Nor did they mind the fact that she was constantly picking up and leaving for short periods to fulfill speaking engagements elsewhere.
▪ At this stage, thoughts will no doubt come to mind which are in fact untrue.
▪ Never mind the fact that, in market economies, almost any economic activity can sometimes be said to meet this test.
▪ His boss doesn't mind, in fact she often turns up to listen.
▪ Red Rum may have won the race, but never mind the facts.
shop
▪ Carrie had been minding the shop.
▪ I have to mind the shop here.
▪ Emily and Maudie can mind the shop quite well without me, so I can look after Josh and the boys.
▪ But never mind the trash shops and the coach lamps.
spring
▪ That written, qualifications immediately spring to mind.
▪ Dell and Elonex immediately spring to mind.
▪ Sheridan and Cantona are the prime examples that spring to mind.
▪ They are not words which spring immediately to mind when considering the honours system in general.
▪ Leading Leisure and Corton Beach spring to mind.
▪ Geographically based organisations Geographically based organisations such as retail businesses readily spring to mind.
▪ It will be useful for processor hungry applications - spreadsheets, graphics applications, and multitasking spring readily to mind.
thought
▪ A thought suddenly came to mind.
▪ Weiss' comment brings several thoughts to mind, about a subject on which little thinking has been done.
■ VERB
bring
▪ It brings to mind the ludicrous feud between Liam Gallagher and Robbie Williams, who need their silly heads knocking together.
▪ Tourists are drawn to them in a spirit of nostalgia for the courage they recall and the peacefulness they bring to mind.
▪ Whatever it was that he could not bring to mind must lie in the past.
▪ Those are the still the first words that cancer brings to mind.
▪ It brings to mind Danny Baker's comment about Millwall under Rioch, that they should play in grey kits.
▪ The scale and spirit of the iron creatures on display brought to mind one image: mechanical dinosaurs without skin.
▪ This shot brings to mind one very important aspect of tropical island work.
▪ Which brings to mind that old saw about being careful what you wish for...
call
▪ The two incidents which were called to mind related to the Company golf scene.
▪ He erupted for two dazzling touchdowns, calling to mind his 235-yard, signature effort against Washington in the 1993 Rose Bowl.
▪ What, or whom, does it call to mind?
▪ His words called to mind our own culpability, which we find hard to admit.
▪ Mungo nodded, calling to mind a diabetic schoolfriend who had to inject himself daily.
▪ This move should call to mind some remarks made in 2.4 about the causal theory of knowledge.
▪ There we were, in a church bedecked with flowers, in arrangements calling to mind every aspect of parish life.
come
▪ Other scenarios come to mind when exploring further areas of development for the partnership.
▪ Dame Edna and sausage rolls come immediately to mind.
▪ She was disappointed to find that nothing came immediately to mind.
▪ The two sources of power that first come to mind are solar and nuclear.
▪ It's amazing the ideas that can come to mind with a little thought and some extra effort on your part.
▪ The students here are not those who come to mind for most of us when we think about school success.
▪ The acid-sweet pastels of 1950s' food photography come to mind.
▪ Paramour comes to mind, but that is a neuter term.
hope
▪ I do hope you won't mind.
▪ Oh, by the way, I ran off copies for myself, I hope you don't mind.
▪ I hope you didn't mind my asking you to come here.
▪ I do hope she doesn't mind lending you for just one dinner.
seem
▪ The ducks don't seem to mind it, cos there's quite a few swimming about now.
▪ But no one seemed to mind.
▪ Mrs Baggley didn't seem to mind.
▪ Renie never seemed to mind wearing clothes that reeked of onions, fried fish, boiled cabbage.
▪ Her parents did not seem to mind that he had no qualifications and had not finished his university course.
▪ Nobody seems to mind that much.
▪ But in the half light, he didn't seem to mind.
▪ Most Westerners would have found this diet a privation: Langford seems not to have minded it.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fertile imagination/mind/brain
▪ Even now no-one seems quite certain whether this was a fact, a half-fact or the product of a fertile imagination.
▪ He is said to have been convivial, widely knowledgeable, with a fertile imagination and a whimsical sense of humour.
a fevered imagination/mind/brain
a nimble mind/brain/wit
a tidy mind
▪ Henry had a tidy mind, and he was practical.
an inquiring mind
an open mind
▪ And later she was going to try to get herself to that meeting with an open mind.
▪ Before he resolves a problem, he keeps an open mind on how that problem might be resolved.
▪ But officially as least the police are still keeping an open mind.
▪ He insists he has an open mind on the players he wants to keep.
▪ In interviews after their inaugural meeting last Thursday, all vowed to keep an open mind on whoever comes before the panel.
▪ Police say they're keeping an open mind.
▪ Until the Profitboss makes a decision, he keeps an open mind as to what that decision might be.
▪ While keeping an open mind, most archaeologists remain extremely doubtful.
at/in the back of your mind
▪ I was hurt that she'd left, but I guess at the back of my mind I always knew she would.
▪ There was always a slight feeling of fear at the back of his mind.
be in two minds (about sth)
▪ As ever, he was in two minds about Clarac's value to the project.
▪ Do you know, he was in two minds about accepting?
▪ For a second he was in two minds about it.
▪ I am in two minds whether to change the engine or repair it.
▪ In her own cottage a few miles away the witch Agnes Nitt was in two minds about her new pointy hat.
▪ Please be warned: they are capable of getting through that gap which you are in two minds about bothering to block.
▪ They were not to be in two minds.
▪ This time she seemed to be in two minds about what to do.
be in/at/to the forefront of sb's mind/attention etc
▪ The risks of a court case also have to be in the forefront of your mind.
▪ This meant that fund-raising news and any other news about the deaf was in the forefront of everyone's attention.
be minded to do sth
▪ At about this time the plaintiff became suspicious that the appellants were minded to sell the property at Westbourne Grove.
be uppermost in your mind
▪ Succeeding in her career was uppermost in her mind.
▪ In fact, financial problems may not be uppermost in her mind.
▪ In fact, they brought up the question before I could do so because it was uppermost in their minds.
▪ It was only natural that that thought should be uppermost in her mind.
▪ Nor was there the slightest need to tell her of the thoughts that were uppermost in his mind.
▪ She was certain, however, that it was not the weather that was uppermost in his mind.
▪ Still, the aspect of that news which affected himself was uppermost in his mind, threatening to swamp such minor worries.
▪ The one which was uppermost in her mind was Maurin.
▪ Two thoughts were uppermost in my mind.
give sb a piece of your mind
▪ I was so mad that I called back and gave her a piece of my mind.
▪ If one of the kids is being sassy, Inez gives them a piece of her mind.
▪ Boy, am I going to give him a piece of my mind when I see him.
▪ But it was worth it, to give Hilda Machin a piece of her mind.
▪ I begin to pronounce the sequence of words and numbers that will prevent her from giving him a piece of her mind.
▪ Ready to give somebody a piece of her mind, Aunt Pat strode to the front door and flung it open.
▪ She'd give Gloria a piece of her mind when she got home!
▪ She managed to manoeuvre into the remaining space and got out to give somebody a piece of her mind.
great minds (think alike)
Great visions are the signs of great minds and there were few greater visions than those of Newton and Einstein.
▪ Alas, there is no space to give a proper account of the thoughts of these great minds.
▪ Some of the confusion would certainly have been lessened if the two great minds had had opportunities to exchange ideas.
▪ That presents no danger if our great minds are in Paris or London or the United States.
▪ The excitement of the intellectual revolution produced some great minds and some important discoveries.
habit of thought/mind
▪ And such habits of mind survive the passage of time.
▪ But a habit of mind, something much more important, will stay with young people.
▪ Has this become a habit of mind?
▪ If views are similar it's because habits of thought are the same.
▪ The care of the interior demands an obsessive habit of mind.
▪ These habits of thought and action enable a business or work group to take full credit for the triumphs it achieves.
▪ This was his habit of mind.
▪ What habits of thought could matter more?
have a lot on your mind
▪ I'm sorry I wasn't paying attention, I have a lot on my mind at the moment.
▪ Since the divorce, Linda's had a lot on her mind.
▪ Stacy didn't go to the party on Saturday because she had a lot on her mind.
have a one-track mind
▪ That guy has a one-track mind.
have half a mind to do sth
▪ I have half a mind to just go home.
▪ I have half a mind to tell her what I really think of her.
▪ I have half a mind to make you take this right back.
literal-minded
meeting of minds
▪ Also there would be no meeting of minds in such a procedure.
▪ But scriptwriter and narrator Indra Sinha said the video emphasised the meeting of minds as well as bodies.
▪ He says that he hopes that there will be a meeting of minds on how to deal with traffic problems.
▪ Only if I used the example of all mankind's progress towards Paradise was there any meeting of minds.
▪ There was just no meeting of minds on the weapons issue.
▪ There was no trust between them, no meeting of minds.
▪ Why such a strange meeting of minds?
mind/brain candy
my mind's a blank
nothing could be/is further from sb's mind/thoughts
out of sight, out of mind
▪ I tucked it in the back of a drawer, figuring out of sight, out of mind.
put/set sb's mind at rest
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
sb was (just) minding their own business
▪ I was just walking along, minding my own business, when this guy ran straight into me.
sb's cast of mind
▪ Interpreting the stories depends on the reader's own cast of mind.
▪ But does he have the right cast of mind for a post-cold-war world now in its second decade?
▪ It became a cast of mind, a framework for existence.
▪ It was rooted in a cast of mind raised to an ethic in the professions.
▪ Moreover, it raises an interesting question about the cast of mind of the government as a whole as it seeks re-election.
▪ Nor, if we are in civilised cast of mind, because we wish to become drunk.
▪ This cast of mind is easily recognizable as the outlook of the traditional ruling class.
▪ This cast of mind survived for decades.
serious-minded/evil-minded etc
the hearts and minds of sb
time out of mind
turn of mind
▪ He is a very intelligent man with a scientific turn of mind.
▪ Certainly there were Gallo-Romans of an independent turn of mind in the south.
▪ She was a plain girl, with straight hair and thin limbs and a mathematical turn of mind.
▪ Very often students' inventive turn of mind can be useful at such formats, and they will largely be absent.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Are you sure your mother doesn't mind?
▪ He spends as much time as his wife minding the children.
▪ Mothers who work part-time are able to mind other people's children when they are not working.
▪ Of course I don't mind if you bring a few friends over.
▪ The woman who minds Pip and Emma collects them from school and gives them an evening meal.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Never mind love, never mind passion.
▪ Never mind opponents lacking the bottle to take on the Old Trafford stars.
▪ Nobody seems to mind that much.
▪ Owen knew this and didn't mind it.
▪ Though whether he minded or not I'd no idea.
▪ When you only used to do four or five a year - never mind five in one weekend.
▪ You might not mind fur on blankets and bedspreads, but the next guest could be allergic to animals.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Mind

Mind \Mind\ (m[imac]nd), n. [AS. mynd, gemynd; akin to OHG. minna memory, love, G. minne love, Dan. minde mind, memory, remembrance, consent, vote, Sw. minne memory, Icel. minni, Goth. gamunds, L. mens, mentis, mind, Gr. me`nos, Skr. manas mind, man to think. [root]104, 278. Cf. Comment, Man, Mean, v., 3d Mental, Mignonette, Minion, Mnemonic, Money.]

  1. The intellectual or rational faculty in man; the understanding; the intellect; the power that conceives, judges, or reasons; also, the entire spiritual nature; the soul; -- often in distinction from the body.

    By the mind of man we understand that in him which thinks, remembers, reasons, wills.
    --Reid.

    What we mean by mind is simply that which perceives, thinks, feels, wills, and desires.
    --Sir W. Hamilton.

    Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind.
    --Rom. xiv. 5.

    The mind shall banquet, though the body pine.
    --Shak.

  2. The state, at any given time, of the faculties of thinking, willing, choosing, and the like; psychical activity or state; as:

    1. Opinion; judgment; belief.

      A fool uttereth all his mind.
      --Prov. xxix. 11.

      Being so hard to me that brought your mind, I fear she'll prove as hard to you in telling her mind.
      --Shak.

    2. Choice; inclination; liking; intent; will.

      If it be your minds, then let none go forth.
      --2 Kings ix. 15.

    3. Courage; spirit.
      --Chapman.

  3. Memory; remembrance; recollection; as, to have or keep in mind, to call to mind, to put in mind, etc.

    To have a mind or To have a great mind, to be inclined or strongly inclined in purpose; -- used with an infinitive. ``Sir Roger de Coverly . . . told me that he had a great mind to see the new tragedy with me.''
    --Addison.

    To lose one's mind, to become insane, or imbecile.

    To make up one's mind, to come to an opinion or decision; to determine.

    To put in mind, to remind. ``Regard us simply as putting you in mind of what you already know to be good policy.''
    --Jowett (Thucyd. ).

Mind

Mind \Mind\, v. i. To give attention or heed; to obey; as, the dog minds well.

Mind

Mind \Mind\ (m[imac]nd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Minded; p. pr. & vb. n. Minding.] [AS. myndian, gemynd[=i]an to remember. See Mind, n.]

  1. To fix the mind or thoughts on; to regard with attention; to treat as of consequence; to consider; to heed; to mark; to note. ``Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate.''
    --Rom. xii. 16.

    My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.
    --Shak.

  2. To occupy one's self with; to employ one's self about; to attend to; as, to mind one's business.

    Bidding him be a good child, and mind his book.
    --Addison.

  3. To obey; as, to mind parents; the dog minds his master.

  4. To have in mind; to purpose.
    --Beaconsfield.

    I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
    --Shak.

  5. To put in mind; to remind. [Archaic]
    --M. Arnold.

    He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things.
    --Fuller.

    I do thee wrong to mind thee of it.
    --Shak.

    Never mind, do not regard it; it is of no consequence; no matter.

    Syn: To notice; mark; regard; obey. See Attend.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
mind

mid-14c., "to remember, take care to remember," also "to remind," from mind (n.). Meaning "perceive, notice" is from late 15c.; that of "to give heed to" is from 1550s; that of "be careful about" is from 1737. Sense of "object to, dislike" is from c.1600; negative use (with not) "to care for, to trouble oneself with" is attested from c.1600. Meaning "to take care of, look after" is from 1690s. Related: Minded; minding. Meiotic expression don't mind if I do attested from 1847.

mind

late 12c., from Old English gemynd "memory, remembrance, state of being remembered; thought, purpose; conscious mind, intellect, intention," Proto-Germanic *ga-mundiz (cognates: Gothic muns "thought," munan "to think;" Old Norse minni "mind;" German Minne (archaic) "love," originally "memory, loving memory"), from PIE root *men- (1) "think, remember, have one's mind aroused," with derivatives referring to qualities of mind or states of thought (cognates: Sanskrit matih "thought," munih "sage, seer;" Greek memona "I yearn," mania "madness," mantis "one who divines, prophet, seer;" Latin mens "mind, understanding, reason," memini "I remember," mentio "remembrance;" Lithuanian mintis "thought, idea," Old Church Slavonic mineti "to believe, think," Russian pamjat "memory").\n

\nMeaning "mental faculty" is mid-14c. "Memory," one of the oldest senses, now is almost obsolete except in old expressions such as bear in mind, call to mind. Mind's eye "remembrance" is early 15c. Phrase time out of mind is attested from early 15c. To pay no mind "disregard" is recorded from 1916, American English dialect. To have half a mind to "to have one's mind half made up to (do something)" is recorded from 1726. Mind-reading is from 1882.

Wiktionary
mind

n. 1 The ability for rational thought. 2 The ability to be aware of things. 3 The ability to remember things. 4 The ability to focus the thoughts. 5 Somebody that embodies certain mental qualities. 6 Judgment, opinion, or view. 7 Desire, inclination, or intention. 8 A healthy mental state. 9 (lb en philosophy) The non-material substance or set of processes in which consciousness, perception, affectivity, judgement, thinking, and will are based. vb. 1 (context now regional English) To remember. (from 14th c.) 2 (context now rare except in phrases English) To concern oneself with, to pay attention to. (from 15th c.) 3 (context originally and chiefly in negative or interrogative constructions English) To dislike, to object to; to be bothered by. (from 16th c.) 4 (context now chiefly North America Ireland English) To pay attention to; to listen attentively to, to obey. (from 16th c.) 5 To pay attention to (something); to keep one's mind on. 6 To look after, to take care of, especially for a short period of time. (from 17th c.) 7 (context chiefly in the imperative English) To make sure, to take care ((term: that)). (from 17th c.) 8 To be careful about. (from 18th c.) 9 (context obsolete English) To have in mind; to intend. 10 (context obsolete English) To put in mind; to remind.

WordNet
mind
  1. v. be offended or bothered by; take offense with, be bothered by; "I don't mind your behavior"

  2. be concerned with or about something or somebody

  3. be in charge of or deal with; "She takes care of all the necessary arrangements" [syn: take care]

  4. pay close attention to; give heed to; "Heed the advice of the old men" [syn: heed, listen]

  5. be on one's guard; be cautious or wary about; be alert to; "Beware of telephone salesmen" [syn: beware]

  6. keep in mind [syn: bear in mind] [ant: forget]

mind
  1. n. that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason; "his mind wandered"; "I couldn't get his words out of my head" [syn: head, brain, psyche, nous]

  2. recall or remembrance; "it came to mind"

  3. an opinion formed by judging something; "he was reluctant to make his judgment known"; "she changed her mind" [syn: judgment, judgement]

  4. an important intellectual; "the great minds of the 17th century" [syn: thinker, creative thinker]

  5. attention; "don't pay him any mind"

  6. your intention; what you intend to do; "he had in mind to see his old teacher"; "the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces" [syn: idea]

  7. knowledge and intellectual ability; "he reads to improve his mind"; "he has a keen intellect" [syn: intellect]

Wikipedia
MinD

The MinD protein is one of three proteins encoded by the minB operon and also a part of the ParA family of ATPases. It is required to generate pole to pole oscillations prior to bacterial cell division as a means of specifying the midzone of the cell. It is a peripheral membrane ATPase involved in plasmid partitioning.

Mind (song)
"Mind" is also a song on System of a Down's eponymous first album.

"Mind" was a single by Liverpool-based pop group The Farm, released as the first single off their second album Love See No Colour. It was released on 12 August 1991, having been produced by Graham "Suggs" McPherson of Madness. The single peaked at #31 on the UK Singles Chart.

Mind (The Culture)

In Iain M. Banks' Culture series, most larger starships, some inhabited planets and all orbitals have their own Minds: sentient, hyperintelligent machines originally built by biological species, which have evolved, redesigned themselves, and become many times more intelligent than their original creators.

These Minds have become an indispensable part of the Culture, enabling much of its post-scarcity amenities by planning and automating society (controlling day-to-day administration with mere fractions of their mental power). The main feature of these Minds—in comparison to extremely powerful artificial intelligences in other fiction—is that the Minds are (by design and by extension of their rational, but " humanistic" thought processes) generally a very benevolent presence, and show no wish to supplant or dominate their erstwhile creators. Though this is commonly viewed in a utopian light, a view where the human members of the Culture amount to little more than pets is not unsupportable.

Mind (disambiguation)

A mind is the set of cognitive faculties that enables memory, consciousness, perception, thinking and judgement.

The term mind may also refer to:

  • Mind, as a translation of Greek Nous or Latin intellectus, a concept in philosophy
  • "mind", a verb meaning looking after or being bothered
  • MIND High School, a high school in Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • MIND Institute, a neuroscience research facility at the University of California, Davis
  • Mind map, diagram used to represent words, ideas, tasks, etc.
  • Mind (charity), a mental health charity based in the United Kingdom
  • Mind (journal), the British journal of analytic philosophy
  • Microsoft Internet Developer (MIND) magazine by Microsoft
  • MINDS, a welfare organisation for the mentally disabled in Singapore
  • Minds, an encrypted start-up social media platform backed by Anonymous
  • Mind (The Culture), self-conscious, hyperintelligent machines in the novels of Iain M. Banks
  • Mind: Path to Thalamus, video game
  • MiND: Media Independence, an Internet television service
  • "Mind", a song by Talking Heads from their album Fear of Music
  • "Mind", a song by System of a Down
  • Minds (comics), the fourth book in the Mothers and Daughters graphic by Dave Sim, and the 11th collected Cerebus the Aardvark volume
  • Gottfried Mind, a Swiss artist known as the Cat-Raphael
  • Mind games, a form of covert psychological influence
Mind (journal)

Mind is a British peer-reviewed academic journal, currently published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Mind Association, which deals with philosophy in the analytic tradition. Its institutional home is the University of York.

Mind (charity)

Mind is a mental health charity in England and Wales. Founded in 1946 as the National Association for Mental Health (NAMH), it celebrated its 60th anniversary in 2006.

Mind offers information and advice to people with mental health problems and lobbies government and local authorities on their behalf. It also works to raise public awareness and understanding of issues relating to mental health. Since 1982, it has awarded an annual prize for "Book of the Year" having to do with mental health, in addition to three other prizes

Over 180 local Mind associations (independent, affiliated charities) provide services such as supported housing, floating support schemes, care homes, drop-in centres and self-help support groups. Local Mind associations are often very different in size, make up and character—it is a common misconception that they all work to the same policy and procedural framework. Mind is a national brand but all local associations are unique, although they do all sign up to certain shared aims and ethical guidelines.

Usage examples of "mind".

For the mind and the passion of Hitler - all the aberrations that possessed his feverish brain - had roots that lay deep in German experience and thought.

For I spake with thee, it is nigh two years agone, when thou wert abiding the coming of our Lady in the castle yonder But now I see of thee that thou art brighter-faced, and mightier of aspect than aforetime, and it is in my mind that the Lady of Abundance must have loved thee and holpen thee, and blessed thee with some great blessing.

Joining in the conversation also helped to take her mind off the nightmarish phantasm that was now abiding somewhere within her unsettled self.

The words shimmered in her mind, his ability to use telepathy growing stronger with each use.

All the while the shaft of phosphorescence from the well was getting brighter and brighter, bringing to the minds of the huddled men, a sense of doom and abnormality which far outraced any image their conscious minds could form.

I felt it advisable to keep my mind wholesomely occupied, for it would not do to brood over the abnormalities of this ancient, blight-shadowed town while I was still within its borders.

Howbeit he had looked on the King closely and wisely, and deemed that he was both cruel and guileful, so that he rejoiced that he had spoken naught of Ursula, and he was minded to keep her within gates all the while they abode at Cheaping-Knowe.

I mind was inside the bar of San Lucar, and he and I were boys about a ten year old, aboord of a Dartmouth ship, and went for wine, and there come in over the bar he that was the beginning of it all.

That the strange name, Abraxas, sprouting simultaneously in the minds of three people, belonged to a real person?

Good or bad, saint or killer, Abraxas had taken their minds and swallowed them whole.

But against the defects of this quality he was guarded by the openness of mind which results from the effort to improve and to keep abreast of the times in which one lives.

He felt in no mood for conversation, and as he sipped his absinth he let his mind run rather sorrowfully over the past few weeks of his life.

Bill of Rights uncoupled religion from the state, in part because so many religions were steeped in an absolutist frame of mind, each convinced that it alone had a monopoly on the truth and therefore eager for the state to impose this truth on others.

The long list of excuses dramatically illustrates to the abuser how many ways his mind distorts and denies reality.

His sword trailed in his paralyzed hand as he glared, open-mouthed, stunned by the realization which was too abysmal and awful for the mind to grasp.