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Crossword clues for got

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
got
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
got a cheek
▪ She’s got a cheek; she just goes on till she gets what she wants.
got a first in
▪ Helen got a first in Law.
got a lot on...mind (=a lot of problems to worry about)
▪ Sorry I forgot. I’ve got a lot on my mind at the moment.
got a phone call
▪ I got a phone call from someone called Mike.
got a...hang-up
▪ She’s got a real hang-up about her body.
got arrested
▪ I got arrested for careless driving.
got bogged down
▪ The car got bogged down in the mud.
got broken (=became broken)
▪ Do you know how the phone got broken?
got busted for drugs
▪ Davis got busted for drugs.
got clogged up
▪ Over many years, the pipes had got clogged up with grease.
got creamed
▪ We got creamed 45–6.
got enough to worry about (=she already has a lot of problems or is very busy)
▪ Don’t tell Mum about this – she’s got enough to worry about.
got fed up
▪ Anna got fed up with waiting.
got frostbite
▪ I nearly got frostbite.
got half the chance
▪ I’d go to university if I got half the chance.
got here in one piece
▪ Ring Mum and let her know we got here in one piece.
got hooked
▪ I got hooked on TV when I was sick.
got hooked
▪ I know a girl who got hooked on cocaine.
got into print (=was printed)
▪ Very little of his poetry actually got into print .
got into...scrapes
▪ He got into all sorts of scrapes as a boy.
got it cracked
▪ He seems to have got it cracked.
got more than...bargained for
▪ The thief got more than he bargained for, as Mr Cox tripped him up with his walking stick.
got off to a flying start
▪ The appeal has got off to a flying start, with over £200,000 raised in the first week.
got on the line to (=phoned)
▪ I got on the line to the hospital as soon as I heard about the accident.
got run over
▪ She got run over outside the school.
got shafted
▪ I can’t believe you paid that much. You got shafted.
got soaked
▪ Her shoes got soaked as she walked through the wet grass.
got soft
▪ He’d got soft after all those years in a desk job.
got stuck
▪ They got stuck in a traffic jam.
got the brush-off
▪ I tried to be friendly but I just got the brush-off.
got the flu
▪ She’s got the flu.
got the sack
▪ He got the sack for stealing.
got the thumbs down
▪ Her performance got the thumbs down from the critics.
got to like (=began to like her)
▪ In time, I got to like her .
got tonsillitis
▪ Sam’s got tonsillitis.
got toothache
▪ I’ve got toothache.
got waylaid
▪ Sorry, we got waylaid at the bar.
got...crocked
▪ Kitty got totally crocked last night.
got...exposure
▪ The failure of their marriage has got a lot of exposure recently.
got...into...mess
▪ You got us into this mess, Terry. You can get us out of it.
got...lined up
▪ He’s already got a new job lined up.
got...lost
▪ I got thoroughly lost on the way here.
got...mashed
▪ We got completely mashed last night.
got...mixed up
▪ I must have got the times mixed up.
got...mixed up
▪ My papers got all mixed up.
got...muddled up
▪ Could you just repeat those figures – I’ve got a bit muddled up.
got...Oscar (=won it)
▪ Who got the Oscar for best actress?
got...second wind
▪ He got his second wind and ran on.
got...slaughtered
▪ We all got completely slaughtered last night.
got...squashed
▪ The cake got a bit squashed on the way here.
got...stuck
▪ I’ve got something stuck in my throat.
have (got) a cold
▪ She’s staying at home today because she’s got a cold.
have (got) a cough
▪ I’ve had a cough for weeks now.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Cat got your tongue?
▪ What's happened to all your brains, Frankie boy? Cat got your tongue?
I've got it
I've got news for you
I've only got one pair of hands
be got up as/in sth
▪ More visionary railway schemes were got up in the inter-war years.
got it in one!
have (got) it in for sb
▪ But then, Riley, why should I have it in for the nuns?
▪ They will have it in for us in a big way.
have (got) it made
▪ Nowadays, these people have got it made.
▪ Others chimed in, saying those who have it made are pulling up the ladder on those less fortunate.
have (got) nothing on sb/sth
▪ Another time she seemed to have nothing on under a grass skirt as she danced on a mirrored floor.
▪ He realized she must have nothing on.
▪ She seemed to have nothing on underneath, which made the wheel in my stomach behave in an entirely crazy fashion.
▪ When it comes to conniving, deceptive control freaks, ex-boyfriends have nothing on record companies.
▪ Where that girl is concerned I have nothing on my conscience.
have (got) sb with you
▪ Additionally, many students have brought with them to school the chaos that surrounds their life outside school.
▪ And then, suddenly, she sees Dieter going off on his own, and decides to have it out with him.
▪ She'd have a natter with him if he were, something she often did on her half-days.
▪ To have played with them then, and still to be in contact, is a great privilege and pleasure.
▪ We would have to deal with it then.
▪ What he would have done with it had not other events intruded is problematical.
▪ Workers have tinkered with it for nearly 18 months to no avail.
▪ You could have come with me as my husband.
have (got) sth licked
have (got) sth on
▪ All we have to go on is what other societies do.
▪ Expatriates should also take into account any fees that they will have to pay on buying a home.
▪ Indeed an inquiry of this sort should not, in my view, have been conducted on adversarial lines at all.
▪ It's thought around 70 travellers have been living on the site for several weeks.
▪ Maybe Desert Storm should have gone on at least to Basrah, if not indeed to Baghdad.
▪ Readers of the Financial Times will have noted reports on the forming of major and powerful consortia.
▪ The company has undergone an extensive reorganization since then, so the numbers have changed.
▪ We have been on a very high state of alert.
have (got) sth on
▪ All we have to go on is what other societies do.
▪ Expatriates should also take into account any fees that they will have to pay on buying a home.
▪ Indeed an inquiry of this sort should not, in my view, have been conducted on adversarial lines at all.
▪ It's thought around 70 travellers have been living on the site for several weeks.
▪ Maybe Desert Storm should have gone on at least to Basrah, if not indeed to Baghdad.
▪ Readers of the Financial Times will have noted reports on the forming of major and powerful consortia.
▪ The company has undergone an extensive reorganization since then, so the numbers have changed.
▪ We have been on a very high state of alert.
have (got) sth on sb
▪ All we have to go on is what other societies do.
▪ Expatriates should also take into account any fees that they will have to pay on buying a home.
▪ Indeed an inquiry of this sort should not, in my view, have been conducted on adversarial lines at all.
▪ It's thought around 70 travellers have been living on the site for several weeks.
▪ Maybe Desert Storm should have gone on at least to Basrah, if not indeed to Baghdad.
▪ Readers of the Financial Times will have noted reports on the forming of major and powerful consortia.
▪ The company has undergone an extensive reorganization since then, so the numbers have changed.
▪ We have been on a very high state of alert.
have (got) sth/sb (all) to yourself
▪ Helen used to have the house to herself.
▪ I have said to myself that that is wrong.
▪ I must have been jealous of her life away from me, and wished to have her entirely to myself.
▪ Most of the people in the boardinghouse would go home, and he and I would have the house to ourselves.
▪ Mummy stopped the car at once, even though the pizza parlour was so crowded that they couldn't have a table to themselves.
▪ Of course, the Little Sprouts and the Plumpsters could have kept to themselves.
▪ She regrets she is so much in the way of the young people, who really should have some time to themselves.
▪ They could; and should have won this match and the players have to look to themselves.
have (got) sth/sb taped
▪ And when several events air live simultaneously, some of them have to be taped.
▪ It should have been taped for a campaign training film; it was too perfect.
▪ Several other infinitely more damaging conversations involving him have been taped over the past few weeks.
have (got) the TV/radio/washing machine etc on
have you got a minute?
if you think ..., you've got another think coming!
▪ If they think it's going to be an easy game, they've got another think coming!
if you've got it, flaunt it
like the cat that got the cream
pull the other one (it's got bells on)
sb got game
sb had (got) it coming
▪ He had it coming, and I did him in.
▪ Put like that and you might think they had it coming.
▪ That pair obviously just had it coming.
the one that got away
▪ Saucy Cecil Parkinson lets his fingers do the talking about the one that got away.
what have you got to say for yourself?
what's got into sb?
you name it (they've got it)!
you've got me (there)
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Got

Get \Get\ (g[e^]t), v. t. [imp. Got (g[o^]t) (Obs. Gat (g[a^]t)); p. p. Got (Obsolescent Gotten (g[o^]t"t'n)); p. pr. & vb. n. Getting.] [OE. geten, AS. gitan, gietan (in comp.); akin to Icel. geta, Goth. bigitan to find, L. prehendere to seize, take, Gr. chanda`nein to hold, contain. Cf. Comprehend, Enterprise, Forget, Impregnable, Prehensile.]

  1. To procure; to obtain; to gain possession of; to acquire; to earn; to obtain as a price or reward; to come by; to win, by almost any means; as, to get favor by kindness; to get wealth by industry and economy; to get land by purchase, etc.

  2. Hence, with have and had, to come into or be in possession of; to have.
    --Johnson.

    Thou hast got the face of man.
    --Herbert.

  3. To beget; to procreate; to generate.

    I had rather to adopt a child than get it.
    --Shak.

  4. To obtain mental possession of; to learn; to commit to memory; to memorize; as to get a lesson; also with out; as, to get out one's Greek lesson.

    It being harder with him to get one sermon by heart, than to pen twenty.
    --Bp. Fell.

  5. To prevail on; to induce; to persuade.

    Get him to say his prayers.
    --Shak.

  6. To procure to be, or to cause to be in any state or condition; -- with a following participle.

    Those things I bid you do; get them dispatched.
    --Shak.

  7. To betake; to remove; -- in a reflexive use.

    Get thee out from this land.
    --Gen. xxxi. 13.

    He . . . got himself . . . to the strong town of Mega.
    --Knolles.

    Note: Get, as a transitive verb, is combined with adverbs implying motion, to express the causing to, or the effecting in, the object of the verb, of the kind of motion indicated by the preposition; thus, to get in, to cause to enter, to bring under shelter; as, to get in the hay; to get out, to make come forth, to extract; to get off, to take off, to remove; to get together, to cause to come together, to collect.

    To get by heart, to commit to memory.

    To get the better of, To get the best of, to obtain an advantage over; to surpass; to subdue.

    To get up, to cause to be established or to exit; to prepare; to arrange; to construct; to invent; as, to get up a celebration, a machine, a book, an agitation.

    Syn: To obtain; gain; win; acquire. See Obtain.

Got

Get \Get\ (g[e^]t), v. t. [imp. Got (g[o^]t) (Obs. Gat (g[a^]t)); p. p. Got (Obsolescent Gotten (g[o^]t"t'n)); p. pr. & vb. n. Getting.] [OE. geten, AS. gitan, gietan (in comp.); akin to Icel. geta, Goth. bigitan to find, L. prehendere to seize, take, Gr. chanda`nein to hold, contain. Cf. Comprehend, Enterprise, Forget, Impregnable, Prehensile.]

  1. To procure; to obtain; to gain possession of; to acquire; to earn; to obtain as a price or reward; to come by; to win, by almost any means; as, to get favor by kindness; to get wealth by industry and economy; to get land by purchase, etc.

  2. Hence, with have and had, to come into or be in possession of; to have.
    --Johnson.

    Thou hast got the face of man.
    --Herbert.

  3. To beget; to procreate; to generate.

    I had rather to adopt a child than get it.
    --Shak.

  4. To obtain mental possession of; to learn; to commit to memory; to memorize; as to get a lesson; also with out; as, to get out one's Greek lesson.

    It being harder with him to get one sermon by heart, than to pen twenty.
    --Bp. Fell.

  5. To prevail on; to induce; to persuade.

    Get him to say his prayers.
    --Shak.

  6. To procure to be, or to cause to be in any state or condition; -- with a following participle.

    Those things I bid you do; get them dispatched.
    --Shak.

  7. To betake; to remove; -- in a reflexive use.

    Get thee out from this land.
    --Gen. xxxi. 13.

    He . . . got himself . . . to the strong town of Mega.
    --Knolles.

    Note: Get, as a transitive verb, is combined with adverbs implying motion, to express the causing to, or the effecting in, the object of the verb, of the kind of motion indicated by the preposition; thus, to get in, to cause to enter, to bring under shelter; as, to get in the hay; to get out, to make come forth, to extract; to get off, to take off, to remove; to get together, to cause to come together, to collect.

    To get by heart, to commit to memory.

    To get the better of, To get the best of, to obtain an advantage over; to surpass; to subdue.

    To get up, to cause to be established or to exit; to prepare; to arrange; to construct; to invent; as, to get up a celebration, a machine, a book, an agitation.

    Syn: To obtain; gain; win; acquire. See Obtain.

Got

Got \Got\, imp. & p. p. of Get. See Get.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
got

past tense of get.

Wiktionary
got

vb. 1 (en-simple past of: get) 2 (context British NZ English) (past participle of get English) 3 (non-gloss definition: Expressing obligation.) 4 (context Southern US with to English) must#Verb; have (to). 5 (context Southern US UK slang English) have

WordNet
got

See get

get
  1. v. come into the possession of something concrete or abstract; "She got a lot of paintings from her uncle"; "They acquired a new pet"; "Get your results the next day"; "Get permission to take a few days off from work" [syn: acquire]

  2. enter or assume a certain state or condition; "He became annoyed when he heard the bad news"; "It must be getting more serious"; "her face went red with anger"; "She went into ecstasy"; "Get going!" [syn: become, go]

  3. cause to move; cause to be in a certain position or condition; "He got his squad on the ball"; "This let me in for a big surprise"; "He got a girl into trouble" [syn: let, have]

  4. receive a specified treatment (abstract); "These aspects of civilization do not find expression or receive an interpretation"; "His movie received a good review"; "I got nothing but trouble for my good intentions" [syn: receive, find, obtain, incur]

  5. reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress; "She arrived home at 7 o'clock"; "She didn't get to Chicago until after midnight" [syn: arrive, come] [ant: leave]

  6. go or come after and bring or take back; "Get me those books over there, please"; "Could you bring the wine?"; "The dog fetched the hat" [syn: bring, convey, fetch] [ant: take away]

  7. of mental or physical states or experiences; "get an idea"; "experience vertigo"; "get nauseous"; "undergo a strange sensation"; "The chemical undergoes a sudden change"; "The fluid undergoes shear"; "receive injuries"; "have a feeling" [syn: experience, receive, have, undergo]

  8. take vengeance on or get even; "We'll get them!"; "That'll fix him good!"; "This time I got him" [syn: pay back, pay off, fix]

  9. achieve a point or goal; "Nicklaus had a 70"; "The Brazilian team got 4 goals"; "She made 29 points that day" [syn: have, make]

  10. cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner; "The ads induced me to buy a VCR"; "My children finally got me to buy a computer"; "My wife made me buy a new sofa" [syn: induce, stimulate, cause, have, make]

  11. succeed in catching or seizing, especially after a chase; "We finally got the suspect"; "Did you catch the thief?" [syn: catch, capture]

  12. come to have or undergo a change of (physical features and attributes); "He grew a beard"; "The patient developed abdominal pains"; "I got funny spots all over my body"; "Well-developed breasts" [syn: grow, develop, produce, acquire]

  13. be stricken by an illness, fall victim to an illness; "He got AIDS"; "She came down with pneumonia"; "She took a chill" [syn: contract, take]

  14. communicate with a place or person; establish communication with, as if by telephone; "Bill called this number and he got Mary"; "The operator couldn't get Kobe because of the earthquake"

  15. give certain properties to something; "get someone mad"; "She made us look silly"; "He made a fool of himself at the meeting"; "Don't make this into a big deal"; "This invention will make you a millionaire"; "Make yourself clear" [syn: make]

  16. move into a desired direction of discourse; "What are you driving at?" [syn: drive, aim]

  17. grasp with the mind or develop an undersatnding of; "did you catch that allusion?"; "We caught something of his theory in the lecture"; "don't catch your meaning"; "did you get it?"; "She didn't get the joke"; "I just don't get him" [syn: catch]

  18. attract and fix; "His look caught her"; "She caught his eye"; "Catch the attention of the waiter" [syn: catch, arrest]

  19. reach with a blow or hit in a particular spot; "the rock caught her in the back of the head"; "The blow got him in the back"; "The punch caught him in the stomach" [syn: catch]

  20. reach by calculation; "What do you get when you add up these numbers?"

  21. acquire as a result of some effort or action; "You cannot get water out of a stone"; "Where did she get these news?"

  22. purchase; "What did you get at the toy store?"

  23. perceive by hearing; "I didn't catch your name"; "She didn't get his name when they met the first time" [syn: catch]

  24. suffer from the receipt of; "She will catch hell for this behavior!" [syn: catch]

  25. receive as a retribution or punishment; "He got 5 years in prison" [syn: receive]

  26. leave immediately; used usually in the imperative form; "Scram!" [syn: scram, buzz off, fuck off, bugger off]

  27. reach and board; "She got the bus just as it was leaving"

  28. irritate; "Her childish behavior really get to me"; "His lying really gets me" [syn: get under one's skin]

  29. evoke an emotional response; "Brahms's `Requiem' gets me every time"

  30. apprehend and reproduce accurately; "She really caught the spirit of the place in her drawings"; "She got the mood just right in her photographs" [syn: catch]

  31. in baseball: earn or achieve a base by being walked by the pitcher; "He drew a base on balls" [syn: draw]

  32. overcome or destroy; "The ice storm got my hibiscus"; "the cat got the goldfish"

  33. be a mystery or bewildering to; "This beats me!"; "Got me--I don't know the answer!"; "a vexing problem"; "This question really stuck me" [syn: perplex, vex, stick, puzzle, mystify, baffle, beat, pose, bewilder, flummox, stupefy, nonplus, gravel, amaze, dumbfound]

  34. take the first step or steps in carrying out an action; "We began working at dawn"; "Who will start?"; "Get working as soon as the sun rises!"; "The first tourists began to arrive in Cambodia"; "He began early in the day"; "Let's get down to work now" [syn: get down, begin, start out, start, set about, set out, commence] [ant: end]

  35. undergo (as of injuries and illnesses); "She suffered a fracture in the accident"; "He had an insulin shock after eating three candy bars"; "She got a bruise on her leg"; "He got his arm broken in the scuffle" [syn: suffer, sustain, have]

  36. make children; "Abraham begot Isaac"; "Men often father children but don't recognize them" [syn: beget, engender, father, mother, sire, generate, bring forth]

  37. [also: gotten, got, getting]

Wikipedia
GOT

GOT or got may refer to:

  • GO Transit (reporting mark)
  • Göteborg Landvetter Airport, an international airport serving the Gothenburg region in Sweden by IATA code
  • Gottschalks (former NYSE ticker symbol)
  • Game of Thrones, an HBO fantasy drama television series
    • A Game of Thrones, the first novel of the series on which the television series is based
  • God of Thunder (video game) (GoT), a 1993 PC game
  • Geranyl-pyrophosphate—olivetolic acid geranyltransferase, an enzyme
  • François Jules Edmond Got, French actor
  • Pascale Got, French politician
  • Raoul Got, French rugby player
  • Got (bull), a cloned bull
  • Got (grape) or Gouais blanc, a white grape variety
  • Gothic language, an extinct Germanic language that was spoken by the Goths by Language codes ISO 639-2 and 639-3
Got (bull)

Got is the name of the world's first cloned fighting bull who was born on Tuesday, May 18, 2010 in Spain by a team from the Prince Felipe Research Center and the Valencia Foundation for Veterinary Research. He was cloned from another fighting bull named Vasito, and scientists are hoping that he displays similar fighting characteristics of his "father". The project of cloning a fighting bull took three years, in part because scientist struggled with how to preserve "valuable bull genes" Animal rights activists have vocally denounced the cloning of the bull saying that it "leads to the genetic manipulation of a species, with the twisted objective of maintaining the falsehood that bulls are fighters by nature,"

Although he is the first Fighting Bull Got is not the first ever bull clone, that honor is believed to be bestowed on "Second Chance" who was born in 1999.

Usage examples of "got".

Eline behoefde het hem niet te verzekeren, dat zij onder dit schrijven geleden had, als zij niet wist, dat iemand lijden kon: hij las dat in elk dier woorden, die van tranen schenen te vloeien, elk dier woorden, die elk een nieuwe smart in zijn ziel goten.

I thank thee heartily for the little spaniel of the new breed thou gottest me from the Duchess of Marlborough.

But smooth out tee lines, give some deadrise an' some more dept' of hull, lower tee freeboard fore an' aft an' bring it up some in between, an' you gots you'self a real tiddly ship.

But smooth out tee lines, give some deadrise an’ some more dept’ of hull, lower tee freeboard fore an’ aft an’ bring it up some in between, an’ you gots you’self a real tiddly ship.

I didn't know Dogwalker from God, but he gots the look, you know, like he been hungry before, and he don't care what he eats these days.

The rider tolds me personally that he would've gots here much sooner but seems some big old white trash woman was blocking the road with her.