Find the word definition

Crossword clues for catch

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
catch
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
batting/catching etc practice
▪ We'd better do a bit of batting practice before the game.
be captured/caught on video (=recorded on video)
▪ The crime was captured on video.
be caught on camera (=be photographed, especially doing something wrong)
▪ The boys were caught on camera leaving the station.
be caught with your hands/fingers in the till (=to be caught stealing from your employer)
be stuck/caught/held up in traffic
▪ Sorry I’m late – I was stuck in traffic.
catch a ball
▪ He’s useless at sport; he can’t even catch a ball.
catch a chill
▪ Let’s get these wet clothes off you before you catch a chill.
catch a cold (=start to have one)
▪ I caught a cold and had to miss the match.
catch a flight (=be in time to get on a plane)
▪ They caught a flight that night to Frankfurt.
catch a train
▪ He was in a hurry to catch a train.
catch the post (=post your letter in time for it to be collected)
▪ He wrote the letter hurriedly because he was anxious to catch the post.
catch up on some sleep (=sleep after not having enough sleep)
▪ I suggest you try and catch up on some sleep.
catch/get a bug
▪ Six out of ten travellers get a stomach bug abroad.
catch/get a disease (also contract a diseaseformal)
▪ He caught the disease while travelling in Africa.
catch/grab/seize etc hold of sth (=start holding something quickly and firmly)
▪ She grabbed hold of the letter and tore it open.
catch/land a fish
▪ Pete caught a really big fish.
catch/take a plane
▪ She caught the first plane back to New York.
caught a glimpse
▪ They caught a glimpse of a dark green car.
caught in the crossfire
▪ During a divorce, kids often get caught in the crossfire.
caught in the crossfire
▪ Doctors who tried to help the wounded were caught in the crossfire.
caught speeding
▪ I got caught speeding on the A40 yesterday.
follow/get/catch sb’s drift (=understand the general meaning of what someone is saying)
▪ She didn’t quite get my drift, did she?
get caught in the rain (=be outside when it starts raining)
▪ Did you get caught in the rain?
get sth caught/stuck etc
▪ She got her foot caught in the wire.
get/catch a cough
▪ A lot of people get coughs at this time of year.
get/catch a whiff of sth
▪ As she walked past, I caught a whiff of her perfume.
get/take/catch a bus
▪ Can we get a bus from here to Reading?
play catch/house/tag/school etc
▪ Outside, the children were playing cowboys and Indians.
risk being seen/caught/arrested etc
▪ Workers who broke the strike risked being attacked when they left the factory.
safety catch
sth catches fire (=it starts burning)
▪ The boat caught fire and sank.
take/get/catch a cab (=travel by cab)
▪ Why don't we take a cab to the theater?
the police catch sb
▪ The police are no nearer to catching his killer.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
act
▪ Householders who catch burglars in the act may get a bit rough and individual policemen may strike out in some after-hours pub rough-house.
▪ For weeks after that outburst, when we had been caught in the act of friendship, he stopped coming near me.
▪ Well, I've caught you in the act.
▪ Adulterers caught in the act could be stoned to death.
▪ But he's got to be caught in the act.
▪ If you move fast, you can catch them in the act, he says.
▪ Those figures whose legs were unequal - which was most of them - looked caught in the act of moving.
▪ Few thieves are caught in the act.
attention
▪ Before the lights went down I saw that some one below in the stalls was trying to catch my attention.
▪ When a moving object catches their attention, babies are apt to focus on it.
▪ In fact, Green Chemistry is published so attractively that it catches immediate attention of the readers.
▪ One white woman nearby caught her attention.
▪ We need to catch and hold their attention.
▪ The captive princess caught their attention and they looked curiously at her.
▪ There are other ways for aspiring stars to catch the attention of a record company.
▪ But it caught the attention of Sarandon, who asked to meet with Prejean over dinner.
ball
▪ Children were playing and throwing a ball for each other to catch.
▪ He caught the ball in rhythm and drained the 3-pointer with 15. 7 seconds left.
▪ The ever-enthusiastic and friendly Bobby Skinstad volunteered to lift me up from behind for me to catch the ball.
▪ He knows how to run routes and catches the ball well.
▪ Winston Churchill, with extraordinary perspicacity, wrote at the time: Meeting an artillery attack is like catching a cricket ball.
▪ He has been catching the ball deeper downfield as the season has gone along.
▪ Meeting an artillery attack is like catching a cricket ball.
▪ He caught the ball and took off, all 320 pounds of him.
breath
▪ Busacher slumped into the passenger seat and sat catching his breath.
▪ They catch their breath and gripe about the trail.
▪ She could hear Moxie catching her breath.
▪ Tokyo stocks fell Monday as investors caught their breath following a strong advance over the two previous sessions.
▪ It gives me a chance to catch my breath before we set off again.
▪ She caught her breath in fear, holding it until the answer came.
▪ Despite her fear she caught her breath at such beauty.
bus
▪ She catches the bus at the end of the lane.
▪ Alvin caught the bus to school at six in the morning and made it home by seven at night.
▪ And I've got to catch the team bus at twelve-forty-five.
▪ She was trying to catch the bus that was greedily gobbling up passengers at an angle across the street.
▪ We arrived back in Funchal some twelve hours after we had first caught the bus.
▪ One cool March morning we hiked over to the Mendoza road and caught the twice-weekly bus to Temuco.
▪ We caught a late bus out of Bordeaux and arrived in darkness.
▪ Had set off to catch the bus.
cold
▪ He caught a bad cold and, thinking that the disease had returned, took his life.
▪ He had enjoyed himself by our fire, but had caught a tremendous cold as soon as he left the mountains.
▪ After addressing a public meeting in support of extending the franchise to agricultural workers he had caught a severe cold.
▪ If Match sneezes, Ankh-Morpork catches a cold.
▪ When he started to tremble, he figured this was the best way to catch a cold.
▪ Then she had caught a very nasty cold which would not budge.
▪ I may be catching a cold.
disease
▪ To be recalled for a second Pap smear is to catch the disease of fear.
▪ The Assiniboin came in to trade and hung around outside the walls and soon caught the disease.
▪ He had gone further and had suggested that he had actually caught the disease from her.
▪ He is believed to have caught the disease from a patient.
▪ We all get sick, but we do not live in fear of catching every known disease.
▪ You have got to spray as soon as you catch the disease in the crop.
▪ The purpose of the statute was to lessen the risk of cattle catching a contagious disease while in transit.
▪ She hoped she hadn't caught an unmentionable disease from her visit to the news-theatre.
eye
▪ It seemed to Kelly that she was trying to catch her eye for some reason.
▪ What could be the meaning of the omen which had caught his eye?
▪ If anyone caught her curious eye, they just smiled politely back and got on with their business.
▪ Buy my ice cream catches the eye when it is accompanied by a picture of two good-looking people seducing each other.
▪ She hugged herself, sniffing from time to time, and tried to catch his eye.
▪ Then she caught Chris's eyes, and yes, it was, after all.
fire
▪ A fault in the drying cycle means that the machine overheats and can catch fire.
▪ Sydney withdrew out of range and bombarded Emden with shells from her 6in guns until she caught fire.
▪ Worse, he was caught in the cross fire of local conflicts.
▪ The plaintiffs were assured that there was no danger of the oil catching fire on water and continued welding.
▪ In the second half, Eddie catches fire.
▪ We know that the next falling star is almost certain to get too close to the sun, and catch fire!
▪ His pants were about to catch fire.
fish
▪ It would surely take less effort to catch a fish itself.
▪ She ordered him to return to the place where he had caught the fish and ask for a nice cottage.
▪ Alan Soden told the court that he caught the fish because his family was desperate for food.
▪ Assume that the skipper can catch a fish dinner in 10 hours and build a thatched hut in 20.
▪ They say you can catch really big fish.
▪ The bridge on State Road 46 is another good spot to catch the fish, using minnows.
▪ Don't you know you're using that boy like bait to catch a fish?
▪ Luckily their cargo included rice which they supplemented by catching fish and collecting rainwater.
flight
▪ And he had deliberately caught his flight with just minutes to spare.
▪ Bernstein caught the first flight out of Washington Friday, August 25, and again spent most of the day with Ruby.
▪ Perhaps she had witnessed the attack on her father but had had to leave in order to catch the designated flight.
▪ It was one reason why I caught the first flight home.
▪ She was so distressed that she caught the first flight from Calcutta to New Delhi.
▪ A week ago her plan had been to give Travis the slip and catch the first flight out.
▪ He must catch a flight to Washington to tell a committee that the cities need more money.
glimpse
▪ You will also catch a glimpse of the Big Wheel in the famous Peter fairground.
▪ No one ever caught a glimpse of his furrowed face smiling over innocent pleasantries.
▪ Sometimes I had caught glimpses of his shadow on the wall.
▪ Occasionally they caught a glimpse of trees on the canyon rim, five thousand feet above.
▪ She caught a glimpse of his paleness at the window of the bathroom on the first floor.
▪ Above them were fields of blazing stars and on some of the curves Marge caught a glimpse of moonlight on rolling surf.
▪ The car slowed down and a chill swept over as she caught a glimpse of the driver.
▪ Perhaps I might catch a glimpse of Frank.
guard
▪ The whole problem was going to be catching her off her guard.
▪ She really caught me off guard with her comments.
▪ The announcement of the opening came suddenly that morning, and many boats were caught off guard.
▪ It feels good to Jody, but she is caught off guard.
▪ This catches William off his guard.
▪ Penelope flinched, angry at her thoughts, and at the girl who had caught her off guard.
▪ The words caught him off guard.
▪ The president faces issues that can catch him off guard and undermine his authority.
imagination
▪ It catches people's imagination, and becomes, as Harry wanted, a kind of pictogram to represent the whole range.
▪ The technology has caught the imagination of many.
▪ Now genetics has become the science that catches the collective imagination as does no other.
▪ The Berlin airlift caught the imagination of the world.
▪ Microscopes caught the imagination, as well they might.
▪ Political hacking is starting to catch the imagination of the Left.
▪ At the turn of the century Paris caught people's imagination.
▪ That is one of the reasons why container gardening catches the imagination.
pass
▪ Floyd has also caught 16 passes.
▪ He had nine carries for 47 yards and caught three passes for 48 yards.
▪ Michael Irvin caught six passes and never once signaled for his own first down.
▪ Jeff George threw for 260 yards, with Tim Brown catching seven passes for 107 yards.
▪ Truitt caught 10 passes for 131 yards.
▪ He caught just three passes for 25 yards and seemed to be used as a decoy most of the game.
▪ He caught four passes for 26 yards, again more than all of last year.
▪ He also caught a 34-yard scoring pass from Morgan.
plane
▪ The only chance was to catch the overnight plane.
▪ He caught a plane last night.
▪ Arriving late to find all moving stairways were out of order a panicky half mile sprint was needed to catch our plane.
▪ She caught the first plane back to New York.
▪ When I heard she was with you, I caught the next plane to Nice.
▪ Had they seen Saturday's encounter, the Kiwis might have been tempted to catch a plane home.
▪ I have a guest house where you can stay and I will make sure you catch your planes.
▪ By the time she was discovered, it would be too late for her to catch the plane.
sun
▪ Dalgliesh could glimpse what was obviously her herb garden planted in elegant terracotta pots carefully disposed to catch the sun.
▪ Up in the woods many of the buds that catch the sun have begun to pop.
▪ Soon, they would catch up with the sun and obscure it.
▪ A flock of dunlin flew across the marsh in a silver swirl, catching the sun, dazzling the eye.
▪ Before his eyes dull muddy grass turned into soft reflective banks which caught the sun a thousand ways.
▪ These beautiful evergreen trees catch the sun and produce wonderful sculptural forms.
▪ Turning uphill, her mirrored glasses catching the hot sun, she looks ready to cry.
surprise
▪ He caught me by surprise and I sounded foolish.
▪ Welch and I had a rather heated exchange about the appropriateness of his editorial interference, which had caught me by surprise.
▪ Billy had caught him by surprise.
▪ The chill in the air caught me by surprise, a sharp mountain night breeze.
▪ He'd caught her by surprise, that was all.
▪ He dipped her, catching her by surprise, letting her drop backwards.
▪ So the two white girls standing in front of the mirrors are caught by surprise.
▪ They too were caught by surprise.
train
▪ After the debate, they dined on hamburgers and talked sports at a local joint before catching a train back to Washington.
▪ Several hours later I was in London making my way to another railway station to catch the train going North.
▪ Panicky civilians raced to the railway station to catch any train heading south.
▪ I hang round the station a bit, watching the people all hurrying to catch their trains.
▪ Maybe she had caught a train to New Rochelle.
▪ After seeing the competitors set off, there was a dash to Forster Square Station to catch the train to Esholt.
■ VERB
get
▪ On the wrong side of the knitting, this looks much neater and stops little fingers getting caught!
▪ And who got caught standing in the rain as gaskets blew and transmissions ground to a halt?
▪ Anyway, we won't get caught.
▪ Orstedt complains wild animals get caught in the fencing while trying to reach the water.
▪ And then I got caught up in being young.
▪ Funny thing is, he repeated the mistake in Game 4, getting caught in a rundown between second and third base.
▪ The people who get caught and imprisoned may not be a representative picture of all criminals.
▪ I could see her debate, trying to decide which was worse: infuriating Rosie or getting caught spying on Lila Sams.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
I wouldn't be seen/caught dead
attract/catch/get sb's attention
be (caught) in a cleft stick
▪ Now the local authorities are caught in a cleft stick, hostages to their own political process.
▪ So the developing countries are caught in a cleft stick.
be (caught/locked/stuck) in a time warp
be taken short/be caught short
capture/catch sb's imagination
▪ The story of a boy raised by monkeys has caught the imagination of millions.
catch hell
▪ That boy's going to catch hell when he gets home.
▪ Emilio, no worse than any of the others, nevertheless caught hell most often.
catch sb flat-footed
▪ The recent recession caught managers flat-footed and unprepared.
catch sb on the hop
▪ Many politicians have been caught on the hop by a good interviewer.
▪ The dramatic fall in share prices caught even the experts on the hop.
▪ Sorry about the mess but you caught me on the hop like.
▪ They catch you on the hop.
▪ Yes, I think I caught her on the hop.
▪ You caught us on the hop there, ol' buddy.
catch sb red-handed
▪ The FBI caught the mayor red-handed using drugs.
catch some/a few rays
▪ Clothes, sleeping bags, spare canvas, all were hung up or spread out to catch a few rays of sunshine.
catch the sun
▪ A flock of dunlin flew across the marsh in a silver swirl, catching the sun, dazzling the eye.
▪ Before his eyes dull muddy grass turned into soft reflective banks which caught the sun a thousand ways.
▪ Dalgliesh could glimpse what was obviously her herb garden planted in elegant terracotta pots carefully disposed to catch the sun.
▪ My chair with its high back and strong iron wheels is positioned correctly to catch the sun.
▪ Perhaps she had caught the sun.
▪ These beautiful evergreen trees catch the sun and produce wonderful sculptural forms.
▪ Up in the woods many of the buds that catch the sun have begun to pop.
catch your breath
▪ Clark had to sit down to catch his breath.
▪ And then history paused, just to catch its breath.
▪ Both waders immediately filled and I caught my breath as freezing April waters began to stimulate sensitive nether regions.
▪ Busacher slumped into the passenger seat and sat catching his breath.
▪ I said, falling on to a chair, trying to catch my breath.
▪ She caught her breath in fear, holding it until the answer came.
▪ She could hear Moxie catching her breath.
▪ The slow movement of this performance is particularly fine, with pianissimos that have you catching your breath.
▪ Tokyo stocks fell Monday as investors caught their breath following a strong advance over the two previous sessions.
catch/get some Z's
catch/take sb off-guard
catch/throw sb off balance
▪ A badly packed rucksack can easily throw you off balance.
▪ And despite what he'd said, less a token of affection than a means of throwing her off balance.
▪ But before Adamowski could get his campaign under way, Daley threw him off balance by going on the offensive.
▪ He had an authority, an abrupt decisiveness, that caught me off balance.
▪ It throws the viewer off balance but speaks to the part of each person that is capable, potent and dignified.
▪ She has a problem with some little gland or other, which can throw her right off balance.
▪ The movement threw him off balance.
▪ Waking up to that penetrating ice-blue gaze was enough to throw anyone off balance for the rest of the day.
catch/throw sb off guard
▪ Could the upper management of a leading firm like Merrill Lynch be caught so entirely off guard?
▪ I said it suddenly like that, just blurted it out, and I guess it caught him off guard.
▪ Penelope flinched, angry at her thoughts, and at the girl who had caught her off guard.
▪ She really caught me off guard with her comments.
▪ The president faces issues that can catch him off guard and undermine his authority.
▪ The question caught Firebug off guard.
▪ The words caught him off guard.
▪ This caught me completely off guard.
catch/throw sb off-balance
catch/touch sb on the raw
▪ She had the fleeting impression that she'd caught him on the raw.
like a rabbit/deer caught in headlights
take/catch sb by surprise
▪ He caught me by surprise and I sounded foolish.
▪ He rolled towards Lily, taking her by surprise.
▪ His deep voice took Romanov by surprise.
▪ In consequence, untold numbers of sailors died when their destinations suddenly loomed out of the sea and took them by surprise.
▪ Inspector Montgomery's sudden termination of the interview had taken her by surprise initially, but now she understood his strategy.
▪ The hug takes him by surprise.
▪ The thought that had been waiting to be revealed, waiting to take him by surprise.
▪ Welch and I had a rather heated exchange about the appropriateness of his editorial interference, which had caught me by surprise.
take/catch sb unawares
▪ I was caught unawares by his kiss.
take/catch your fancy
▪ A porcelain corgi in the window took her fancy.
▪ And you use everyone, for whatever little scheme takes your fancy.
▪ Have you been trawling the sales and picking up every urn and tub that caught your fancy?
▪ I'd wander down the high street, frittering away on whatever took my fancy.
▪ I am just glad I wasn't Anne Boleyn, or some other lady who took his fancy.
▪ Selection is not a matter of having everything that takes your fancy.
▪ Turn to page 14 to see which takes your fancy.
▪ When Oates took his fancy passing to Boston, Cam Neely thrived.
the early bird catches the worm
you'll catch your death (of cold)
▪ Don't go out without a coat! You'll catch your death of cold!
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Can I see that pen?" "Sure, catch."
▪ "I bet you can't catch me!" yelled Katie, skipping away.
▪ "We went fishing." "Did you catch anything?"
▪ "You can't catch me!" she yelled.
▪ A lot of burglars never get caught.
▪ As Yvonne shook her head, her earrings caught the light from the candles.
▪ Brooks was caught smoking in an airplane lavatory and fined $750 dollars.
▪ Denise caught the bride's bouquet.
▪ Did you catch what the book's called?
▪ Dion caught a cold on vacation.
▪ Go on, jump. I'll catch you.
▪ I caught their act at the Blue Note Jazz Club.
▪ I didn't catch his first name.
▪ I managed to catch her just as she was leaving the office.
▪ I only caught about the last 20 minutes of the movie.
▪ I think I must have caught the flu from Sarah.
▪ I was about to correct him, but I caught myself in time.
▪ If we're quick, we should still be able to catch our train.
▪ If you call around 8:30, you might catch Shirley.
▪ It's a really funny play, but goes too fast to catch all the jokes.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Before his eyes dull muddy grass turned into soft reflective banks which caught the sun a thousand ways.
▪ Every time I get caught or arrested I get asthma.
▪ From within, I catch the trill of a Pogues song.
▪ In this way there is less chance of being caught at a disadvantage or being ambushed by circumstances.
▪ Linder appeared to waver for a moment, like a leaf caught in a breeze.
▪ They too were caught by surprise.
▪ They were questioning me about whether I could catch.
▪ You caught me, I came willingly, and we enjoyed each other.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
good
▪ Harvey was the better catch, and there was her speech to worry about.
▪ Since a doctor or a lawyer is a good catch, he can attract a woman whose family is wealthy.
▪ A man in a uniform was a good catch in these parts.
▪ Mr Cubbage must have seemed a good catch with his fine house, handsome looks and with his obvious wealth.
▪ Her new boyfriend was a young businessman and drove a Sprite and Pam thought he was a good catch.
■ NOUN
fire
▪ Some 60,000 catch fire every year, killing several hundred people and injuring over 10,000.
▪ One local fisherman is drowned when his boat catches fire and burns.
▪ A spark from the engine ignites the gas, and smoke and flames start to rise as the wood catches fire.
phrase
▪ This is sometimes described in the catch phrase that we must treat like cases alike.
▪ Nearly every economic summit since the first one in 1975 has come up with a catch phrase.
▪ These two catch phrases would later be appropriated by the marketers charged with selling the Macintosh.
safety
▪ He pulled the trigger, believing that the safety catch was on.
▪ Plummer lowered the weapon, easing the hammer forward and slipping on the safety catch.
▪ He thought the safety catch was on.
▪ She slipped the safety catch into place and deposited the gun on the coffee table beside her.
▪ It came clear from the bag, her finger slipping on to the trigger, thumb freeing the safety catch.
▪ Desperately, he reached for the hidden gun and fumbled with its safety catch.
▪ The man had seen Mike first but had fumbled with his safety catch as Mike killed him.
touchdown
▪ Owens is a dangerous playmaker with six touchdown catches.
■ VERB
drop
▪ On the first day he dropped two catches in the slip / gulley region; one straight forward, the other hard.
hold
▪ Gough scrambled forward from mid-off but just failed to hold on to the catch.
▪ The batsman failed to survive the over though, Gooch managing to hold on to a slip catch.
▪ Jason Brown at last had a bowl-five innocuous overs-and super-sub Stewart held three catches.
▪ He held 59 catches and took 32 wickets at 47.00 with unremarkable medium-pace.
make
▪ Running back at the crack of the bat, Greer leaped high and made the catch with his glove above the fence.
▪ The key to coverage, Carroll said, is tackling the receivers as soon as they make their catch.
play
▪ From my second-floor vantage point I could see my classmates as they tumbled out into the quad playing catch with my shoes.
▪ Its polythene wrapping looked vaguely torn and grubby, as if members of the Waitrose staff had already been playing catch with it.
▪ I read to him, played catch in the alley and taught him how to ride his new bike.
▪ My first thoughts were about the two of us playing catch.
▪ I bought one the first day I arrived and have been roaming the streets ever since looking for some one to play catch.
release
▪ Wilcox told her to get in and release the bonnet catch.
▪ When the boy releases the catch, we don't get out immediately, because we can't stand up.
▪ The bolts are stiff; the pair of them have some difficulty releasing the catches and sliding them back.
take
▪ They cast their lines not far off-shore, and appeared to take excellent catches of fish.
▪ Eventually Rutherford's bat protruded too far forward and enabled Stewart to take a smart catch at short leg.
▪ On a rapid return journey he took the catch of the series so far in his right glove while airborne.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
I wouldn't be seen/caught dead
attract/catch/get sb's attention
be (caught) in a cleft stick
▪ Now the local authorities are caught in a cleft stick, hostages to their own political process.
▪ So the developing countries are caught in a cleft stick.
be (caught/locked/stuck) in a time warp
be caught napping
▪ Nowadays, no company can afford to be caught napping by a technological development.
▪ Stock traders who ignore these signs are in danger of being caught napping when a recession hits.
▪ I was reminding the golfing spirits that I could not be caught napping.
▪ Quakers were caught napping again two minutes later.
be taken short/be caught short
capture/catch sb's imagination
▪ The story of a boy raised by monkeys has caught the imagination of millions.
catch hell
▪ That boy's going to catch hell when he gets home.
▪ Emilio, no worse than any of the others, nevertheless caught hell most often.
catch sb flat-footed
▪ The recent recession caught managers flat-footed and unprepared.
catch sb red-handed
▪ The FBI caught the mayor red-handed using drugs.
catch some/a few rays
▪ Clothes, sleeping bags, spare canvas, all were hung up or spread out to catch a few rays of sunshine.
catch your breath
▪ Clark had to sit down to catch his breath.
▪ And then history paused, just to catch its breath.
▪ Both waders immediately filled and I caught my breath as freezing April waters began to stimulate sensitive nether regions.
▪ Busacher slumped into the passenger seat and sat catching his breath.
▪ I said, falling on to a chair, trying to catch my breath.
▪ She caught her breath in fear, holding it until the answer came.
▪ She could hear Moxie catching her breath.
▪ The slow movement of this performance is particularly fine, with pianissimos that have you catching your breath.
▪ Tokyo stocks fell Monday as investors caught their breath following a strong advance over the two previous sessions.
catch/get some Z's
catch/take sb off-guard
catch/throw sb off balance
▪ A badly packed rucksack can easily throw you off balance.
▪ And despite what he'd said, less a token of affection than a means of throwing her off balance.
▪ But before Adamowski could get his campaign under way, Daley threw him off balance by going on the offensive.
▪ He had an authority, an abrupt decisiveness, that caught me off balance.
▪ It throws the viewer off balance but speaks to the part of each person that is capable, potent and dignified.
▪ She has a problem with some little gland or other, which can throw her right off balance.
▪ The movement threw him off balance.
▪ Waking up to that penetrating ice-blue gaze was enough to throw anyone off balance for the rest of the day.
catch/throw sb off guard
▪ Could the upper management of a leading firm like Merrill Lynch be caught so entirely off guard?
▪ I said it suddenly like that, just blurted it out, and I guess it caught him off guard.
▪ Penelope flinched, angry at her thoughts, and at the girl who had caught her off guard.
▪ She really caught me off guard with her comments.
▪ The president faces issues that can catch him off guard and undermine his authority.
▪ The question caught Firebug off guard.
▪ The words caught him off guard.
▪ This caught me completely off guard.
catch/throw sb off-balance
catch/touch sb on the raw
▪ She had the fleeting impression that she'd caught him on the raw.
drop a catch
like a rabbit/deer caught in headlights
take/catch sb unawares
▪ I was caught unawares by his kiss.
take/catch your fancy
▪ A porcelain corgi in the window took her fancy.
▪ And you use everyone, for whatever little scheme takes your fancy.
▪ Have you been trawling the sales and picking up every urn and tub that caught your fancy?
▪ I'd wander down the high street, frittering away on whatever took my fancy.
▪ I am just glad I wasn't Anne Boleyn, or some other lady who took his fancy.
▪ Selection is not a matter of having everything that takes your fancy.
▪ Turn to page 14 to see which takes your fancy.
▪ When Oates took his fancy passing to Boston, Cam Neely thrived.
the early bird catches the worm
you'll catch your death (of cold)
▪ Don't go out without a coat! You'll catch your death of cold!
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Each morning, Troy goes down to the fish market to inspect the daily catch.
▪ Many of the best deals come with a catch: they are only good through early summer.
▪ That was a great catch!
▪ The catch is that you can't enter the contest unless you have spent $50 in the store.
▪ The catch on my necklace is broken.
▪ The deal comes with a catch - you have to buy one before June.
▪ You get free meals and accommodation, but there's a catch -- you have to look after the children.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A tall, fair woman with legs as long as Julia Roberts', she would be a catch for his grand party.
▪ Anglers can take home limit or near limit catches daily.
▪ Certainly in his bachelor days Johnnie Spencer was the catch of the county.
▪ Ex-Chiefs wideout Willie Davis has turned five of his 22 catches into touchdowns.
▪ I read to him, played catch in the alley and taught him how to ride his new bike.
▪ The men fish and sell their catch along the little promenade.
▪ There is a catch, however!
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Catch

Catch \Catch\, n.

  1. Act of seizing; a grasp.
    --Sir P. Sidney.

  2. That by which anything is caught or temporarily fastened; as, the catch of a gate.

  3. The posture of seizing; a state of preparation to lay hold of, or of watching he opportunity to seize; as, to lie on the catch. [Archaic]
    --Addison.

    The common and the canon law . . . lie at catch, and wait advantages one againt another.
    --T. Fuller.

  4. That which is caught or taken; profit; gain; especially, the whole quantity caught or taken at one time; as, a good catch of fish.

    Hector shall have a great catch if he knock out either of your brains.
    --Shak.

  5. Something desirable to be caught, esp. a husband or wife in matrimony. [Colloq.]
    --Marryat.

  6. pl. Passing opportunities seized; snatches.

    It has been writ by catches with many intervals.
    --Locke.

  7. A slight remembrance; a trace.

    We retain a catch of those pretty stories.
    --Glanvill.

  8. (Mus.) A humorous canon or round, so contrived that the singers catch up each other's words.

Catch

Catch \Catch\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Caughtor Catched; p. pr. & vb. n. Catching. Catched is rarely used.] [OE. cacchen, OF. cachier, dialectic form of chacier to hunt, F. chasser, fr. (assumend) LL. captiare, for L. capture, V. intens. of capere to take, catch. See Capacious, and cf. Chase, Case a box.]

  1. To lay hold on; to seize, especially with the hand; to grasp (anything) in motion, with the effect of holding; as, to catch a ball.

  2. To seize after pursuing; to arrest; as, to catch a thief. ``They pursued . . . and caught him.''
    --Judg. i. 6.

  3. To take captive, as in a snare or net, or on a hook; as, to catch a bird or fish.

  4. Hence: To insnare; to entangle. ``To catch him in his words''.
    --Mark xii. 13.

  5. To seize with the senses or the mind; to apprehend; as, to catch a melody. ``Fiery thoughts . . . whereof I catch the issue.''
    --Tennyson.

  6. To communicate to; to fasten upon; as, the fire caught the adjoining building.

  7. To engage and attach; to please; to charm.

    The soothing arts that catch the fair.
    --Dryden.

  8. To get possession of; to attain.

    Torment myself to catch the English throne.
    --Shak.

  9. To take or receive; esp. to take by sympathy, contagion, infection, or exposure; as, to catch the spirit of an occasion; to catch the measles or smallpox; to catch cold; the house caught fire.

  10. To come upon unexpectedly or by surprise; to find; as, to catch one in the act of stealing.

  11. To reach in time; to come up with; as, to catch a train.

    To catch fire, to become inflamed or ignited.

    to catch it to get a scolding or beating; to suffer punishment. [Colloq.]

    To catch one's eye, to interrupt captiously while speaking. [Colloq.] ``You catch me up so very short.''
    --Dickens.

    To catch up, to snatch; to take up suddenly.

Catch

Catch \Catch\, v. i.

  1. To attain possession. [Obs.]

    Have is have, however men do catch.
    --Shak.

  2. To be held or impeded by entanglement or a light obstruction; as, a kite catches in a tree; a door catches so as not to open.

  3. To take hold; as, the bolt does not catch.

  4. To spread by, or as by, infecting; to communicate.

    Does the sedition catch from man to man?
    --Addison.

    To catch at, to attempt to seize; to be eager to get or use. ``[To] catch at all opportunities of subverting the state.''
    --Addison.

    To catch up with, to come up with; to overtake.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
catch

late 14c., "device to hold a latch of a door," also "a trap;" also "a fishing vessel," from catch (v.). Meaning "action of catching" attested from 1570s. Meaning "that which is caught or worth catching" (later especially of spouses) is from 1590s. Sense of "hidden cost, qualification, etc." is slang first recorded 1855 in P.T. Barnum.\n\n\n\n

catch

c.1200, "to take, capture," from Anglo-French or Old North French cachier "catch, capture" (animals) (Old French chacier "hunt, pursue, drive (animals)," Modern French chasser "to hunt;" making it a doublet of chase (v.)), from Vulgar Latin *captiare "try to seize, chase" (also source of Spanish cazar, Italian cacciare), from Latin captare "to take, hold," frequentative of Latin capere "to take, hold" (see capable).\n

\nSenses in early Middle English also included "chase, hunt," which later went with chase (v.). Of infections from 1540s; of fire from 1734; of sleep, etc., from early 14c. Related: Catched (obsolete); catching; caught.\n

\nMeaning "act as a catcher in baseball" recorded from 1865. To catch on "apprehend" is 1884, American English colloquial. To catch (someone's) eye is first attested 1813, in Jane Austen. Catch as catch can first attested late 14c.

Wiktionary
catch

n. 1 (context countable English) The act of seizing or capture. (jump act of capturing s) 2 (context countable English) The act of catching an object in motion, especially a ball. (jump catching a ball s t) 3 (context countable English) The act of noticing, understanding or hearing. (jump act of noticing s t) 4 (context uncountable English) The game of catching a ball. (jump ball game t) 5 (context countable English) A find, in particular a boyfriend or girlfriend or prospective spouse. (jump a find s t) 6 (context countable English) Something which is captured or caught. (jump something caught t) (jump quantity captured s) 7 (context countable English) A stopping mechanism, especially a clasp which stops something from opening. (jump stopping mechanism s t) 8 (context countable English) A hesitation in voice, caused by strong emotion. 9 (context countable sometimes noun adjunct English) A concealed difficulty, especially in a deal or negotiation. (jump hidden difficulty s t) 10 (context countable English) A crick; a sudden muscle pain during unaccustomed positioning when the muscle is in use. 11 (context countable English) A fragment of music or poetry. (jump fragment of music s) vb. 1 (lb en heading) ''To capture, overtake.'' 2 # (lb en transitive) To capture or snare (someone or something which would rather escape). (jump capture prey s) (from 13thc.) 3 # (lb en transitive) To entrap or trip up a person; to deceive. (from 14thc.) 4 # (lb en transitive figuratively dated) To marry or enter into a similar relationship with. 5 # (lb en transitive) To reach (someone) with a strike, blow, weapon etc. (from 16thc.)

WordNet
catch
  1. v. discover or come upon accidentally, suddenly, or unexpectedly; catch somebody doing something or in a certain state; "She caught her son eating candy"; "She was caught shoplifting"

  2. perceive with the senses quickly, suddenly, or momentarily; "I caught the aroma of coffee"; "He caught the allusion in her glance"; "ears open to catch every sound"; "The dog picked up the scent"; "Catch a glimpse" [syn: pick up]

  3. reach with a blow or hit in a particular spot; "the rock caught her in the back of the head"; "The blow got him in the back"; "The punch caught him in the stomach" [syn: get]

  4. take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of; "Catch the ball!"; "Grab the elevator door!" [syn: grab, take hold of]

  5. succeed in catching or seizing, especially after a chase; "We finally got the suspect"; "Did you catch the thief?" [syn: get, capture]

  6. to hook or entangle; "One foot caught in the stirrup" [syn: hitch] [ant: unhitch]

  7. attract and fix; "His look caught her"; "She caught his eye"; "Catch the attention of the waiter" [syn: arrest, get]

  8. capture as if by hunting, snaring, or trapping; "I caught a rabbit in the trap toady" [syn: capture]

  9. reach in time; "I have to catch a train at 7 o'clock"

  10. get or regain something necessary, usually quickly or briefly; "Catch some sleep"; "catch one's breath"

  11. catch up with and possibly overtake; "The Rolls Royce caught us near the exit ramp" [syn: overtake, catch up with]

  12. be struck or affected by; "catch fire"; "catch the mood"

  13. check oneself during an action; "She managed to catch herself before telling her boss what was on her mind"

  14. hear, usually without the knowledge of the speakers; "We overheard the conversation at the next table" [syn: take in, overhear]

  15. see or watch; "view a show on television"; "This program will be seen all over the world"; "view an exhibition"; "Catch a show on Broadway"; "see a movie" [syn: watch, view, see, take in]

  16. cause to become accidentally or suddenly caught, ensnared, or entangled; "I caught the hem of my dress in the brambles"

  17. detect a blunder or misstep; "The reporter tripped up the senator" [syn: trip up]

  18. grasp with the mind or develop an undersatnding of; "did you catch that allusion?"; "We caught something of his theory in the lecture"; "don't catch your meaning"; "did you get it?"; "She didn't get the joke"; "I just don't get him" [syn: get]

  19. contract; "did you catch a cold?"

  20. start burning; "The fire caught"

  21. perceive by hearing; "I didn't catch your name"; "She didn't get his name when they met the first time" [syn: get]

  22. suffer from the receipt of; "She will catch hell for this behavior!" [syn: get]

  23. attract; cause to be enamored; "She captured all the men's hearts" [syn: capture, enamour, trance, becharm, enamor, captivate, beguile, charm, fascinate, bewitch, entrance, enchant]

  24. apprehend and reproduce accurately; "She really caught the spirit of the place in her drawings"; "She got the mood just right in her photographs" [syn: get]

  25. take in and retain; "We have a big barrel to catch the rainwater"

  26. spread or be communicated; "The fashion did not catch"

  27. be the catcher; "Who is catching?"

  28. become aware of; "he caught her staring out the window"

  29. delay or hold up; prevent from proceeding on schedule or as planned; "I was caught in traffic and missed the meeting"

  30. [also: caught]

catch
  1. n. a hidden drawback; "it sounds good but what's the catch?"

  2. the quantity that was caught; "the catch was only 10 fish" [syn: haul]

  3. a person regarded as a good matrimonial prospect [syn: match]

  4. anything that is caught (especially if it is worth catching); "he shared his catch with the others"

  5. a break or check in the voice (usually a sign of strong emotion)

  6. a restraint that checks the motion of something; "he used a book as a stop to hold the door open" [syn: stop]

  7. a fastener that fastens or locks a door or window

  8. a cooperative game in which a ball is passed back and forth; "he played catch with his son in the backyard"

  9. the act of catching an object with the hands; "Mays made the catch with his back to the plate"; "he made a grab for the ball before it landed"; "Martin's snatch at the bridle failed and the horse raced away"; "the infielder's snap and throw was a single motion" [syn: grab, snatch, snap]

  10. the act of apprehending (especially apprehending a criminal); "the policeman on the beat got credit for the collar" [syn: apprehension, arrest, collar, pinch, taking into custody]

  11. [also: caught]

Wikipedia
Catch (The Cure song)

"Catch" is the name of a 1987 single by The Cure from their album Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me. The single was not released in the US. It charted at #27 in the UK.

Catch (band)

Catch were a British indie pop group consisting of musicians Toby Slater (vocals and keyboards), Wayne Murray (bass and vocals) and Ben Etchells (guitar). The band were signed to Virgin Records and released two singles - "Bingo", which reached No. 23 in the UK Singles Chart, and "Dive In", which reached No. 44. The band released one self-titled album, which was only issued in Indonesia. The album is no longer in print or available online, however various tracks have surfaced on file and video sharing websites over the years.

Catch (album)

Catch is an album by Japanese singer/pianist Misako Odani, released May 17, 2006 on the independent Hip Land Music label. All songs and lyrics were written by Misako, and she was a producer of the album as well.

Catch

Catch may refer to:

Catch (Allie X song)

"Catch" is the debut single by Canadian singer-songwriter Allie X, from her major label debut EP CollXtion I, released initially on February 3, 2014, with a GIF designed in coordination with Logan White and Krissie Torgerson. It was re-released on November 20, 2015 as an EP with additional tracks. It is the first single under the name of Allie X.

Catch (baseball)

In baseball, a catch occurs when a fielder gains secure possession of a batted ball in flight, and maintains possession until he voluntarily or intentionally releases the ball. When a catch occurs, the batter is out, and runners, once they properly tag up (retouch their time-of-pitch base), may attempt to advance at risk of being tagged out.

Unlike in American football and other sports, neither secure possession for a time nor for a number of steps is enough to demonstrate that a catch has occurred. A fielder may, for example, appear to catch and hold a batted ball securely, take a few more steps, collide with a wall or another player, and drop the ball. This is not a catch.

Umpires signal a catch with the out signal: a fist raised into the air, often with a hammering motion; if there is doubt about it, the umpire will likely shout "That's a catch!" On a close no-catch, the umpire will signal with the safe signal, which is both arms swept to the side and extended, accompanied by the call "No catch, no catch!" with an emphasis on the word "no".

The fielder must catch the ball with his hand or glove. If the fielder uses his cap, protector, pocket or any other part of his uniform in getting possession, it is not a catch. Therefore, a foul ball which directly becomes lodged in the equipment of the catcher (other than his or her glove) is not considered a catch and hence not a foul tip.

It is not a catch if the batted ball hits a fielder, then hits a member of the offensive team or an umpire, and then is caught by another defensive player.

A catch is legal if the ball is finally held by any fielder before it touches the ground. Runners may leave their bases the instant the first fielder touches the ball. A fielder may reach over a fence, a railing, a rope, or a line of demarcation to make a catch. He may jump on top of a railing or a canvas that may be in foul ground. Interference should not be called in cases where a spectator comes into contact with a fielder and a catch is not made if the fielder reaches over a fence, a railing, a rope. The fielder does so at his or her own risk.

If a fielder, attempting a catch at the edge of the dugout, is "held up" and kept from an apparent fall by a player or players of either team and the catch is made, it shall be allowed.

To avoid ambiguity with the common term catch meaning any action that gains possession of a ball, some may say that a fielder gloved a thrown ball or a batted, bouncing ball.

Catch (music)

In music, a catch is a type of round or canon at the unison. That is, it is a musical composition in which two or more voices (usually at least three) repeatedly sing the same melody, beginning at different times. Generally catches have a secular theme, though many collections included devotional rounds and canons.

In early collections the terms "catch" and "round" were interchangeable and, with part-songs and multi-voice canons, were all indexed as "songs". The catch and round differ from the canon in having a cadence on which the song can terminate after a specified number of repeats or when the leader gives a signal. A catch does not necessarily require the lines of lyrics to interact so that a word or phrase is produced from one part in the rests of another. This view became prevalent in the later part of the eighteenth century under the influence of the competitions sponsored by the Noblemen and Gentlemen's Catch Club.

Catches were originally written out at length as one continuous melody, and not in score. The change to printing in score was first made in the early eighteenth century, and this is now the normal method of presentation. In the score for a catch the different voices are usually labelled "1", "2", "3", etc. This indicates that voice "1" sings its part first and continues to part 2. When part 1 has been completed it is sung by voice "2" and so on. A common mistake in performance is for all parts to start together as though the score were to indicate a part song.

Catch (game)

Catch, having a catch, or playing catch, is one of the most basic children's games, often played between children or between a parent and child, wherein the participants throw a ball, beanbag, Flying disc or similar object back and forth to each other. At early stages in a child's life, playing catch is a good way to evaluate and improve the child's physical coordination. Notably, "[i]f a child cannot catch a ball that he or she is bouncing, it is unlikely the child will be able to play catch". Most children begin to be able to play catch around the age of four. Many four-year-olds instinctively close their eyes when a ball is heading towards them, and it can take some time to overcome this. Practising playing catch can help develop dexterity, coordination and confidence.

Because playing catch requires at least two participants, and because participants can be substituted at any point during the game, catch can be used to place children in social situations where they will interact with each other. For example, this can be done by first having one child play catch with an adult, and then bringing other children into the game or substituting another child for the adult, at which point the adult can leave entirely. As children become more adept at the skills used to catch a thrown object and return it to the thrower, these skills are incorporated into more complex games played with larger groups of participants, such as hot potato, dodgeball, and keep away. Playing catch can improve an aptitude for sports that involve catching and throwing, such as baseball, football, and basketball.

Usage examples of "catch".

Every day, top lawyers and accountants bustled in and out, hoping to catch the ear of the man who ruled this realm: Arthur Levitt, the SEC chairman.

Just then my eye was caught by the pragmatical old gentleman in the Greek grizzled wig, who was scrambling away in sore affright with half a score of authors in full cry after him.

Marchmont, whom the affrighted Camilla, springing forward, could only answer in catching by the arm.

Like them he had been a firm believer in homeopathy, until after his first fever, whereupon, unlike them, he made a grand slide back to allopathy and quinine, catching fever and carrying on his Gospel work.

God, or some one of the gods, in sending the souls to their birth, placed eyes in the face to catch the light and allotted to each sense the appropriate organ, providing thus for the safety which comes by seeing and hearing in time and, seeking or avoiding under guidance of touch.

The thrill of finding an allusion, of locating the precise source of a teasing echo, of suddenly catching an obscure pun or seeing what should have been an obvious joke makes the reader alert, curious, eager to find new puzzles to solve.

His amatory songs and catches are such poetry as Orlando would have liked to hang on the boughs in the forest of Arden.

Jass found himself caught in an agony of ambivalence, not for the first time that day.

As they ambled along, Taran caught his foot on a jutting edge of stone and he tumbled head over heels.

Unlike when Ambler had made love with his wife he and his lover often began to talk immediately, right after they had caught their breath.

Then Antelope caught it and she started swaying and curtseying to Bear and Grizzly.

Andy wondered whether they were all caught under the sway of some long gone but powerful personality, perhaps the very one who had caused antimacassar to be piled upon antimacassar.

It learned from a monk how to use antimony, from a Jesuit how to cure agues, from a friar how to cut for stone, from a soldier how to treat gout, from a sailor how to keep off scurvy, from a postmaster how to sound the Eustachian tube, from a dairy-maid how to prevent small-pox, and from an old marketwoman how to catch the itch-insect.

There he hooked legs into the ladder and stopped each of the arriving items, catching them easily in chest and arms, leaving them hanging somehow in the air, motionless beside the ladder.

While she was watching the arrowy birds, she caught sight of someone coming towards her from a clump of beech-trees, and suddenly saw that it was Mrs.