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convey
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
convey
verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
convey a sense of sth
▪ We want to convey our sense of excitement to the audience.
convey meaning (=express a meaning)
▪ the use of hand signals to convey meaning
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
ability
▪ Attainment target 3: A growing ability to construct and convey meaning in written language matching style to audience and purpose.
▪ Films possess the ability to convey both motion and colour.
▪ I am much more concerned at my apparent lack of ability to convey what I mean.
concern
▪ His photographs and descriptions convey concern for the human suffering resulting from natural disasters.
▪ Clinton routinely dazzled guests with displays of empathy, of listening, of conveying interest and concern, according to witnesses.
idea
▪ In fact, the sound alone does not convey the full idea, but the context in which it is used.
▪ Of course I have been considering a simplified situation here in order to convey the main ideas.
▪ The decoration on the monument is intended to convey the idea of Leonardo as artist, sculptor, architect and engineer.
▪ Alternatively, it might be said that the talk about words conveying ideas it not to be taken seriously.
image
▪ Each company sells clothes which have a clear identity allowing the wearer to convey a particular image to the outside world.
▪ The news media, themselves privately owned and controlled, convey an image of society which support dominant class interests.
impression
▪ Taken at face value the words found sinister and can convey a false impression like some sort of second-rate horror movie.
▪ Even his description of Oswiu's overlordship in Britain may convey an inflated impression of military activity under Oswiu.
▪ It is intended to convey an impression of the main themes at work. 1.
▪ An account which tries to convey the impression that you're not there at all.
▪ The slang term square might convey an impression which includes the suit, crew-cut and tie.
▪ A few instances quickly convey an impression of it.
▪ Some dealers tried to convey the false impression that the two markets were in cahoots.
information
▪ For example, the days of dull, impenetrable forms that seemed designed to obscure rather than to convey information are passing.
▪ Since contradictions convey absolutely no information, the cosmic bootstrap turns out to be vacuous.
▪ Remember, above all, that the purpose of the document is that is should convey information quickly and clearly.
▪ Use the indicator solution to write short messages to the students conveying information related to classwork.
▪ I convey the further information that with awakening awareness I am stirred to approach, and as I approach awareness quickens.
▪ The value of graphic material is to attract attention and convey information in a summarised form, e.g. cell division.
▪ Tape-slide presentations appear to be a suitable medium for conveying the type of information used in library education.
▪ These cells will convey information about wavelength boundaries that could be used to compute true colour.
language
▪ Without words, children could not use language to convey their intentions or attitudes to others.
▪ Compared to pidgins, a proper language can convey such complicated concepts using relatively few words.
▪ Even without verbal language, we can convey meaning.
▪ But it isin Between that the function of language to convey meaning is most actively questioned.
▪ He uses the indeterminacy of language to convey, through a single utterance, two very different propositions to the audience.
meaning
▪ Nurses frequently have difficulty in conveying the exact meaning of messages to patients and relatives.
▪ The rest often consists of sentences to help convey the meaning of those key points and to make the language flow.
▪ Attainment target 3: A growing ability to construct and convey meaning in written language matching style to audience and purpose.
▪ Contrast also grants priority to lexical expressions that conventionally convey a specific meaning.
▪ Choice of words and their arrangement in sentences to convey exact meaning are therefore vital in the activity of communicating.
▪ They must faithfully convey the historian's meaning and still be memorable for you. 3.
▪ Even without verbal language, we can convey meaning.
▪ But it isin Between that the function of language to convey meaning is most actively questioned.
message
▪ Use the indicator solution to write short messages to the students conveying information related to classwork.
▪ Pictorial representations of women can carry all kinds of subtle hints and messages, can indeed convey a whole world-view of meaning.
▪ She relayed several more messages, conveying by her voice that she thought it was time he appeared in his office.
▪ What was the message they wanted to convey: the full message, exact: that was where she must start.
▪ You need only to look at commercial copy or displays to see how powerfully a type-face complements the message it is conveying.
▪ For example, what messages are we conveying when we separate some children from others?
▪ Have you noticed that you are becoming increasingly aware of people and of the message they are conveying?
sense
▪ Marchant builds up a factual record of dereliction in Stepney with the intention of conveying a sense of loss.
▪ During the conference it is very useful for the teacher or counselor to convey a sense of positive expectations.
▪ His drawings of it convey the sense of some one singing at his work.
▪ Groping for a name that would properly convey their sense of both awe and relief, Powell decided on Glen Canyon.
▪ I do not wish to convey a sense of complacency.
▪ Even the brush or other instruments could be employed freely, the whole image fabricated to convey a sense of handling.
▪ Now, it is important to say that an intelligent expression of faith will still convey some sense of uncertainty.
▪ Over the years demographers have groped for ways to convey some sense of what this extraordinary growth in human numbers means.
speaker
▪ Whether or not one hears well the face of the speaker helps to convey their message.
▪ This representation is decoded into a representation of the same message that the speaker originally chose to convey.
▪ The other segment conveys the new information that the speaker wishes to convey to the hearer.
view
▪ I would be grateful if you could convey these views to the committee which is considering the legislation.
▪ The guardian ad litem is expected to convey the child's views to the court.
way
▪ The dualist holds that there can be different ways of conveying the same content.
▪ Over the years demographers have groped for ways to convey some sense of what this extraordinary growth in human numbers means.
▪ The way to convey what I actually felt, if I knew what I felt, if I felt anything.
▪ Implication is an indirect way of conveying one's own meaning; inference is a process of discovering a fact outside oneself.
▪ In this way they could convey to one another mental pictures of such objects.
word
▪ The ordinary communication of words was inadequate to convey all she was feeling, all that she desired.
▪ Choose words which best convey your message to your audience.
▪ It was the talking that did it; how could he make words convey what had happened, what could happen?
▪ Alternatively, it might be said that the talk about words conveying ideas it not to be taken seriously.
▪ But, alas, the printed word can not adequately convey the panting, gasping misery of this particular torment.
■ VERB
attempt
▪ Unlike the previous two, this film attempts to convey the nature of the fighting within a brief history of the war.
▪ Converse said, attempting to convey zestful satisfaction in his profession.
▪ In the following article he attempts to convey some of his enthusiasm for his pastime.
▪ This chapter will attempt to convey some of our experiences, as well as describing a structured group programme.
▪ We use words to give voice to our thoughts and feelings and to attempt to convey them to other people.
▪ She attempted to convey these to Fabio.
fail
▪ Yet, Lord Taylor accuses newspapers of slanting accounts of sentences, of failing to convey salient facts.
▪ One thing the advisory teacher had failed to convey was that the syllabus was being covered via these activities.
help
▪ The rest often consists of sentences to help convey the meaning of those key points and to make the language flow.
▪ Whether or not one hears well the face of the speaker helps to convey their message.
intend
▪ It should lead us to reflect further on the messages which such behaviour is intended to convey.
▪ The analogy was intended to convey two things.
▪ It is intended to convey an impression of the main themes at work. 1.
▪ Since I haven't, I must intend to convey that Nigel only has fourteen.
▪ Mildly indignant surprise was what she intended to convey, and almost succeeded.
▪ The decoration on the monument is intended to convey the idea of Leonardo as artist, sculptor, architect and engineer.
▪ The religious habit had lost its symbolic value; it no longer conveyed the meaning it was intended to convey.
▪ The Observer said that it had not intended to convey that meaning, and accepted that the allegation was without foundation.
manage
▪ However, Lucy managed to convey that she intended to stay for several days, or perhaps for even a week.
▪ I managed to convey my gratitude.
▪ With those five words, Lili managed simultaneously to convey exhaustion, indomitable, spirited arrogance, and shocked, virginal modesty.
▪ It was a simple favor Wilson managed to convey.
▪ George manages to convey that the arguments of a man who doesn't know his desert are not to be relied upon.
▪ But Father John McCullagh has managed to convey the same sentiment in a very different way.
▪ The statement is false, terribly so; but it is the impression that most mathematics texts manage to convey.
▪ Taking another glass of champagne, he wondered if he had really managed to convey all that.
mean
▪ Speech is not an end in itself but is meant to convey something.
▪ It was meant to convey that they had no recognition of the young men in the car, and therefore no interest.
▪ This is meant to convey a sense of security and privacy: the drawbridge is pulled up and the portcullis is dropped.
try
▪ William Daniell in his Animated Nature of 1807-12 had tried to convey not only background but also atmosphere.
▪ I have tried to convey a pale memory of our meeting, but further than that I can not go.
▪ He tries to convey the humour to Phil, but Phil looks at him sardonically and talks of other things.
▪ He tried to convey the power of the emotion which gripped a man at such a moment.
▪ Muriel did not know precisely what she was trying to convey - more than consolation; nothing she could have explained.
▪ An account which tries to convey the impression that you're not there at all.
use
▪ Films and video-tapes can be used to convey both motion and colour.
▪ Without words, children could not use language to convey their intentions or attitudes to others.
▪ Different sensory modalities, then, are used to convey different types of message, forming an enormously rich communication network.
▪ Impartiality is a concept which has been used to convey many things.
▪ Royal parents could also use the medium to convey a dynastic message: the ritual role identified the child born to reign.
▪ All I did was to use a term to convey a meaning.
▪ Some students would be interested in the way the medium is used to convey a message.
want
▪ Dots mime everything they want to convey, with surprising success.
▪ They desperately wanted to convey to us the soulfulness of their jobs.
▪ I have no interest in the psychological interpretation of my sitters, I want to convey their physical appearance.
▪ But they want those accounts to convey the sense that candidates are accessible to voters.
▪ I wanted to convey a similar feeling for our progress toward a complete understanding of the laws that govern the universe.
▪ Christina Rossetti wanted to convey a particular feeling of overwhelming joy.
▪ Yes, you will have something that you want to convey: your theme.
▪ What was the message they wanted to convey: the full message, exact: that was where she must start.
wish
▪ I do not wish to convey a sense of complacency.
▪ The other segment conveys the new information that the speaker wishes to convey to the hearer.
▪ Delegates said later that the conference had been ambiguous about the message it had wished to convey.
▪ I wish I could convey to you what inspires them to do it.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A crack had developed in one of the main cooling pipes which are used to convey water.
▪ Her blond hair and blue eyes convey her Swedish origins.
▪ His office conveyed an impression of efficiency and seriousness.
▪ His tone conveyed an unmistakable warning.
▪ I tried to convey my sympathy by touching her hand.
▪ The blood is conveyed to the heart from the veins.
▪ The guard was charged with conveying drugs to a prison inmate.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Even his description of Oswiu's overlordship in Britain may convey an inflated impression of military activity under Oswiu.
▪ How to convey the battle scene posed a problem.
▪ I suggest that these parents look long and hard at the messages they have been inadvertently conveying about reading.
▪ Instead the class used percussion music to convey the clash between the two armies.
▪ Just how did they function in conveying meaning?
▪ Migliore was clearly eager to convey the message that all would now be well, according to Orr.
▪ The descriptions of weapons, commanders and tactics are much too brief to convey historical competence.
▪ They may also find one or two of the papers unnecessarily long for the points they convey.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Convey

Convey \Con*vey"\ (k[o^]n*v[=a]"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Conveyed (k[o^]n*v[=a]d"); p. pr. & vb. n. Conveying.] [OF. conveir, convoier, to escort, convoy, F. convoyer, LL. conviare, fr. L. con- + via way. See Viaduct, Voyage, and cf. Convoy.]

  1. To carry from one place to another; to bear or transport.

    I will convey them by sea in floats.
    --1 Kings v. 9.

    Convey me to my bed, then to my grave.
    --Shak.

  2. To cause to pass from one place or person to another; to serve as a medium in carrying (anything) from one place or person to another; to transmit; as, air conveys sound; words convey ideas.

  3. To transfer or deliver to another; to make over, as property; more strictly (Law), to transfer (real estate) or pass (a title to real estate) by a sealed writing.

    The Earl of Desmond . . . secretly conveyed all his lands to feoffees in trust.
    --Spenser.

  4. To impart or communicate; as, to convey an impression; to convey information.

    Men fill one another's heads with noise and sound, but convey not thereby their thoughts.
    --Locke.

  5. To manage with privacy; to carry out. [Obs.]

    I . . . will convey the business as I shall find means.
    --Shak.

  6. To carry or take away secretly; to steal; to thieve.

  7. To accompany; to convoy. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

    Syn: To carry; transport; bear; transmit; transfer.

Convey

Convey \Con*vey"\, v. i. To play the thief; to steal. [Cant]

But as I am Crack, I will convey, crossbite, and cheat upon Simplicius.
--Marston.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
convey

c.1300, "to go along with;" late 14c., "to carry, transport;" from Anglo-French conveier, from Old French convoier "to escort" (Modern French convoyer), from Vulgar Latin *conviare "to accompany on the way," from Latin com- "together" (see com-) + via "way, road" (see via). It was a euphemism for "steal" 15c.-17c., which helped broaden its meaning. Related: Conveyed; conveying.

Wiktionary
convey

vb. 1 To transport; to carry; to take from one place to another. 2 To communicate; to make known; to portray. 3 (context legal English) To transfer legal rights (to). 4 (context obsolete English) To manage with privacy; to carry out. 5 (context obsolete English) To carry or take away secretly; to steal; to thieve.

WordNet
convey
  1. v. make known; pass on, of information [syn: impart]

  2. serve as a means for expressing something; "The painting of Mary carries motherly love"; "His voice carried a lot af anger" [syn: carry, express]

  3. transfer to another; "communicate a disease" [syn: transmit, communicate]

  4. transmit a title or property

  5. transmit or serve as the medium for transmission; "Sound carries well over water"; "The airwaves carry the sound"; "Many metals conduct heat" [syn: conduct, transmit, carry, channel]

  6. take something or somebody with oneself somewhere; "Bring me the box from the other room"; "Take these letters to the boss"; "This brings me to the main point" [syn: bring, take]

  7. go or come after and bring or take back; "Get me those books over there, please"; "Could you bring the wine?"; "The dog fetched the hat" [syn: bring, get, fetch] [ant: take away]

Usage examples of "convey".

In ways devoid of his own vaunted subtlety, it was conveyed to Solon that Little Arcady expected him to do something.

Great significance is given in the Indian mythology to Agni, the god of fire, who burns the sacrifice in honor of the gods, who conveys the offerings and prayers of men to gods and their gifts to men, who gladdens the domestic hearth, lights up the darkness of night, drives away the evil spirits, the Ashuras and Rakshas, and purges of evil the souls of men.

I immediately dispatched a messenger, riding at full tilt, conveying to Zeno my hearty thanks and my auths of loyalty, and asking him to send legionaries to relieve me of my stewardship of Singidunum.

The other part of taxes seemed simple enough to him - the barons collected taxes, sent some to the Earl, who kept some and conveyed the rest to the Duke, who probably did the same thing and passed along a bit to King Rodric or Prince Erland.

Lekel, chaplain of the Bastile, who had accompanied the cardinal, and was devoted to him, to take charge of it and convey it to the queen.

These contingents had been assembled by long railway journeys, conveyed across thousands of miles of ocean to Cape Town, brought round another two thousand or so to Beira, transferred by a narrow-gauge railway to Bamboo Creek, changed to a broader gauge to Marandellas, sent on in coaches for hundreds of miles to Bulawayo, transferred to trains for another four or five hundred miles to Ootsi, and had finally a forced march of a hundred miles, which brought them up a few hours before their presence was urgently needed upon the field.

Belli emitted a long mouthful at that, which John understood to convey the shock Belli felt at the impropriety of the employment of such language in a holy place before and under holy pictures.

Whether, in so doing, tables walk of their own accord, or fiend-like shapes appear in a magic circle, or bodyless hands rise and remove material objects, or a Thing of Darkness, such as presented itself to me, freeze our blood - still am I persuaded that these are but agencies conveyed, as if by electric wires, to my own brain from the brain of another.

That my very thoughts are conveyed to Erik Bonebreaker at Offleah and thence, doubtless, to Earl Guthrum in London.

For she wears a very handsome silk dress on state occasions, with a breastpin set, as I honestly believe, with genuine pearls, and appears habitually with a very smart cap, from under which her gray curls come out with an unmistakable expression, conveyed in the hieratic language of the feminine priesthood, to the effect that while there is life there is hope.

Saloon to be met by the intelligence, conveyed to me by Brummell, that you had slipped away with the Regent.

She obtained a pass for herself and infant, her two Burman girls and cook, and got on board a boat, which conveyed them within two miles of Amarapoora.

The ensign and his soldiers stood to their arms: while the faint echo of the musket-sound conveyed to the watchful bushranger the fatal intimation that some discovery had taken place on shore which could bode only ill to him, from the junction of the parties now united for his destruction, and which required the exercise of all his cunning and unequalled daring to guard against and to repel.

Some buttonwood trees, now thinning out with annual age, conveyed by their speckled trunks the notion of a changing social standard, white and brown, native and foreign, while the lines of maples stood on blackened boles like old retired seamen, bronzed in many voyages and planted home forever.

In every fact, every detail, and in the whole mental impression which they convey, these manuscripts bring before us the Casanova of the Memoirs.