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Crossword clues for start

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
start
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a computer starts up/boots up
▪ My computer takes ages to start up in the morning.
a starting point
▪ The following recipes are a good starting point for making your own bread.
auspicious start/beginning
▪ Saccani’s excellent recording is an auspicious start to what promises to be a distinguished musical career.
begin/start a journey
▪ He began the journey home across London.
begin/start construction
▪ Developers are planning to begin construction on a new housing project.
begin/start out on/start a career
▪ Jacobson started his banking career in 1990.
begin/start out on/start a career
▪ Jacobson started his banking career in 1990.
begin/start proceedings (also institute proceedings formal)
▪ They threatened to begin legal proceedings against him.
begin/start to laugh
▪ He suddenly began to laugh.
doomed from the start
▪ The plan was doomed from the start.
do/start/finish a PhD
false start
▪ After several false starts, the concert finally began.
from start to finish (=from the beginning until the end)
▪ The day was a disaster from start to finish.
give sb/get/have a head start
▪ Give your children a head start by sending them to nursery school.
got off to a flying start
▪ The appeal has got off to a flying start, with over £200,000 raised in the first week.
head start
▪ Give your children a head start by sending them to nursery school.
inauspicious start
▪ an inauspicious start
it starts raining/it starts to rain
▪ It had started to rain again.
it starts raining/it starts to rain
▪ It had started to rain again.
make a fresh start
▪ I hope Jim and I can get back together and make a fresh start.
negotiations start
▪ Peace negotiations started last week.
prices start from £200/$300 etc
▪ Ticket prices start from £39.00.
rocky start
▪ Rangers got off to a rocky start this season.
set up/start up in business
▪ The bank gave me a loan to help me set up in business.
set up/start/form a company
▪ Two years later he started his own software company.
signal the start/beginning/end of sth
▪ the lengthening days that signal the end of winter
standing start
▪ The runners set off from a standing start.
start a collection
▪ I think I might start a stamp collection.
start a fight
▪ They started a fight in the crowded bar.
start a fire
▪ The fire may have been started by a cigarette.
start a friendship
▪ Their friendship started after they met at a conference.
start a group
▪ Ben and some friends started a rock group at school.
start a trend
▪ The young started a trend toward living in the downtown area.
start afresh
▪ He moved to America to start afresh.
start at the beginning (=start a story or activity at the first part)
▪ Just start at the beginning and tell us exactly what happened.
start school
▪ Children in Britain start school when they are five.
start the day (=do something at the beginning of a day)
▪ You should start the day with a good breakfast.
start university (also enter universityformal)
▪ Some people take a year off before they start university.
start up/boot up a computer (=make it start working)
start work
▪ He started work as a trainee accountant.
start/begin a relationship
▪ She is in no hurry to start another relationship.
start/begin to cry
▪ She suddenly started to cry.
start/cause an argument
▪ He was deliberately trying to start an argument.
▪ Money often causes arguments.
started at the bottom (=in a low position in a company)
▪ Higgins had started at the bottom and worked his way up to become managing director.
started snowing
▪ It started snowing around five.
start/finish your homework
▪ You're not going out until you've finished your homework.
start...from scratch
▪ We had to start again from scratch.
starting blocks
starting gate
starting line-up (=the players who begin the game)
▪ This was his first match in the starting line-up .
starting line
starting point
▪ The article provides a starting point for discussion.
starting price
starting salary (=the salary someone gets when they start a job)
▪ The starting salary for a hotel manager is $26,400.
start/light a fire
▪ It was too damp to light a fire.
start/set up a business
▪ When you’re starting a business, you have to work longer hours.
switch on/turn on/start an engine
▪ I fastened my seat belt and turned on the engine.
the beginning/start of a chapter
▪ His character is introduced at the beginning of the first chapter.
the beginning/start of term
▪ The beginning of term was only two days away.
the beginning/start of the year
▪ They moved here at the beginning of last year.
unpromising start
▪ Sales improved after an unpromising start.
work starts/begins
▪ Work had already started on the bridge when the error was spotted.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
again
▪ An enthusiastic committee is vital as the work goes on throughout the year, starting again as soon as one event is over.
▪ She Could start again and not lose much.
▪ So top up when you can, rather than stripping off old varnish and starting again.
▪ Each time he begins with a deferential tone, she disconnects the call and makes him start again.
▪ He sometimes fantasized about emigrating, starting again in Hollywood where his looks and talent might be better appreciated.
▪ He had stopped guessing a long time ago, and he decided not to start again now.
▪ So you'd better borrow another gram and start again.
▪ Once it was stopped they preferred it not to start again.
already
▪ Mr Wilson said Nerco had already started disposing of the gold and silver operations.
▪ If you already started the document and saved it on the disk, recall it for editing or addition.
▪ She had already started to retreat into eating when she felt upset.
▪ But the trend that I see for the next decade has already started.
▪ Two people living near the pit had written to the council expressing concern the changes had already started.
▪ But dealers are already starting to run low on a handful of more popular models.
▪ Similar trials have already started in Britain, where the vaccine was developed, and early results show no complications.
▪ He had already started to turn into his driveway, but now he paused.
off
▪ We were determined not to start off with a mortgage round our necks if we could possibly avoid it.
▪ It had started off a clear February day.
▪ No audience wants to start off with blunders.
▪ Crisp and dry, the wine starts off slowly but builds to an impressive finish.
▪ We had started off in grand style, rattling right round the station plaza with a great tooting of horns.
▪ It started off fantastic, with the warmest welcome anyone could imagine from Yuri and Yuri.
▪ After making his plans for the safekeeping of funds in several banks he started off on his travels once again.
▪ I started off by drawing the twigs and winter buds that I collected yesterday.
out
▪ I sent my luggage on by train and after lunch, I started out on foot.
▪ They had started out with 700 gallons of fuel.
▪ As a consequence, the government starts out with a legitimacy based on the will of the people.
▪ The adaptive technologies that cOmputers bring us started Out as huge, conspicuous, and centralized.
▪ After all, they started out from the same nest of opportunities as the rats who are now fatter.
▪ After starting out in vaudeville shows, Burns rose to fame with his wife in radio and television programs.
▪ I hadn't been in a very good mood when I started out on this journey.
▪ I always start out with one or two pieces I really want to play.
■ NOUN
business
▪ You're just starting your farming business.
▪ But there are other inexpensive ways to get started in business too.
▪ Like how he started his business empire, where the money came from.
▪ Another person I knew started a retail business, selling electrical goods, in a small rented shop.
▪ Should I go out on my own and start a business, or would the insecurity be unbearable?
▪ The average time to start a business is fIve years.
▪ The company has produced nearly 100 models and 500,000 units since Norman Mordaunt and Rodney Short started the business back in 1967.
▪ Would starting my own business help me resolve these questions? 5.
engine
▪ To avoid this and also to facilitate starting, engines are set to run about fifteen percent rich on the ground.
▪ He started the engine again and they climbed for several hundred yards without lights.
▪ Then I started the engine and drove back to where I had seen the Pan-Am Norte sign.
▪ Then the driver started the engine, and off they went.
▪ He started the engine as gently and quietly as possible.
▪ Sherman started the engine up again.
▪ She started up the engine and drove swiftly away.
▪ The weary town crew, unable to start the frozen diesel engines of their snowplows, were the only other customers.
fire
▪ Open fires should always have the chimney regularly swept, otherwise the build up of soot can start a chimney fire.
▪ Robles has confessed to starting seven fires since Aug. 1, authorities said.
▪ He hands me a billy and suggests I get some snow for water and a few twigs to start the fire.
▪ The family regrouped outdoors, after preventing the dazed Kong from starting a fire in the kitchen stove.
▪ Over at the engang they are starting their fires into life.
▪ Finally, we started re-turning fire, and at that point, the mech unit finally got there.
▪ They went indoors to find Donald splitting wood to start the fire.
▪ We were walking parallel with a tree line and started taking fire.
price
▪ There is no frontage included but prices start at £145,000 for a two bed flat.
▪ The list price starts at £3,945.
▪ Still video camera prices start from £500.
▪ Parsytec plans to release an entire family of character recognition systems with prices starting at £15,000.
▪ It's designed to protect and soothe even the most sensitive male skins and prices start at £2.45.
▪ It should be here early next year, with prices starting around £20,000.
▪ And with prices starting at under £40, they're cheaper than the latest Reeboks or Nikes.
▪ Now that it has a published price list it can start to take orders.
scratch
▪ As she explained, it was not easy to start from scratch.
▪ Once more, Machanguana is starting from scratch.
▪ It would be arrogant foolishness to ignore that experience and to start from scratch designing a stringing by ear.
▪ The trainees work hard, but they must start from scratch.
▪ So, in one sense I was not starting entirely from scratch.
▪ You start either from scratch or by modifying an existing module, changing colors, shapes and movement.
▪ The only way to design tastefully was to start from scratch, he had said.
▪ Some analysts believe Westinghouse decided to make a deal because it realized the difficulty of starting new channels from scratch.
season
▪ This season hadn't started any better with reversals already suffered at Arsenal and Liverpool.
▪ In the Dodgers' third and final intrasquad game of the season, Valdes started and pitched two innings.
▪ But soon the season would start again and the rich harvest of the oysters would be ready for dredging.
▪ The lockout was lifted months ago, and still the season started late.
▪ It has been almost a month since the team was officially introduced to the media and three weeks since the season started.
▪ All clubs received a letter warning them against organising practice or trial matches before the season officially starts on 1st September.
▪ I just told him he better bet back here before football season starts next August.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a flying start
▪ David Currie gave Barnsley a flying start, scoring after 31 seconds, and Andy Rammell added their second.
▪ However, you also need to give yourself a flying start by stimulating the circulation through massage and natural herbal extracts.
▪ It's given them a flying start ahead of their Japenese competitors, who until now were the traditional market leaders in electronics.
▪ Racers, once the top team in Britain, will want a flying start to the season to reassert themselves.
▪ That nagging thought deepened as the captain came in first, and gave the innings a flying start.
▪ The appeal got off to a flying start at the weekend when the group held a jumble sale and raffle.
▪ Video-Taped report follows Voice over Despite missing 7 first team regulars Gloucester got off to a flying start.
▪ Well, it seems we have a flying start.
a fresh start
▪ Around six years ago, she departed for California to make a fresh start.
▪ Bankruptcy proceedings free you from overwhelming debts so that you can make a fresh start, subject to restrictions.
▪ Every week is a fresh start.
▪ It gives you a fresh start.
▪ It was spring, and he was making a fresh start.
▪ She decided to travel back to this country and make a fresh start.
▪ The prisoners welfare group Nacro, says every prisoner leaving jail should be given at least the basics to make a fresh start.
▪ Then make a fresh start on a more efficient brand of government activism for the future.
▪ What we need, it argues, is a fresh start.
an early start
▪ After an early start we were soon out of the city and climbing.
▪ Dennis excused himself, saying he had to make an early start the following morning.
▪ Everything must be ready for an early start tomorrow.
▪ Good judgement of conditions, an early start and a fast, efficient ascent are essential to avoid such torrid descent.
▪ Have you got an early start?
▪ Or get an early start on that long weekend commute, then catch up from home.
▪ Surely an early start on atoms and molecules must somehow be brought about.
▪ We had an earlier start than I expected and now we are taking more time to turn the corner.
be in at the beginning/start (of sth)
▪ But Effie Bawn was in at the start.
in/by fits and starts
▪ Electoral reform is moving ahead in fits and starts.
▪ Although change often unfolds in fits and starts, organisations can learn to improve.
▪ But civilization was approaching in fits and starts.
▪ But his proposals for electoral reform, now moving ahead in fits and starts, contain no such provision.
▪ He spoke in fits and starts.
▪ It has continued in fits and starts ever since.
▪ The conversation is awkward, moving in fits and starts.
▪ This means the machine tends to go forward in fits and starts, sometimes quite quickly but at other times embarrassingly slowly.
set/start/keep the ball rolling
▪ Ali MacGraw set the ball rolling with Love Story.
▪ And laughter is infectious ... so a little bit of effort on the small screen could start the ball rolling.
▪ Does that make a difference, or did he and others just start the ball rolling?
▪ He will keep the ball rolling.
▪ Her words started the ball rolling.
▪ To start the ball rolling, the government was asked to contribute £1 million.
▪ Volume 2 deals with general idioms e.g. keep the ball rolling, the proof of the pudding.
▪ Wolves play a similar style, and at times one yearned for some one to set the ball rolling ... literally.
start/begin anew
▪ Los Angeles was regarded as the place to begin life anew.
▪ And then silence again and the whole sequence begins anew.
▪ If nothing else, the legal clock on the case will likely start anew when it returns to the trial court.
▪ She was fresher now, more confident; confident enough to scrap the entire chapter and begin anew.
▪ The reaction would start anew, but this time with no way to remove its heat.
▪ The sun floods in, young plants shoot upwards and the struggle starts anew as the winners block light from their inferiors.
▪ We should at least be able to start anew with some element of hope.
▪ When this landmass begins to warm up that section of the mantle, the cycle begins anew.
start/get off on the wrong/right foot
start/stop the clock
▪ The clock is stopped when a player runs out of bounds with the ball.
▪ If you are bled totally dry and white, they will simply stop the clock.
▪ Some expend tremendous energy desperately trying to stop the clock.
▪ You start the clock, paint the glue, fit the pieces, block the cramps.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A 'safe neighbourhood' campaign has been started by local residents.
▪ A group of women in the neighborhood have started an investment club.
▪ Adding acid to the test tube starts a chemical process which leads to the formation of crystals.
▪ Halfway through the performance, she started to feel a little faint.
▪ Have you started that book yet?
▪ I'm starting a new job next week.
▪ I've just started learning German.
▪ Investigators still aren't sure what started the fire.
▪ It is thought that the avalanche was started by a small rock-fall on the higher slopes.
▪ It sounds like an exciting job. When do you start?
▪ It was getting dark so we started looking for a place to stay the night.
▪ Outside, it was starting to rain.
▪ The police have already started an investigation.
▪ The referee couldn't start the game because there were fans on the field.
▪ We'll have to start early if we want to get to Grandma's by lunchtime.
▪ We can't start until Carol gets here.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A.. We are going to start a trade paperback line in the spring of 1997.
▪ He could not argue that, if he was not allowed to start his new job, he would starve.
▪ I started my descent about a mile away and a thousand feet high.
▪ I think I was about nineteen when I started taking drugs.
▪ It was starting to sound very familiar.
▪ The 1.85-mile track would be lined by five grandstands with a capacity for 150,000, and racing would start in 1995.
▪ We have decided to start with the basics.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bad
▪ In the difficult job of getting through one's life happily, she had made a bad start.
▪ The bold event got off to a bad start.
▪ From that bad start, many little rotten apples grew.
▪ It was the worst start in the history of sports.
▪ In an area with no obstetric service there is logic in this, but babies get the worst start in life.
▪ Three successive defeats, the latest at Stirling, mean Hawick's worst League start.
early
▪ Dennis excused himself, saying he had to make an early start the following morning.
▪ After an early start we were soon out of the city and climbing.
▪ Or get an early start on that long weekend commute, then catch up from home.
▪ He tells the driver that tomorrow will require an even earlier start.
flying
▪ However, you also need to give yourself a flying start by stimulating the circulation through massage and natural herbal extracts.
▪ Racers, once the top team in Britain, will want a flying start to the season to reassert themselves.
▪ David Currie gave Barnsley a flying start, scoring after 31 seconds, and Andy Rammell added their second.
▪ But this year it was Cairngorm, further east, which got off to the flying start.
▪ The appeal got off to a flying start at the weekend when the group held a jumble sale and raffle.
▪ It's given them a flying start ahead of their Japenese competitors, who until now were the traditional market leaders in electronics.
fresh
▪ The prisoners welfare group Nacro, says every prisoner leaving jail should be given at least the basics to make a fresh start.
▪ He talked about fresh air and fresh starts.
▪ Bankruptcy proceedings free you from overwhelming debts so that you can make a fresh start, subject to restrictions.
▪ It was spring, and he was making a fresh start.
▪ Yet we hanker after wider experience and a fresh start.
▪ It gives you a fresh start.
▪ Why not make a completely fresh start some place else?
▪ Then make a fresh start on a more efficient brand of government activism for the future.
good
▪ He'd made a good start but now he was faltering, and the focus of attention was drifting slowly away from him.
▪ The Bears had better start grabbing on to something, anything, as the outlook on the season suddenly turned very grim.
▪ But it wasn't a good start in the lessons of love, and left me very arid in such matters.
▪ McFaul is among the analysts who said Yeltsin made a good start with the Chechnya peace plan.
▪ You've got off to a good start, Deirdra, so keep writing - and reading!
new
▪ A new start, far away from Hugh, in this novel but secure haven.
▪ If you had the additional capital to go all-out for a new start I'd say it was almost a certainty.
▪ The tribal order remained stable while its members experienced a new start.
▪ That's what making a new start is all about.
▪ But it was a new start.
▪ The Lord told him plainly that entering the Kingdom demanded a new start.
rocky
▪ A fuel shortage got the holiday season off to a rocky start, and promises to cause further problems this month.
▪ Despite this happy event, the marriage seemingly got off to a rocky start.
▪ The rocky start was caused by traders who thought they detected a whiff of inflation in the air.
shaky
▪ He converted nine in a row at one point, after a shaky start.
▪ We took them, after a shaky start, to the cleaners.
▪ Their work together got off to a shaky start.
▪ In that context, 22-year-old Faulkner said the shaky start to coeducation at the Citadel was little wonder.
▪ After a shaky start, the president now gets a better than 50 percent approval rating in opinion polls here.
slow
▪ After a slow start John Campbell managed to raise a further £90 for the Fund.
▪ But the council got off to a painfully slow start.
▪ But Mercury is making a slow start.
▪ He has had a very slow start this season, though.
▪ Garah, who split a pastern last year, overcame a slow start to win the Stetchworth Maiden Stakes.
▪ And the work got off to a very slow start.
▪ The picture is one of a slow start followed by years of sustained rapid growth.
▪ In spite of this painfully slow start, today he is a millionaire.
■ NOUN
line
▪ At least that's what I was telling myself at the start line of the Bury 20.
▪ For obvious reasons, laser beams or submerged fluorescent wires can not be used to mark the start line.
▪ As I clicked my stopwatch at the start line it began to rain.
▪ Until the armoured regiment had crossed its start line, the armoured infantry would pause momentarily in forward holding areas.
▪ As the group moved at best speed towards the start line, evidence of the recent tank battle littered the area.
▪ The race begins with all riders on the start line waiting behind a backwards falling start gate.
point
▪ As it's circular there's a choice of start points including the main towns on the route -.
▪ Between the loch and your start point at Caldons campsite you need to follow a short section of the Water of Trool.
▪ Spitfire restorations to airworthy status have notoriously exceeded initial estimates of timing and cost, irrespective of start point condition.
▪ You can change this start point if required.
▪ The storm abates a bit, and there is no problem in reaching our start point.
▪ Go left here, along the valley floor before turning left again to return to your start point over the high moors.
■ VERB
give
▪ However, you also need to give yourself a flying start by stimulating the circulation through massage and natural herbal extracts.
▪ So give her a head start.
▪ Belasco gave DeMille his start in the theater.
▪ Our comprehensive range of services has been developed to make sure that your business is given the best possible start.
▪ Keith Tower was given his first start of the season and played a season-high 26 minutes.
make
▪ I should have mentioned that Joe Lawley and Graham Lloyd have already made a start with tree clearance.
▪ Necessary jobs are helping to clear up the smaller branches and making a start on repointing the bridge itself.
▪ We have made quite a start, under the seal of the Citizen's Charter.
▪ And it's obvious that he's made a start with the clunch pit murder; but that isn't noted either.
▪ Of course, these ideas are just a few ways of making a beautiful start at Allied.
▪ He's made a good start, now comes the big push.
▪ Barwick had earlier made a spectacular start to this day, opening up with three straight birdies.
mark
▪ For me their arrival marks the start of summer.
▪ At the foot of the park a rainbow of balloons marks the start of the parade.
▪ For obvious reasons, laser beams or submerged fluorescent wires can not be used to mark the start line.
▪ It also marked the start of a full-court press on the federal government.
▪ Tuesday, a groundbreaking ceremony at the bridge will mark the start of the first $ 35 million phase of the project.
▪ We are marking the start of the new-look soccer season with a super full-colour wallchart, featuring all 22 teams.
signal
▪ This signalled the start of the victory celebrations as Randalstown swamped the Victorians circle.
▪ I love the sweet bell that ends the round, and hate its sour, doomsday note when it signals the start.
▪ They use intonational cues to signal the start of a new paragraph.
▪ In fact, it is the greed that serves to signal the start of his entrepreneurship.
▪ An eerie blast on a horn signalled the start of the ceremony and the crowd became silent.
▪ Then when ready, they push a button to signal the start of their 40 shots that make up the first round.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a flying start
▪ David Currie gave Barnsley a flying start, scoring after 31 seconds, and Andy Rammell added their second.
▪ However, you also need to give yourself a flying start by stimulating the circulation through massage and natural herbal extracts.
▪ It's given them a flying start ahead of their Japenese competitors, who until now were the traditional market leaders in electronics.
▪ Racers, once the top team in Britain, will want a flying start to the season to reassert themselves.
▪ That nagging thought deepened as the captain came in first, and gave the innings a flying start.
▪ The appeal got off to a flying start at the weekend when the group held a jumble sale and raffle.
▪ Video-Taped report follows Voice over Despite missing 7 first team regulars Gloucester got off to a flying start.
▪ Well, it seems we have a flying start.
a fresh start
▪ Around six years ago, she departed for California to make a fresh start.
▪ Bankruptcy proceedings free you from overwhelming debts so that you can make a fresh start, subject to restrictions.
▪ Every week is a fresh start.
▪ It gives you a fresh start.
▪ It was spring, and he was making a fresh start.
▪ She decided to travel back to this country and make a fresh start.
▪ The prisoners welfare group Nacro, says every prisoner leaving jail should be given at least the basics to make a fresh start.
▪ Then make a fresh start on a more efficient brand of government activism for the future.
▪ What we need, it argues, is a fresh start.
an early start
▪ After an early start we were soon out of the city and climbing.
▪ Dennis excused himself, saying he had to make an early start the following morning.
▪ Everything must be ready for an early start tomorrow.
▪ Good judgement of conditions, an early start and a fast, efficient ascent are essential to avoid such torrid descent.
▪ Have you got an early start?
▪ Or get an early start on that long weekend commute, then catch up from home.
▪ Surely an early start on atoms and molecules must somehow be brought about.
▪ We had an earlier start than I expected and now we are taking more time to turn the corner.
be in at the beginning/start (of sth)
▪ But Effie Bawn was in at the start.
bring sb up short/with a start
get off to a good/bad etc start
in/by fits and starts
▪ Electoral reform is moving ahead in fits and starts.
▪ Although change often unfolds in fits and starts, organisations can learn to improve.
▪ But civilization was approaching in fits and starts.
▪ But his proposals for electoral reform, now moving ahead in fits and starts, contain no such provision.
▪ He spoke in fits and starts.
▪ It has continued in fits and starts ever since.
▪ The conversation is awkward, moving in fits and starts.
▪ This means the machine tends to go forward in fits and starts, sometimes quite quickly but at other times embarrassingly slowly.
set/start/keep the ball rolling
▪ Ali MacGraw set the ball rolling with Love Story.
▪ And laughter is infectious ... so a little bit of effort on the small screen could start the ball rolling.
▪ Does that make a difference, or did he and others just start the ball rolling?
▪ He will keep the ball rolling.
▪ Her words started the ball rolling.
▪ To start the ball rolling, the government was asked to contribute £1 million.
▪ Volume 2 deals with general idioms e.g. keep the ball rolling, the proof of the pudding.
▪ Wolves play a similar style, and at times one yearned for some one to set the ball rolling ... literally.
start/begin anew
▪ Los Angeles was regarded as the place to begin life anew.
▪ And then silence again and the whole sequence begins anew.
▪ If nothing else, the legal clock on the case will likely start anew when it returns to the trial court.
▪ She was fresher now, more confident; confident enough to scrap the entire chapter and begin anew.
▪ The reaction would start anew, but this time with no way to remove its heat.
▪ The sun floods in, young plants shoot upwards and the struggle starts anew as the winners block light from their inferiors.
▪ We should at least be able to start anew with some element of hope.
▪ When this landmass begins to warm up that section of the mantle, the cycle begins anew.
start/get off on the wrong/right foot
start/stop the clock
▪ The clock is stopped when a player runs out of bounds with the ball.
▪ If you are bled totally dry and white, they will simply stop the clock.
▪ Some expend tremendous energy desperately trying to stop the clock.
▪ You start the clock, paint the glue, fit the pieces, block the cramps.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A pint of vodka at eight o'clock in the morning was not a good start to the day.
▪ If we get off to a good start this season, I think the team has a real chance to win the championship.
▪ The runners are now lining up for the start of the race.
▪ They had an exotic meal to celebrate the start of the Chinese New Year.
▪ Tomorrow marks the start of the presidential election campaign.
▪ We want to give our kids the best possible start in life.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ From that bad start, many little rotten apples grew.
▪ From the start, the physical setting was an essential part of the Black Mountain experience.
▪ He's allowed just five goals in his last four starts.
▪ Only in 1993-94 did San Jose manage to survive a bad start.
▪ There are also no ligatures to confuse the start of the letter as there are in other letter positions.
▪ When we reached the start after a nervous descent there were no fewer than seven climbers ahead of us.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
start

start \start\ (st[aum]rt), v. i. [imp. & p. p. started; p. pr. & vb. n. starting.] [OE. sterten; akin to D. storten to hurl, rush, fall, G. st["u]rzen, OHG. sturzen to turn over, to fall, Sw. st["o]rta to cast down, to fall, Dan. styrte, and probably also to E. start a tail; the original sense being, perhaps, to show the tail, to tumble over suddenly.

  1. To leap; to jump. [Obs.]

  2. To move suddenly, as with a spring or leap, from surprise, pain, or other sudden feeling or emotion, or by a voluntary act.

    And maketh him out of his sleep to start.
    --Chaucer.

    I start as from some dreadful dream.
    --Dryden.

    Keep your soul to the work when ready to start aside.
    --I. Watts.

    But if he start, It is the flesh of a corrupted heart.
    --Shak.

  3. To set out; to commence a course, as a race or journey; to begin; as, to start in business.

    At once they start, advancing in a line.
    --Dryden.

    At intervals some bird from out the brakes Starts into voice a moment, then is still.
    --Byron.

  4. To become somewhat displaced or loosened; as, a rivet or a seam may start under strain or pressure.

    To start after, to set out after; to follow; to pursue.

    To start against, to act as a rival candidate against.

    To start for, to be a candidate for, as an office.

    To start up, to rise suddenly, as from a seat or couch; to come suddenly into notice or importance.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
start

Old English *steortian, *stiertan, Kentish variants of styrtan "to leap up" (related to starian "to stare"), from Proto-Germanic *stert- (cognates: Old Frisian stirta "to fall, tumble," Middle Dutch sterten, Dutch storten "to rush, fall," Old High German sturzen, German stürzen "to hurl, throw, plunge"), of uncertain origin. According to Watkins, the notion is "move briskly, move swiftly," and it is from PIE root *ster- (1) "stiff."\n

\nFrom "move or spring suddenly," sense evolved by late 14c. to "awaken suddenly, flinch or recoil in alarm," and by 1660s to "cause to begin acting or operating." Meaning "begin to move, leave, depart" (without implication of suddenness) is from 182

  1. The connection probably is from sporting senses ("to force an animal from its lair," late 14c.). Transitive sense of "set in motion or action" is from 1670s; specifically as "to set (machinery) in action" from 1841.\n

    \nRelated: Started; starting. To start something "cause trouble" is 1915, American English colloquial. To start over "begin again" is from 191

  2. Starting-line in running is from 1855; starting-block in running first recorded 1937.

start

late 14c., "an involuntary movement of the body, a sudden jump," from start (v.). Meaning "act of beginning to move or act" is from 1560s. Meaning "act of beginning to build a house" is from 1946. That of "opportunity at the beginning of a career or course of action" is from 1849. Paired with finish (n.) at least from 1839. False start first attested 1850.

Wiktionary
start

Etymology 1 n. 1 The beginning of an activity. 2 A sudden involuntary movement. 3 The beginning point of a race, a board game, etc. 4 An appearance in a sports game from the beginning of the match. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (label en transitive) To begin, commence, initiate. 2 # To set in motion. Etymology 3

n. 1 A tail, or anything projecting like a tail. 2 A handle, especially that of a plough. 3 The curved or inclined front and bottom of a water wheel bucket. 4 The arm, or level, of a gin, drawn around by a horse.

WordNet
start
  1. n. the beginning of anything; "it was off to a good start"

  2. the time at which something is supposed to begin; "they got an early start"; "she knew from the get-go that he was the man for her" [syn: beginning, commencement, first, outset, get-go, kickoff, starting time, showtime, offset] [ant: middle, end]

  3. a turn to be a starter (in a game at the beginning); "he got his start because one of the regular pitchers was in the hospital"; "his starting meant that the coach thought he was one of their best linemen" [syn: starting]

  4. a sudden involuntary movement; "he awoke with a start" [syn: startle, jump]

  5. the act of starting something; "he was responsible for the beginning of negotiations" [syn: beginning, commencement] [ant: finish]

  6. a line indicating the location of the start of a race or a game [syn: starting line]

  7. a signal to begin (as in a race); "the starting signal was a green light"; "the runners awaited the start" [syn: starting signal]

  8. advantage gained by an early start as in a race; "with an hour's start he will be hard to catch" [syn: head start]

start
  1. v. take the first step or steps in carrying out an action; "We began working at dawn"; "Who will start?"; "Get working as soon as the sun rises!"; "The first tourists began to arrive in Cambodia"; "He began early in the day"; "Let's get down to work now" [syn: get down, begin, get, start out, set about, set out, commence] [ant: end]

  2. set in motion, cause to start; "The U.S. started a war in the Middle East"; "The Iraqis began hostilities"; "begin a new chapter in your life" [syn: begin, lead off, commence] [ant: end]

  3. leave; "The family took off for Florida" [syn: depart, part, start out, set forth, set off, set out, take off]

  4. have a beginning, in a temporal, spatial, or evaluative sense; "The DMZ begins right over the hill"; "The second movement begins after the Allegro"; "Prices for these homes start at $250,000" [syn: begin] [ant: end]

  5. bring into being; "He initiated a new program"; "Start a foundation" [syn: originate, initiate]

  6. get off the ground; "Who started this company?"; "We embarked on an exciting enterprise"; "I start my day with a good breakfast"; "We began the new semester"; "The afternoon session begins at 4 PM"; "The blood shed started when the partisans launched a surprise attack" [syn: start up, embark on, commence]

  7. move or jump suddenly, as if in surprise or alarm; "She startled when I walked into the room" [syn: startle, jump]

  8. get going or set in motion; "We simply could not start the engine"; "start up the computer" [syn: start up] [ant: stop]

  9. begin or set in motion; "I start at eight in the morning"; "Ready, set, go!" [syn: go, get going] [ant: stop]

  10. begin work or acting in a certain capacity, office or job; "Take up a position"; "start a new job" [syn: take up]

  11. play in the starting line-up

  12. have a beginning characterized in some specified way; "The novel begins with a murder"; "My property begins with the three maple trees"; "Her day begins with a work-out"; "The semester begins with a convocation ceremony" [syn: begin]

  13. begin an event that is implied and limited by the nature or inherent function of the direct object; "begin a cigar"; "She started the soup while it was still hot"; "We started physics in 10th grade" [syn: begin]

Wikipedia
Start

Start can refer to multiple topics:

  • Takeoff, the phase of flight where an aircraft transitions from moving along the ground to flying through the air
  • Starting lineup in sports
  • Standing start and rolling start, in an auto race
Start (album)

Start is Singaporean Mandopop artist Stefanie Sun's first Mandarin and English studio cover album. It was released on 1 February 2002 by Warner Music Taiwan. The album is a collection of 12 of Sun's and her fans' favourite songs.

Start (Orsha bandy club)

Start are a Bandy club from Orsha, Belarus who are among the best in the country with several of their players having represented the Belarusian national bandy team.

Category:Bandy clubs in Belarus

Start (cereal)

Start is a breakfast cereal which has been produced by Kellogg's in the UK since the mid-1980s. Start has been promoted as a cereal designed for improving sports performance. It is made from wheat, corn and oats and a single bowlful is said to provide a third of a human's daily vitamin RDA. It is suitable for vegetarians but not for wheat allergy sufferers.

STart (magazine)

STart was a spin-off computer magazine from Antic magazine. While Antic focused on the Atari 8-bit family, STart covered the Atari ST computer line. The magazine lasted 42 issues, from Summer 1986 to April/May 1991, outliving its parent. It originally started from Atari ST specific sections in Antic, later becoming a separate monthly publication in 1986. Each issue included a 3.5-inch cover disk.

Its main rivals were ST-Log, which spun out of ANALOG Computing and Compute!'s ST Magazine. Both of these also included a cover disk, and STart outlived both of them.

Start (newspaper)

Start was a short-lived daily tabloid published in Belgrade between late 2005 and early 2006.

After the commercial failure of his Ekipa sports daily, Radisav Rodić, owner of Kurir and Glas javnosti dailies, decided to give Start a try in late 2005. The first issue hit the stands on November 1, 2005.

Resembling Kurir in many ways, many wondered about the commercial reasoning behind a launch of yet another tabloid (admittedly, a little less sensationalist) in the highly saturated Serbian daily newspaper media market.

Edited by Milka Ljubičić, in addition to running the usual political, culturual, life, and social sections, Start tried to compete by offering expanded sports coverage, something that most Serbian tabloids don't do. However, it couldn't keep up and the January 24, 2006 issue turned out to be its last.

Category:Defunct newspapers of Serbia Category:Publications established in 2005 Category:Publications disestablished in 2006 Category:Media in Belgrade

Start (command)

In computing, the commandSTART is a command of the OS/2 and Windows command-line interpreter CMD.EXE (and some versions of COMMAND.COM ) to start programs or batch files or to open files or directories using the default program.

The corresponding Apple Macintosh command is open. The command is also one of the basic commands implemented in the Keyboard Monitor (KMON) of RT-11.

Start (Polish camera)

Start was a Polish twin-lens reflex camera of Rolleicord type. It was a first camera produced in Poland after World War II. Camera was produced in numerous versions – Start, Start II, Start B, Start 66 and Start 66S.

Start 66S was exported outside of the Poland under names "NOCO flex" and "Universa Uniflex 66".

The camera was produced respectively by Warszawskie Zakłady Kinotechniczne, Warszawskie Zakłady Fotooptyczne and then by Polskie Zakłady Optyczne.

Start (Soviet camera)

Start ( Russian: Старт, transliterated Cmapm) was a 35 mm single lens reflex Soviet camera produced by Mechanical Factory of Krasnogorsk (KMZ) during the years of 1958–1964. The camera was inspired by Exakta camera. Start had Bayonet-mount lenses with Exakta-style shutter release arm, KMZ Helios-44 58 mm 2 normal lens, cloth focal-panel shutter.

An improved version, Start-2, was produced ca. 1963–1964. It had automatic diaphragm and meteric prism.

Usage examples of "start".

Indeed, the best accredited and most popular couples would take a start away from their companions and acquaintances, and ride ten miles or so to be married privately, and so escape all ceremony.

Post-humanism schooled us to think in terms of fits and starts, of structures accreting along unspoken patterns, following the lines first suggested by the ancient Terran philosopher llya Prigogine.

And the fellers acrost the street hollered and started shooting at both of us.

Yet, when at last the expected step drew near, she shuddered, trembled, and turned pale with affright, and, starting to her feet, looked this way and that with a wild impulse to flee: then, as the door opened, she dropped into her chair again, and covered her face with her shaking hands.

The French camp is in this crater, stupefied, affrighted, starting up from sleeping,--a funereal swarming.

His idea was to start people at one level of development and, using the transcendent or allegorical method, work them up to gnosis.

The garrotte goes round his neck at the start of the Allegretto grazioso, keeps turning like you turn a can opener until the breath is out of his body and his neck is cut through.

She rested them softly on the keys a moment, then started the allegro once again.

And next Summer when I start out on my campane with my Show, wharever I pitch my little tent, you shall see floatin prowdly from the center pole thereof the Amerikan Flag, with nary a star wiped out, nary a stripe less, but the same old flag that has allers flotid thar!

She started to wave to the detective but a cluster of people ambled between them and she lost sight of him.

Pangle stood beside him, and theirs was the proud and nervous pose men struck when having ambrotypes made at the start of the war, though instead of rifle musket and Colt pistol and bowie knife, Stobrod and Pangle held fiddle and banjo before them as defining implements.

If Ambry starts acting peculiarly I can try to get him to snap out of the spell or, if that fails, call a doctor.

I saw nothing of the amphitheatre, nothing of the spectators, nothing but her, till, at the sudden shout from the crowd, I roused myself with a start.

Christa do the actual hook-up of the amplifier and the stereo, insisting that if she did not start learning about electronics immediately, she would be lost in rock and roll.

Significantly, it is Chien, the Anarchist, with whom this novel starts.