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Crossword clues for train

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
train
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a car/bus/train etc ride
▪ The resort is a short bus ride away from the hotel.
a car/train/plane etc crash
▪ He was badly hurt in a car crash.
a commuter train/plane (=a train or plane that people use to travel to work in a city)
▪ Several commuter trains were delayed because of the bad weather.
a flight/train/coach departure
▪ I'm afraid your flight departure has been delayed.
a night train/bus/flight
▪ I took the night train to Fort William.
a passenger train (=rather than a goods train)
▪ The driver of the passenger train was unable to stop in time.
a professional/trained counsellor
▪ Seek help from a professional counsellor if things go wrong.
a rail accident/a train accident
▪ It was the country's worst ever rail accident.
a railway/train/bus timetable
a teacher training college (=where you learn to be a teacher)
a train/bus/coach ticket
▪ I’ve lost my train ticket.
a training centre
▪ He was a new recruit at the police training centre.
a training course
▪ If you are offered the job, you will attend a two-week training course.
a training scheme
▪ The company runs an apprentice training scheme.
a training session
▪ Every training session starts with a series of exercises.
basic training
boat train
bus/train/air/cab fare
▪ Air fares have shot up by 20%.
by car/train/bus/taxi etc
▪ They travelled to Chicago by train.
car/train/plane wreck
▪ My father died in a car wreck.
circuit training
clinical medicine/experience/training etc (=medicine etc that deals directly with people, rather than with research or ideas)
come by car/train/bus etc
▪ Will you be coming by train?
endurance sports/training (=designed to test or improve your endurance)
fitness training
▪ The players have to do a lot of fitness training.
freight train
ghost train
go by bus/train/car etc
▪ It’ll be quicker to go by train.
gravy train
▪ Privatization is not always the gravy train that governments promise.
highly skilled/trained/educated
▪ She is a highly educated woman.
instruction/training/reference etc manual
▪ Consult the computer manual if you have a problem.
mail train
miss the train/bus etc
▪ I overslept and missed the train.
passengers board a plane/trainformal (= get on it)
▪ The first three cars were reserved for passengers boarding in Queens.
professional training
▪ All the charity’s workers are volunteers, without professional training.
receive education/training
▪ 16 to 18-year-olds receiving full-time education
running/jogging/training etc shoes
▪ Get yourself a good pair of running shoes if you want to take up running.
spring training
staff training
▪ The company has made a massive investment in staff training.
steam engine/train/hammer etc (=an engine etc that works by steam power)
stopping train
teacher training/education (=professional training to become a teacher)
technical training
technical training
the morning train/flight (=that leaves in the morning)
▪ She took the morning flight back to London.
train set
train spotter
train station
train station/railway stationBritish English
trained/qualified personnel
▪ The unit is staffed by trained personnel.
trained/qualified staff
▪ Recruitment of trained staff was a continuing problem.
training college
▪ a teacher training college
training facilities
▪ The company plans to set up in-house training facilities.
training wheel
training/study aids
▪ Receive free study aids when you enrol, including a copy of The IDM Marketing Guide worth £95.
travel by train/car/air etc
▪ Emily hated travelling by train.
undergo training
▪ Doctors have to undergo years of training.
wagon train
weight training
▪ He does weight training at the gym twice a week.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
express
▪ It still sounded like an express train in the confines of the small garage.
▪ And the brakes feel like they could stop an express train.
▪ The North Hey itself was still well over its banks, and flowing like an express train.
▪ What they did not realize was that the express train had a restaurant car and the slow train did not.
▪ An eagle diving to the hand from 500 feet whistling down like an express train is a sight not often forgotten.
long
▪ A few paces behind walked the bride on her father's arm, her long heavy train and the bridesmaids behind her.
▪ Peahens prefer long trains, he said, because of an innate aesthetic sense-which is no answer at all.
▪ The amount of people crammed into offices out here, they should have built longer trains.
▪ I passed long wagon trains filled with wounded and dying soldiers, without even a blanket to shield them....
▪ Eventually Durham was reached and the long train drew into the ancient city.
▪ The cigarette ban will be most troublesome for smokers on long train journeys.
▪ Lily held the long heel-length train of her gown carefully out to the side.
▪ It was a long train ride up to our prep school in Boston, and there were guys on that train.
special
▪ One possibility: Clinton may campaign in Great Lakes battle ground states from a special presidential train.
▪ For the conveyance of wounded men in ambulance trains, refugees, and prisoners of war, 13,318 special trains were provided.
▪ If the presidential yacht was under-used, the special train built for the couple was never put into service.
▪ Indeed, as regular third-class traffic increased, the excursion traffic by special train became less important.
▪ As usual, special trains will be running from Charing Cross, waterloo East and London bridge.
■ NOUN
commuter
▪ The cab control car of a commuter train being pushed from the rear collided head-on with an Amtrak diesel locomotive.
▪ Today the manager of personnel makes a point of sitting next to his old friend on the daily commuter train.
▪ Priority projects are double-decker commuter trains and more money for the West Coast line.
▪ Caltrain runs commuter trains to both destinations and to other Silicon Valley cities, culminating in San Francisco.
driver
▪ A spokesman said the freight train driver spotted the danger but could not prevent the collision.
▪ In the extreme case of train drivers, there is no transfer into the hierarchy above the entry grade.
▪ They were joined by underground train drivers in the capital.
▪ So you're both going to be firemen, not train drivers?
▪ First, a strike by even a proportion of core workers such as train drivers or signalmen can paralyse the network.
▪ So ticket collectors would strike while train drivers worked normally.
fare
▪ Finally run out of money and had to borrow train fare from Chamonix to Geneva.
▪ Tlere was also that uncertainty about the train fare.
▪ He reported back faithfully to Theo, who had provided his train fare.
▪ Round-trip train fare was about $ 3. 50, admission $ 7. 50.
freight
▪ A spokesman said the freight train driver spotted the danger but could not prevent the collision.
▪ Investigators were photographing the wreckage from all angles, and searching for a data recorder that had been aboard the freight train.
▪ Another woman corrected him, saying she heard the coat was found a bit farther down the freight train track.
▪ A Manhattan team, meanwhile, sent its bikes ahead and hopped a freight train west.
▪ Jack was able to stop the freight train without accident.
▪ The Subway Series lumbers along like a freight train overloaded with nitroglycerine on a mountain pass.
▪ What is the length of the longest ever recorded freight train?
▪ Thirty-five to 40 freight trains pass through there daily.
gravy
▪ Six cents an hour, in Salvador, is considered the gravy train.
journey
▪ We never missed them when I was young and we all loved our train journeys.
▪ The cigarette ban will be most troublesome for smokers on long train journeys.
▪ At first, I wanted to take train journeys across the continents.
▪ Only an overnight train journey, however, divides it from tropical areas and their exotic products.
▪ And, of course, there's always the train journey home to look forward to.
▪ Smoking on a train journey, looking out at the countryside whizzing by.
▪ The train journey between Leeds and Sheffield shows one this nineteenth-century landscape to perfection.
▪ Arriving, and the train journey, and the march ... what if I dream every day of it?
night
▪ Taxi then from Prado and night train up to Léon.
▪ On receiving it, Norman returned directly to London and caught a night train to Edinburgh.
▪ I took the night train for Fort William, which stops at Crianlarich at seven in the morning.
▪ My celebration consisted of a few beers with my caddie friends at Edinburgh station and on the night train.
▪ Both dealers took the night train to a Northern province, the home town of one of them.
▪ Keeble and I chatted about this before settling down in our sleepers on the night train from Moscow to Kiev.
passenger
▪ The engine on the passenger train is the same one that was involved in the Hatfield train disaster.
▪ Amtrak also runs its passenger trains on this stretch.
▪ And, according to the black-haired man, there would be more to come ... He watched the approaching passenger train from Interlaken.
▪ No passenger train ever stops here.
▪ The engine of the passenger train and six wagons in the coal train were considerably damaged.
▪ Since nearly all passenger trains included Pullmans, a nationwide strike resulted.
ride
▪ This train ride felt like that - except that the station wouldn't have saved him from the nightmare.
▪ Lethamhill is in the town of Helensburgh, a half-hour train ride from Glasgow.
▪ A long train ride to an owl called Maggie.
▪ Seclusion is at hand a short train ride from Zurich, whose airport handles sleek business jets in nearly any weather.
▪ The 75-ton monster was spotted by staff at Three Bridges station, a short train ride from busy Gatwick Airport.
▪ I mean, a chump who spends an entire three-hour train ride returning voice mail?
▪ Vernazza is nearest - a short train ride or lovely hour-and-a-half walk away - appearing like an unexpected vision as you approach.
▪ It is smaller and more refined than its sister city, a 21-hour train ride to the south.
service
▪ Geographical organisations would still operate the railway, but their role was to supply train services to the business sectors.
▪ Amtrak suspended train service between Portland and Seattle until crews could inspect the tracks.
▪ Millfield-educated Hewitt already has his heart set on working for Virgin tycoon Richard Branson's planned privatised train service.
▪ Amtrak suspended train service between Portland and Seattle until tracks could be inspected, a spokesman said.
▪ In May 1991 a new high-speed train service on the Hamburg-Munich route was introduced.
▪ The event attracted a record number of passengers who enjoyed an intensive steam train service and additional vintage train service.
▪ It has been argued that it would make sense for whoever runs the train services to also take responsibility for the track.
set
▪ Once he nicked my entire Corgi transporter filled with cars and a train set.
▪ It was just a train set, indefinably old-fashioned.
▪ I used the money to buy an electric train set, but frustratingly enough, it didn't work very well.
▪ The display in the shop window was an extravagant scenario designed to showcase a monster train set.
▪ There was a big Hornby train set, working by battery, with a set of rails to match, for Jerry.
▪ They re-entered general service in 1947, but not as train sets.
▪ The toylike character of this electric train set is emphasised by lack of people.
▪ Another early memory was getting my first train set.
station
▪ They will also meet you at the train stations.
▪ Doyle remembers Gabby, an 8-year-old he first met eating discarded ice cream cones in the train station.
▪ Hugh's Glasgow was a paradise of train stations and carpet factories.
▪ I know it's a train station and that, but I du n no how to get home from here.
▪ She arrived at the train station, with trunk, on August 6.
▪ I had reached their house late at night from the train station, absolutely penniless.
steam
▪ Up to 20 caravans have parked close to the town's historic cathedral, and opposite the leisure centre and steam train station.
▪ Read in studio Railway enthusiasts are queueing up for a nostalgic trip on a steam train.
▪ Some find this special reproduction steam train moving and nostalgic.
▪ Twenty-five feet down, Foo rolled over and saw an upside-down steam train puff by above him.
▪ She was aware that her heart was clattering inside her, racketing against her ribs like a demented steam train.
▪ At Ambleside you can take a steam train through the lake and river scenery of the Leven valley.
▪ The admission price includes rides on the steam trains and the other attractions.
▪ On Steamdays visitors can enjoy rides in the 1930s steam trains and see the activities of a steam locomotive depot.
ticket
▪ Only at level 14 and above can you buy a soft sleeper train ticket.
▪ He turned a small cardboard rectangle over and over between his fingers: the train ticket.
▪ The price of train tickets can vary from the reasonable to the ridiculous.
▪ He purchased a train ticket with the money he had left.
▪ It was just costing them a lot of money in phone calls and train tickets to London.
▪ Getting there is relatively easy - Nick's train ticket cost £140 and he travelled direct from London on the Warsaw Express.
▪ There is panic buying of food, air tickets, train tickets, everything.
wagon
▪ He was left behind by the rest of the wagon train because his vehicle was so cumbersome.
▪ There must be people in these old graveyards who came out on wagon trains.
▪ She attacked a wagon train two years ago.
▪ As sundown approached, scores of settlers and a wagon train of police vans moved down the hill as Maj.
▪ The noises got nearer and shapes became clearer - horses pulling a long wagon train.
▪ I passed long wagon trains filled with wounded and dying soldiers, without even a blanket to shield them....
▪ Everybody circled up like wagon trains around the bleach vats and wood room and even the goddamn lunch table.
wreck
▪ If there were no blizzard to shut down Washington, there would still be the budget train wreck.
▪ And if the budget train wreck ended, there would still be -- political correctness.
▪ The show-biz story of the decade has spawned the cinematic train wreck of 1996.
■ VERB
board
▪ No record of the former Prime Minister would be complete without boarding the train between Birmingham to Wolverhampton.
▪ He boarded the train for the overnight journey and entered a first-class compartment with his first-class ticket.
▪ When they boarded the train back to London all were still emotionally exhausted: throughout the long journey little was said.
▪ It was dark when he boarded the train.
▪ In Dresden, witnesses reported violent clashes between police and would-be emigrants desperate to board trains to the West.
▪ They must be somewhere in the Bronx: he boarded the train only half an hour ago.
▪ Had the boys boarded a train to Carlisle and caused damage there, this might have been regarded as too remote.
▪ Q: All over the world, analysts are saying that you finally have boarded the Oslo peace train.
catch
▪ Chris and Patrick had caught a train to London and taken a taxi straight to Richie's flat.
▪ They returned to their hotel, packed their bags, and left for Penn Station to catch a train for Washington.
▪ I could still catch the early train if I left immediately.
▪ Then I closed off my Albany life with four phone calls and caught the ten thirty train to New York.
▪ Peter arranged a taxi to Victoria for me to catch a train to Gatwick and the last flight to Edinburgh.
▪ After the debate, they dined on hamburgers and talked sports at a local joint before catching a train back to Washington.
▪ After seeing the competitors set off, there was a dash to Forster Square Station to catch the train to Esholt.
▪ Panicky civilians raced to the railway station to catch any train heading south.
change
▪ We parted at Paddington, and assured them that they would have to change trains at Oxford.
▪ Although the line will remain open, people will have to change trains at Thornaby.
▪ There is an unutterable sadness around Medina del Campo, where I had to change trains for Salamanca.
▪ At midnight, twenty-four hours after leaving Calais, she finally arrived in Milan where she had to change trains.
▪ It shows passengers where they need to change trains.
▪ In Trieste we changed trains and took the express to Venice.
▪ But it does tell you where you have to change trains, the time of the connections and the overall travelling time.
▪ But not to change trains, only cars.
get
▪ We've only just got off the train, haven't had time for a cup of tea or anything.
▪ Recently, I returned to Walton junction with my children to get the train to Ormskirk.
▪ A powerful urge told me to return to the station and get on the train back to Jamila's place.
▪ She said I would when I got on the train.
▪ Lenin got into the train without replying a word.
▪ They got two trains running every day.
jump
▪ Some guards moved the taxi back to the road and then they jumped on to the train again.
▪ I was a fisherman myself before I jumped that train and wound up here.
▪ Anyway, I'd already found a seat when he jumped on as the train was about to leave.
▪ I once read a case in the newspaper about a man who jumped in front of an Underground train.
▪ And says if he'd been given his own psychiatric nurse ... he would never have jumped off the train.
leave
▪ There is plenty of time to look around Stratford-upon-Avon or leave the train at Warwick to visit the historic castle.
▪ Mount Tarumae rose on the left as the train began to turn sharply inland, towards Sapporo on the Chitose Line.
▪ Some of the brighter ones left trains for several minutes, and were photographed.
▪ Amelie sat on her suitcase all day, not daring to leave in case the train came.
▪ Below these entrances were folding steps, in case it should be necessary to enter or leave the train from track level.
▪ He left alone before the train reached Carrick.
miss
▪ I had to go - I had a meeting in town and I didn't want to miss the train.
▪ They took a drive and missed the last train to Wareham.
▪ Back in the main street of Ballinasloe, I had to act fast, or I would miss my train.
▪ I missed the slower trains with the lounge cars and the rackety wheels.
▪ We talked until I missed the last train.
▪ You may miss the train unless you go at once.
▪ It might only save seconds, but seconds can make the difference between missing a train and getting to work.
move
▪ It would be like parachuting on to a moving train.
▪ For if the moving train had shrunk laterally, it would fit inside the stationary train, as in a tunnel.
▪ Hornby, founded in 1908, has now moved on from trains and cars to sell dolls and video games.
▪ With other mutilated veterans in Rumania, later, he had been thrown from a moving train.
▪ It is a little like throwing a ball out of a moving train.
▪ Why, very easily, if the moving train has shrunk in length.
▪ I could see the remains of those buildings from the moving train.
▪ Or alternatively, if time is passing at a slower rate on the moving train.
pull
▪ The loco was rostered to pull a brake van train between Bewdley and Kidderminster at 10.10, 11.35 and 13.05.
▪ The engine was in front, pulling the train, which Parr said prevented additional injuries.
▪ It will be one of two engines pulling trains on the line this summer.
▪ The terrain was so difficult that for part of the journey three locomotives were needed to pull one train.
▪ The noises got nearer and shapes became clearer - horses pulling a long wagon train.
▪ The child's amazement and delight at first seeing the trundling engine pulling a train behind it had been something to witness.
▪ The horses pulling the train came to a halt and Eline stumbled to her feet.
run
▪ Denied the ability to run and train, she felt useless.
▪ Amtrak also runs its passenger trains on this stretch.
▪ The narrator, returning to the box shortly afterwards, finds that the signalman has been run over by a train.
▪ Caltrain runs commuter trains to both destinations and to other Silicon Valley cities, culminating in San Francisco.
▪ The state government retains the right to license other operators to run passenger and freight trains over the country rail network.
▪ But it was like being run over by a train.
▪ Some one saw me running up that right-hand staircase, running for the train.
▪ It has been argued that it would make sense for whoever runs the train services to also take responsibility for the track.
stop
▪ The overhead track then stops, so the train runs on just the horizontal bottom supports.
▪ The man had tried to stop a train carrying arms that were to be sent to the contras.
▪ I expect she was so excited that she didn't stop to look up trains.
▪ And the brakes feel like they could stop an express train.
▪ We needed always to stop where the trains were serviced for water, trash and fuel.
▪ Two London gangs had joined forces to stop the train at Sear's Crossing in Buckinghamshire by rigging the signals.
▪ Jack was able to stop the freight train without accident.
take
▪ When Eva was three years old she was taken by train to the city.
▪ I had a day off so I took the train down and did my part.
▪ He reads a newspaper to him every day, takes him on trains and buses and to the shops.
▪ The next day they took the train to Salzburg.
▪ Day 5 Sat Aswan-Cairo Another free day before taking the overnight train to Cairo.
▪ She took the train to Wellesley, in nervousness dropping her money on the platform.
▪ I took the night train for Fort William, which stops at Crianlarich at seven in the morning.
▪ The fastest way from there to the Embankment was to take an Underground train from Euston.
travel
▪ They had to travel by train all over the country.
▪ Alvin 1 214 was able to fly on alone to book rooms for the dancers, who would travel by train.
▪ Together they travelled north by train.
▪ To get there one has to travel four hours by train from Calcutta to the town of Asansol, 150 miles away.
▪ Certainly this man could afford to travel by train.
▪ That's why I don't travel on the train very often.
▪ He then travelled by train to London to visit Bond Street in general and a famed jeweller in particular.
wait
▪ Charlotte walked slowly on to the platform and waited for her train to pull in.
▪ The platform is brightly lit and filled with people waiting for the train to pull in.
▪ The man was standing by his left shoulder, waiting for the train to stop.
▪ At about 4: 00 p. m. about 600 people were waiting around for their trains.
▪ But he could not sit patiently and wait for the next train, in an hour's time.
▪ There were a couple of men standing there by the door, waiting for the train to pull in and stop.
▪ I spect he's waiting for a train.
▪ It'd be nice to be waiting here for a train and then getting on it and going somewhere nice.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
bird/train etc spotter
▪ Here is the story of one of them, Derek, the most unsuccessful train spotter in the world.
▪ I suppose we're all train spotters at heart.
▪ In Leicester a group of men got up like train spotters were very excited to see our coach.
▪ It's a bonus for the late train spotter.
▪ What a field day the train spotters had!
▪ Why are so many train spotters called Derek?
catch a train/plane/bus
▪ I should be able to catch the 12:05 train.
▪ Kevin catches the bus home on Mondays and Wednesdays.
▪ After the debate, they dined on hamburgers and talked sports at a local joint before catching a train back to Washington.
▪ Chris and Patrick had caught a train to London and taken a taxi straight to Richie's flat.
▪ He caught a plane last night.
▪ I could catch a bus back into town.
▪ Maybe she had caught a train to New Rochelle.
▪ Peter arranged a taxi to Victoria for me to catch a train to Gatwick and the last flight to Edinburgh.
▪ The second time I caught a bus to the coast.
▪ They returned to their hotel, packed their bags, and left for Penn Station to catch a train for Washington.
express train/coach/bus
▪ And the brakes feel like they could stop an express train.
▪ He took the ball like an express train and burst through the midfield defence.
▪ It still sounded like an express train in the confines of the small garage.
▪ It was perfect for low-fare express coach services.
▪ The subway trip seemed endless, even on the express train.
▪ Transfer to the Kobe line and catch the 8: 20 express train.
▪ Visitors have to take a local train to visit Delft; the express trains speed by.
formal education/training/qualifications
▪ But today students need more formal education to learn the academic skills that increasingly are required on the job.
▪ Entry-level budget analysts may receive some formal training when they begin their jobs.
▪ Mekki had little formal education, a bullying manner and a longshoreman's fondness for obscenity.
▪ Not only did the managers gain skills and knowledge from formal training, but they also augmented their networks of relationships.
▪ The ritualistic quality of the formal training programs was not lost on the neW managers.
▪ Then, of course, the whole process of formal education is a crucial socialising agency.
▪ We believe that formal training in the use of the laryngeal mask would be beneficial to any physician dealing with such cases.
▪ Yet there is undoubtedly a very positive value placed on formal education by black families.
hop a plane/bus/train etc
▪ Elated, Daley and Sis hopped a plane for a vacation in the Florida Keys.
▪ He would just hop trains and stuff.
▪ Receiving assurances that there was no ethnic dimension to the role he had been offered, Hoch hopped a plane headed west.
in-service training/courses etc
▪ A national in-service training programme will ensure that all teachers are fully qualified in the subject they are teaching.
▪ Both should receive official sanction and both require in-service training opportunities to acquire the necessary skills.
▪ If trainees are attending a regular in-service training course, individual viewing could be built into the syllabus.
▪ In some cases school finances are being pooled to fund in-service training, large expensive resources and joint activities for the children.
▪ Organizers of in-service training courses will also find them useful.
▪ Some apply for every in-service training course that is going.
▪ The potential contributions of the academic and in-service courses must be left for another occasion.
▪ The second one, which is two hours long, is designed for teachers, college lecturers and in-service training.
jump a train
model aircraft/train/car etc
▪ A model car doesn't have to contain all the elements of an internal combustion engine in order to work as a toy!
▪ Andrew has been prompted to make a model car like his dad's.
▪ Corgi sent a full range of their model cars, including Rolls Royces and Porsches.
▪ Genghis, assembled out of model car parts, weighed only 3. 6 pounds.
▪ I built model cars when I was younger.
▪ Loafers that looked more like model cars.
▪ Some people like model trains or football.
▪ The sum was raised at a model aircraft flying display that was all but washed out through appalling weather.
put sb on a train/plane etc
the gravy train
through train
▪ By 1993, he hopes to have moved 250 public housing developments through training for tenant management.
▪ Employee Development Programs help employees develop their talents and capacities through training sessions, workshops, and the like.
▪ He said the new 16.52 Middlesbrough to Darlington service was in fact a through train to Bishop Auckland.
▪ Officials are drafting the strategy, which aims to raise teaching standards through training and staff support.
▪ The foundry supplied some 42 spans of varying sizes which enabled the natives to travel from Benares to Calcutta by through train.
▪ The regulation will be through training and a points system, based on experience gained in mediation.
▪ To reprise Wallace Stevens, managers wear square hats and learn through training.
▪ We finished the trip on a through train, drinking white wine and eating crisps, looking at the Cambrian line scenery.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a wagon train
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As the mail train thundered past and disappeared into the distance he heard the familiar sound of footsteps.
▪ But he made it, and got to the station just before the train did.
▪ Caltrain runs commuter trains to both destinations and to other Silicon Valley cities, culminating in San Francisco.
▪ Comment on the dollar had been sombre for much of the year in the train of developments the previous autumn.
▪ We parted at Paddington, and assured them that they would have to change trains at Oxford.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
highly
▪ In practice, spoken language interpreters are highly educated and highly trained.
Highly trained and experienced financial managers head each financial department.
▪ Today it is identically equipped to the Regular Army and is highly trained in at least one speciality.
▪ They were tough, highly trained volunteers in the Airborne, but some looked very young to me.
▪ Swordsmen are amongst the most highly trained and proficient of the provincial regiments.
▪ It was, by and large, the domain of highly trained white men.
▪ The Reiksguard forms an elite core of highly trained, expensively-equipped troops who are loyal to the Emperor in person.
▪ With the touch of a button, these highly trained technicians can change the picture being transmitted.
■ NOUN
management
▪ But you get the general lay of the land from management training.
▪ Senior staff and middle managers having an explicit management role and being trained and developed to do it. 3.
▪ The twenty-year relationship between Anne and Laura started when they found themselves on the same management training course.
▪ He warned management during training camp that the team would be in deep trouble if either he or Johnson suffered injuries.
▪ The Kenilworth-Parkside Resident Management Corporation hired and trained residents to manage the property and do the maintenance.
▪ Of course, we also provide practical project management training from the shop floor up.
▪ The advanced training program focused on estate planning and liability management.
worker
▪ I usually don't mention the fact that I once trained as a social worker.
▪ Indiana has reserved the bulk of its economic-development spending for training workers.
▪ Ask about the qualifications and training of workers, and whether the agency insures against misconduct.
▪ This makes them much harder to replace than easily trained shop-floor workers or line managers.
▪ Dively said he will be reimbursed the $ 2, 400 it will cost to train each worker in his 13-week program.
▪ Their growing team of newly trained women health workers were from the village peasant classes, however.
▪ The 1-page standard would require employers to provide special training to injured workers and others handling the same duties.
■ VERB
receive
▪ Many doctors feel that medical students still do not receive enough training in communication skills.
▪ Entry-level budget analysts may receive some formal training when they begin their jobs.
▪ Some are instructors, who do not receive training, others are on the graduate teaching programme.
▪ He seemed to have received special training somewhere that allowed him to live with such possibilities without a trace of fear.
▪ At Chalmers University some 600 undergraduates and 50 postgraduates now receive hands-on training in online information retrieval every year.
▪ The schools will receive additional teacher training and textbook money, as well as closer monitoring.
▪ However, staff in residential and nursing homes generally receive little training in caring for the elderly.
▪ They had received little training on the job, and had not been plainly told that plutonium caused cancer.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
bird-spotting/train-spotting etc
bird/train etc spotter
▪ Here is the story of one of them, Derek, the most unsuccessful train spotter in the world.
▪ I suppose we're all train spotters at heart.
▪ In Leicester a group of men got up like train spotters were very excited to see our coach.
▪ It's a bonus for the late train spotter.
▪ What a field day the train spotters had!
▪ Why are so many train spotters called Derek?
express train/coach/bus
▪ And the brakes feel like they could stop an express train.
▪ He took the ball like an express train and burst through the midfield defence.
▪ It still sounded like an express train in the confines of the small garage.
▪ It was perfect for low-fare express coach services.
▪ The subway trip seemed endless, even on the express train.
▪ Transfer to the Kobe line and catch the 8: 20 express train.
▪ Visitors have to take a local train to visit Delft; the express trains speed by.
formal education/training/qualifications
▪ But today students need more formal education to learn the academic skills that increasingly are required on the job.
▪ Entry-level budget analysts may receive some formal training when they begin their jobs.
▪ Mekki had little formal education, a bullying manner and a longshoreman's fondness for obscenity.
▪ Not only did the managers gain skills and knowledge from formal training, but they also augmented their networks of relationships.
▪ The ritualistic quality of the formal training programs was not lost on the neW managers.
▪ Then, of course, the whole process of formal education is a crucial socialising agency.
▪ We believe that formal training in the use of the laryngeal mask would be beneficial to any physician dealing with such cases.
▪ Yet there is undoubtedly a very positive value placed on formal education by black families.
in-service training/courses etc
▪ A national in-service training programme will ensure that all teachers are fully qualified in the subject they are teaching.
▪ Both should receive official sanction and both require in-service training opportunities to acquire the necessary skills.
▪ If trainees are attending a regular in-service training course, individual viewing could be built into the syllabus.
▪ In some cases school finances are being pooled to fund in-service training, large expensive resources and joint activities for the children.
▪ Organizers of in-service training courses will also find them useful.
▪ Some apply for every in-service training course that is going.
▪ The potential contributions of the academic and in-service courses must be left for another occasion.
▪ The second one, which is two hours long, is designed for teachers, college lecturers and in-service training.
model aircraft/train/car etc
▪ A model car doesn't have to contain all the elements of an internal combustion engine in order to work as a toy!
▪ Andrew has been prompted to make a model car like his dad's.
▪ Corgi sent a full range of their model cars, including Rolls Royces and Porsches.
▪ Genghis, assembled out of model car parts, weighed only 3. 6 pounds.
▪ I built model cars when I was younger.
▪ Loafers that looked more like model cars.
▪ Some people like model trains or football.
▪ The sum was raised at a model aircraft flying display that was all but washed out through appalling weather.
the gravy train
through train
▪ By 1993, he hopes to have moved 250 public housing developments through training for tenant management.
▪ Employee Development Programs help employees develop their talents and capacities through training sessions, workshops, and the like.
▪ He said the new 16.52 Middlesbrough to Darlington service was in fact a through train to Bishop Auckland.
▪ Officials are drafting the strategy, which aims to raise teaching standards through training and staff support.
▪ The foundry supplied some 42 spans of varying sizes which enabled the natives to travel from Benares to Calcutta by through train.
▪ The regulation will be through training and a points system, based on experience gained in mediation.
▪ To reprise Wallace Stevens, managers wear square hats and learn through training.
▪ We finished the trip on a through train, drinking white wine and eating crisps, looking at the Cambrian line scenery.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A lot of employers don't train their staff properly.
▪ All employees will be trained to use the new computer system.
▪ Chris trained at an airbase in Honduras.
▪ Hamilton trains and sells horses.
▪ Her husband trained to be an auto mechanic, but he can't find a job.
▪ I'm not as fit as I should be. I don't train enough.
▪ If you're really going to run in the marathon, you need to start training now.
▪ In the winter months, she trains in Montana.
▪ Julie is training to be a nurse.
▪ Melanie trained for a career in music, but switched to photography in her early thirties.
▪ She's been training for the marathon for six months.
▪ The dog was trained to detect illegal drugs.
▪ The staff must be trained to use the software correctly.
▪ The team is currently training in Hampshire.
▪ The troops had been training for an important role in the battle.
▪ Tyson is training for the big fight next week.
▪ We train people in skills such as typing and business administration.
▪ We train twice a week at the local gym.
▪ We want to encourage people who left school early to train for better jobs.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Mr Gorman recently trained to become a chiropractor.
▪ These teams will be trained in direction and how to participate in problem solving.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
train

Accommodation \Ac*com`mo*da"tion\, n. [L. accommodatio, fr. accommodare: cf. F. accommodation.]

  1. The act of fitting or adapting, or the state of being fitted or adapted; adaptation; adjustment; -- followed by to. ``The organization of the body with accommodation to its functions.''
    --Sir M. Hale.

  2. Willingness to accommodate; obligingness.

  3. Whatever supplies a want or affords ease, refreshment, or convenience; anything furnished which is desired or needful; -- often in the plural; as, the accommodations -- that is, lodgings and food -- at an inn.
    --Sir W. Scott.

  4. An adjustment of differences; state of agreement; reconciliation; settlement. ``To come to terms of accommodation.''
    --Macaulay.

  5. The application of a writer's language, on the ground of analogy, to something not originally referred to or intended.

    Many of those quotations from the Old Testament were probably intended as nothing more than accommodations.
    --Paley.

  6. (Com.)

    1. A loan of money.

    2. An accommodation bill or note.

      Accommodation bill, or note (Com.), a bill of exchange which a person accepts, or a note which a person makes and delivers to another, not upon a consideration received, but for the purpose of raising money on credit.

      Accommodation coach, or train, one running at moderate speed and stopping at all or nearly all stations.

      Accommodation ladder (Naut.), a light ladder hung over the side of a ship at the gangway, useful in ascending from, or descending to, small boats.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
train

early 14c., "a drawing out, delay;" late 14c., "trailing part of a skirt, gown, or cloak;" also "retinue, procession," from Old French train "tracks, path, trail (of a rome or gown); act of dragging," from trainer "to pull, drag, draw," from Vulgar Latin *traginare, extended from *tragere "to pull," back-formation from tractus, past participle of Latin trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)).,\n

\nGeneral sense of "series, progression, succession, continuous course" is from late 15c. Train of thought first attested 1650s. The railroad sense "locomotive and the cars coupled to it" is recorded from 1820 (publication year, dated 1816), from notion of a "train" of wagons or carriages pulled by a mechanical engine.

train

"to discipline, teach, bring to a desired state by means of instruction," 1540s, probably from earlier sense of "draw out and manipulate in order to bring to a desired form" (late 14c.), specifically of the growth of branches, vines, etc. from mid-15c.; from train (n.). Sense of "point or aim" (a firearm, etc.) is from 184

  1. Sense of "fit oneself for a performance by a regimen or exercise" is from 183

  2. The meaning "to travel by railway" is recorded from 1856. Related: Trained; training.

Wiktionary
train

Etymology 1 n. 1 Elongated portion. 2 # The elongated back portion of a dress or skirt (or an ornamental piece of material added to similar effect), which drags along the ground. (from 14th c.) 3 # A trail or line (term: of) something, especially gunpowder. (from 15th c.) 4 # (context now rare English) An animal's trail or track. (from 16th c.) 5 Connected sequence of people or things. 6 # A group of people following an important figure, king etc.; a retinue, a group of retainers. (from 14th c.) 7 # A group of animals, vehicles, or people that follow one another in a line, such as a wagon train; a caravan or procession. (from 15th c.) 8 # A sequence of events or ideas which are interconnected; a course or procedure (term: of) something. (from 15th c.) 9 # (context military English) The men and vehicles following an army, which carry artillery and other equipment for battle or siege. (from 16th c.) 10 # A set of interconnected mechanical parts which operate each other in sequence. (from 18th c.) 11 # A series of electrical pulses. (from 19th c.) 12 # A series (term: of) specified vehicles, originally tramcars in a mine, and later especially railway carriages, coupled together. (from 19th c.) 13 # A line of connected railway cars or carriages considered overall as a mode of transport; (as uncountable noun) rail travel. (from 19th c.) vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To practice an ability. 2 (context transitive English) To teach and form by practice; to educate; to exercise with discipline. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context obsolete English) treachery; deceit. (14th-19th c.) 2 (context obsolete English) A trick or stratagem. (14th-19th c.) 3 (context obsolete English) A trap for animals; a snare. (14th-18th c.) 4 (context obsolete English) A lure; a decoy. (15th-18th c.)

WordNet
train
  1. n. public transport provided by a line of railway cars coupled together and drawn by a locomotive; "express trains don't stop at Princeton Junction" [syn: railroad train]

  2. a sequentially ordered set of things or events or ideas in which each successive member is related to the preceding; "a string of islands"; "train of mourners"; "a train of thought" [syn: string]

  3. a procession (of wagons or mules or camels) traveling together in single file; "we were part of a caravan of almost a thousand camels"; "they joined the wagon train for safety" [syn: caravan, wagon train]

  4. a series of consequences wrought by an event; "it led to a train of disasters"

  5. piece of cloth forming the long back section of a gown that is drawn along the floor; "the bride's train was carried by her two young nephews"

  6. wheelwork consisting of a connected set of rotating gears by which force is transmitted or motion or torque is changed; "the fool got his tie caught in the geartrain" [syn: gearing, gears, geartrain, power train]

train
  1. v. create by training and teaching; "The old master is training world-class violinists"; "we develop the leaders for the future" [syn: develop, prepare, educate]

  2. undergo training or instruction in preparation for a particular role, function, or profession; "She is training to be a teacher"; "He trained as a legal aid" [syn: prepare]

  3. train by instruction and practice; especially to teach self-control; "Parents must discipline their children"; "Is this dog trained?" [syn: discipline, check, condition]

  4. prepare (someone) for a future role or function; "He is grooming his son to become his successor"; "The prince was prepared to become King one day"; "They trained him to be a warrior" [syn: prepare, groom]

  5. train to be discriminative in taste or judgment; "Cultivate your musical taste"; "Train your tastebuds"; "She is well schooled in poetry" [syn: educate, school, cultivate, civilize, civilise]

  6. aim or direct at; as of blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment; "Please don't aim at your little brother!"; "He trained his gun on the burglar"; "Don't train your camera on the women"; "Take a swipe at one's opponent" [syn: aim, take, take aim, direct]

  7. teach and supervise (someone); act as a trainer or coach (to), as in sports; "He is training our Olympic team"; "She is coaching the crew" [syn: coach]

  8. exercise in order to prepare for an event or competition; "She is training for the Olympics"

  9. train to grow in a certain way by tying and pruning it; "train the vine"

  10. travel by rail or train; "They railed from Rome to Venice"; "She trained to Hamburg" [syn: rail]

  11. drag loosely along a surface; allow to sweep the ground; "The toddler was trailing his pants"; "She trained her long scarf behind her" [syn: trail]

Wikipedia
Train (disambiguation)

A train is a connected series of vehicles that move along a track to transport freight or passengers.

Train(s) may also refer to:

Train (album)

Train is the 1998 self-titled debut album from the band Train. The album was self-produced for $25,000 and three singles from the album were released. The first single released, "Free", was largely a hit on rock stations. The second, "Meet Virginia", peaked at No. 20 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the third single from the album was "I Am". The album has been certified Platinum by the RIAA.

Train (film)

Train is a 2008 horror film directed and written by Gideon Raff; the film stars Thora Birch and Gideon Emery.

Train (3 Doors Down song)

"Train" is the second rock single from 3 Doors Down's, self titled fourth studio album. The song was released as a rock radio only promo on May 19, 2008, and was one of the most added tracks. No music video was made for the track, since it was a radio-only single. The demo version appears on the deluxe edition of the band's 2011 album " Time of My Life".

Train (band)

Train is an American roots rock band from San Francisco, formed in 1993. The band currently consists of Patrick Monahan (vocals), Jimmy Stafford (lead guitar), Jerry Becker (rhythm guitar and piano), Hector Maldonado (bass), Drew Shoals (drums), Nikita Houston (backing vocals) and Sakai Smith (backing vocals).

With a lineup that included original members Monahan, Stafford, Scott Underwood, Rob Hotchkiss and Charlie Colin, the band achieved mainstream success with their debut album Train, which was released in 1998 with the hit " Meet Virginia". Train's 2001 album, Drops of Jupiter contained the lead single " Drops of Jupiter (Tell Me)", which won two Grammy Awards in 2002. The album was certified double platinum in the United States and Canada and remains the band's best-selling album to date.

Train's third studio album, My Private Nation, released in 2003, was certified platinum in the United States with the hit " Calling All Angels". Following the departures of Hotchkiss and Colin, the band released their fourth album, For Me, It's You in 2006, with Brandon Bush (keyboards) and Johnny Colt (bass). Despite a generally positive reception from critics, the album was commercially unsuccessful. Because of this, Train went on a three-year hiatus.

In late 2009, Train released the album Save Me, San Francisco, from which the album's three singles—-the RIAA 6x Platinum-certified international hit " Hey, Soul Sister", " If It's Love" and " Marry Me"—-reached high positions on the Billboard Hot 100 at numbers 3, 34, and 34, respectively. The album itself has been certified gold by both the RIAA and ARIA and has sold 954,000 units. Since 2008, Jerry Becker (guitar, keyboards, backing vocals) and Hector Maldonado (bass, guitar, percussion, backing vocals) have been touring and recording with the group around the world. In May 2012, Nikita Houston (backing vocals, percussion) and Sakai Smith (backing vocals, percussion) joined Train. Following Scott Underwood's departure in summer 2014, Drew Shoals is now the drummer for the band.

In April 2012, Train released their sixth studio album titled California 37. The first single from the album entitled " Drive By" reached number 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was a Top 10 hit in the UK, their first Top 20 single since 2009. Train have sold over 10 million albums and 30 million tracks worldwide.

Train

A train is a form of rail transport consisting of a series of vehicles that usually runs along a rail track to transport cargo or passengers. Motive power is provided by a separate locomotive or individual motors in self-propelled multiple units. Although historically steam propulsion dominated, the most common modern forms are diesel and electric locomotives, the latter supplied by overhead wires or additional rails. Other energy sources include horses, engine or water-driven rope or wire winch, gravity, pneumatics, batteries, and gas turbines. Train tracks usually consist of two running rails, sometimes supplemented by additional rails such as electric conducting rails and rack rails, with a limited number of monorails and maglev guideways in the mix. The word 'train' comes from the Old Frenchtrahiner, from the Latintrahere 'pull, draw'.

There are various types of trains that are designed for particular purposes. A train may consist of a combination of one or more locomotives and attached railroad cars, or a self-propelled multiple unit (or occasionally a single or articulated powered coach, called a railcar). The first trains were rope-hauled, gravity powered or pulled by horses. From the early 19th century almost all were powered by steam locomotives. From the 1910s onwards the steam locomotives began to be replaced by less labor-intensive and cleaner (but more complex and expensive) diesel locomotives and electric locomotives, while at about the same time self-propelled multiple unit vehicles of either power system became much more common in passenger service.

A passenger train is one which includes passenger-carrying vehicles which can often be very long and fast. One notable and growing long-distance train category is high-speed rail. In order to achieve much faster operation over , innovative Maglev technology has been researched for years. In most countries, such as the United Kingdom, the distinction between a tramway and a railway is precise and defined in law. The term light rail is sometimes used for a modern tram system, but it may also mean an intermediate form between a tram and a train, similar to a heavy rail rapid transit system except that it may have level crossings.

A freight train (also known as a goods train) uses freight cars (also known as wagons or trucks) to transport goods or materials ( cargo). Freight and passengers may be carried in the same train in a mixed consist.

Rail cars and machinery used for maintenance and repair of tracks, etc., are termed maintenance of way equipment; these may be assembled into maintenance of way trains. Similarly, dedicated trains may be used to provide support services to stations along a train line, such as garbage or revenue collection.

Train (roller coaster)

A roller coaster train is a vehicle made up of two or more cars connected by specialized joints which transports passengers around a roller coaster's circuit.

It is called a train because the cars follow one another around the track, the same reason as for a railroad train. Individual cars vary in design and can carry from one to eight or more passengers each.

Many roller coasters operate more than one train, sometimes several, simultaneously. Typically they operate two trains at a time, with one train loading and unloading while the other train runs the course. On the Rock 'n' Roller Coaster at Walt Disney World, there are five trains, but only four operate at a time (the trains are rotated out on a regular basis for safety reasons).

Train (Goldfrapp song)

"Train" is an electronic dance song written by British group Goldfrapp for their second album Black Cherry (2003). The song was produced by Goldfrapp and received a very positive reception from music critics. It was released as the lead single in the second quarter of 2003 and reached the top thirty in the United Kingdom, where it became Goldfrapp's first top thirty single. The original title of the song was "Wolf Lady", which makes reference to the lyrics in the second verse of the song. The lyrics of "Train" are based on Alison Goldfrapp's observations while in Los Angeles, California. She stated that the song describes wealth, drugs, and sex with "a sort of disgust of it and at the same time a sort of need to indulge in these things."

Train (clothing)

In clothing, a train describes the long back portion of a skirt, overskirt, or dress that trails behind the wearer. It is a common part of a woman's court dress, formal evening gowns or wedding dress.

In the Roman Catholic Church the cappa magna (literally, "great cape"), a form of mantle, is a voluminous ecclesiastical vestment with a long train. Cardinals, bishops, and certain other honorary prelates are entitled to wear the cappa magna.

Train (military)

In military contexts, a train is the logistical transport elements accompanying a military force. Often called a supply train or baggage train, it has the job of providing materiel for their associated combat forces when in the field. For sieges, the additional siege engines or artillery, ammunition, and its required transport was called a siege train. These military terms predate, and do not imply a railway train, though railways are often employed for modern logistics, and can include armored trains.

Historically for land forces, this usually referred to forces employing wagons, horses, mules, oxen, camels, or even elephants. These can still be useful where difficult weather or topography limit use of railways, trucks, sealift, or airlift.

The United States Department of DefenseDictionary of Military and Associated Terms defined the term "train" as:

Train (surname)

Train is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Charles J. Train (1845–1906), American admiral
  • Charles R. Train (1817–1885), American politician
  • Charles William Train (1890–1965), British soldier, recipient of the Victoria Cross
  • George Francis Train (1829–1904), American businessman, author and eccentric
  • Jack Train (1902–1966), British radio and film actor
  • John Train (investment advisor) (born 1928), American investment advisor and author
  • John Train (politician) (1873–1942), Unionist Party (Scotland) MP for Glasgow Cathcart
  • John Butler Train, alter ego of American musician Phil Ochs

Usage examples of "train".

The guns of those ships, being disposed along the sides, were for the most part able to bear only upon an enemy abreast of them, with a small additional angle of train toward ahead or astern.

Appropriate training for people who have trusted access to such information should be designed around the answers to these questions.

Ethernet jacks installed in conference rooms, the cafeteria, training centers, or other areas accessible to visitors shall be filtered to prevent unauthorized access by visitors to the corporate computer systems.

He saw Darryl Adin and his gang training the Gellesenians in guerrilla warfare, hoping to make the price of taking the planet too high in Konor lives.

The train steamed into the advancing Boer army, was fired upon, tried to escape, found the rails blocked behind it, and upset.

A virtue is none the less to be desired for its own sake, because it has some adventitious profit connected with it: indeed, in most cases the noblest virtues are accompanied by many extraneous advantages, but it is the virtues that lead the way, and these merely follow in their train.

Notably so, when in a neck-to-neck dash with an express train, the aeroplane won out in a race to file the location papers of the mine at Monument Rocks.

Special Forces units trained in Aggressor tactics playing the role of the adversary.

The spoor was but a couple of days old when the two discovered it, which meant that the slow-moving caravan was but a few hours distant from them whose trained and agile muscles could carry their bodies swiftly through the branches above the tangled undergrowth which had impeded the progress of the laden carriers of the white men.

Marine Corps combat instructor, Akers was trained as a Navy SEAL, and Swigart was a former Navy A-36 fighter pilot.

The thing is, I never learned anything about alcoholism in school or residency training.

The train is set in motion on December 19, when the world weather engine is traditionally in almanac respite.

It was resting in the sidecar attached to a Russian-made Ural motorcyclejust like the one Amad had trained on in Yemen.

Lulled by the sound of distant trains passing in the night, immersed in a familiar ambience, I slept as well as I had in years.

The training offered by the priests of Amel is to look beyond the illusion of opposites fostered by the grid and to master the instinctual responses those opposites provoke.