Find the word definition

Crossword clues for bishop

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
bishop
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
catholic
▪ But Catholic bishops have let both parties know where they stand.
▪ In the latest round, two student leaders of the pro-democracy movement were released yesterday, as was a Roman Catholic bishop.
▪ Billy Graham to Catholic bishops to leaders of the Promise Keepers has had something to say about gays and religion.
local
▪ I remember in particular going with the local bishop to an early morning Eucharist.
▪ One influential local bishop warned that women who sought abortion would be excommunicated.
▪ There may be a local priest or bishop to meet.
▪ There had been many minor challenges, from earlier emperors, and from the popes, and from local bishops and nobles.
other
▪ No other bishop could have done so much harm to Philip as Conrad.
▪ The pope's authority is superior to that of any other bishop, but the same rule applies also to him.
▪ For all his reverence for Hugh of Lincoln Richard had always been determined that other bishops should not be like him.
roman
▪ Of missions sent by Roman bishops beyond the imperial frontiers we hear nothing until the sixth century.
▪ In the latest round, two student leaders of the pro-democracy movement were released yesterday, as was a Roman Catholic bishop.
▪ The earliest known example of the Roman bishop exercising jurisdiction is painful.
■ VERB
appoint
▪ Emygdius' ability to evangelize created such a stir that the newly appointed bishop was beheaded.
▪ He was appointed bishop shortly before he was martyred while saying mass.
become
▪ However, instead of becoming alienated against Richard Baxter, the people had become alienated against the bishops and clergy instead.
▪ Vincent successfully converted tens of thousands of people, including Rabbi Paul of Burgos, who became the bishop of Cartagena.
▪ By 1265, Michel had become bishop of Thérouanne.
▪ They returned to Marseilles and were baptised by Maximinus who became the first bishop of Aix.
▪ Avitus was later to become bishop of the same see.
▪ Hamilton became a bishop in 1955, the same year Flunder was born.
▪ Unfortunately, on becoming a bishop you forfeit your right to that particular principle.
▪ In about 431, Palladius became Ireland's first bishop.
consecrate
▪ He refused only to renew his own homage or to recognize or consecrate bishops whom the king had invested.
▪ Here he was following a precedent created by Lanfranc, who had already consecrated bishops of Dublin in 1074 and 1085.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He was a popular bishop in a flourishing diocese.
▪ His doctrinal position is further and usefully clarified in fifteen sermons, which presumably belong to his years as abbot and bishop.
▪ If so, it was good to give him experience as a bishop as soon as possible.
▪ In finest conspiratorial tones a correspondent insisted he could not yet tell whether the bishop would settle at Boston or elsewhere.
▪ In many towns - including, supremely, Rome itself - municipal authority drained towards the bishop.
▪ The bishop has not been charged, but has been on police bail since the investigation began.
▪ The nine-member panel of bishops serving as judges is expected to rule any day on the Righter case.
▪ With the bishops also back in the House of Lords, the political tide had now turned very markedly against the Puritans.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
bishop

Bustle \Bus"tle\, n. A kind of pad or cushion worn on the back below the waist, by women, to give fullness to the skirts; -- called also bishop, and tournure.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
bishop

Old English bisceop "bishop, high priest (Jewish or pagan)," from Late Latin episcopus, from Greek episkopos "watcher, overseer," a title for various government officials, later taken over in a Church sense, from epi- "over" (see epi-) + skopos "one that watches, one that looks after; a guardian, protector" (see scope (n.1)). Given a specific sense in the Church, but the word also was used in the New Testament as a descriptive title for elders, and continues as such in some non-hierarchical Christian sects.\n\nA curious example of word-change, as effected by the genius of different tongues, is furnished by the English bishop and the French évêque. Both are from the same root, furnishing, perhaps the only example of two words from a common stem so modifying themselves in historical times as not to have a letter in common. (Of course many words from a far off Aryan stem are in the same condition.) The English strikes off the initial and terminal syllables, leaving only piscop, which the Saxon preference for the softer labial and hissing sounds modified into bishop. Évêque (formerly evesque) merely softens the p into v and drops the last syllable.

[William S. Walsh, "Handy-Book of Literary Curiosities," Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1892]

\nLate Latin episcopus in Spanish became obispo. Cognate with Old Saxon biscop, Old High German biscof. The chess piece (formerly archer, before that alfin) was so called from 1560s.
Wiktionary
bishop

Etymology 1 alt. 1 (context Christianity English) An overseer of congregations: either any such overseer, generally speaking, or (in Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, etc.) an official in the church hierarchy (actively or nominally) governing a diocese, supervising the church's priests, deacons, and property in its territory. 2 # (context religion obsolete English) A similar official or chief priest in another religion. 3 # (context obsolete English) Any watchman, inspector, or overlooker. 4 # (context obsolete English) The holder of the Greek or Roman position of (term episcopus Latin), supervisor over the public dole of grain, etc. 5 # The chief of the Festival of Fools or St. Nicholas Day. 6 (context chess English) The chess piece denoted ♗ or ♝ which moves along diagonal lines and developed from the shatranj alfil ("elephant") and was originally known as the aufil or archer in English. 7 Any of various African birds of the genus ''Euplectes''; a kind of weaverbird closely related to the widowbirds. 8 (context dialectal English) A ladybug or ladybird, beetles of the genus ''Coccinellidae''. 9 (context alcoholic beverages‎ English) A sweet drink made from wine, usually with oranges, lemons, and sugar; mulled and spiced port. 10 (context US archaic English) A bustle. 11 (context UK dialectal archaic English) A children's smock or pinafore. n. 1 (context Christianity English) An overseer of congregations: either any such overseer, generally speaking, or (in Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, etc.) an official in the church hierarchy (actively or nominally) governing a diocese, supervising the church's priests, deacons, and property in its territory. 2 # (context religion obsolete English) A similar official or chief priest in another religion. 3 # (context obsolete English) Any watchman, inspector, or overlooker. 4 # (context obsolete English) The holder of the Greek or Roman position of (term episcopus Latin), supervisor over the public dole of grain, etc. 5 # The chief of the Festival of Fools or St. Nicholas Day. 6 (context chess English) The chess piece denoted ♗ or ♝ which moves along diagonal lines and developed from the shatranj alfil ("elephant") and was originally known as the aufil or archer in English. 7 Any of various African birds of the genus ''Euplectes''; a kind of weaverbird closely related to the widowbirds. 8 (context dialectal English) A ladybug or ladybird, beetles of the genus ''Coccinellidae''. 9 (context alcoholic beverages‎ English) A sweet drink made from wine, usually with oranges, lemons, and sugar; mulled and spiced port. 10 (context US archaic English) A bustle. 11 (context UK dialectal archaic English) A children's smock or pinafore. vb. 1 (context Christianity English) To act as a bishop, to perform the duties of a bishop, especially to confirm another's membership in the church. 2 # (context by extension jocularly obsolete English) To confirm (''in its other senses''). 3 (context Christianity English) To make a bishop. 4 (context Christianity rare English) To provide with bishops. 5 (context UK dialectal English) To permit food (esp. milk) to burn while cooking (''from bishops' role in the inquisition or as mentioned in the quote below, of horses''). 6 (context by extension of horses English) To make a horse seem younger, particularly by manipulation of its teeth. Etymology 2

vb. (context UK colloquial obsolete English) To murder by drowning.

WordNet
bishop
  1. n. a clergyman having spiritual and administrative authority; appointed in Christian churches to oversee priests or ministers; considered in some churches to be successors of the twelve apostles of Christ

  2. port wine mulled with oranges and cloves

  3. (chess) a piece that can be moved diagonally over unoccupied squares of the same color

Gazetteer
Bishop, CA -- U.S. city in California
Population (2000): 3575
Housing Units (2000): 1867
Land area (2000): 1.750266 sq. miles (4.533169 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 1.750266 sq. miles (4.533169 sq. km)
FIPS code: 06798
Located within: California (CA), FIPS 06
Location: 37.365087 N, 118.394896 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Bishop, CA
Bishop
Bishop, GA -- U.S. town in Georgia
Population (2000): 146
Housing Units (2000): 67
Land area (2000): 0.775768 sq. miles (2.009231 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.775768 sq. miles (2.009231 sq. km)
FIPS code: 08200
Located within: Georgia (GA), FIPS 13
Location: 33.816355 N, 83.436304 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 30621
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Bishop, GA
Bishop
Bishop, TX -- U.S. city in Texas
Population (2000): 3305
Housing Units (2000): 1269
Land area (2000): 2.370688 sq. miles (6.140054 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 2.370688 sq. miles (6.140054 sq. km)
FIPS code: 08392
Located within: Texas (TX), FIPS 48
Location: 27.585178 N, 97.799437 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 78343
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Bishop, TX
Bishop
Wikipedia
Bishop (chess)

A bishop (♗,♝) is a piece in the board game of chess. Each player begins the game with two bishops. One starts between the king's knight and the king, the other between the queen's knight and the queen. In algebraic notation the starting squares are c1 and f1 for White's bishops, and c8 and f8 for Black's bishops.

Bishop (artillery)

The Bishop was the nickname of a British self-propelled artillery vehicle based on the Valentine tank, armed with the 25 pounder gun-howitzer, which could fire an HE shell or an armour-piercing shell. A result of a rushed attempt to create a self-propelled gun, the vehicle had numerous problems, was produced in limited numbers and was soon replaced by better designs.

Bishop (Methodism)

A Bishop is a role in Christian ministry in many Methodist denominations that have an episcopal polity.

Bishop (Eastern Orthodox Church)

A Bishop in the Orthodox Christian Church is the highest spiritual office within the Universal Church. Unlike in some other Christian denominations, an Orthodox bishop cannot interfere with other dioceses that are not under his own jurisdiction.

Bishop

A bishop (English derivation from the New Testament of the Christian Bible Greek , epískopos, "overseer", "guardian") is an ordained or consecrated member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight.

Within the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, Old Catholic and Independent Catholic churches and in the Assyrian Church of the East, bishops claim apostolic succession, a direct historical lineage dating back to the original Twelve Apostles. Within these churches, bishops are seen as those who possess the full priesthood and can ordain clergy – including other bishops. Some Protestant churches including the Lutheran and Methodist churches have bishops serving similar functions as well, though not always understood to be within apostolic succession in the same way. One who has been ordained deacon, priest, and then bishop is understood to hold the fullness of the (ministerial) priesthood, given responsibility by Christ to govern, teach and sanctify the Body of Christ, members of the Faithful. Priests, deacons and lay ministers cooperate and assist their bishop(s) in shepherding a flock.

Bishop (comics)

Bishop is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, particularly titles associated with the X-Men.

Lucas Bishop first appears as a member of Xavier's Security Enforcers (initially called the Xavier School Enforcers), a mutant police force from a dystopian future of the Marvel Universe. He travels to the 20th century and joins the X-Men, a team he knew only as legends. An example of 1990s anti-authority antiheroes, Bishop experiences difficulty adjusting to the norms of the time period. In the mid-2000s, Bishop took on an antagonistic role over the course of several storylines.

Bishop made frequent appearances in the X-Men animated series of the 1990s. Bishop is portrayed by Omar Sy in the 2014 film X-Men: Days of Future Past.

Bishop (disambiguation)

A bishop is a person of authority in a Christian church. Specific articles include:

  • Anglican ministry#Bishops
  • Appointment of Catholic bishops
  • Appointment of Church of England bishops
  • Archbishop, the position and title of a higher-ranking bishop
  • Assistant bishop
  • Auxiliary bishop
  • Bishop (Catholic Church)
  • Bishop (Latter Day Saints)
  • Bishop in Europe
  • Bishop of Alexandria, or Pope
  • Bishop of Rome, or Pope
  • Bishops in the Church of Scotland
  • Coadjutor bishop
  • Diocesan bishop
  • Gay bishops
  • List of Catholic bishops of the United States
  • Lists of patriarchs, archbishops, and bishops
  • Lord Bishop
  • Prince-bishop
  • Metropolitan bishop or Metropolitan
  • Presiding bishop
    • List of presiding bishops of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America
    • Presiding Bishop (LDS Church)
  • Spokesperson bishops in the Church of England
  • Suffragan Bishop in Europe
  • Suffragan bishop
  • Supreme Bishop or Obispo Máximo of the Iglesia Filipina Independiente
  • Titular bishop

There are many articles like "bishop of [place]" (e.g. Roman Catholic Bishop of Gibraltar), "[personal name] (bishop)", and "Bishop [personal name]".

Bishop, Bishops or Bishop's may also refer to:

Bishop (Latter Day Saints)

Bishop is the highest priesthood office of the Aaronic priesthood in the Latter Day Saint movement. It is almost always held by one who already holds the Melchizedek priesthood office of high priest. The Latter Day Saint concept of the office differs significantly from the role of bishops in other Christian denominations, being in some respects more analogous to a pastor or parish priest. Each bishop serves with two counselors, which together form a bishopric.

The role of a bishop varies in the different Latter Day Saint denominations; however, they derive from a common history.

Bishop (surname)

Bishop is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Amanda Bishop, Australian actress
  • Andy Bishop (born 1982), English footballer
  • Anne Bishop, American novelist of fantasy fiction
  • Arthur Ernest Bishop (1917–2006). Australian engineer and inventor
  • Arthur Gary Bishop (1951–1988), American serial killer
  • Ben Bishop (born 1986), American professional ice hockey goaltender
  • Bernice Pauahi Bishop (1831–1884), Princess of the Kamehameha dynasty
  • Billy Bishop (1894–1956), Canadian First World War flying ace
  • Bob Bishop (scout), Northern Irish football scout for Manchester United
  • Bradford Bishop (born 1936), U.S. Foreign Service officer
  • Bridget Bishop (c. 1632 – 1692), the first person executed for witchcraft during the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692
  • Bronwyn Bishop (born 1942), Australian politician
  • Carl Whiting Bishop (1881–1942), American archeologist
  • Charles Reed Bishop (1822–1915), American businessman and philanthropist
  • Christopher Bishop, British physician and computer scientist
  • David Bishop, New Zealand, screenwriter, author and comics editor
  • David Bishop (athlete) (born 1987), British middle-distance athlete
  • Ed Bishop (1932–2005), American film, television, stage and radio actor
  • Edward Bishop (Salem), accused of witchcraft during the Salem witchcraft trials
  • Edward Stanley Bishop (1920–1984), British Labour Party politician
  • Elizabeth Bishop (1911–1979), American poet and writer
  • Elvin Bishop (born 1942), American blues and rock 'n roll musician
  • Errett Bishop (1926–1983), American mathematician
  • Harry A. Bishop, mayor of Juneau, Alaska 1912–1913
  • Henry Bishop (postmaster general) (1611–1691), English postmaster general
  • Henry Rowley Bishop (1786–1855), English musical composer
  • Ian Bishop (disambiguation), several people
  • Isaac W. Bishop, 19th-century New York politician
  • James Bishop (disambiguation), , several people
  • Jerry G. Bishop (1936–2013), American radio and television personality
  • Joey Bishop (1918–2007), American entertainer
  • John Bishop (disambiguation), disambiguation page for various people with this name
  • Julie Bishop (actress) (1914–2001), Hollywood leading lady of the 1930s and 40s
  • Julie Bishop (born 1956), Australian politician
  • K. J. Bishop, Australian writer and artist
  • Katharine Bishop (1889–1976), co-discoveror of Vitamin E
  • Kelly Bishop (born 1944), American actress
  • Kevin Bishop (born 1980), English actor and comedian
  • Kirsten Bishop, voice actress
  • Malcolm Bishop, Welsh lawyer and QC
  • Mark Bishop (born 1954), Australian Labor Party member
  • Matt Bishop (born 1962), head of Communications and Public Relations for the McLaren Group
  • Maurice Bishop (1944–1983), Grenadian revolutionary and politician
  • Max Bishop (1889–1962), American baseball player
  • Meredith Bishop (born 1976), American actress
  • Michael Bishop (businessman) (born 1942), British businessman
  • Michael Bishop (author) (born 1945), American science fiction and fantasy author
  • Michael Bishop (bassist), American bassist, member of GWAR and Kepone
  • Michael Bishop (football player) (born 1976), American football player
  • J. Michael Bishop (born 1938), American immunologist and microbiologist
  • Morris Bishop (1893–1973), American scholar, historian, biographer, author, and humorist
  • Neal Bishop (born 1981), English footballer
  • Nicholas Bishop (born 1973), Australian actor
  • Raymond J. Bishop (1906–1978), Catholic priest and exorcist
  • Richard M. Bishop (1812–1893), American politician from Ohio
  • Rob Bishop (born 1951), Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives
  • Robert Bishop (artist) (1945–1991), American erotic artist
  • Robert Hamilton Bishop (1777–1855), first president of Miami University
  • Roswell P. Bishop (1843–1920), American politician from Michigan
  • Russell Bishop (academic), New Zealand academic
  • Russell Bishop (sex offender) (born 1966), convicted English sex offender
  • Ruth Bishop (born 1933), Australian virologist
  • Sherman C. Bishop (1887–1951), American herpetologist and arachnologist
  • Stephen Bishop (disambiguation), several people
  • Stuart Bishop (born c. 1975), incoming member of the Louisiana House of Representatives
  • Tim Bishop (born 1950), American politician from New York
  • Walter Bishop, Sr. (1905–1964), Jamaican composer and songwriter
  • Walter Bishop, Jr. (1927–1988), American bop and hard bop jazz pianist
  • Wesley T. Bishop (born 1967), American academic, lawyer, and politician
Bishop (Catholic Church)

In the Catholic Church, a bishop is an ordained minister who holds the fullness of the sacrament of holy orders and is responsible for teaching doctrine, governing Catholics in his jurisdiction, and sanctifying the world and representing the Church. Catholics trace the origins of the office of bishop to the apostles, who it is believed were endowed with a special charism by the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. Catholics believe this special charism has been transmitted through an unbroken succession of bishops by the laying on of hands in the sacrament of Holy Orders.

Diocesan bishops—known as eparchs in the Eastern Catholic Churches—are assigned to govern local regions within the Catholic Church known as dioceses in the Latin Church and eparchies in the Eastern Rites. Bishops are collectively known as the College of Bishops and can hold such additional titles as archbishop, cardinal, patriarch, or pope. As of 2009 there were approximately 5,100 bishops total in the Latin and Eastern churches of the Catholic Church.

Bishops are always men. In addition, Canon 378 § 1 requires that a candidate for the Latin episcopacy should be:

  1. outstanding in solid faith, good morals, piety, zeal for souls, wisdom, prudence, and human virtues, and endowed with other qualities which make him suitable to fulfill the office in question;
  2. of good reputation;
  3. at least thirty-five years old;
  4. ordained to the presbyterate for at least five years;
  5. in possession of a doctorate or at least a licentiate in sacred scripture, theology, or canon law from an institute of higher studies approved by the Apostolic See, or at least truly expert in the same disciplines.
Bishop (American band)

Bishop A.C. (formerly xBISHOPx) is an American straight edge hardcore band, formed in Florida in 2004. It band features current and ex members of Until the End, Remembering Never, xReign of Terrorx, and Suffocate Faster. The lyrical contents' main focus is straight-edge related issues such as drugs and promiscuous sex.

Originally formed under the name xDiary Of A Corpsex, they recorded a four track demo (which was later released as Bless the Dead in 2007). The band changed its name in 2005 and released their first full length album Suicide Party on Ferret Records. Soon after they released the remainder of the recorded tracks on a split with The Red Barron. Despite rumors of a breakup or permanent hiatus, Ferret Records announced that their second full length, Drugs would be released in late 2008. The vinyl version would reportedly feature an exclusive track.

Usage examples of "bishop".

She replied that she was debarred from accepting any money by her vow of poverty and obedience, and that she had given up to the abbess what remained of the alms the bishop had procured her.

He was one of those present when the King abdicated in favor of his son, along with Addis and myself and members of every degree, from bishops to serfs.

Their adherence to the old system of Church discipline involved a reaction against the secularising process, which did not seem to be tempered by the spiritual powers of the bishops.

The debate having been again adjourned, was resumed by Earl Spencer and the Bishop of Norwich.

In this state of disgrace and agony, two bishops, Isaiah of Rhodes and Alexander of Diospolis, were dragged through the streets of Constantinople, while their brethren were admonished, by the voice of a crier, to observe this awful lesson, and not to pollute the sanctity of their character.

Hagbart is the nephew of the bishop of the diocese, who, after much persuasion is induced to receive Agot, on condition that her aunt will remove from the district and demand no recognition from the family.

The lord on the other side thereof was a mightier man than King Pete, albeit he was a bishop, and a baron of Holy Church.

He combines ecclesiastical with secular functions, being apostolic administrator and bishop of Hermopolis, and at the same time Grand Almoner of the household and superintendent of the third Salle of the casino.

Taylor, bishop of Down, Connor, and Dromore, after strictly examining Taverner anent the whole matter, expressed his belief in the realness of the apparition.

The first twelve articles are devoted to the pope, the annates, the appointment of foreigners to German benefices, the appeal of cases to Rome, the asserted authority of the papacy over bishops, the emperor, and other rulers.

In the first place the definite abolition of the annates meant that henceforth the election of archbishops and bishops must be under licence by the king and that they must swear allegiance to him before consecration.

The bishop without answering me referred me to his chancellor, to whom I repeated all I had said to the bishop, but with words calculated to irritate rather than to soften, and certainly not likely to obtain the release of the captain.

Greek with Bishop Jewell, and translated his Apologia from the Latin so correctly that neither he nor ArchBishop Parker could suggest a single alteration.

Therefore the royal Audiencia, in order to proceed with more certainty, called a council of the bishop who was governor of that archbishopric, the archbishop, and the superiors of the orders.

Camarines, Don Fray Francisco de Zamudio, to act as provisor until the bishop of Zebu, Don Fray Pedro de Arze, should be notified, to whom the government of this archbishopric belongs by a bull of Paul V.