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Crossword clues for pitch

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
pitch
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cricket field/ground/pitch (=area of ground where cricket is played)
▪ the school cricket field
a football pitch (=an area of grass where football is played)
▪ An area of wasteland had been turned into a football pitch.
a pitched roof (=with parts that slope down)
▪ a row of garages with tiled pitched roofs.
an artificial pitchBritish English
▪ The club is building a new artificial training pitch at its sports ground.
make/pitch camp (=put up your tents)
▪ We made camp in a clearing in the woods.
perfect pitch
pitch black (=very dark)
▪ It was still pitch black out.
pitch dark (=when there is no light at all)
▪ We stood outside in the pitch dark.
pitch dark (=completely dark)
▪ It was pitch dark in the attic.
pitch darkness (=complete darkness)
▪ We ended up coming down the mountain in pitch darkness.
pitch pine
pitched battle
▪ a pitched battle between the rival groups
pitch...tent (=put up our tent)
▪ We looked for a flat spot where we could pitch our tent.
reached fever pitch
▪ After a night of rioting, tensions in the city reached fever pitch.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
different
▪ What seemed a single animal is now known to be two, distinct in their genes and with squeaks of different pitch.
▪ You can print indented paragraphs in a different pitch than surrounding text.
▪ Theology must somehow be playing on a different pitch, with revelation determining the rules and faith the outcome.
▪ Barn owls have one ear slightly higher than the other, so sound comes to them at two different pitches.
▪ These used rotating discs to initiate a quasi-musical sound which was then filtered, processed and reproduced at different pitches.
final
▪ On the final pitches the topo proves to be hopelessly inaccurate and route-finding difficult in the poor visibility.
▪ Bip Roberts struck out, Grissom stealing second base on the final pitch of that at-bat.
▪ Kirkus also made a solo attempt on the line now known as Nameless, retreating from its final pitch.
▪ Left: Laybacking up the final pitch of Direct route, Dinas Mot.
high
▪ One emits a low sound. the other a sound of higher pitch.
▪ Our ears, for example, can distinguish higher pitches from lower frequencies.
▪ Gliders have very low stick forces and the lower flying speeds give them a very high rate of pitch.
▪ To maintain the row's high pitch of energy, you need to make sure that sympathy is withheld by all parties.
▪ It has risen to a high, resonant pitch, emerging from his nose.
▪ He had golden-brown hair and beard and a voice high in pitch but rich in timbre.
▪ It will therefore be of higher pitch.
▪ Or heard yourself screaming in a high pitch while arguing fruitlessly with your nearest and dearest?
low
▪ Probably because of the very much greater stick forces and lower rates of pitch occurring in most light aircraft.
▪ SureSeam is low pitch steel roofing for high integrity buildings.
▪ Where the confusion seems to stem from is the fact that guitar music sounds an octave lower than concert pitch.
▪ The formal markers, low pitch close plus lengthy pause plus raised pitch introductory expression, are not present.
▪ It can be marked by very low pitch, even on lexical items, loss of amplitude and a lengthy pause.
▪ Model 520 roof window, suitable for roofs with low headroom or low pitch.
perfect
▪ In essays on whisky-tasting, sheath knives, deer hunting, he has a kind of perfect pitch.
▪ It got him trying to be too perfect with his pitches all of a sudden.
▪ You had perfect pitch, my love.
▪ I have neither perfect pitch nor a head for mathematics, and anyway who wants to compute the speed of history?
▪ Computer games that require a player to recognise perfect pitch might also help, Saffran says.
▪ In pastoral terms, the program had perfect pitch.
▪ But the five people in Saffran's group with perfect pitch had started learning aged four.
▪ The woodwind maintained a perfect pitch and, like the strings and brass, produced a consistently voluptuous sound.
slow
▪ Add in the slower pitches ad lower bounce and Hick was able to take full advantage.
■ NOUN
attitude
▪ Apply climb power and raise the pitch attitude to the required position. 2.
▪ Then start to lower the pitch attitude by maximum stages of a half bar. 3.
▪ If necessary adjust the pitch attitude a maximum of a quarter to a half bar at any one time. 9.
▪ The Altimeter will be used to indicate that the pitch attitude is correct. 2.
▪ This correction will be achieved with a pitch attitude change of half a bar on the Artificial Horizon.
▪ Unless turbulence is severe, use the Vertical Speed Indicator to help maintain correct pitch attitude.
▪ This correction of 200 ft/min is achieved by raising or lowering the pitch attitude a maximum of a half-bar. 6.
cricket
▪ The garden will double as go-kart track, cricket pitch, tennis court.
▪ He looked as if he had just walked off the cricket pitch.
▪ In abeyance at the moment is a cricket pitch.
▪ There is a playing field with equipment for the younger members of the community, and a football and cricket pitch.
▪ There is a cricket pitch in a village green setting and small zoo for the children.
▪ The new building will serve the existing football and cricket pitches, tennis court and bowling green.
dark
▪ It was pitch dark everywhere, and the whirr of the ceiling fan seemed to fill the silent bedroom.
▪ It was pitch dark where I was standing, and silent as a tomb.
▪ He developed the photographs himself, blundering round the bathroom in the pitch dark.
▪ It was pitch dark, but a man could follow the path by the pale line of sky between the branches.
▪ It was pitch dark inside the attic.
▪ In the freezing cold and pitch dark, families were driven to clinging to the roof.
▪ I set off at 5 am but those Sussex lanes are pitch dark, and hilly!
▪ Inside the coffin it is pitch dark and fouled with faeces because women confined there are refused access to a toilet.
darkness
▪ In part two ... Into the night ... Freefalling in pitch darkness.
▪ We will perform the experiment as before, but this time in pitch darkness.
▪ He set out brightly, on past the notice, into pitch darkness.
▪ Up a narrow circular stair therefrom he went, and in the almost pitch darkness cannoned into somebody coming down.
▪ Suddenly the headlights of the Glory went out and they found themselves sitting in pitch darkness.
▪ She woke in the pitch darkness of the curtained bed with the suddenness of one called.
fever
▪ By the time the star is sighted, octave passages have taken over and the excitement reaches fever pitch.
▪ The challenges to her credibility are reaching fever pitch and are putting the first lady and her allies on the defensive.
▪ Speculation about the deportations have reached fever pitch in Hong Kong.
▪ Excitement grew to a fever pitch.
▪ The debate in Birmingham has reached something like fever pitch, now that the city council is faced with two rival development schemes.
▪ In 1989, an 11-year-old girl was killed by two Rotties and public terror reached fever pitch.
▪ The crowd was getting to a fever pitch of excitement, Will among them.
▪ But as the game's tempo reached fever pitch, Saunders squandered a golden opportunity to grab an equaliser.
football
▪ Another must is a football pitch.
▪ There will also be a floodlit multi-purpose outside court, and two hockey and football pitches.
▪ It had not been spent on the football pitch, however, nor the training ground.
▪ And finally the tale of a little village football club and their little football pitch.
▪ Five-a-side football pitch at Baberton Mains.
▪ Habit flying behind, she is bound for the football pitch where local kids are playing.
▪ Another possibility is to place two rectangular cakes together to make a football pitch.
▪ The Citrus Bowl requires some work, with seats being taken out to accommodate the corners of a football pitch.
invasion
▪ Apart from one brief pitch invasion when Sunderland scored, the supporters of both clubs behaved impeccably.
▪ The fans were delighted which resulted in a pitch invasion from the new stand behind the Southampton goal.
range
▪ Obviously, this large pitch range will make the model more difficult to fly in most other situations.
▪ Many manufacturers give details of how the pitch range of their models should be set up.
rugby
▪ Since the school took up so much space on the island, the rugby pitches were the size of tennis courts.
▪ An orderly queue was formed, stretching throughout the corridors of Hardside and out on to the rugby pitches.
▪ He had always seen them somewhere in the medical field as well as on a rugby pitch.
soccer
▪ He stood beside a muddy soccer pitch.
▪ Two full size soccer pitches, and inside a fully equipped fitness centre complement the gymnasium and provide a comprehensive community facility.
▪ Mind you it was not just any soccer pitch.
▪ Were we marking out a soccer pitch?
■ VERB
leave
▪ To deter them, the Dinamo side linked arms with their opponents as they left the pitch.
▪ With the fairway firm and running, players who hit drivers left themselves with pitch shots into the green.
▪ As he left the pitch he blacked out and fell through a glass door, cutting his hand.
▪ If you simply leave the positive pitch on, the model will fall over backwards during the climb.
▪ The Stamford Bridge faithful turned on the keeper and jeered him until after the players had left the pitch.
▪ Lock forward Bayfield had to leave the pitch while playing for Northampton after suffering an asthma attack.
▪ In the end, Linfield left the pitch to a standing ovation from the Windsor faithful.
▪ Newton was sent off and Mr Hallam had to leave the pitch because of his injuries.
make
▪ If you do not feel the tinkling, repeat the hum but make it lower in pitch.
▪ The profit-making Institute for Advanced Technology in Minneapolis makes a similar pitch.
▪ Some ideas he rejected, such as the liquid developed at Derby County for making pitches usable in all weathers.
▪ They are making their pitch on radio stations, and are videotaping interviews with returning refugees and playing them in the camps.
▪ Four days later, Oakland made its pitch.
▪ Another possibility is to place two rectangular cakes together to make a football pitch.
▪ Celebrities still went on the air to appeal for dimes and dollars, and newspapers still made their annual January pitch.
play
▪ Grace and Jane are impressed by the size of the garden until informed that children may not play on the pitch.
▪ Tavarez got Sanders to ground into an inning-ending double play on his first pitch.
▪ A match would involve three teams instead of two, playing on a triangular pitch with three sets of goals.
▪ Father and daughter would spend endless hours at a nearby tennis court, playing pitch and catch under the lights.
▪ The Headingley game was played on an uneven pitch that made batting difficult.
▪ Theology must somehow be playing on a different pitch, with revelation determining the rules and faith the outcome.
reach
▪ Speculation about the deportations have reached fever pitch in Hong Kong.
▪ The challenges to her credibility are reaching fever pitch and are putting the first lady and her allies on the defensive.
▪ The debate in Birmingham has reached something like fever pitch, now that the city council is faced with two rival development schemes.
▪ In 1989, an 11-year-old girl was killed by two Rotties and public terror reached fever pitch.
▪ Bankside activity has reached such a pitch, even at night, that the carp will not come near the margins.
▪ Public support for the system was waning steadily as accusations of sleaze in high places reached fever pitch.
▪ What was happening to them that this awareness had reached such a pitch in so short a time?
▪ But he had reached a pitch where he couldn't give up.
rise
▪ Parties utter a loud trilling whistle, rising and falling in pitch.
▪ The grinding, stretching sounds were rising to a pitch and behind it all, another low-register noise.
▪ Bernice became aware of a humming, rising in pitch and volume, that seemed to come from all around.
▪ As the line crawled gradually closer and closer excitement and enthusiasm rose to fever pitch.
run
▪ I can run around a pitch 25 times, no problem.
▪ Wimbledon's hard man ran across the pitch to point threateningly at Middlesbrough assistant manager John Pickering.
▪ They ran themselves into the ground, ran Chesterfield off the pitch, but they couldn't get another goal.
▪ Several Sunderland fans were escorted from the ground after running on the pitch when their team scored the winning goal.
▪ Not wearing a shellsuit at Center Parcs would be like running out on the pitch at Wembley in a dinner jacket.
throw
▪ And what would you have done if Schemichal got hold of you and threw you off the pitch like last night?
▪ Coaches sometimes have to remind him to throw a pitch off the plate every now and then.
▪ The flares were thrown on to the pitch as the players were warming up.
▪ Maddux threw 29 pitches in the first inning.
▪ He threw 82 pitches, and maybe one of them crossed the heart of the plate.
▪ But a pitching staff can get a shutout even if it walks 10 and throws another 10 wild pitches.
▪ Blaine, Ohio, will throw out the first pitch.
▪ That year, President Dwight Eisenhower threw out the first pitch on April 13.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(at) fever pitch
▪ By the time the star is sighted, octave passages have taken over and the excitement reaches fever pitch.
▪ Excitement grew to a fever pitch.
▪ Her legs trembled as his strokes of desire on her thighs crazed her need to fever pitch.
▪ In 1989, an 11-year-old girl was killed by two Rotties and public terror reached fever pitch.
▪ Speculation about the deportations have reached fever pitch in Hong Kong.
▪ The challenges to her credibility are reaching fever pitch and are putting the first lady and her allies on the defensive.
▪ The crowd was getting to a fever pitch of excitement, Will among them.
▪ The debate in Birmingham has reached something like fever pitch, now that the city council is faced with two rival development schemes.
queer sb's pitch/queer the pitch for sb
sales pitch/talk
▪ Don't give them a sales pitch because there is nothing more irritating.
▪ He is running out of possible patrons, sales talk, flirtatiousness, hair, steam.
▪ None of this is likely to stop a flurry of sales pitches from mutual-fund salespeople.
▪ Personally I think this is another of his sales pitches.
▪ The sales pitch can be so slick that many consumers don't even realize they have bought magazines until the bill arrives.
▪ The sales pitch is a wonderful movie moment.
▪ The analogy of the sales pitch is revealing, for advertisers do not promote their product merely by providing information about it.
▪ There was nothing spectacular about my sales pitch except the language in which it was couched.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Kendrick's pitch was good throughout the first aria.
▪ Ryan's first pitch was high and wide.
▪ Some of the fans rushed onto the pitch at the end of the match
▪ the pitch of the roof
▪ The pitch went wide.
▪ The President made his strongest pitch yet for standardized testing in schools.
▪ The same syllables were sung repeatedly at a number of different pitches.
▪ The village has attractive playing fields, with a football and cricket pitch.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As the vehicle approaches, the pitch of its siren increases and then it decreases as the vehicle speeds past.
▪ Barnett ruled a two-strike pitch from Shawn Boskie was a called third strike.
▪ Son of Star Wars replicates that pitch.
▪ Swindon Town away against Sunderland has been postponed because of a water-logged pitch at Roker Park.
▪ Tavarez got Sanders to ground into an inning-ending double play on his first pitch.
▪ Then start to lower the pitch attitude by maximum stages of a half bar. 3.
▪ There, Williams wowed national coaches with her array of pitches.
▪ Thomas already was widely admired for his combination of power and pitch selection.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
forward
▪ The yacht pitched forward as they slid down the bow wave.
▪ He staggers, though I weigh no more than 104 pounds, and with him, I pitch forward slightly.
▪ Lewis put his arms round her as he pitched forward.
▪ I was a few feet up when I pitched forward and fell flat.
▪ Brennan was pitched forward off the firestep and broke his leg.
▪ As Rostov watched, the lieutenant dropped his weapon and pitched forward out of the hatch.
▪ Just as he discovered it was yet another Mars Bar wrapper, he slipped and pitched forward.
▪ She pitched forward into the flooded darkness of the interior, and Trent heaved himself after her.
in
▪ Hurd raised the issue in a speech on 25 March, and Baker pitched in more stridently a day later.
▪ Brewer has a younger sister who pitches in, too.
▪ Well, we pitched in, ferrying the people back to their villages and so on.
▪ But hiring such people means that you have to pitch in and be willing to do the menial tasks yourself.
▪ If you're in trouble, or have a problem, everyone pitches in to help.
▪ Even the poorest unemployed father can help his children by being there, staying sober, and pitching in.
▪ Walsh, bedecked with new suit and executive glasses, had pitched in with his usual aggressive style.
▪ When work had to be done, we all pitched in, even when the task was unpleasant.
well
▪ This suggests that any bid would be pitched well above the suspension price.
▪ VanLandingham came around and pitched well for a stretch, seemingly ready to fulfill his vast promise.
Well, pitching well in the major leagues is all about handling pressure.
■ NOUN
ball
▪ All too often you pitch the ball short, catch the slope and finish back on the lower layer.
▪ The strike zone shall be determined from the batter's stance as the batter is prepared to swing at a pitched ball.
▪ On the Monday they showed how easy it was for top-class bowlers to pitch the ball up and get wickets.
▪ More often, though, he preferred to pitch the ball up and get his wickets in less intimidating fashion.
battle
▪ There was a pitched battle here a few hours ago, but soldiers are nowhere in sight now.
▪ I had expected rage, flying pupusas, a pitched battle.
▪ For three weeks he witnessed pitched battles between gendarmes and young demonstrators in the streets of Tizi-Ouzou.
▪ She so much wanted to avoid another pitched battle with her son.
▪ There were once pitched battles and riotous football matches between colliers and tradesmen around the turn of the last century.
▪ The month before, the Metropolitans had fought a pitched battle with their rivals for control of City Hall.
▪ He describes how he killed two young workers taken prisoner in a pitched battle inside a factory workshop.
▪ Our country is engaged in a pitched battle in a fiercely competitive commercial world.
camp
▪ Then, as abruptly as it had pitched camp, the caravan moved on.
▪ Lugh would make the decisions about where they pitched camp and how much bear meat they brought.
▪ That evening they pitched their camp on a shoulder of dry ground above a valley, thankful for the respite.
game
▪ First pitch of the split-squad game with the Giants: a Marvin Benard bunt that Brosius charged hard.
▪ They had great pitching performances all three games.
▪ Left-hander Scott Radinsky, bothered by tendinitis in his left middle finger, will pitch a simulated game against hitters today.
▪ Brown was supposed to pitch Game 4, then Game 5, but was scratched both times because of a stomach virus.
▪ Tom Candiotti and Ramon Martinez will pitch in the B game.
▪ The third-string pitcher, a kid named Ingrid, has pitched a great game.
innings
▪ Left-hander Joey Eischen and right-hander Mike Harkey each pitched two scoreless innings.
▪ Ismael Valdes pitched four scoreless innings and the Dodgers defeated the Expos 3-1 in a game rained out after five innings.
▪ Maddux pitched eight shutout innings and could have gone nine or 10 more.
▪ In his second exhibition start, Tom Candiotti pitched four scoreless innings.
▪ Right-hander Ismael Valdes started and pitched three innings.
▪ Will Cunnane, a former Marlin, pitched two stout innings, running his scoreless streak to 13 1 / 3 innings.
▪ In the Dodgers' third and final intrasquad game of the season, Valdes started and pitched two innings.
▪ Ace Mark Leiter pitched four innings, giving up a run, walking two and striking out two.
level
▪ This course is very widely available and it is pitched at the right level for the medical teacher.
▪ The noise was pitched to a level of pain he absorbed as a personal test.
▪ The projects were pitched at different levels, so that in the strictest sense the students were working in a parallel fashion.
▪ Perhaps the task in hand is too easily achieved or is pitched at an inappropriate level.
▪ Only by doing so can one judge whether the amount of procedural protection is being pitched at the correct level. 1.
sale
▪ To reinforce the sales pitch, the video van will return to the village next month.
▪ There was nothing spectacular about my sales pitch except the language in which it was couched.
▪ Charles's talk was an artful and seductive sales pitch....
tent
▪ In which wilderness have they pitched their tents?
▪ If he keeps blossoming at this rate, too, basketball coaches soon will be pitching tents in his yard.
▪ Joel arrived in time to pitch my tent.
▪ That was how Master Yehudi came to pitch his tent in Kansas.
▪ After pitching their tents, the travellers held a rave party that went on for 3 days and nights.
▪ Troops could scarcely find dry ground on which to pitch their tents.
▪ It was late by the time we had finished chatting and they cycled off to find somewhere to pitch their tent.
▪ We trailed off into the canyons, and pitched tents under the conifers.
■ VERB
start
▪ Right-hander Ismael Valdes started and pitched three innings.
▪ In the Dodgers' third and final intrasquad game of the season, Valdes started and pitched two innings.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(at) fever pitch
▪ By the time the star is sighted, octave passages have taken over and the excitement reaches fever pitch.
▪ Excitement grew to a fever pitch.
▪ Her legs trembled as his strokes of desire on her thighs crazed her need to fever pitch.
▪ In 1989, an 11-year-old girl was killed by two Rotties and public terror reached fever pitch.
▪ Speculation about the deportations have reached fever pitch in Hong Kong.
▪ The challenges to her credibility are reaching fever pitch and are putting the first lady and her allies on the defensive.
▪ The crowd was getting to a fever pitch of excitement, Will among them.
▪ The debate in Birmingham has reached something like fever pitch, now that the city council is faced with two rival development schemes.
sales pitch/talk
▪ Don't give them a sales pitch because there is nothing more irritating.
▪ He is running out of possible patrons, sales talk, flirtatiousness, hair, steam.
▪ None of this is likely to stop a flurry of sales pitches from mutual-fund salespeople.
▪ Personally I think this is another of his sales pitches.
▪ The sales pitch can be so slick that many consumers don't even realize they have bought magazines until the bill arrives.
▪ The sales pitch is a wonderful movie moment.
▪ The analogy of the sales pitch is revealing, for advertisers do not promote their product merely by providing information about it.
▪ There was nothing spectacular about my sales pitch except the language in which it was couched.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A sudden gust of wind pitched him off the ledge and he was left hanging by his safety rope.
▪ Johnny learned to pitch by aiming at a target his Dad had painted on the side of the garage.
▪ Ryan pitched a curve ball which easily beat the batter.
▪ She pitched the ball to the little boy.
▪ Stanton pitched to two batters in the ninth inning.
▪ The investment was pitched to parents as a safe way to deal with rising college costs.
▪ Tod pitched his coat onto the sofa and ran toward the kitchen.
▪ Two of the crew were pitched overboard when a big wave hit their ship.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All too often you pitch the ball short, catch the slope and finish back on the lower layer.
▪ I have come home and there is not left me a place on which to pitch my lodge.
▪ I hear Aubrey pitching his voice above the hubbub: engines; horns; bicycle bells.
▪ Phil Niekro pitched on two division winners.
▪ Seawitch tugged at her line again, pitching on the rising swell.
▪ Steinbach will have his hands full with a pitching staff fresh out of the box.
▪ Swing low, sweet Chariot is left unaccompanied, but that involves a disturbing oddity of pitching at the start.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
pitch

Dip \Dip\, n.

  1. The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid. ``The dip of oars in unison.''
    --Glover.

  2. Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch.

  3. a hollow or depression in a surface, especially in the ground.

  4. A liquid, as a sauce or gravy, served at table with a ladle or spoon. [Local, U.S.]
    --Bartlett.

  5. A dipped candle. [Colloq.]
    --Marryat.

  6. A gymnastic exercise on the parallel bars in which the performer, resting on his hands, lets his arms bend and his body sink until his chin is level with the bars, and then raises himself by straightening his arms.

  7. In the turpentine industry, the viscid exudation, which is dipped out from incisions in the trees; as, virgin dip (the runnings of the first year), yellow dip (the runnings of subsequent years).

  8. (A["e]ronautics) A sudden drop followed by a climb, usually to avoid obstacles or as the result of getting into an airhole.

  9. a liquid, in which objects are soaked by dipping; e.g., a parasiticide or insecticide solution into which animals are dipped (see sheep-dip).

  10. a sauce into which foods are dipped to enhance the flavor; e. g., an onion dip made from sour cream and dried onions, into which potato chips are dipped.

  11. a pickpocket. [slang]

    Dip of the horizon (Astron.), the angular depression of the seen or visible horizon below the true or natural horizon; the angle at the eye of an observer between a horizontal line and a tangent drawn from the eye to the surface of the ocean.

    Dip of the needle, or Magnetic dip, the angle formed, in a vertical plane, by a freely suspended magnetic needle, or the line of magnetic force, with a horizontal line; -- called also inclination.

    Dip of a stratum (Geol.), its greatest angle of inclination to the horizon, or that of a line perpendicular to its direction or strike; -- called also the pitch.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
pitch

"resinous substance, wood tar," late 12c., pich, from Old English pic "pitch," from a Germanic borrowing (Old Saxon and Old Frisian pik, Middle Dutch pik, Dutch pek, Old High German pek, German Pech, Old Norse bik) of Latin pix (genitive picis) "pitch," which according to Watkins is from a PIE root *pik- "pitch" (cognates: Greek pissa, Lithuanian pikis, Old Church Slavonic piklu "pitch"), but according to Pokorny this is from the same PIE root as pine (n.). The English word was applied to pine resins from late 14c. Pitch-black is attested from 1590s; pitch-dark from 1680s.

pitch

c.1200, "to thrust in, fasten, settle," probably from an unrecorded Old English *piccean, related to prick (v.). The original past tense was pight. Sense of "set upright," as in pitch a tent (late 13c.), is from notion of "driving in" the pegs. Meaning to incline forward and downward" is from 1510s. Meaning "throw (a ball)" evolved late 14c. from that of "hit the mark." Musical sense is from 1670s. Of ships, "to plunge" in the waves, 1620s. To pitch in "work vigorously" is from 1847, perhaps from farm labor. Related: Pitched; pitching.

pitch

1520s, "something that is pitched," from pitch (v.1). Meaning "act of throwing" is attested from 1833. Meaning "act of plunging headfirst" is from 1762; sense of "slope, degree, inclination" is from 1540s; musical sense is from 1590s; but the connection of these is obscure. Sales pitch in the modern commercial advertising sense is from 1943, American English, perhaps from the baseball sense.

pitch

"to cover with pitch," Old English pician, from the source of pitch (n.2).

Wiktionary
pitch

Etymology 1 n. 1 A sticky, gummy substance secreted by trees; sap. 2 A dark, extremely viscous material remaining in still after distilling crude oil and tar. 3 (context geology English) pitchstone vb. 1 To cover or smear with pitch. 2 To darken; to blacken; to obscure. Etymology 2

n. 1 A throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand. 2 (senseid en the act of pitching a baseball)(context baseball English) The act of pitching a baseball. 3 (context sports English) The field on which cricket, soccer, rugby or hockey is played. In '''cricket''', the pitch is in the centre of the field; see '''cricket pitch'''. 4 An effort to sell or promote something. 5 The distance between evenly spaced objects, e.g. the teeth of a saw, the turns of a screw thread, or letters in a monospace font. 6 The angle at which an object sits. 7 More specifically, the rotation angle about the transverse axis. 8 A level or degree. 9 (context aviation English) A measure of the degree to which an aircraft's nose tilts up or down. 10 (context aviation English) A measure of the angle of attack of a propeller. 11 (context nautical English) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel rotates on its athwartships axis, causing its bow and stern to go up and down. Compare with roll, yaw and heave. 12 The place where a busker performs. 13 An area in a market (or similar) allocated to a particular trader. 14 A point or peak; the extreme point or degree of elevation or depression; hence, a limit or bound. vb. 1 (senseid en to throw)(context transitive English) To throw. 2 (senseid en baseball: to throw the ball toward home plate)(context transitive or intransitive baseball English) To throw (the ball) toward home plate. 3 (context intransitive baseball English) To play baseball in the position of pitcher. 4 (context transitive English) To throw away; discard. 5 (context transitive English) To promote, advertise, or attempt to sell. 6 (context transitive English) To deliver in a certain tone or style, or with a certain audience in mind. 7 (context transitive English) To assemble or erect (a tent). 8 (context intransitive English) To fix or place a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp. 9 (context ambitransitive aviation or nautical English) To move so that the front of an aircraft or ship goes alternatively up and down. 10 (context transitive golf English) To play a short, high, lofty shot that lands with backspin. 11 (context intransitive cricket English) To bounce on the playing surface. 12 (context intransitive Bristol of snow English) To settle and build up, without melting. 13 To alight; to settle; to come to rest from flight. 14 To fix one's choice; with ''on'' or ''upon''. 15 To plunge or fall; especially, to fall forward; to decline or slope. 16 To set, face, or pave with rubble or undressed stones, as an embankment or a roadway. 17 To set or fix, as a price or value. 18 (label en transitive card games slang) To discard a card for some gain. Etymology 3

n. 1 (context music English) The perceived frequency of a sound or note. 2 (context music English) In an a cappella group, the singer responsible for singing a note for the other members to tune themselves by. vb. 1 To produce a note of a given pitch. 2 To fix or set the tone of.

WordNet
pitch
  1. n. the property of sound that varies with variation in the frequency of vibration

  2. (baseball) the throwing of a baseball by a pitcher to a batter [syn: delivery]

  3. a vendor's position (especially on the sidewalk); "he was employed to see that his paper's news pitches were not trespassed upon by rival vendors"

  4. promotion by means of an argument and demonstration [syn: sales talk, sales pitch]

  5. degree of deviation from a horizontal plane; "the roof had a steep pitch" [syn: rake, slant]

  6. any of various dark heavy viscid substances obtained as a residue [syn: tar]

  7. a high approach shot in golf [syn: pitch shot]

  8. an all-fours game in which the first card led is a trump [syn: auction pitch]

  9. abrupt up-and-down motion (as caused by a ship or other conveyance); "the pitching and tossing was quite exciting" [syn: lurch, pitching]

  10. the action or manner of throwing something; "his pitch fell short and his hat landed on the floor"

pitch
  1. v. throw or toss with a light motion; "flip me the beachball"; "toss me newspaper" [syn: flip, toss, sky]

  2. move abruptly; "The ship suddenly lurched to the left" [syn: lurch, shift]

  3. fall or plunge forward; "She pitched over the railing of the balcony"

  4. set to a certain pitch; "He pitched his voice very low"

  5. sell or offer for sale from place to place [syn: peddle, monger, huckster, hawk, vend]

  6. be at an angle; "The terrain sloped down" [syn: slope, incline]

  7. heel over; "The tower is tilting"; "The ceiling is slanting" [syn: cant, cant over, tilt, slant]

  8. erect and fasten; "pitch a tent" [syn: set up]

  9. throw or hurl from the mound to the batter, as in baseball; "The pitcher delivered the ball" [syn: deliver]

  10. hit (a golf ball) in a high arc with a backspin

  11. lead (a card) and establish the trump suit

  12. set the level or character of; "She pitched her speech to the teenagers in the audience" [syn: gear]

Wikipedia
Pitch

Pitch may refer to:

  • Pitch (resin), a viscous substance produced by plants or formed from petroleum
  • Pitch (card game) (or "High Low Jack"), an American trick-taking card game
  • Sales pitch, a line of talk that attempts to persuade someone or something
    • Elevator pitch, a very short sales presentation, allegedly short enough to be made during an elevator ride
    • Pitch (filmmaking), a proposal for a film
Pitch (music)

Pitch is a perceptual property of sounds that allows their ordering on a frequency-related scale, or more commonly, pitch is the quality that makes it possible to judge sounds as "higher" and "lower" in the sense associated with musical melodies. Pitch can be determined only in sounds that have a frequency that is clear and stable enough to distinguish from noise. Pitch is a major auditory attribute of musical tones, along with duration, loudness, and timbre.

Pitch may be quantified as a frequency, but pitch is not a purely objective physical property; it is a subjective psychoacoustical attribute of sound. Historically, the study of pitch and pitch perception has been a central problem in psychoacoustics, and has been instrumental in forming and testing theories of sound representation, processing, and perception in the auditory system.

Pitch (resin)

Pitch is a name for any of a number of viscoelastic polymers. Pitch can be natural or manufactured, derived from petroleum, coal tar or plants. Various forms of pitch may also be called tar, bitumen or asphalt. Pitch produced from plants is also known as resin. Some products made from plant resin are also known as rosin.

Pitch was traditionally used to help caulk the seams of wooden sailing vessels (see shipbuilding). Pitch was also used to waterproof wooden containers, and in the making of torches. Petroleum-derived pitch is black in colour, hence the adjectival phrase, "pitch-black".

Pitch (TV series)

Pitch is an upcoming American drama television series set to be broadcast on Fox starting September 22, 2016, and the first scripted television program of its kind to be officially associated with Major League Baseball. The series was commissioned on May 10, 2016.

Pitch (baseball)

In baseball, a pitch is the act of throwing a baseball toward home plate to start a play. The term comes from the Knickerbocker Rules. Originally, the ball had to be literally "pitched" underhand, as with pitching horseshoes. Overhand throwing was not allowed until 1884.

The biomechanics of pitching have been studied extensively. The phases of throwing include windup, early cocking, late cocking, early acceleration, late acceleration, deceleration, and follow-through.

Pitchers throw a variety of pitches, each of which has a slightly different velocity, trajectory, movement, hand position, wrist position and/or arm angle. These variations are introduced to confuse the batter in various ways, and ultimately aid the defensive team in getting the batter or baserunners out. To obtain variety, and therefore enhance defensive baseball strategy, the pitcher manipulates the grip on the ball at the point of release. Variations in the grip cause the seams to "catch" the air differently, thereby changing the trajectory of the ball, making it harder for the batter to hit.

The selection of which pitch to use can depend on a wide variety of factors including the type of hitter who is being faced; whether there are any base runners; how many outs have been made in the inning; and the current score.

Pitch (ascent/descent)

In rock climbing and ice climbing, a pitch is a steep section of a route that requires a rope between two belays, as part of a climbing system. Standard climbing ropes are between 50 and 80 metres long, so a pitch is always shorter, between two convenient ledges if possible; longer routes are multi-pitch, requiring the re-use of the rope each time. In free climbing, pitch refers to classification by climbers of the difficulty of ascent on certain climbing routes.

In advanced climbing or mountaineering, another definition of pitch is not restricted by the length of the rope. On easier terrain or when moving quickly, the length of a pitch can be extended by means of simul climbing, effectively combining several pitches together by means of a running belay. Speed climbers will often state that they completed a long route with a reduced number of pitches, effectively calling a pitch any time a fixed belay was used or a changeover in the lead occurred. This definition is used loosely, since the length of a pitch is only limited by the nature of the terrain and the confidence of the individual climbing party.

Tree NP - Double Cross - 1.jpg|Old Woman formation in Joshua Tree National Park is climbed in a single pitch Tree - Wonderland of Rocks South Astro Dome.jpg|South Astro Dome formation in Joshua Tree National Park is climbed in two pitches Tree - Moosedog Tower 1.jpg|Moosedog Tower in Joshua Tree National Park is climbed in three pitches southwest.jpg| Seneca Rocks is usually done in four pitches. Dome.jpg| Pywiack Dome is usually done in five pitches. Meadows - Fairview Dome from Daff Dome descent - 3.JPG| Fairview Dome originally done in twelve pitches. Capitan 01.JPG|| The Nose on El Capitan has 31 pitches.

Pitch (filmmaking)

A pitch is a concise verbal (and sometimes visual) presentation of an idea for a film or TV series generally made by a screenwriter or film director to a film producer or studio executive in the hope of attracting development finance to pay for the writing of a screenplay.

"Pitch" is a contraction of the phrase " sales pitch". A pitch is used throughout different stages of production, such as casting and distribution, as well as to urge film producers to further fund a project. Filmmakers who devise a pitch tend to manufacture a production package, which is handed out to each potential investor during the pitch. The package contains the basic information for the filmmaker's project, such as a plot synopsis and budgeting values. Sometimes, filmmakers will produce an independent pitch trailer as a part of the package to help potential financiers better visualize the project and the filmmaker's vision.

Though pitches are usually made on the basis of a full script or teleplay, animated productions for both film and television are often pitched on the basis of storyboards alone. For example, the animated television show Phineas and Ferb was pitched from a storyboard. Co-founders of the project, Dan Povenmire and Jeff "Swampy" Marsh, needed to convince overseas executives for The Walt Disney Company to greenlight the series, so they drew a storyboard and recorded it as a reel. They then mixed it and dubbed it over with sound effects, voices, and narrative, then sent the recording to the executives, who accepted it.

Television pitches can also be devised by the network or company that produces the program. Certain networks are pitched the idea of including a character in a series in order to boost ratings. Such pitches have been used with "Oliver" in The Brady Bunch and "Luke" on Growing Pains. Networks also try to force their ideas on series' producers through their pitches, though their approach is business-oriented and their ideas are generally not favored by writers and viewers. In 1992, the crew of the animated series Rugrats was approached by Nickelodeon, which pitched the idea of a Rugrats Hanukkah special. Paul Germain, co-creator of the series, responded by suggesting a passover special, which he dubbed a "funny idea." After they closed production for that special, they began considering the Hanukkah special and eventually created it in 1996 as the episode " A Rugrats Chanukah."

Pitch (card game)

Pitch (or "High Low Jack") is an American trick-taking card game derived from the English game of All Fours (Seven Up). Historically, Pitch started as "Blind All Fours", a very simple All Fours variant that is still played in England as a pub game. The modern game involving a bidding phase and setting back a party's score if the bid is not reached came up in the middle of the 19th century and is more precisely known as Auction Pitch or Setback. Whereas All Fours started as a two-player game, Pitch is most popular for three to five players. Four can play individually or in fixed partnerships, depending in part on regional preferences. Auction Pitch is played in numerous variations that vary the deck used, provide methods for improving players' hands, or expand the scoring system. Some of these variants gave rise to a new game known as Pedro or Cinch.

Pitch (sports field)

A pitch or a sports ground is an outdoor playing area for various sports. The term pitch is most commonly used in British English, while the comparable term in American and Canadian English is playing field or sports field.

In most sports the official term is field of play, although this is not regularly used by those outside refereeing/umpiring circles. The field of play generally includes out-of-bounds areas that a player is likely to enter while playing a match, such as the area beyond the touchlines in association football and rugby or the sidelines in American and Canadian football, or the " foul territory" in baseball.

The surface of a pitch is most commonly composed of sod (grass), but may also be artificial turf, sand, clay, gravel, concrete, or other materials. A playing field on ice may be referred to as a rink, for example an ice hockey rink, although rink may also refer to the entire building or, in the sport of curling, to either the building or a particular team.

In the sport of cricket, the cricket pitch refers not to the entire field of play, but to the section of the field on which batting and bowling take place in the centre of the field. The pitch is prepared differently from the rest of the field, to provide a harder surface for bowling.

A pitch is often a regulation space, as in an association football pitch.

The term level playing field is also used metaphorically to mean fairness in non-sporting human activities such as business where there are notional winners and losers.

Pitch (film)

Pitch is a 1997 Canadian documentary created by Kenny Hotz and Spencer Rice, featuring themselves as two young filmmakers attending the Toronto Film Festival to pitch a film concept to various celebrities.

Their film idea, titled "The Dawn", concerns a Mafia don who goes for a hernia operation but gets a sex change instead. During the 1996 Toronto fest, they approach Roger Ebert, Norman Jewison (at a packed press conference), Eric Stoltz (leaving a limo), Al Pacino, and others without much success. On a roll, they leave Toronto for Hollywood, getting advice from Arthur Hiller and Neil Simon and finding an agent who expresses interest in their pitch. The film was shown at the 1997 Toronto Film Festival.

The film features songs by the Toronto band Phono-Comb.

Pitch (typewriter)

Pitch is the number of characters and spaces in one inch of running text, that is characters per inch (abbreviated cpi). The pitch is most often used as a measurement of font size of typewriters as well as printers.

The relation between pitch font size and typographic font size is usually inverse: a 12 pitch typewriter font is equal in height to 10 point typographic font, while a 10 pitch typewriter font is equal in height to 12 point typographic font. Though this relation is not obligatory: a smaller in the x-height 12 pitch font can have the body height equal to a 10 pitch font, thus creating a text with increased line spacing.

The most widespread fonts in typewriters are 10 and 12 pitch, called Pica and Elite respectively. There may be other font styles with various width: condensed or compressed (17–20 cpi), italic or bold (10 pitch), enlarged (5–8 cpi) and so on.

Usage examples of "pitch".

Since Bull Shockhead would bury his brother, and lord Ralph would seek the damsel, and whereas there is water anigh, and the sun is well nigh set, let us pitch our tents and abide here till morning, and let night bring counsel unto some of us.

In the sudden brightness he saw Abraxas, first screaming in terror as the ocean rushed toward him, then pitching with the force of the water.

Walking through a wall in the pitch black, feeling the rough adobe as she made her way blindly down a secret passageway, was sensible?

Whereupon the adulation reached fever pitch, the people screamed and shrieked with joy, every .

As the adulation showered upon Napoleon reaches a fevered pitch and spurs a movement to name him First Consul for Life with the right to name a successor, Josephine has misgivings.

Pitching your tent An example of continuity between the headline and the body copy is an advertisement for a line of tents sold by the Boy Scouts of America.

Kili, who had almost trapped him once before, with a much smaller force aflight, was streaking to a pitch a thousand feet above the other six, screaming commands.

They were the hard-eyed group, the appraisers, the potential aggressors, the bunch of guys making the half-obvious pitch at the interesting stranger.

And the aileron and rudder controls, and those which governed the pitch and tune of the rotor blades, by whose combined means the little gig could have been brought down to the surface, were out of operation.

Amid the smoke, deafened by the incessant reports which always made him jump, Tushin not taking his pipe from his mouth ran from gun to gun, now aiming, now counting the charges, now giving orders about replacing dead or wounded horses and harnessing fresh ones, and shouting in his feeble voice, so high pitched and irresolute.

The herd paused for an instant at the edge of the slope, but Akela gave tongue in the full hunting yell, and they pitched over one after the other just as steamers shoot rapids, the sand and stones spurting up round them.

The alienists listened with keen attention to his words, since their curiosity had been aroused to a high pitch by the suggestive yet mostly conflicting and incoherent stories of his family and neighbors.

With each mortal wound, an amphibian pitched writhing into space and tumbled flailing against those behind.

On each cane shaft, tied behind the iron arrowhead, was a tuft of unravelled hemp rope that had been soaked in pitch, which spluttered and then burned fiercely when touched with the slow-match, The archers loosed their arrows, which sailed up in a high, flaming parabola and dropped down to peg into the timbers of an anchored vessel.

Stone colossi marched in endless night and drove herds of grinning androsphinxes down to the shores of illimitable stagnant rivers of pitch.