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Crossword clues for name

name
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
name
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a brand name
▪ The use of tobacco brand names in sponsoring sports has been banned.
a code name (=a secret name used to hide your real identity)
▪ The spy was referred to in the report only by his code name 'Trevor S'.
a name/an identity tag
▪ Every baby had a name tag on his or her wrist.
a naming ceremony (=to name a baby, without a religious service)
▪ Many people opt for a naming ceremony rather than a christening.
assumed name
▪ He’s been living in Peru under an assumed name.
big name
▪ Poor attendance at the concert was put down to the lack of big names.
brand name
changed...name by deed poll
▪ Steve changed his name by deed poll to Elvis Presley-Smith.
Christian name
▪ She didn’t like children to call her by her Christian name.
clear...name
▪ a long-running legal battle to clear his name
code name
▪ a crime busting operation code-named Jeeves
domain name
enrol on a course/put your name down for a courseBritish English (= to arrange to officially join a course)
▪ How about enrolling on a sailing course?
family name
first name
▪ Her first name’s Helen, but I don’t know her surname.
full name
▪ Please write your full name and address on the form.
generic term/name (for sth)
▪ Fine Arts is a generic term for subjects such as painting, music, and sculpture.
give sb/sth a bad name
▪ These annoying tourists give all Americans a bad name.
given name
good name
▪ It threatened to damage the good name of the firm.
have/get a bad name
▪ The bar had a bad name and was avoided by all the locals.
I forget the name/details etc
▪ I forget the name of the street, but it’s the first on the left.
in joint names (=belong to two named people)
▪ Both parties must sign the form if the account is to be in joint names.
last name
long name
▪ He has a very long name.
maiden name
mention sb’s name
▪ Why does he look angry every time I mention Clare’s name?
middle name
▪ Don’t worry – discretion is my middle name.
name a successor (=tell people who the successor will be)
▪ The company is expected to name a successor for Corbett in May.
name brand
▪ name-brand climbing gear
name day
name tag
pen name
pet name
place name
▪ Many of the place names are Scottish in origin.
proper name for
▪ The proper name for Matthew’s condition is hyperkinetic syndrome.
sb’s married name (=a woman’s last name, when she has changed it to her husband’s name)
▪ She gave them Pat’s married name and address.
sb’s name and address
▪ We’ll need your full name and address.
second name
▪ ‘What’s your second name?’ ‘Jones.’
shout sb’s name
▪ Then she heard Ferdinando shout her name.
signed...name
▪ The artist had signed his name in the corner of the painting.
stage name
trade name
trades under...name
▪ The firm now trades under the name Lanski and Weber.
under the name of
▪ He made a few records under the name of Joe Ritchie.
user name
▪ Please enter your user name and password and click ‘OK’.
what on earth/in the world/in heaven’s name etc (=used for emphasis when you are surprised, angry etc)
▪ What on earth’s going on?
without a penny to...name
▪ He died without a penny to his name.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bad
▪ Good technology has gained a bad name.
▪ On the field, he is annoying and irritating and gives high-salaried athletes more of a bad name than they already have.
▪ In this way the original insights of New Right thinking have acquired for themselves a bad name.
▪ This is the sort of self-serving, insincere baloney that gives good government a bad name.
▪ Then came the kind of spot award that gets Anfield a bad name.
▪ He called them, regularly, the worst purple-prose names.
▪ The dinner they gave him ranks among the epic brawls which regularly give the brotherhood of socialist solidarity a bad name.
▪ This is the kind of disingenuous hair-splitting that gives politics a bad name.
big
▪ No doubt about it, no doubt at all: Davis was going to be a big, big name.
▪ Investors steered clear of big-name high techs in favor of shares like karaoke equipment trader Nikkodo.
▪ Then he starts buying large consumer stocks and big brand names.
▪ The venue's been upgraded to attract big names, but critics say it's still not good enough.
▪ Many longtime Internet users vow to stick with the lowest-priced provider, not the one with the biggest brand name.
▪ The Lisburn event traditionally draws big names, as a glance through the previous winners list confirms.
▪ Many of the biggest names in rock have already been inducted.
different
▪ We know these parallel-operating wholes by different names.
▪ A number of different names have evolved for the new languages but the consensus today labels them Tocharian.
▪ Even if I am peculiar, I wish I had a different name.
▪ Only it seems they was callin' him by a different name, or names even.
▪ It did not produce new concepts or frameworks, although it did prevent unneeded competition among essentially identical approaches bearing different names.
▪ Even when their specific characteristics are recognized, they are given different interpretations and names.
▪ Students know it by different names in different towns: freaking, grinding, jacking, booty dancing, the nasty.
famous
▪ Building a reputation is extremely difficult unless you have a famous name coming from a famous relative.
▪ Inpart, the fading lustre of famous names can be blamed on the economic downturn of the 1990s.
▪ Rarely can such a clutch of famous names have faced the stark and unfamiliar spectre of failure on one afternoon.
▪ It was the best private house in Hochhauser, and after all, he was an internationally famous name.
▪ The imaginative and nimble have registered lots of famous corporate names before their sleepy owners realized what was happening.
▪ Otherwise the High Court will order the final curtain to fall on one of motorsports most famous names.
full
▪ An identity bracelet was put on her wrist with her full name and hospital record number written on it.
▪ At the very least, the full name of the first individual should fit on the first line.
▪ For companies you need their full name, country of registration and registration number.
▪ It occurred to Oswald that everyone called the prisoner by his full name.
▪ Maisie's full name was Maisie Ophelia.
▪ You know what my full name is?
▪ Include your full name and address, and request that your name be removed from their mailing list.
maiden
▪ And I see no point in reverting to my maiden name since that belonged to my father.
▪ Callahan is her maiden name as a matter of fact.
▪ For a long time she maintained her maiden name until it became a public and political necessity to adopt the surname Clinton.
▪ Or is Jones your maiden name?
▪ Many women choose to work under their maiden names.
▪ For example, they recently voted to strike down an act that would have allowed married women to keep their maiden names.
▪ Her maiden name was Wyatt, but now she's called Hughes.
new
▪ The originator can be replaced with a new name, up to 28 printing characters long, including spaces.
▪ Ancient evil spirits went by a new name.
▪ The new wife's name was Medina.
▪ That could be the new column name.
▪ By late 1969, the length had increased, giving rise to a new name.
▪ Its members gave themselves new names, like X or No. 84.
▪ However, the party will give itself a new name when it resumes the congress next weekend.
▪ The sale needs to be revamped, even relaunched with a new name, and aggressively marketed.
proper
▪ When we're among ourselves we call it by its proper name, which is poliomyelitis.
▪ Other groups of plants require a thorough revision before we can be sure of the proper name for the species.
▪ Unusually for so dim a star, it is dignified by an old proper name: Alrakis.
▪ No, but patients occasionally complain afterward that they have more trouble with proper names than with memories in general.
▪ Many will never be known for many lived and died without a proper name.
▪ Consider the following grammatical and ungrammatical sentences containing proper names.
▪ His proper names show the same self-conscious striving for a romantic atmosphere.
▪ How does the syntax of proper names differ from that of descriptions? 15.
real
▪ Neither the instructors nor the other students knew anyone's real name, or even what they were giving as their name.
▪ The jury also acquitted the rapper, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, of being an accessory after the fact.
▪ Bonefish's real name was Hector, but he had earned his nickname because of his uncanny ability to find the elusive fish.
▪ Achaachi was the only agent who had stayed at a Paris hotel under his real name.
▪ That is not my real name.
▪ Nor is Garcia his real name.
▪ My real name I can not remember.
■ NOUN
brand
▪ As a result, brand name activity is no longer permissible whereas corporate is, or at least still goes on.
▪ Some consumers associate brand name with quality; others associate quality with cost.
▪ Earlier this month the partners of this shop in Cheltenham were fined £600 each for selling fake top brand name t-shirts.
▪ Because a respected brand name is a valuable asset, the producer has a tremendous incentive to protect the reputation.
▪ It is a major opportunity for banks, insurance companies, and others with established brand names and good products.
▪ One product, aspartame - better known by its Nutrasweet brand name - dominates, with four-fifths of the world market.
▪ They may also feature brand name products whose price reductions are subsidized by food manufacturers.
change
▪ It has since undergone six name changes and numerous revolutions in technology, style and editorial philosophy.
▪ City officials were hoping the name change would help curb the prostitution which festered in the area during the 1970s.
▪ The former Teesside Polytechnic celebrated its name change by releasing hundreds of balloons into the sky above Middlesbrough.
▪ There have been a lot of name changes in retailing lately, he noted.
▪ Another name change came in 1973, to Health and Social Service Journal.
▪ Hansen says the name change will bring new life to the ballpark.
▪ Saturday's name change was the sixth this century, and the previous alterations did not necessarily lead to a radical renewal.
▪ The names change, but the winning continues.
code
▪ It was preceded by a scrupulous recce weeks before in a restaurant near his house with the code name Pomme d'Amour.
▪ The new system was as deep and mysterious as its chromatic code name implied.
▪ Medusa was the code name of a back-up disk suite product brought to market a year ago.
▪ Olenick picked the code name as a tribute to his commander, Col.
▪ The Triumph code name, by the way, has been changed.
▪ Chuck is short for Charlie, and Charlie is the old code name for a down-home white bigot.
▪ Fascination with code names went well beyond operations, reaching even the contra supporters and fund-raisers.
▪ Given the ironic code name Oxcart, the plane was the first to be built from titanium.
domain
▪ Seven new top-level domain names have been agreed on after lengthy deliberations.
▪ In addition, parked domain names increased by over 40,000 to a new total of 210,000.
▪ Bimpson recognised a business opportunity when he discovered that the government had secured domain names for all the schools in his borough.
▪ Some domain names have reportedly sold for as much as $ 50, 000.
▪ Anyone who's serious about their presence on the Web has their own domain name.
▪ The service provider will register the domain name for the customer and act as the customer mail forwarder.
▪ Finally, if you have a business of your own or some cash to burn, get yourself a good domain name.
▪ Verio's new self-serve domain name registration services provide customers with an easy-to-use and faster way to register and manage domain names.
household
▪ Nintendo, a household name, is accused of fixing the prices of its home-video games.
▪ Norris is not a household name.
▪ And it would be promoted by the sort of publicity which had made Sunlight soap a household name.
▪ Billy Dale is not going to become a household name.
▪ Interestingly, though, the bottom 10 includes many household names fallen on hard times.
▪ Plus, it's not as if the Barn Burners, Helm's current band, is a household name.
▪ Not only a household name, now it was a household face with household heart as well.
▪ Artists will range from school choirs to household names.
module
▪ Distribution, however, takes place via module names.
▪ A first issue number must be specified for every module name entered.
▪ You should check the spelling and enter an existing module name.
▪ A Part Number equal to the module name is automatically assigned for each module name reserved.
▪ Reserve module names for the package and the new modules which it is to contain.
▪ The details required are: The module name for the root package.
user
▪ You can change this user name is you wish.
▪ Repeat the request at a later time or repeat the request with a different start user name.
▪ The user name can be up to 28 alphanumeric characters long including spaces.
▪ The latter is the default and assumed to be the case wherever a user name mapping does not exist.
▪ If there are more than 25 ascendants, enter the last displayed ascendant in the user name field to reveal the other ascendants.
▪ Note that on all subsequent pages, the supplied user name will be displayed at the top of the page.
■ VERB
bear
▪ He devised a set of heavy draft horse casting hobbles which are now outmoded but still bear his name.
▪ The Lechmere chain traces its roots to merchant Abraham Cohen, who opened a harness store that bore his name in 1913.
▪ This company bears the name Royalbion, which is synonymous with Britain itself.
▪ Among them: Paul Dresher, founder of the Bay Area ensemble that bears his name.
▪ The open moors now bore the names and the marks of their Covenant spirit.
▪ Carl says some fake letters even bear the names of Apache tribal members.
▪ Any infant protected by an amulet bearing the names of the angels would be immune from her attentions.
call
▪ She sat there for a few seconds, then heard a voice softly calling her name.
▪ When she spoke to me, calling me by name, I never wanted to do anything to spoil the moment.
▪ Having skirted the mire itself without success, the search-party fanned out to cover a wider area, calling Horatia's name.
▪ The effect of this is to give the advantage to the person who is skilled at calling names.
▪ If I call it by this name I will have the whole of a dental audience with me.
▪ Lillian Garner called her Jenny for some reason but she never pushed, hit or called her mean names.
▪ This will help it to identify with you, and soon instinctively it will come to you when you call its name.
▪ All of the other reindeer used to laugh and call him names.
clear
▪ Mr Donovan's motive had been to clear his name, not to close the magazine.
▪ The Joint Committee investigating the scandal cleared my name.
▪ After twenty years of gossip and innuendo was this going to be the one chance to clear his father's name?
▪ No defendant could completely clear his or her name.
▪ The trial could have been abandoned but he insisted on having the opportunity to clear his name.
▪ The suspects say they are not guilty but want to clear their names.
▪ Amal's brother, fearful of severe punishment for using drugs, did not step forward to clear his sister's name.
▪ Also this week: Samantha suggests to Siobhan that exhuming Josh's body could clear her name.
forget
▪ It's so easy to forget that the name of the game is survival.
▪ I was wondering if you know this guy Wilkinson, I forget his first name.
▪ You've forgotten my name again now.
▪ Edwards revealed he knew his days at Spurs were numbered when then-manager Peter Shreeves forgot his name!
▪ Through the passage of time and their incurious nature, the townspeople had completely forgotten where the name came from.
▪ She never forgot the names of her dead.
▪ She had come to this, to a limp white heap who had forgotten the names of her nearest and dearest.
give
▪ These may be included in the same genus - Tyrannosaurus - but will be given a different specific name.
▪ She remembered giving secret names to things, carrying on conversations with chairs and trees.
▪ In my application I had to give the names of two people who could give references about my work.
▪ He looked up at the screen at the exact moment Rocky gave himself the name he would henceforth carry.
▪ We believe a cup of coffee leaves a nicer taste in your mouth when it's given to you by name.
▪ He declined to give the names of the companies.
▪ Its situation south of Turnham Green is thought to have given rise to its name locally, in the first case.
▪ Here, for the first time, the prints were given pretty names instead of numbers.
hear
▪ Did you ever hear such dopey names?
▪ Now, where have I heard that name before?
▪ Travis has said nothing to his family about any Leith Everett, so they won't have heard your name before.
▪ His attorney, Zachary Jones, initially said Smith left after hearing his name in trade rumors.
▪ I was to hear his name again and again.
▪ He actually could hear his name!
▪ I remember having heard the name Primo before.
know
▪ If you know the name of the existing document that you want to edit, press Shift-F10.
▪ I don't know your first name, but I love you.
▪ And I know all the names of the states in the United States and their capitals.
▪ It had been Arthur's brainwave in the night; they must know Clare's second name, and address.
▪ I knew what its name was.
▪ Birger Dahlerus, Wenner-Gren, you know the names.
▪ This requirement arises only where such a person demands to know the name and address of the proprietor and not otherwise.
mention
▪ I could mention the names of several persons whose influence over their flocks was solely attributable to this circumstance.
▪ Only when she mentions the name Miranda do their eyes light up with respect.
▪ Clare had evidently mentioned my name to her.
▪ Although the president did not mention him by name, Feuerstein was seated behind Mrs Clinton throughout the address.
▪ The original title-page was replaced with one that did not mention Shakespeare's name.
▪ He never referred to any of his predecessors by so much as mentioning their names.
▪ When the initial grief of the desertion had passed she had known better than to mention her father's name.
▪ Don't ever mention the boy's name again.
put
▪ Get him into a corner / Corner him. 89. Put his name in a book / Book him.
▪ I did not put my name in.
▪ Craig McGrugan put his name on the score sheet twice and Jonathan Kennedy got the other.
▪ Some disreputable agencies try to charge just for putting your name on their lists although this is illegal.
▪ Emilio recognized the smell instantly but it was a moment before he could put a name to it.
▪ Consumers will be able to put their names on a register of people who don't want to receive sales calls.
▪ That would teach me to pay more attention, and to put names to phone numbers.
▪ Charfi had never before put his name to such a public statement.
remember
▪ Unfortunately they couldn't remember its name - or even which town it was in.
▪ He dreaded the sessions, although years later he remembered the name of at least one of the most gifted little girls.
▪ A simple method for remembering the names of the three areas is to associate them with a particular point of the body.
▪ I do not remember her name, just that she was very old.
▪ Entrants should remember to include their name, address and age on a label on the back of each piece of work.
▪ I recall, in my confusion, being inanely impressed by a pop star with enough upstairs to remember his own name.
▪ If people can not remember any other name from the crew, they do remember hers.
sign
▪ The potter has signed his name Alletio on a raised panel.
▪ Some extend their billed baseball caps or hunch over and have the players sign their names on the back of their shirts.
▪ Mr Rosenthal's charitable actions go much further than signing his name on checks.
▪ Eight days later, the agreement was drafted and both sides met again at the summit and signed their names.
▪ So sign your names, friends, or make a mark if need be.
▪ He pulled out the piece of paper upon which earlier I had signed my name.
▪ The importer signifies his acceptance to future payment by signing his name across the bill's face.
▪ It was all signed in my name, made out in my name and everything.
use
▪ It is general that, in geology at least, women use their own names professionally.
▪ San Francisco-based AirTouch hoped to use its name in the effort.
▪ The trick is to use the person's name to conjure up a picture in your mind.
▪ In many cases, he has kept members of the original groups from using the names they helped make famous.
▪ He was right; she didn't use his name, if she could avoid it.
▪ She started using her given name in the Western manner rather than her family name, Wei.
▪ If I used my father's name.
▪ Twelve years later, Biddy returns to Dublin as a highly successful photographer using the name Beth Waters.
write
▪ Because I was afraid, and tired, and ill, I wrote my name on the letter: Mary.
▪ After studying her application, the examiner asked her to write down the name of the first president.
▪ Please write your name and address on the back.
▪ He wrote only his first name, in script-a big loop connected to a smaller loop.
▪ Taking an envelope from his pocket he wrote down the names of his guests.
▪ People must write her name on the ballot to vote for her.
▪ After attending a local nursery school, some children had been able to write their own names.
▪ He asks Primo to write his name on it.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bad name
▪ In this way the original insights of New Right thinking have acquired for themselves a bad name.
▪ On the field, he is annoying and irritating and gives high-salaried athletes more of a bad name than they already have.
▪ The dinner they gave him ranks among the epic brawls which regularly give the brotherhood of socialist solidarity a bad name.
▪ Then came the kind of spot award that gets Anfield a bad name.
▪ These holy rollers gave all the churches a bad name.
▪ This is the kind of disingenuous hair-splitting that gives politics a bad name.
▪ This is the sort of self-serving, insincere baloney that gives good government a bad name.
▪ What happened is indisputable: students, and the institutions to which they belonged, acquired a bad name universally.
a name to conjure with
▪ Carruthers, a name to conjure with!
▪ There is a name to conjure with and let slip easily of the tongue.
answer to the name of sth
▪ He's 6 foot 5, but he answers to the name of Shorty.
▪ One answering to the name of Henry.
▪ Relieved of her professional role, she manifested herself as an attractive well-dressed young woman answering to the name of Suzanne.
any ... you care to name/mention
aptly named/described/called etc
▪ In that regard, this disc is aptly named.
▪ It was aptly named the Plough & Harrow.
▪ The aptly named Honda Accord has been produced in co-operation with Rover.
▪ The latter was aptly named, so tart that the first gulp curled your lips back.
▪ The Manor might be aptly described as a spiritual College.
▪ The Moonlight Restaurant was aptly named.
▪ The parish was recently founded and aptly named.
▪ Then it was being run by the aptly named Thomas Mill.
be a household name/word
▪ Apple computers became a household word in the late '80s.
▪ He was the first Aboriginal to have mastered a western mode of painting and by 1940 his was a household name.
▪ His was a household name when the craze for stereoscopic views was fashionable.
▪ However, a number are household names; the obvious examples are the Severn and the Thames.
▪ I won't tell you who she is because the name is a household word.
▪ It sold world-wide, was a household name, and had virtually no competition.
▪ Its heroes are household names and millions of pounds are at stake when it is staged.
▪ Of course, her name was a household word.
▪ Plus, it's not as if the Barn Burners, Helm's current band, is a household name.
be on first name terms (with sb)
▪ Voice over Even the governor is on first name terms with the inmates, although the staff still keep a respectful distance.
blacken sb's name/character/reputation
drag sb's name through the mire
drag sb's name through the mud
get (your name) on the scoresheet
▪ Johansson got on the scoresheet himself just after the break to give Charlton the lead.
have your name in lights
lend your name to sth
▪ Nintendo lends its name to new games developed by about 60 companies.
▪ But a more calculating side is emerging, where celebrities are almost being blackmailed into lending their names to causes.
▪ Can he lend his name to the petition without compromising his professional integrity?
▪ Is he actually involved, or just lending his name to it?
rejoice in the name/title (of) sth
▪ This hotel looked older and rejoiced in the name of the Lion's Cub.
stain on sb's character/name/reputation etc
▪ Buy him eine kleine Knackwurst and toddle home without a stain on your character.
▪ Duran dominated Leonard physically that night, but five months later the New Orleans farce put a huge stain on his reputation.
▪ Robert Lopez is released without a stain on his character.
▪ The massacre has left an indelible stain on the name of Clan Campbell.
▪ Whatever the outcome, he not unnaturally regarded his time in gaol as a stigma, as a stain on his character.
stain sb's name/honour/reputation etc
sth is sb's middle name
▪ Don't worry - consistency is my middle name.
▪ I think Serious is your middle name.
▪ Let's just say this: Pretension is thy middle name.
▪ Optimism is my middle name because, unable to agree on a name, my parents stuck a pin in a dictionary.
the name/date/title etc escapes sb
to name/mention but a few
what's his/her/its name
What about your commitment to - what's his name?
what/how/where/who in God's name
▪ What in God's name is that noise?
what/how/why etc in heaven's name
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Ayrton Senna's full name was Ayrton Senna da Silva.
▪ He's a determined man and he values his good name.
▪ Her name was Martha.
▪ His name is Raymond Ford.
▪ I'm not very good at remembering people's names.
▪ I've forgotten the name of the street where she lives.
▪ I can't remember the name of the island.
▪ Marks and Spencer have made a name for themselves as a producer of high quality goods at reasonable prices.
▪ She didn't mention you by name, but I'm sure it was you she was talking about.
▪ She must have written to Laura without signing her name.
▪ Teenagers tend to get a bad name for being moody.
▪ The Chinese name for this plant means "cat's ears".
▪ The doctor will call your name when he is ready to see you.
▪ The village of Furnace got its name from the local industries of silver and iron smelting.
▪ This man has a name for making tough business deals.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Any name that was on the list was there because Nikos had put it there.
▪ I can't even recall how I ended up with Derek - if that was his real name.
▪ I was wondering if you know this guy Wilkinson, I forget his first name.
▪ If you are not ready to print the form letter, save it under a different name.
▪ The names came after a studio competition.
▪ Would the funds get new names?
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
aptly
▪ In fact, one way and another the food is very aptly named, having risen from the ashes in two senses!
▪ The parish was recently founded and aptly named.
▪ In that regard, this disc is aptly named.
■ NOUN
director
▪ Michael Merson was named as acting director.
▪ Clinton has not named a campaign director or other top officials except Lewis.
▪ Darryl Marek was named the director of sports.
domain
▪ Humans are numerically dim so we use domain names instead, by matching up the names and numbers in a table.
▪ Verio previously hosted over 55,000 domain names.
▪ Some suggest simply increasing the kinds of domain names available.
man
▪ But that was so long ago, before even one man named Bush had won the White House.
▪ One of his linguistics professors, a man named Samuel Goldstein, had helped him understand the consequences of that simple fact.
▪ The man has not been named by police but was said to be aged 23.
▪ I sat next to a personable young man named Yong Yoon, who was not a typical bureaucrat.
player
▪ Premiership One title winners Leicester claimed another award when Austin Healey was named player of the season.
▪ He became the sixth player to be named a conference player of the week after playing the Raiders.
▪ Toby Bailey was named Pac-10 player of the week.
president
▪ ProActive Software Inc has named Pat Marriott vice president of market.
▪ Fitzsimmons was named senior executive vice president, and it appeared his coaching days were over.
▪ The latest impasse appears to be over the naming of a president.
▪ When the politicians returned to Congress, they approved the compromise that named Arteaga interim president.
▪ Since Newman was named president in October, Bankers Trust reorganized its derivatives and asset management businesses.
▪ Bennett, 44 years old, succeeds Rob Dickenson, 46, who recently was named president of a new company division.
son
▪ But so cool is the blue minimalist card that one style magazine editor aspired to name his baby son Sony.
▪ But she wondered what would happen if she and her husband had a son named Bastianelo and the son died.
▪ And he named his first son George Alex after his personal heroes, Best and Higgins.
▪ I vaguely recalled that Amin had named one of his sons after him.
▪ Of these the most important was Hartley, after whom he had named his first son.
woman
▪ Its only remaining inhabitant, a woman named Wah Wah, is cooking rice in a hut in the afternoon downpour.
▪ A beautiful biblical woman named Abigail is responsible for yet another version.
▪ He told his Intourist guide, a young woman named Rimma, that he wanted to apply for Soviet citizenship.
▪ Although he was personally opposed to slavery, in 1835 Barnum purchased a slave woman named Joice Heth.
▪ What motivated my desire to write about the homeless from the position of that doorway was a woman named Gerri Willinger.
▪ Soon after John Henry got the railroad job, he married a woman named Polly Ann.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bad name
▪ In this way the original insights of New Right thinking have acquired for themselves a bad name.
▪ On the field, he is annoying and irritating and gives high-salaried athletes more of a bad name than they already have.
▪ The dinner they gave him ranks among the epic brawls which regularly give the brotherhood of socialist solidarity a bad name.
▪ Then came the kind of spot award that gets Anfield a bad name.
▪ These holy rollers gave all the churches a bad name.
▪ This is the kind of disingenuous hair-splitting that gives politics a bad name.
▪ This is the sort of self-serving, insincere baloney that gives good government a bad name.
▪ What happened is indisputable: students, and the institutions to which they belonged, acquired a bad name universally.
aptly named/described/called etc
▪ In that regard, this disc is aptly named.
▪ It was aptly named the Plough & Harrow.
▪ The aptly named Honda Accord has been produced in co-operation with Rover.
▪ The latter was aptly named, so tart that the first gulp curled your lips back.
▪ The Manor might be aptly described as a spiritual College.
▪ The Moonlight Restaurant was aptly named.
▪ The parish was recently founded and aptly named.
▪ Then it was being run by the aptly named Thomas Mill.
be a household name/word
▪ Apple computers became a household word in the late '80s.
▪ He was the first Aboriginal to have mastered a western mode of painting and by 1940 his was a household name.
▪ His was a household name when the craze for stereoscopic views was fashionable.
▪ However, a number are household names; the obvious examples are the Severn and the Thames.
▪ I won't tell you who she is because the name is a household word.
▪ It sold world-wide, was a household name, and had virtually no competition.
▪ Its heroes are household names and millions of pounds are at stake when it is staged.
▪ Of course, her name was a household word.
▪ Plus, it's not as if the Barn Burners, Helm's current band, is a household name.
be on first name terms (with sb)
▪ Voice over Even the governor is on first name terms with the inmates, although the staff still keep a respectful distance.
drag sb's name through the mire
get (your name) on the scoresheet
▪ Johansson got on the scoresheet himself just after the break to give Charlton the lead.
have your name in lights
stain on sb's character/name/reputation etc
▪ Buy him eine kleine Knackwurst and toddle home without a stain on your character.
▪ Duran dominated Leonard physically that night, but five months later the New Orleans farce put a huge stain on his reputation.
▪ Robert Lopez is released without a stain on his character.
▪ The massacre has left an indelible stain on the name of Clan Campbell.
▪ Whatever the outcome, he not unnaturally regarded his time in gaol as a stigma, as a stain on his character.
sth is sb's middle name
▪ Don't worry - consistency is my middle name.
▪ I think Serious is your middle name.
▪ Let's just say this: Pretension is thy middle name.
▪ Optimism is my middle name because, unable to agree on a name, my parents stuck a pin in a dictionary.
to name/mention but a few
what's his/her/its name
What about your commitment to - what's his name?
what/how/where/who in God's name
▪ What in God's name is that noise?
what/how/why etc in heaven's name
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Bill was named after his father.
▪ Can you name this tune?
▪ Have they named the baby yet?
▪ He would not name his clients.
▪ McCarthy was recently named to the Small Business Committee.
▪ Our sources spoke on condition that they not be named.
▪ Police have named the dead woman as Annabel Thomas.
▪ Ron has a cat named Chicken.
▪ She refused to name the father of her child.
▪ The editor of "The Times" has resigned amid a political storm. His successor has not yet been named.
▪ The magazine has named Bonnie Fuller as deputy editor.
▪ The new building is going to be named for Ronald Reagan.
▪ We named our daughter Sarah.
▪ We are naming Dr Bob McClure head of the IRC in China.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ In 1570, the Marquis's son, also conveniently named Alberigo, inaugurated the use of gunpowder in quarrying.
▪ It named Thomas Ashmore president of the top-10-market organization, which will be based in Dallas.
▪ On 31 August Sukarno named his Cabinet.
▪ Potter's wife is unknown, but he had a brother-in-law named Thomas Fowle in Boston prior to the civil war.
▪ The form should name the registered proprietor in full.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Name

Name \Name\ (n[=a]m), n. [AS. nama; akin to D. naam, OS. & OHG. namo, G. name, Icel. nafn, for namn, Dan. navn, Sw. namn, Goth. nam[=o], L. nomen (perh. influenced by noscere, gnoscere, to learn to know), Gr. 'o`mona, Scr. n[=a]man. [root]267. Cf. Anonymous, Ignominy, Misnomer, Nominal, Noun.]

  1. The title by which any person or thing is known or designated; a distinctive specific appellation, whether of an individual or a class.

    Whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof.
    --Gen. ii. 19.

    What's in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet.
    --Shak.

  2. A descriptive or qualifying appellation given to a person or thing, on account of a character or acts.

    His name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.
    --Is. ix. 6.

  3. Reputed character; reputation, good or bad; estimation; fame; especially, illustrious character or fame; honorable estimation; distinction.

    What men of name resort to him?
    --Shak.

    Far above . . . every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come.
    --Eph. i. 21.

    I will get me a name and honor in the kingdom.
    --1 Macc. iii. 1

  4. He hath brought up an evil name upon a virgin.
    --Deut. xxii. 19.

    The king's army . . . had left no good name behind.
    --Clarendon.

    4. Those of a certain name; a race; a family.

    The ministers of the republic, mortal enemies of his name, came every day to pay their feigned civilities.
    --Motley.

  5. A person, an individual. [Poetic] They list with women each degenerate name. --Dryden. Christian name.

    1. The name a person receives at baptism, as distinguished from surname; baptismal name; in western countries, it is also called a first name.

    2. A given name, whether received at baptism or not. Given name. See under Given. In name, in profession, or by title only; not in reality; as, a friend in name. In the name of.

      1. In behalf of; by the authority of. `` I charge you in the duke's name to obey me.''
        --Shak.

      2. In the represented or assumed character of. ``I'll to him again in name of Brook.''
        --Shak.

        Name plate, a plate as of metal, glass, etc., having a name upon it, as a sign; a doorplate.

        Pen name, a name assumed by an author; a pseudonym or nom de plume.
        --Bayard Taylor.

        Proper name (Gram.), a name applied to a particular person, place, or thing.

        To call names, to apply opprobrious epithets to; to call by reproachful appellations.

        To take a name in vain, to use a name lightly or profanely; to use a name in making flippant or dishonest oaths.
        --Ex. xx. 7.

        Syn: Appellation; title; designation; cognomen; denomination; epithet.

        Usage: Name, Appellation, Title, Denomination. Name is generic, denoting that combination of sounds or letters by which a person or thing is known and distinguished. Appellation, although sometimes put for name simply, denotes, more properly, a descriptive term (called also agnomen or cognomen), used by way of marking some individual peculiarity or characteristic; as, Charles the Bold, Philip the Stammerer. A title is a term employed to point out one's rank, office, etc.; as, the Duke of Bedford, Paul the Apostle, etc. Denomination is to particular bodies what appellation is to individuals; thus, the church of Christ is divided into different denominations, as Congregationalists, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, etc.

Name

Name \Name\ (n[=a]m), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Named (n[=a]md); p. pr. & vb. n. Naming.] [AS. namian. See Name, n.]

  1. To give a distinctive name or appellation to; to entitle; to denominate; to style; to call.

    She named the child Ichabod.
    --1 Sam. iv. 21.

    Thus was the building left Ridiculous, and the work Confusion named.
    --Milton.

  2. To mention by name; to utter or publish the name of; to refer to by distinctive title; to mention.

    None named thee but to praise.
    --Halleck.

    Old Yew, which graspest at the stones That name the underlying dead.
    --Tennyson.

  3. To designate by name or specifically for any purpose; to nominate; to specify; to appoint; as, to name a day for the wedding; to name someone as ambassador.

    Whom late you have named for consul.
    --Shak.

  4. (House of Commons) To designate (a member) by name, as the Speaker does by way of reprimand.

    Syn: To denominate; style; term; call; mention; specify; designate; nominate.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
name

Old English namian "to name, call; nominate, appoint," from source of name (n.). Related: Named; naming.

name

Old English nama, noma "name, reputation," from Proto-Germanic *namon (cognates: Old Saxon namo, Old Frisian nama, Old High German namo, German Name, Middle Dutch name, Dutch naam, Old Norse nafn, Gothic namo "name"), from PIE *nomn- (cognates: Sanskrit nama; Avestan nama; Greek onoma, onyma; Latin nomen; Old Church Slavonic ime, genitive imene; Russian imya; Old Irish ainm; Old Welsh anu "name").\n

\nMeaning "famous person" is from 1610s. Meaning "one's reputation" is from c.1300. As a modifier meaning "well-known," first attested 1938. Name brand is from 1944; name-calling attested from 1846; name-dropper first recorded 1947. name-tag is from 1903; name-child attested from 1845. The name of the game "the essential thing or quality" is from 1966; to have one's name in lights "be a famous performer" is from 1929.\n\nHe who once a good name gets,\n
May piss a bed, and say he sweats.\n

["Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit and Pickpocket Eloquence," London, 1811]

Wiktionary
name

n. Any nounal word or phrase which indicates a particular person, place, class, or thing. vb. (context transitive English) To give a name to.

WordNet
name
  1. v. assign a specified, proper name to; "They named their son David"; "The new school was named after the famous Civil Rights leader" [syn: call]

  2. give the name or identifying characteristics of; refer to by name or some other identifying characteristic property; "Many senators were named in connection with the scandal"; "The almanac identifies the auspicious months" [syn: identify]

  3. charge with a function; charge to be; "She was named Head of the Committee"; "She was made president of the club" [syn: nominate, make]

  4. create and charge with a task or function; "nominate a committee" [syn: appoint, nominate, constitute]

  5. mention and identify by name; "name your accomplices!"

  6. identify as in botany or biology, for example [syn: identify, discover, key, key out, distinguish, describe]

  7. make reference to; "His name was mentioned in connection with the invention" [syn: mention, advert, bring up, cite, refer]

  8. give or make a list of; name individually; give the names of; "List the states west of the Mississippi" [syn: list]

  9. determine or distinguish the nature of a problem or an illness through a diagnostic analysis [syn: diagnose]

name
  1. n. a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"

  2. by the sanction or authority of; "halt in the name of the law"

  3. a person's reputation; "he wanted to protect his good name"

  4. a well-known or notable person; "they studied all the great names in the history of France"; "she is an important figure in modern music" [syn: figure, public figure]

  5. family based on male descent; "he had no sons and there was no one to carry on his name" [syn: gens]

  6. a defamatory or abusive word or phrase; "sticks and stones may break my bones but names can never hurt me" [syn: epithet]

Wikipedia
Name (disambiguation)

A name is a word or term used for identification.

Name may also refer to:

Name

A name is a term used for identification. Names can identify a class or category of things, or a single thing, either uniquely, or within a given context. A personal name identifies, not necessarily uniquely, a specific individual human. The name of a specific entity is sometimes called a proper name (although that term has a philosophical meaning also) and is, when consisting of only one word, a proper noun. Other nouns are sometimes called "common names" or ( obsolete) "general names". A name can be given to a person, place, or thing; for example, parents can give their child a name or a scientist can give an element a name.

Caution must be exercised when translating, for there are ways that one language may prefer one type of name over another. A feudal naming habit is used sometimes in other languages: the French sometimes refer to Aristotle as "le Stagirite" from one spelling of his place of birth, and English speakers often refer to Shakespeare as "The Bard", recognizing him as a paragon writer of the language. Also, claims to preference or authority can be refuted: the British did not refer to Louis-Napoleon as Napoleon III during his rule.

Name (song)

"Name" is an alternative rock song by the American rock band Goo Goo Dolls. It was released in September 1995 as the third single from the album A Boy Named Goo. As the band's first hit, the song topped both the US Modern Rock chart and the US Album Rock chart, and reached number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Although the Goo Goo Dolls were considered an alternative group prior to the single's release, "Name" crossed over to pop and adult contemporary radio, greatly increasing the band's fan base.

Prior to the release of the Dizzy Up the Girl album three years later, "Name" was the band's most successful single. It is currently their 3rd most successful single, after " Iris" and " Slide".

The band re-recorded this song for their compilation album, Greatest Hits Volume One: The Singles; this version featured minimal arrangements and production.

NAME (dispersion model)

The NAME atmospheric pollution dispersion model was first developed by the UK's Met Office in 1986 after the nuclear accident at Chernobyl, which demonstrated the need for a method that could predict the spread and deposition of radioactive gases or material released into the atmosphere.

The acronym, NAME, originally stood for the Nuclear Accident ModEl. The Met Office has revised and upgraded the model over the years and it is now used as a general purpose dispersion model. The current version is known as the NAME III (Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modeling Environment) model. NAME III is currently operational and it will probably completely replace the original NAME model sometimes in 2006.

Usage examples of "name".

The name of his partially duped accomplice and abettor in this last marvelous assault, is no other than PHILIP LYNCH, Editor and Proprietor of the Gold Hill News.

Had it not been for a determined English professor named Arthur Holmes, the quest might well have fallen into abeyance altogether.

They abjured and abhorred the name of Roman citizens, which had formerly excited the ambition of mankind.

The candidate who aspired to the virtue of evangelical poverty, abjured, at his first entrance into a regular community, the idea, and even the name, of all separate or exclusive possessions.

It bore both the rich aroma of leaves being burnt in the fall and the faint perfume of wildflowers ablow in the spring, but it also held a third attar which seemed to be the breath of the Wind itself which none could ever set name to.

He had given the name of Stanley Adams, and had had such a queerly thick droning voice, that it made the clerk abnormally dizzy and sleepy to listen to him.

That the strange name, Abraxas, sprouting simultaneously in the minds of three people, belonged to a real person?

LePat took up the name of Abraxas in a chant, and the others joined him.

Roman court, and gave his abridgment the name of Breviary, which thus came to denote a work which from another point of view might be called a Plenary, involving as it did the collection of several works into one.

It was time well spent, for they located a number of vessels in the port, with their names and destinations, and gave him chapter and verse of the hunt for the absconders from Port Arthur, which had apparently been going on for most of the day.

If Glenn Abies is murdered, or if any harm comes to his wife or any one of his five innocent children then in the name of all that is Christian and Good, the second American Revolution will begin right here.

Then calling on the name of Allah, he gave a last keen cunning sweep with the blade, and following that, the earth awfully quaked and groaned, as if speaking in the abysmal tongue the Mastery of the Event to all men.

New Orleans, simply clothed in homespun cotton striped red and blue, abysmally poor and surrounded by swarms of children who all seemed to bear names like Nono and Vev6 and Bibi, cheerfully selling powdered file and alligator hides and going away again without bothering, like the Americans did, to sample the delights of the big city.

Very little careful examination would have sufficed to find, in the second section of the very first article of the Constitution, the names of every one of the thirteen then existent States distinctly mentioned, with the number of representatives to which each would be entitled, in case of acceding to the Constitution, until a census of their population could be taken.

He invited me to come and spend a whole day with him, naming the days when I would be certain to find him at home, but he advised me to consult the Pacha Osman before accepting his invitation.