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Crossword clues for call

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
call
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a personal call
▪ Are you sure your boss doesn’t mind your using the telephone for personal calls?
a petition calling for sth/demanding sth
▪ A petition calling for an inquiry was signed by 15,118 people.
a resolution calling for sth
▪ We support the EU resolution calling for a ban on the use of these fishing nets.
a social call (=one that does not relate to business)
▪ Don't misunderstand, this is purely a social call.
a strike call (=when a group asks people to strike)
▪ The ANC estimated that more than 4,000,000 people heeded its strike call.
a telephone call
▪ She got a telephone call from Joe last night.
anonymous phone call/letter etc (=one that is often unpleasant or contains threats)
be called/invited for (an) interview
▪ Applicants who are called for interview may be asked to have a medical exam.
beyond the call of duty (=more than you have to do as part of your job)
▪ She's a doctor who has gone beyond the call of duty in her care for her patients.
call a doctor (=telephone one, especially to ask them to come to you)
▪ His mother was very worried and called the doctor.
call a meeting (also convene a meetingformal) (= arrange a meeting)
▪ The board has the power to convene a general meeting if necessary.
call a strike (=tell people to strike)
▪ The union threatened to call a strike.
call a truce
▪ They agreed to call a truce.
call a witness (=require a witness to speak in court)
▪ She was the final witness to be called.
call an ambulance (=phone to ask an ambulance to come)
▪ Do you think we need to call an ambulance ?
call an election (=arrange for an election to happen)
▪ The Prime Minister would be unwise to call an election now.
call box
call centre
call for a ban
▪ French farmers have called for a ban on imports.
call for a halt to sth (=publicly ask for something to stop)
▪ The government has called for a halt to the violence.
call for sb's resignation (=publicly ask for it)
▪ After the defeat, there were calls for the coach's resignation.
call for/demand an end to sth (=publicly ask for something to happen or be done)
▪ The union is calling for an end to discrimination.
call girl
call in/round for a chat
▪ Are you free later if I call in for a chat?
call letters
call off/abandon a search
▪ They called off the search when it got dark.
call option
call sb a liar (=say that someone is lying)
▪ Are you calling my mother a liar?
call sb a taxi (=telephone for a taxi to come for someone else)
▪ Call me a taxi, would you?
call sb by their first/full etc name (=use that name when you speak to them)
▪ Everyone called him by his first name.
call sb on the phone
▪ I called her on the phone and invited her to Las Vegas.
call sb on the telephone
▪ Her son doesn’t even call her on the telephone.
call sb’s name (=say someone’s name loudly, to get their attention)
▪ He called Jean’s name, but there was no answer.
call screening
call sign
call the police
▪ Staff called the police when they noticed a broken window.
call waiting
call/bring/throw sth into question (=make people doubt it)
▪ He brought into question all the principles on which the Soviet system was based.
called for reinforcements
▪ The police called for reinforcements.
called for...boycott
▪ He called for a boycott of the elections.
called time out
▪ With 15.7 seconds left, Washington State called time out.
called...ceasefire
▪ They have called a temporary ceasefire in the region.
calling card
call/order (sb) a cab (=telephone for one to come)
▪ Here's the phone number if you want to call a cab.
call/phone/ring in sick (=phone to say you are not coming in to work because you are ill)
▪ I could have called in sick, but I knew you needed this report.
call/take the registerBritish Englishold-fashioned (= say the names of the students in a class, to check who is there)
call/take the roll (=say the list of names to check who is there)
▪ The teacher called the roll.
▪ Three senators missed the roll call.
call/throw sth into doubt (=make people unsure about something)
▪ The accuracy of his account was called into doubt.
clarion call
▪ This election is a clarion call for our country to face the challenges ahead.
cold call
collect call
conference call
curtain call
demand/call for action (=ask forcefully)
▪ Voters are demanding tougher action on gun crime.
end/call off a strike (=decide not to continue with it)
▪ The strike was called off two days later.
fielded...calls
▪ The press office fielded numerous calls from the media.
first port of call
▪ My first port of call will be the post office.
got a phone call
▪ I got a phone call from someone called Mike.
have/get/receive a telephone call
▪ I had a telephone call from George this morning.
hoax calls (=telephone calls giving false information)
hoax calls to the police
house call
It was a tough call (=a difficult decision)
It was a tough call, but we had to cancel the game because of the weather.
last call
local call
make a...phone call
▪ I need to make a quick phone call.
make...telephone call
▪ Can I make a quick telephone call?
obscene phone calls (=calls from an unknown person saying obscene things)
obscene phone calls
phone call
▪ I need to make a quick phone call.
phone for/call a taxi (=telephone for a taxi to come)
▪ Can you phone for a taxi and I'll get our coats.
popularly believed/thought/called etc
▪ Vitamin C is popularly believed to prevent colds.
port of call
▪ My first port of call will be the post office.
return sb’s call (=phone someone who phoned you)
▪ I left a message but he hasn't returned my call.
screen...calls
▪ You can use an answerphone to screen your phone calls before you answer them.
sth to call your own/which you can call your own (=something that belongs to you)
▪ She just wanted a place to call her own.
sth to call your own/which you can call your own (=something that belongs to you)
▪ She just wanted a place to call her own.
takes...calls (=telephone calls)
▪ Our helpline takes 3.5 million calls a year.
telephone call
▪ There’s a telephone call for you, Mr Baron.
trunk call
variously described as/known as/called etc sth
▪ the phenomena variously known as ‘mass culture’, ‘popular culture’, or the ‘public arts’
wake-up call
▪ The success of extremist groups in the elections should be a wake-up call to all decent citizens.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
for
▪ A truly socialist legal system and democracy complete with free speech and free media were called for.
▪ New strategies for regional distribution were called for, and a fresh interest in the regions was shown by Whitehall.
▪ Before setting it in place, though, an Ultratherm heating mat was called for.
▪ A considerable injection of resources will be required to provide the managerial and technological expertise called for in the White Paper.
▪ Problems of enforcement A final note on the enforcement of the duty of care is called for.
▪ I like Marshalls in the studio if a heavy sound is called for, but I find they vary quite a lot.
▪ The day dawned misty and drizzly so we went to have a look, confident heroics would not be called for.
▪ Once dead, treatment obviously is no longer called for.
in
▪ Each of our shops is staffed by a small friendly team of experts. Call in and meet them.
▪ Bye was called in to testify once Brett left, and he was asked to produce Yardley the next day.
▪ On our way back we called in at the field centre, a converted ex-shunter's cabin.
▪ We finally rescued our wounded, and, with the artillery still pounding, we called in for an air strike.
▪ Environmental health officers have been called in and are now treating the problem.
▪ It would also enable all telephone calls in and out of their workplaces to be intercepted.
▪ Lawyer B wrote to the neighbour, who called in to see him.
▪ I am an accountant, I have been called in by the bank, and my duty is to the bank.
off
▪ After passing the information to our shore controls we were told to call off the operation and return to Southampton.
▪ Only two death row inmates have been put to death since then, and both men chose to call off their appeals.
▪ The plan was called off at the last moment.
▪ Once the search team was called off, Aldegonda joined the Benedictine order.
▪ A car boot sale at Boxted Airfield has also been called off.
▪ Throughout the property market, deals that had been nearly completed were called off.
▪ Stopped Thousands of residents were ordered to stay indoors and close all windows before the alert was finally called off.
▪ Just before midnight they called off the fast and rushed Snyder to a hospital.
sometimes
▪ This is sometimes called partial indexing.
▪ The newer ones, such as that one, are sometimes called miniskirt houses.
▪ Trades his latest software for your latest. Sometimes called a Mail-Trader.
▪ Piano legs, they are sometimes called.
▪ This term is sometimes called the external energy.
▪ Unsupervised Learning Unsupervised learning is sometimes called self-supervised learning.
▪ This emerging kind of organization within production is sometimes called flexible specialization.
▪ We must even be judicious when hiking though the outback, where objects sometimes call out for rescue.
upon
▪ More importantly, the defense finally made a critical play when called upon.
▪ This court is thus called upon for the first time to give construction to these articles....
▪ Meanwhile, all available characters have been called upon to repeat bits of exposition over and over.
▪ The boat seemed to be crying out in pain, like an arthritic suddenly called upon to use weak muscles.
▪ Fortunately, we are rarely called upon to sacrifice our lives literally.
▪ I did not feel called upon to answer as the rest did.
■ NOUN
conference
▪ Garang had called for a constitutional conference, involving all political parties.
▪ She startled people on arrival in Washington in 1932 by calling a news conference before her husband.
▪ The National Council of the Guild decided by three votes to two to call a special conference to rescind the affiliation decision.
▪ They called a news conference at Santa Anita on Thursday to announce that Cigar will be starring in a new series.
▪ The next step would be to come out in public and call a Press conference.
▪ The university then called the press conference to announce the news.
▪ Gen Wiranto called a news conference in Jakarta to say that he would not step down until his position had been clarified.
▪ We know this because White practically calls a news conference every day to relate those facts.
election
▪ Delhi resembled an armed camp as the government pulled out all the stops to prevent a rally called to demand early elections.
▪ Kwasniewski has said he may dissolve parliament to put the issue to rest and call for new elections.
▪ Pawar called for an election of the parliamentary party leader by secret ballot.
▪ He would be obliged to call new elections within three months.
▪ Rather than cut shabby deals, he should call a general election.
▪ His opponents say his return was a violation of a town code calling for direct election of the mayor.
▪ The original Bill came under strong attack and fell when John Major called an April election.
▪ Four years later, he called elections and turned over power to civilian rule.
information
▪ For more information, call 881-6350.
▪ For information, call 327-4809 or 884-1220.
▪ For information, call 447-7217.
▪ For lodging information, begin by calling the ski resort of your choice.
▪ For more information, call 623-1000 or 622-5924; or see the City Week listings.
▪ For more information, call Lori Lantz at 299-3000, ext. 103.
meeting
▪ He called the meeting to discuss an expedition at silver level.
▪ Mandy, Mrs Foster has called a staff meeting.
▪ Already he has called an extraordinary meeting of directors and supporters to discuss his radical new proposals.
▪ As chairman you are responsible for calling the meeting, holding it together, and devising an effective way of working.
▪ Hours were spent on phone calls, meetings.
▪ The result of this was a surprise telephone call from Jenny herself suggesting that we should call a meeting.
▪ You may even wish the witnesses to be called into the meeting, so that you can question them yourself.
name
▪ Every few minutes a man came in and called some one's name.
▪ When a runner from the office called my name, I jumped out of my skin.
▪ The isolation seemed complete, in the haste he had forgotten his companion and in recompense he called out his name.
▪ If I call it by this name I will have the whole of a dental audience with me.
▪ Houston also is responsible for the Kissing Oak being called by that name.
▪ This will help it to identify with you, and soon instinctively it will come to you when you call its name.
▪ Where it had lain there was blooming a new and lovely flower, and they called it by his name, Narcissus.
phone
▪ He then lifted the phone to call Peggy Vanderheld, Hauser's statuesque and hard-bitten personal assistant.
▪ Meyer did not return phone calls late Tuesday.
▪ Now pick up your phone, call us, and move on to Stage Two.
▪ I reached for the phone to call Goldman Sachs, Alex.
▪ Getting a phone call at the Writers' Club had so confused me that I became half deaf.
▪ I served on the citizenship working party after receiving a phone call from David Blunkett's office.
▪ Eid got a phone call with a demand for a correction.
police
▪ If they call the police that would be different.
▪ One moment he doubted Teal had called the police, and the next moment he was sure he had.
▪ Go to a neighbour's house and call the police.
▪ Stanton later managed to free himself, called police and told them his stolen car was equipped with a tracking device.
▪ When the lifeboat approached he refused the rescue crew's assistance so helmsman Mike Picknett called the police.
▪ I would call the police, everyone.
question
▪ Such a view is called into question by Jacques Lacan's understanding of the subject's relation to the mirror image.
▪ Yet when he called for questions, there was silence.
▪ The success of the modernisation drive was called into question as was the security of party leaders who supported the developmentalist line.
▪ In an age where commercial profit and gain are predominant, the purpose of archaeology is often called into question.
▪ Every relationship on the show will be called into question.
▪ Does not this call into question a view of lawyers as controllers of the masses?
▪ Yet it is this very assumption which these writers call into question.
shot
▪ Cant about the free market creating opportunities for poor people is meaningless when wealth calls all the shots.
▪ Traditionally, Tucson Water officials have also been allowed to call the shots.
▪ But chaps who try chat-up lines of their own get the boot-because she likes to call the shots.
▪ Strug, the Houstonian with powerful floor and vault routines, may benefit from having Karolyi calling the shots.
▪ Simple-ad men call the shots and they want gullible audiences.
▪ Not many years ago, they called all the shots.
▪ He wanted some greater degree of power for himself, always within a political reality where the malais ultimately called the shots.
▪ He had been in another program, where he got to call all the shots.
strike
▪ They now have to ballot their members before being able to call a strike.
▪ The opposition has called for a citywide strike Monday.
▪ The five unions who called the indefinite strike said up to 80 percent of postal workers stayed away from work in some areas.
▪ When we decided we had them pinned down, they called in an air strike.
▪ They called a protest strike for Aug. 21-23, leaving it to individual parties to decide on a boycott.
▪ It broke right down in there for a called third strike.
▪ That is, unless the Postman was called out on urgent strike.
▪ He opened the sixth inning with a breaking ball for a called strike to Greg Gagne.
telephone
▪ Maurice has a gadget to record any telephone calls he wants to.
▪ We make it to a telephone, call Stan, and he comes to fetch us straight-away.
▪ I've got one or two telephone calls to make.
▪ Neither Whitacre nor his lawyers returned telephone calls seeking comment on the charges.
▪ As her fears bordered upon obsession, she began deliberately re-dialling telephone numbers Charles had called.
▪ But the phone company patched through a line Friday night, and du Pont answered the telephone when authorities called.
▪ This would enable all telephone calls in and out of their homes to be intercepted.
▪ Gingrich, who has been making telephone calls to reassure colleagues, will address House Republicans on Monday night.
witness
▪ Prosecutors called 24 witnesses, all of whom underwent aggressive cross-examination by the defense.
▪ The judge insisted that a tedious technical trial be run before Mr Schlichtmann could call non-expert witnesses.
▪ I saw more of human agony and woe than l trust I will ever again be called on to witness.
▪ I can't call witnesses, I can't produce evidence.
▪ Frazier was asked to leave the party several times the police were even called according to the witness.
▪ Let us call in two expert witnesses.
▪ But the most controversial is expected to be called to the witness stand.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(a case of) the pot calling the kettle black
▪ It was a bit like the pot calling the kettle black.
aptly named/described/called etc
▪ In that regard, this disc is aptly named.
▪ It was aptly named the Plough & Harrow.
▪ The aptly named Honda Accord has been produced in co-operation with Rover.
▪ The latter was aptly named, so tart that the first gulp curled your lips back.
▪ The Manor might be aptly described as a spiritual College.
▪ The Moonlight Restaurant was aptly named.
▪ The parish was recently founded and aptly named.
▪ Then it was being run by the aptly named Thomas Mill.
be at sb's beck and call
▪ I have never liked to be at anybody's beck and call.
▪ She was always rushing around at her mother's beck and call.
▪ I had to be at his beck and call, night and day.
be called to the Bar
be called to the bar
▪ He also studied law and was called to the bar by the Middle Temple in 1874.
▪ He was called to the bar at the Inner Temple in 1856.
▪ He was called to the bar in 1609.
▪ He was called to the bar in 1843 and for most of the rest of his life he practised as a conveyancer.
▪ He was called to the Bar when he left Oxford.
▪ In 1808 he entered Lincoln's Inn and was called to the bar in 1814 though he never practised.
be/get called on the carpet
▪ Demmons was called on the carpet by the Board of Supervisors to explain his excessive spending.
bring/call sb to account
▪ The people responsible for the accident must be brought to account.
▪ But when it was over, Cronin called me to account.
▪ Inevitably, Whitney and the board called him to account.
▪ It is a summary remedy which should enable a person in default to be brought swiftly to account.
▪ Promotion panels, search committees, nominating bodies, nobody calls them to account.
▪ The debate is intended to bring the Government to account.
bring/call sth to mind
▪ Each ornament on their Christmas tree brings to mind the friend or relative that gave it.
▪ Wiesel's speech called to mind the victims of the Holocaust.
▪ But they were shocked that just over one in ten could bring the day to mind.
▪ But whose ministry is it to bring things to mind and to convict?
▪ For some reason, the book brings Don Quixote to mind, charging in from the right.
▪ I can still bring it to mind, with lines of people coming off the hillsides and on to the road.
▪ Red and green, of course, bring the holidays to mind.
▪ Remembering them brought back to mind the Wainfleet item.
▪ Weiss' comment brings several thoughts to mind, about a subject on which little thinking has been done.
▪ What brings this all to mind is something that happened recently at the convenience store.
call a halt (to sth)
▪ Here General McDowell called a halt.
▪ Objectives of this kind threaten to impoverish the nation and will cause the electorate to call a halt.
▪ On the Monday before her wedding-day, Diana gave serious consideration to calling a halt to the whole affair.
▪ Small wonder many women call a halt.
▪ Surely it is time to call a halt to all vehicles on the pavement.
▪ The charade at the White House today about calling a halt to politics is transparently hypocritical.
▪ They ought to see that and just call a halt.
▪ When she got the blade of the shove between her teeth and began to worry it I called a halt.
call a spade a spade
▪ Why not call a spade a spade and say that she's incompetent, if that what you're thinking.
call it quits
▪ After 8 years of marriage, they're calling it quits.
▪ At midnight the band still showed no sign of calling it quits.
▪ Fortunately, the timeless musical genius knew when to call it quits, though his stunning creations live on.
▪ He thought it was time to call it quits.
▪ In the House, 33 members -- 23 Democrats and 10 Republicans -- are also calling it quits.
▪ It would be easy to call it quits.
▪ No one is suggesting that Zajedno is about to call it quits.
▪ Now you've broken it ... well, let's hope they count Miss Tuckey as a pro and call it quits.
▪ Spring focus: Albert Belle's chronic hip problem could force him to call it quits.
▪ Still, Elgaen is not ready to call it quits.
call sb names
call sb's bluff
call/phone sb collect
courtesy visit/call
▪ To this end an unofficial courtesy visit was arranged and in August 1857 the Imperial couple came to Osborne.
crank call/letter
▪ Anyone who dares defend this breakthrough speaks in hushed tones, fearing crank calls and canceled grants.
draw/call attention to sth
▪ Both of these draw attention to the urgent need to provide better opportunities and facilities to encourage walking and cycling.
▪ Darwin knew these things perfectly well, and drew attention to them.
▪ Despite many advantages, such a definition fails to draw attention to the unifying characteristics of pragmatic phenomena.
▪ My hon. Friend rightly draws attention to the benefits of Community co-operation.
▪ One can merely draw attention to the problem here, for local arrangements were complex and varied.
▪ Richard Hodges has drawn attention to the beginnings of this process in the post-Roman period with the establishment of emporia.
▪ The feminine voice at the start of the Shipman's Tale is a conundrum that draws attention to the teller.
▪ Wearing sunglasses indoors is pretty much guaranteed to draw attention to you.
judgment call
long-distance call
▪ Illiterates have no hope at all of calculating the expense of local service, let alone long-distance calls.
▪ Let us handle your long-distance calls, the letter said.
▪ Starting in late 1984, other elements of long-distance calling will begin to change...
▪ Taking a long-distance call still causes a certain turbulence here.
▪ The company said it plans to offer wireless telephone service beginning Thursday, with discounted packages of local and long-distance calling.
outside line/call etc
▪ A few telephones had direct outside lines when the switchboard closed down at night.
▪ Caroline Amphlett had left and it was switched through to an outside line.
▪ Each telephone instrument had its own dial and from it can be dialled other extensions as well as outside calls.
▪ She concentrated on the outside call.
▪ There's a private telephone in the compartment in front of you if you need to make any outside calls.
siren voices/song/call
▪ Daniel Boone heard it: the siren song of the open road, beckoning him to pack up and go.
▪ Forty Niners president Carmen Policy called the lure of free agency a siren song.
▪ Mr. Sheerman Is not it time that the Minister ignored some of the siren voices behind her?
▪ The bottom line is that General Motors heeded the siren song of management Centralism in the mid-sixties.
▪ Then, unable to resist the telephonic siren song, she picked it up.
▪ They prepared their siren song for the early-evening crowd.
▪ This coalition must hold together in the post-war settlement and resist the siren voices calling for a huge re-arming of the region.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Coming, Mom," I called.
▪ "I'll call your dollar - what have you got?" "Three nines."
▪ "OK, call it." "Heads."
▪ "She's a fraud." "I wouldn't call her that."
▪ A meeting has been called for 3 p.m. Wednesday.
▪ Already his followers were calling him a saint.
▪ Can you call Becky before six?
▪ Didn't you hear me calling you?
▪ Do you want to be called Miss or Ms.?
▪ Get out of here or I'll call the police!
▪ Guidebooks call Chicago "The Windy City".
▪ His name's actually Robert, but everyone just calls him Bob.
▪ His secretary started calling around to find out where the commission was meeting.
▪ I'll call for a taxi now.
▪ I called round to see if anyone knew where Tom was.
▪ I called Sue yesterday.
▪ Mr. Sweeney called while you were out.
▪ My mother wanted to call me Yuri.
▪ OK, when I call your name, raise your hand.
▪ Patty called when you were out.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A similar service is offered via e-mail by a company called Mercury Mail.
▪ People wishing to enroll in the study should request a referral from their doctors or call the nearest participating hospital.
▪ The back page has a strip called Haggis, which is about a black highland terrier and his adventures.
▪ The three packages used in this example are called A-CONFORMOLINES, E-VALUES and F-MAP.
▪ The transition to democracy and market economies will call for much patience and persistence.
▪ This use is a form of spending; in business it is called depreciation.
▪ Though Republicans called for the president to fire him, Brown refused to step down.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
anonymous
▪ And there was also the matter of the anonymous phone call, pointing the finger squarely at Amanda.
▪ The anonymous call had offered up two names for the Jabelman murder: Iain MacPherson and Tommy somebody.
▪ How many other officers are under investigation from anonymous calls to the hotlines?
▪ He was too eager to get back to his roll to ask how Zen had found out about the anonymous phone call.
▪ The Border Patrol received an anonymous call one night about drug activity in the area.
▪ What for? the Union said. Anonymous phone call, the company said.
close
▪ Sydney's closest call operating out of Rendcomb was in a Brisfit shortly after his arrival.
▪ This was surely a close call!
▪ You seem fit as a fiddle, Mr Blake. Close call, though.
▪ Afterward, when he came down for his evening meal, we talked about the close call.
▪ If you are a Swindon fan, you're bias of course, but it was a close call.
▪ You can only have so many close calls for your luck to run out.
▪ But it had been a close call.
▪ Two days before, there had been a close call.
incoming
▪ It wasn't permitted to take incoming calls on the pay phone in the hallway of the hotel.
▪ Just how many incoming calls will be blocked?
▪ As some one who hates being pestered by incoming calls, I no longer see the point of a cellular phone.
▪ Three or four staff members handle incoming telephone calls.
▪ If you leave the fax software running, waiting to answer incoming calls, you can't use the data modem as well.
▪ She took only incoming calls from Sheila.
local
▪ It's always a local call to anywhere, at any time.
▪ The ideal bulletin board is a local call away, with a crowd you like and lots of cool shareware for downloading.
▪ It is a local rate call from anywhere in the country.
▪ The changes would have raised basic monthly charges 21 percent and the cost of local calls by an average 19 percent.
▪ The three-minute cheap rate for local calls is now cheaper in cash terms than it was in 1981.
▪ For the next year or so, they say, most Texans will still have only one choice for local telephone calls.
Local calls remain local calls, even if the call crosses area codes.
■ NOUN
conference
▪ Verio is hosting a conference call on Tuesday, February 1, 2000 at 9: 00 a.m.
▪ The next afternoon at three, the conference call goes through.
▪ Participants in the conference call included Gingrich, other Republican leaders, and one of his lawyers, former Rep.
▪ Kantner and Palmer participated in a media conference call Wednesday and sounded as if they had undergone proper corporate indoctrination.
▪ Video links were set up in Tucson and Phoenix for family therapy conference calls.
▪ The conference call has been rearranged for later in the week.
▪ His plan, he says, is to discuss all this in a conference call with all parties involved.
▪ A conference call was arranged, and the three founders gathered at the tiny office.
curtain
▪ The curtain calls went on for days.
▪ In fact fans rose to their feet for his curtain call.
▪ There were six curtain calls and Rose Lipman came on stage to be presented with a bouquet.
Curtain call followed curtain call, to the surprise of some of the dancers.
▪ That would seem to wrap it up, with nothing left but a final curtain call.
phone
▪ The immigration officer made a couple of phone calls and I was allowed 24 hours to collect Esmeralda and leave.
▪ United did not return phone calls asking for comment.
▪ If you get an obscene or abusive phone call, don't say anything and hang up immediately!
▪ Raymond goes on taking phone calls, conferring with Larren and Mike and Joe Reilly.
▪ Apart from your Internet access subscription, you pay only for the local phone call.
▪ Drinker answered phone calls at all hours from around the world, giving instructions on how to build and operate them.
▪ As Marguerite left the room for a moment to answer a phone call, Jenna looked up at Alain.
▪ Never mind all the free phone calls we get to make.
roll
▪ A roll call of just some of our people who have achieved something special.
▪ When the alphabetical roll call vote for speaker began, members dutifully voted for Gingrich or Gephardt until Rep.
▪ Price was reading the roll call.
▪ Throughout the hourlong roll call, Republicans looked grim.
▪ Meanwhile, a roll call was being taken.
▪ A stack of computer printouts is waiting, the road-kill roll call.
▪ And the long roll call begins.
▪ He made telephone calls to swing Congressmen right up to the roll call.
strike
▪ A strike call by the Sacred Union on Feb. 3 was taken up by workers across the country.
▪ The ejection came after Joyner questioned a strike call.
▪ Twenty factories obeying Yeltsin's strike call were asked to return to work by Sobchak.
▪ The strike call, however, was reportedly not widely observed.
▪ The strike call was endorsed and Local Councils of Action were set up throughout the country, to await events.
▪ According to local reports an opposition strike call was widely observed on Oct. 26.
telephone
▪ Your cover will begin as soon as your telephone call or Application is received by Sun Alliance.
▪ There have been a few telephone calls and some occasional supervision on my part.
▪ Every time you make a long distance telephone call, your voice is processed through an adaptive filter.
▪ The paper said Hallier's favourite restaurant and well-known bars from which he made telephone calls were bugged.
▪ He said the show has generated a number of telephone calls from other parents across the nation similarly accused.
▪ As soon as he settles into his chair, he returns all telephone calls.
■ VERB
answer
▪ Employing one or several people to answer calls, so that they are screened for their relevance.
▪ They answered our call....
▪ The police officers, answering a call reporting a man beating a woman, were shot shortly before 10 p. m. Sunday.
▪ Perhaps she had known it would happen, perhaps he had answered her call for the same reason.
field
▪ A smartly dressed female presenter has to field calls from a small audience and international callers.
▪ Many of the new workers are in training and should start fielding calls by late next week, she said.
▪ So when the station came clean, they had to field several angry calls accusing them of pro-Nottingham Forest bias.
▪ He fielded the phone calls and promised answers - answers which never came.
▪ Later, they fielded the phone calls from recruiters, sat for home visits and helped their daughters sort out offers.
get
▪ This process means, inevitably, that the code will get different calls when running under different operating systems.
▪ I sometimes get calls still at the office.
▪ In Jerusalem they get a call from Washington.
▪ But he never got the call.
▪ I lounged in the truck and listened to the radio, which could be adjusted so you got police calls.
give
▪ There would be an advantage in giving an alarm call that is difficult to locate.
▪ If Andruw gives you any trouble, give me a call.
▪ If another male is grabbed he will give a release call.
▪ What a guy, huh? Give us a call if we can assist in any way.
▪ Still, he would give Carter a call.
▪ Will you give me a call if you have any ideas?
▪ But you have to give Gordon Beauchamp a call right away.
make
▪ When you make your calls, ensure that you speak clearly and precisely.
▪ You had your own reasons for making the call, and why not make a joke out of it?
▪ He was arrested within minutes of making the calls.
▪ He listened, but made the calls himself, quickly, on the pictures, their cropping and placement.
▪ While Dooley took a bath, the rector made two calls asking for prayer, and gave Miss Sadie an update.
▪ If just one agent makes such a call there is no problem.
▪ Deputies said Jackson has made numerous calls to 911 in past years.
pay
▪ Another out-of-town visitor paid a call last month.
▪ Users of the new service, called Metal-Web, only pay local telephone call charges.
▪ Having met his hero one evening at a small gathering, he was invited to pay a call the following week.
▪ You pay for the calls you answer as well as the ones you place.
▪ And then one night, one bright and starlit night, a true free dragon came by to pay a call.
▪ He came down from Massachusetts for a little while and paid a call on Whitman in Brooklyn.
receive
▪ Some time ago I received a frantic telephone call from Carol, who had undergone successful hypnotic treatment about two years earlier.
▪ Investigators responded to the two locations after they received calls of suspicious packages in the mail.
▪ The Northern has received telephone calls and letters from people who have contributed and want to know what is happening.
▪ They've received hundreds of calls, and now have the names of two men who fit the attacker's description.
▪ Last year, the city received 914 alarm calls, 703 of which were false, according to city records.
▪ He received a call on his mobile phone while he was attending an agricultural fair.
▪ Sheffield received harassing phone calls most of last season.
respond
▪ The emergency services say it could cut vital minutes from the time it takes to respond to a call.
▪ Washington area police also responded to dozens of calls for suspicious packages, all of which turned out to be false alarms.
▪ Even after the Czech coup, however, Congress was not willing to respond wholeheartedly to a call to arms.
▪ Last year, the Police Department spent about 70 man-hours responding to alarm calls.
return
▪ Motorola did not return calls by press time.
▪ Executives at Dignity Partners yesterday have not returned telephone calls since issuing the unexpected announcement on Tuesday.
▪ The Democratic Party machine did not return his calls, the media ignored him, but he kept driving.
▪ United did not return phone calls asking for comment.
▪ Because of their workload, they may not be immediately available but they all have telephone answering machines and will return all calls.
▪ His lawyer did not return a call requesting a comment.
▪ Shapiro did not return telephone calls seeking comment last week.
▪ Resort Properties officials did not return phone calls.
wait
▪ Now he too was waiting for a phone call, promised for the afternoon.
▪ Women spend more time waiting to get telephone calls and wondering if there will be another date.
▪ If you leave the fax software running, waiting to answer incoming calls, you can't use the data modem as well.
▪ They were waiting for my call.
▪ A team of officers will also be waiting for calls at the Durham Police headquarters.
▪ Each night as I wait for his call I feel my strength on trial; what will become of my hard-won solitude?
▪ Especially now, waiting for the call into their presence.
▪ For the time being she was excused from her prop-room duties and she needn't wait for the curtain call.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
answer the phone/a call/the door
aptly named/described/called etc
▪ In that regard, this disc is aptly named.
▪ It was aptly named the Plough & Harrow.
▪ The aptly named Honda Accord has been produced in co-operation with Rover.
▪ The latter was aptly named, so tart that the first gulp curled your lips back.
▪ The Manor might be aptly described as a spiritual College.
▪ The Moonlight Restaurant was aptly named.
▪ The parish was recently founded and aptly named.
▪ Then it was being run by the aptly named Thomas Mill.
be at sb's beck and call
▪ I have never liked to be at anybody's beck and call.
▪ She was always rushing around at her mother's beck and call.
▪ I had to be at his beck and call, night and day.
bring/call sth to mind
▪ Each ornament on their Christmas tree brings to mind the friend or relative that gave it.
▪ Wiesel's speech called to mind the victims of the Holocaust.
▪ But they were shocked that just over one in ten could bring the day to mind.
▪ But whose ministry is it to bring things to mind and to convict?
▪ For some reason, the book brings Don Quixote to mind, charging in from the right.
▪ I can still bring it to mind, with lines of people coming off the hillsides and on to the road.
▪ Red and green, of course, bring the holidays to mind.
▪ Remembering them brought back to mind the Wainfleet item.
▪ Weiss' comment brings several thoughts to mind, about a subject on which little thinking has been done.
▪ What brings this all to mind is something that happened recently at the convenience store.
call it quits
▪ After 8 years of marriage, they're calling it quits.
▪ At midnight the band still showed no sign of calling it quits.
▪ Fortunately, the timeless musical genius knew when to call it quits, though his stunning creations live on.
▪ He thought it was time to call it quits.
▪ In the House, 33 members -- 23 Democrats and 10 Republicans -- are also calling it quits.
▪ It would be easy to call it quits.
▪ No one is suggesting that Zajedno is about to call it quits.
▪ Now you've broken it ... well, let's hope they count Miss Tuckey as a pro and call it quits.
▪ Spring focus: Albert Belle's chronic hip problem could force him to call it quits.
▪ Still, Elgaen is not ready to call it quits.
call sb's bluff
call/phone sb collect
courtesy visit/call
▪ To this end an unofficial courtesy visit was arranged and in August 1857 the Imperial couple came to Osborne.
crank call/letter
▪ Anyone who dares defend this breakthrough speaks in hushed tones, fearing crank calls and canceled grants.
draw/call attention to sth
▪ Both of these draw attention to the urgent need to provide better opportunities and facilities to encourage walking and cycling.
▪ Darwin knew these things perfectly well, and drew attention to them.
▪ Despite many advantages, such a definition fails to draw attention to the unifying characteristics of pragmatic phenomena.
▪ My hon. Friend rightly draws attention to the benefits of Community co-operation.
▪ One can merely draw attention to the problem here, for local arrangements were complex and varied.
▪ Richard Hodges has drawn attention to the beginnings of this process in the post-Roman period with the establishment of emporia.
▪ The feminine voice at the start of the Shipman's Tale is a conundrum that draws attention to the teller.
▪ Wearing sunglasses indoors is pretty much guaranteed to draw attention to you.
give sb a call/buzz
▪ Compaq is pretty wonderful about fixing such stuff under warranty, so give them a call.
▪ If Andruw gives you any trouble, give me a call.
▪ If you'd like to meet up for a drink or something, do give me a call on the above number.
▪ It's obvious: unless work gives us a buzz, we won't give our best.
▪ So why not give us a call!
▪ Still, he would give Carter a call.
▪ Will you give me a call if you have any ideas?
▪ You and a friend can give each other a call.
he who pays the piper calls the tune
▪ Her benefits were therefore not so much economic as political: he who pays the piper calls the tune.
judgment call
long-distance call
▪ Illiterates have no hope at all of calculating the expense of local service, let alone long-distance calls.
▪ Let us handle your long-distance calls, the letter said.
▪ Starting in late 1984, other elements of long-distance calling will begin to change...
▪ Taking a long-distance call still causes a certain turbulence here.
▪ The company said it plans to offer wireless telephone service beginning Thursday, with discounted packages of local and long-distance calling.
outside line/call etc
▪ A few telephones had direct outside lines when the switchboard closed down at night.
▪ Caroline Amphlett had left and it was switched through to an outside line.
▪ Each telephone instrument had its own dial and from it can be dialled other extensions as well as outside calls.
▪ She concentrated on the outside call.
▪ There's a private telephone in the compartment in front of you if you need to make any outside calls.
pay (sb) a call/visit
▪ Another out-of-town visitor paid a call last month.
▪ Having met his hero one evening at a small gathering, he was invited to pay a call the following week.
▪ I was more than once surprised to see men going into those rooms, paying visits to the legless men.
▪ Latimer is living apart from people, divorced even from religious faith by his visions, when Charles Meunier pays a visit.
▪ No, Robert insisted, he could not, would not, pay a visit to such distant parts.
▪ The Marshal decided it was time to pay a visit to Headquarters.
▪ Then one day, just for old times' sake, I paid a visit to Winston Street.
▪ They were scheduled to pay a visit to another model resettlement village that morning - their last official tour.
siren voices/song/call
▪ Daniel Boone heard it: the siren song of the open road, beckoning him to pack up and go.
▪ Forty Niners president Carmen Policy called the lure of free agency a siren song.
▪ Mr. Sheerman Is not it time that the Minister ignored some of the siren voices behind her?
▪ The bottom line is that General Motors heeded the siren song of management Centralism in the mid-sixties.
▪ Then, unable to resist the telephonic siren song, she picked it up.
▪ They prepared their siren song for the early-evening crowd.
▪ This coalition must hold together in the post-war settlement and resist the siren voices calling for a huge re-arming of the region.
trace a call
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a call for help
▪ Ambulances try to arrive within eight minutes of an emergency call.
▪ Have there been many calls?
▪ This is the last call for flight 372 to Atlanta.
▪ When you play at your opponent's court, the calls tend to go against you.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As a result, there are fewer circuits open for regular voice calls.
▪ He remained calm, made a call and forked out $ 700 of his own money for a plane ticket.
▪ Investigators responded to the two locations after they received calls of suspicious packages in the mail.
▪ Phone call from Education Office, re. dinner money summary sheets.
▪ Taking a long-distance call still causes a certain turbulence here.
▪ This is an unobtrusive way of keeping expensive unofficial calls to the minimum.
▪ Weiss has failed to return calls seeking comment.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Call

Call \Call\ (k[add]l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Called (k[add]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Calling] [OE. callen, AS. ceallian; akin to Icel. & Sw. kalla, Dan. kalde, D. kallen to talk, prate, OHG. kall[=o]n to call; cf. Gr. ghry`ein to speak, sing, Skr. gar to praise. Cf. Garrulous.]

  1. To command or request to come or be present; to summon; as, to call a servant.

    Call hither Clifford; bid him come amain
    --Shak.

  2. To summon to the discharge of a particular duty; to designate for an office, or employment, especially of a religious character; -- often used of a divine summons; as, to be called to the ministry; sometimes, to invite; as, to call a minister to be the pastor of a church. Paul . . . called to be an apostle --Rom. i.

    1. The Holy Ghost said, Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them.
      --Acts xiii.

  3. To invite or command to meet; to convoke; -- often with together; as, the President called Congress together; to appoint and summon; as, to call a meeting of the Board of Aldermen.

    Now call we our high court of Parliament.
    --Shak.

  4. To give name to; to name; to address, or speak of, by a specifed name.

    If you would but call me Rosalind.
    --Shak.

    And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night.
    --Gen. i.

  5. 5. To regard or characterize as of a certain kind; to denominate; to designate.

    What God hath cleansed, that call not thou common.
    --Acts x. 15.

  6. To state, or estimate, approximately or loosely; to characterize without strict regard to fact; as, they call the distance ten miles; he called it a full day's work.

    [The] army is called seven hundred thousand men.
    --Brougham.

  7. To show or disclose the class, character, or nationality of. [Obs.]

    This speech calls him Spaniard.
    --Beau. & Fl.

  8. To utter in a loud or distinct voice; -- often with off; as, to call, or call off, the items of an account; to call the roll of a military company.

    No parish clerk who calls the psalm so clear.
    --Gay.

  9. To invoke; to appeal to.

    I call God for a witness.
    --2 Cor. i. 23

  10. To rouse from sleep; to awaken. If thou canst awake by four o' the clock. I prithee call me. Sleep hath seized me wholly. --Shak. To call a bond, to give notice that the amount of the bond will be paid. To call a party (Law), to cry aloud his name in open court, and command him to come in and perform some duty requiring his presence at the time on pain of what may befall him. To call back, to revoke or retract; to recall; to summon back. To call down, to pray for, as blessing or curses. To call forth, to bring or summon to action; as, to call forth all the faculties of the mind. To call in,

    1. To collect; as, to call in debts or money; ar to withdraw from cirulation; as, to call in uncurrent coin.

    2. To summon to one's side; to invite to come together; as, to call in neighbors. To call (any one) names, to apply contemptuous names (to any one). To call off, to summon away; to divert; as, to call off the attention; to call off workmen from their employment. To call out.

      1. To summon to fight; to challenge.

      2. To summon into service; as, to call out the militia. To call over, to recite separate particulars in order, as a roll of names. To call to account, to demand explanation of. To call to mind, to recollect; to revive in memory. To call to order, to request to come to order; as:

        1. A public meeting, when opening it for business.

        2. A person, when he is transgressing the rules of debate. To call to the bar, to admit to practice in courts of law. To call up.

          1. To bring into view or recollection; as to call up the image of deceased friend.

          2. To bring into action or discussion; to demand the consideration of; as, to call up a bill before a legislative body.

            Syn: To name; denominate; invite; bid; summon; convoke; assemble; collect; exhort; warn; proclaim; invoke; appeal to; designate.

            Usage: To Call, Convoke, Summon. Call is the generic term; as, to call a public meeting. To convoke is to require the assembling of some organized body of men by an act of authority; as, the king convoked Parliament. To summon is to require attendance by an act more or less stringent anthority; as, to summon a witness.

Call

Call \Call\, n.

  1. The act of calling; -- usually with the voice, but often otherwise, as by signs, the sound of some instrument, or by writing; a summons; an entreaty; an invitation; as, a call for help; the bugle's call. ``Call of the trumpet.''
    --Shak.

    I rose as at thy call, but found thee not.
    --Milton.

  2. A signal, as on a drum, bugle, trumpet, or pipe, to summon soldiers or sailors to duty.

  3. (Eccl.) An invitation to take charge of or serve a church as its pastor.

  4. A requirement or appeal arising from the circumstances of the case; a moral requirement or appeal.

    Dependence is a perpetual call upon humanity.
    --Addison.

    Running into danger without any call of duty.
    --Macaulay.

  5. A divine vocation or summons.

    St. Paul himself believed he did well, and that he had a call to it, when he persecuted the Christians.
    --Locke.

  6. Vocation; employment.

    Note: [In this sense, calling is generally used.]

  7. A short visit; as, to make a call on a neighbor; also, the daily coming of a tradesman to solicit orders.

    The baker's punctual call.
    --Cowper.

  8. (Hunting) A note blown on the horn to encourage the hounds.

  9. (Naut.) A whistle or pipe, used by the boatswain and his mate, to summon the sailors to duty.

  10. (Fowling) The cry of a bird; also a noise or cry in imitation of a bird; or a pipe to call birds by imitating their note or cry.

  11. (Amer. Land Law) A reference to, or statement of, an object, course, distance, or other matter of description in a survey or grant requiring or calling for a corresponding object, etc., on the land.

  12. The privilege to demand the delivery of stock, grain, or any commodity, at a fixed, price, at or within a certain time agreed on. [Brokers' Cant]

  13. See Assessment, 4. At call, or On call, liable to be demanded at any moment without previous notice; as money on deposit. Call bird, a bird taught to allure others into a snare. Call boy

    1. A boy who calls the actors in a theater; a boy who transmits the orders of the captain of a vessel to the engineer, helmsman, etc.

    2. A waiting boy who answers a cal, or cames at the ringing of a bell; a bell boy.

      Call note, the note naturally used by the male bird to call the female. It is artificially applied by birdcatchers as a decoy.
      --Latham.

      Call of the house (Legislative Bodies), a calling over the names of members, to discover who is absent, or for other purposes; a calling of names with a view to obtaining the ayes and noes from the persons named.

      Call to the bar, admission to practice in the courts.

Call

Call \Call\, v. i.

  1. To speak in loud voice; to cry out; to address by name; -- sometimes with to.

    You must call to the nurse.
    --Shak.

    The angel of God called to Hagar.
    --Gen. xxi. 17.

  2. To make a demand, requirement, or request.

    They called for rooms, and he showed them one.
    --Bunyan.

  3. To make a brief visit; also, to stop at some place designated, as for orders. He ordered her to call at the house once a week. --Temple. To call for

    1. To demand; to require; as, a crime calls for punishment; a survey, grant, or deed calls for the metes and bounds, or the quantity of land, etc., which it describes.

    2. To give an order for; to request. ``Whenever the coach stopped, the sailor called for more ale.'' --Marryat. To call on, To call upon,

      1. To make a short visit to; as, call on a friend.

      2. To appeal to; to invite; to request earnestly; as, to call upon a person to make a speech.

    3. To solicit payment, or make a demand, of a debt.

    4. To invoke or play to; to worship; as, to call upon God.

      To call out To call or utter loudly; to brawl.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
call

early 14c., from call (v.). Sense of "a short formal visit" is from 1862.\n\n

call

Old English ceallian "to call, shout," less common than clipian; replaced by related Old Norse kalla "to cry loudly," from Proto-Germanic *kall- (cognates: Dutch kallen "to talk," Old High German kallon "to call"), from PIE root *gal- (2) "to call, scream, shriek, shout" (cognates: Sanskrit garhati "bewail, criticize;" Latin gallus "cock;" Old High German klaga, German Klage "complaint, grievance, lament, accusation;" Old English clacu "affront;" Old Church Slavonic glasu "voice," glagolu "word;" Welsh galw "call"). Related: Called; calling.\n

\nMeaning "to give a name to" is mid-13c. Coin-toss sense is from 1801. Meaning "to visit" (Middle English) was literally "to stand at the door and call." Telephone/telegraph sense is from 1889. To call out someone to fight (1823) corresponds to French provoquer. To call it a day is from 1834.

Wiktionary
call

n. 1 A telephone conversation. 2 A short visit, usually for social purposes. 3 A cry or shout. 4 A decision or judgement. 5 The characteristic cry of a bird or other animal. 6 A beckoning or summoning. 7 (context finance English) An option to buy stock at a specified price during or at a specified time. 8 (context cricket English) The act of calling to the other batsman. 9 (context cricket English) The state of being the batsman whose role it is to call (depends on where the ball goes.) 10 A work shift which requires one to be available when requested (see on call). 11 (context computing English) The act of jumping to a subprogram, saving the means to return to the original point. 12 A statement of a particular state, or rule, made in many games such as bridge, craps, jacks, and so on. 13 (context poker English) The act of matching a bet made by a player who has previously bet in the same round of betting. 14 A note blown on the horn to encourage the dogs in a hunt. 15 (context nautical English) A whistle or pipe, used by the boatswain and his mate to summon the sailors to duty. 16 A pipe to call birds by imitating their note or cry. 17 An invitation to take charge of or serve a church as its pastor. 18 (context archaic English) Vocation; employment; calling. 19 (context US legal English) A reference to, or statement of, an object, course, distance, or other matter of description in a survey or grant requiring or calling for a corresponding object, etc., on the land. vb. 1 (lb en heading) ''To use one's voice.'' 2 # (lb en intransitive) To request, summon, or beckon. 3 # (lb en intransitive) To cry or shout. 4 # (lb en transitive) To utter in a loud or distinct voice. 5 # (lb en transitive intransitive) To contact by telephone. 6 # (lb en transitive) To declare in advance. 7 # To rouse from sleep; to awaken. 8 (lb en heading intransitive) ''To visit.'' 9 # To pay a (social) visit.

WordNet
call
  1. n. a telephone connection; "she reported several anonymous calls"; "he placed a phone call to London"; "he heard the phone ringing but didn't want to take the call" [syn: phone call, telephone call]

  2. a special disposition (as if from a divine source) to pursue a particular course; "he was disappointed that he had not heard the Call"

  3. a loud utterance; often in protest or opposition; "the speaker was interrupted by loud cries from the rear of the audience" [syn: cry, outcry, yell, shout, vociferation]

  4. a demand especially in the phrase "the call of duty" [syn: claim]

  5. the characteristic sound produced by a bird; "a bird will not learn its song unless it hears it at an early age" [syn: birdcall, birdsong, song]

  6. a brief social visit; "senior professors' wives no longer make afternoon calls on newcomers"

  7. a demand by a broker that a customer deposit enough to bring his margin up to the minimum requirement [syn: margin call]

  8. a demand for a show of hands in a card game; "after two raises there was a call"

  9. a request; "many calls for Christmas stories"; "not many calls for buggywhips"

  10. an instruction that interrupts the program being executed; "Pascal performs calls by simply giving the name of the routine to be executed"

  11. brief visit in an official or professional capacity; "the pastor's visits to his parishioners"; "a visit to a dentist"; "the salesman's call on a customer"

  12. (sports) the decision made by an umpire or referee; "he was ejected for protesting the call"

  13. the option to buy a given stock (or stock index or commodity future) at a given price before a given date [syn: call option] [ant: put option]

call
  1. v. assign a specified, proper name to; "They named their son David"; "The new school was named after the famous Civil Rights leader" [syn: name]

  2. get or try to get into communication (with someone) by telephone; "I tried to call you all night"; "Take two aspirin and call me in the morning" [syn: telephone, call up, phone, ring]

  3. ascribe a quality to or give a name of a common noun that reflects a quality; "He called me a bastard"; "She called her children lazy and ungrateful"

  4. order, request, or command to come; "She was called into the director's office"; "Call the police!" [syn: send for]

  5. utter a sudden loud cry; "she cried with pain when the doctor inserted the needle"; "I yelled to her from the window but she couldn't hear me" [syn: shout, shout out, cry, yell, scream, holler, hollo, squall]

  6. pay a brief visit; "The mayor likes to call on some of the prominent citizens" [syn: visit, call in]

  7. call a meeting; invite or command to meet; "The Wannsee Conference was called to discuss the `Final Solution'"; "The new dean calls meetings every week"

  8. order or request or give a command for; "The unions called a general strike for Sunday"

  9. order, summon, or request for a specific duty or activity, work, role; "He was already called 4 times for jury duty"; "They called him to active military duty"

  10. indicate a decision in regard to; "call balls and strikes behind the plate"

  11. stop or postpone because of adverse conditions, such as bad weather; "call a football game"

  12. read aloud to check for omissions or absentees; "Call roll"

  13. send a message or attempt to reach someone by radio, phone, etc.; make a signal to in order to transmit a message; "Hawaii is calling!"; "A transmitter in Samoa was heard calling"

  14. declare in the capacity of an umpire or referee; "call a runner out"

  15. utter a characteristic note or cry; "bluejays called to one another"

  16. utter in a loud voice or announce; "He called my name"; "The auctioneer called the bids"

  17. make a prediction about; tell in advance; "Call the outcome of an election" [syn: predict, foretell, prognosticate, forebode, anticipate, promise]

  18. challenge (somebody) to make good on a statement; charge with or censure for an offense; "He deserves to be called on that"

  19. consider or regard as being; "I would not call her beautiful"

  20. demand payment of (a loan); "Call a loan" [syn: call in]

  21. give the calls (to the dancers) for a square dance [syn: call off]

  22. greet, as with a prescribed form, title, or name; "He always addresses me with `Sir'"; "Call me Mister"; "She calls him by first name" [syn: address]

  23. make a stop in a harbour; "The ship will call in Honolulu tomorrow"

  24. make a demand, as for a card or a suit or a show of hands; "He called his trump" [syn: bid]

  25. require the presentation of for redemption before maturation; "Call a bond"

  26. lure by imitating the characteristic call of an animal; "Call ducks"

  27. challenge the sincerity or truthfulness of; "call the speaker on a question of fact"

  28. rouse somebody from sleep with a call; "I was called at 5 A.M. this morning"

Wikipedia
Call

Call may refer to:

Call (band)

Call is a band from Lahore, Pakistan (not to be confused with the American band The Call), formed by Zulfiqar J. Khan, Danish J. Khan, Khurram J. Khan and Omer Pervaiz. In 1996, the band's guitarist, Omer Pervaiz left to concentrate on his solo project, Naqsh and the band bassist, Shahzad Hameed, left to pursuit his own solo project. Ahsan Fida Khan and Faisal Murtaza recruited their places.

On 20 October 2001, Danish J. Khan, the band's vocalist and lyricist, performed for the last time and later on left the band. Khurram Jabbar Khan moved to the United States, Zulfiqar J. Khan concentrated on his band Paradigm (which later became Entity Paradigm) while Ahsan and Faisal moved on to fulfill family obligations.

However, the band reformed in 2002 and after a few line-up changes, released their debut album, Jilawatan in late 2005.

Call (surname)

Call is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Ann Lowdon Call (1945–2007), horsewoman
  • Annie Payson Call (1853-1940), American author
  • Anson Call (1810–1890), Mormon pioneer and colonizer of the Utah Territory
  • Brandon Call (born 1976), American television and film actor
  • Sir John Call, 1st Baronet (1731–1801), English engineer and baronet
  • Ramon Malla Call (1922–2014), Bishop of Lleida, Andorra
  • R. D. Call (born 1950), American film and television actor
  • Richard K. Call (1792–1862), territorial governor of Florida
  • Wilkinson Call (1834–1910), US senator from Florida

Usage examples of "call".

The third time, a band of Abenaki had appeared on the edge of the forest as if preparing for an attack, and the fort had been called to battle readiness.

I took it with me when I called on Flora Abernethy at her flat the following day.

I have succeeded in calling the attention of abler writers to Varallo, and if these find the present work of any, however small, assistance to them, I shall hold that I have been justified in publishing it.

In the autumn the southeasterlies came barreling up from Abor one after another, making the outward trip to the fishing grounds a swift pleasure, but beating back in their teeth was hard, intense work, and it called for fine judgment on the helm to keep the wind on the port bow.

Edie left Abram to his calls, his networking, his schemes, whatever it was that Abram did when he was alone.

Angela Abruzzi made a smooth slide of her hand on the leather steering wheel of her BMW, turning it up the drive to the rambling Victorian house she had once called home.

And they dismounted and sat down to watch the colorful birds the Absarokee call the-bird-that-makes-many-sounds.

Dicky called him when he saw him on the morrow, because of the elephantine breeks he wore--was not averse to sending his Abyssinian slaves through the sugar-cane to waylay and rob, and worse, maybe.

In a paroxysm of passion Selamlik Pasha called two Abyssinian slaves standing behind.

But if we were in New York, you could go to a restaurant called Aces High.

Emerald green is copper acetoarsenite, also called Paris green and used as an insecticide.

Now, too, that Achang had called him a pig, he had to get level also with that turmeric-tinted warrior, and, as he blew sullenly at his charcoal, he saw how.

Harvard paleontologist named Hallum Movius drew something called the Movius line, dividing the side with Acheulean tools from the one without.

In truth, she could be as stubborn as the barbarian slaves, and rather than try her further, the Acoma Strike Leader called off the warrior who held the redhead down.

An isotope discovered only four years earlier, called U-235 or actinouranium, could conceivably fire off in a self-sustaining explosion of incalculable magnitude.