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Crossword clues for shout

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
shout
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
shout a command
▪ Kruger shouted his commands: 'Faster, faster!'
shout slogans
▪ Five youths were arrested after shouting anti-government slogans.
shout/hurl/scream abuse at sb
▪ The other driver started hurling abuse at me.
shouting match
shouts/cries of joy
▪ They greeted each other with cries of joy.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
back
▪ The door stayed jammed shut, and he didn't shout back or answer her in any way.
▪ I heard him shout back as he retired, loading his gun.
▪ Everyone stopped and looked around and one or two voices shouted back to him along the valley.
▪ We were shouting back and forth over the sound of the water.
▪ Giles shouted back as loudly as he could.
▪ He could hear engines gunning, hammers ringing, voices shouting back and forth.
▪ My cries make Connie back up, until he is shouted back by Mr Barraza.
down
▪ The party stalwarts toe the presidential line and shout down those who disagree.
▪ But for once, it was he who was shouted down.
▪ She shouted down the phone and Mrs Hendry reddened.
▪ Logical deals are killed, rational arguments are shouted down, ambitious engineers are demoralized.
▪ By the Monday they were to shout down with peculiar virulence a similar although more long-winded question by Churchill.
▪ I do not say anything, but only in part because I would be shouted down too.
▪ But now it was everywhere, clamouring at her, shouting down the years of her virginal marriage.
▪ Schilling fought it, but since business was booming, he was shouted down.
out
▪ If you are for the latter, shout out Aye.
▪ Soon enough you can sit quietly while your child shouts out the lines.
▪ The guards used to fire blasts of tear-gas into the cells while forcing their occupants to shout out their names.
▪ I want to shout out and stop her, but I can't get no sound out.
▪ He shouted out to be killed, but since he was not of his own regiment, Stephen demurred.
▪ The drumming disoriented him, the darkness frightened him; he shouted out.
▪ I stayed where I was, shouting out orders and near enough to the postern gate if things should go wrong.
▪ The trainer would then shout out a random number, for example, six.
■ NOUN
help
▪ The alarm was raised by a passer-by who heard one of the youngsters, clinging to rocks, shouting for help.
▪ I opened my mouth to shout for help, but nothing came out.
▪ A witness had seen him in deep water, shouting and waving for help.
▪ Always, the best thing to do is to run and shout for help, before attempting anything else.
▪ He tried to shout for help, but was too weak to raise even the feeblest of cries.
▪ Maria was last seen shouting for help inside a military jeep that evening.
▪ My resistance surprised him, and he shouted for help.
name
▪ The guards used to fire blasts of tear-gas into the cells while forcing their occupants to shout out their names.
▪ Hercules sought him madly everywhere, shouting his name and plunging deeper and deeper into the forest away from the sea.
▪ He shouted her name, but she only let him in after he threatened to kick down the door.
▪ A typical campaign consists of politicians repeatedly shouting their name, party affiliation, and other slogans through loudspeakers.
▪ Artai sat down, and at once the people began to shout his name.
▪ When questioned during campaign appearances, supporters shouted the names of battles in which he had fought.
▪ He would shout her name, call repeatedly into the wind until she appeared on the balcony to wave.
top
▪ Cheryl's three words were hardly finished before Angela was racing back to the farmhouse shouting at the top of her voice.
▪ These newcomers trotted through the streets-nobody seemed to walk anymore-waving papers, shouting at the top of their lungs.
▪ Was he still rushing up and down stairs shouting at the top of his voice in case anyone had missed his presence?
▪ He was too far away to hear, even if she shouted at the top of her voice.
voice
▪ White faces: cracked voices shouting.
▪ It is tempting for leaders to confuse the popular will with the voices of those who shout the loudest.
▪ And then an impatient male voice had shouted from the cockpit above.
▪ She remembered his laughter, and her father's voice shouting farewell.
▪ Everyone stopped and looked around and one or two voices shouted back to him along the valley.
▪ An angry voice shouted something behind her.
▪ His voice, shouting commands, hardly ceased.
▪ Then they swept past with a great roar of engines, and there seemed to be a voice shouting from a loudspeaker.
■ VERB
begin
▪ Demanding to know why, he began to shout at her.
▪ Men began to shout with excitement.
▪ Members of Spencers family began shouting and had to be restrained.
▪ One day we had just made camp when a local caste of herders came and began shouting and threatening us.
▪ Artai sat down, and at once the people began to shout his name.
▪ There was music and dancing and the crowd began to shout.
▪ Then he saw a policeman near him, so he began to sing and shout and make a lot of noise.
▪ The people began to laugh and shout.
hear
▪ From below he heard shouting and running feet, and from further off came the muffled sound of more gunfire.
▪ I heard him shout back as he retired, loading his gun.
▪ But I heard them shouting, right through these walls.
▪ Barnett heard, or thought he heard, somebody shout that they were going to kill his father.
▪ I pretended not to hear, but he shouted a message that he would return.
▪ Frozen with horror, Kate heard noises and shouting from beyond the hut.
▪ They argued while eating their meals, having baths and in their sleep too you could hear them shouting.
▪ It wasn't until the next day some one heard him shouting and came to his rescue.
start
▪ I wakened up when he started shouting at me.
▪ Or else he started to shout.
▪ He's going to start shouting.
▪ So you start shouting at your breadhead: come on, supply me.
▪ Finally Ishmael starts shouting at Queequeg and nudging him and finally awakes the big man.
▪ He threw it hard at the Dodger, but missed and hit Charley Bates, who started to shout with fear.
▪ The old gentleman was not the only one who started shouting.
stop
▪ She stopped shouting and gave up hammering on the door.
▪ He had to stop himself from shouting aloud with pleasure.
▪ So when you see me overtaking, stop shouting and give it a whirl.
▪ I wanted him to pay attention. Stop shouting.
▪ Burun clenched his fists and bit his tongue to stop himself from shouting out.
▪ Every few steps I stopped and shouted, but the only sound in that wild, lonely place was the wind.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be all over bar the shouting
laugh/shout/scream etc your head off
▪ By this time Irene was emitting a steady gurgle of contentment, when she wasn't laughing her head off.
▪ If Hancock himself had been around, he would have doubtless squirmed as the audience laughed their heads off.
▪ Joey stood in the door laughing his head off and Noreen peered over his shoulder, her hands over her mouth.
▪ Louise: Ursula would have laughed her head off.
▪ Old Warleigh would laugh his head off if I put reasons like that to him.
▪ Then he tips her down and she's screaming her head off.
▪ Tony races past, laughing his head off.
▪ You were screaming your head off.
read/shout etc sth out (loud)
▪ Everything I had read before turned out to be outdated.
▪ He comes up to my room in the evenings so that I can read them out to him.
▪ He read it out loud to his colleagues, quite sarcastically, expecting them to agree that it was ridiculous.
▪ He shouts her out into the street for a harlot.
▪ Laura listened attentively while Yoyo read the speech out loud, and in the end, her eyes were glistening too.
▪ North read it out at his trial four years later as evidence of approval, but it was all delightfully vague.
▪ She brings her notes about it to the meeting and reads them out.
▪ We can read the books children are reading, find out what happens in class, ask what the guidance counselor said.
shouting match
▪ He was a diplomat; he liked negotiation and conclusions, not shouting matches in smoke-filled rooms which went nowhere.
▪ On the pavements, pedestrians bump into each other rather than step aside, and small offences turn quickly into shouting matches.
▪ Once, amid a furious shouting match reported by Clinton biographer David Maraniss, then-Gov.
▪ Precipitating the shouting match at Lindale was a 25-cent increase in the $ 1 admission fee.
▪ She interrupts the shouting match behind her to seek directions to Aunt Molly's hotel.
▪ Their late-night shouting match was so noisy it kept staff awake.
▪ Then the shouting matches would commence.
sing/shout at the top of your voice
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Get out of the way!" she shouted.
▪ "Get out!" she shouted angrily.
▪ I wish you'd stop shouting at the children
▪ Linda leant out of the widow and shouted out my name.
▪ The protesters marched through the streets, shouting slogans.
▪ There was so much noise from the engine that we had to shout to hear each other.
▪ You don't need to shout. I'm standing right here.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All those people shouting at each other.
▪ Fong turned to Soo and shouted at her in Swahili.
▪ One day we had just made camp when a local caste of herders came and began shouting and threatening us.
▪ The companies that follow this principle often don't shout about it, but they are easy to recognise.
▪ The drumming disoriented him, the darkness frightened him; he shouted out.
▪ These newcomers trotted through the streets-nobody seemed to walk anymore-waving papers, shouting at the top of their lungs.
▪ They shouted and laughed like tourists, and called out greetings to Langford and Wall.
▪ They were shouting at her to get on with it.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
great
▪ The Israelite army greets it with the same great shout as bounced off the walls of Jericho and heralded their demolition.
▪ As we passed through the city wall, a great shout went up from the occupants of the car.
▪ Suddenly I was full of hope again, and I gave a great shout of happiness.
▪ Then with a great shout he began to plunge over bodies and kit-bags down the gangway towards us.
▪ I was so surprised that I gave a great shout.
loud
▪ As soon as we passed, loud shouts went up.
▪ Underline the follow-up by means of a loud shout to show that you have unified mental resolve and physical effort in the technique.
▪ When somebody suggested hide and seek, there were loud shouts of agreement.
▪ She gave a loud, bitter shout of laughter that made them all stare.
▪ A louder shout than usual took her back to the ring.
▪ The hips turn strongly behind the punch and a loud shout should accompany it.
■ VERB
give
▪ Suddenly I was full of hope again, and I gave a great shout of happiness.
▪ At each round the Confederate artillerymen gave a shout, which seemed surprisingly near.
▪ Melwas gave a shout, and swung his sword up for the kill.
▪ Suddenly the man called Barakai gave a shout, then charged.
▪ I tugged the ribbon and lifted the lid and heard myself give a harsh shout of anger and rejection and probably shame.
▪ Anyway, give me a shout if you want me.
▪ Angel glanced round and gave a shout of warning.
hear
▪ Just then Grant heard shouts and running feet from various parts of the house, converging on the sounds of gunfire.
▪ They hear the shouts of the peasants coming up the hill.
▪ But he could hear no shouts of terror and panic as he might have supposed.
▪ A few yards later they heard a shout from the shore.
▪ Swallows fought under the eaves outside the window, a lonely bell sounded, and Corbett heard faint shouts from the courtyard.
▪ The man managed to pull them free after he heard their shouts for help at Towyn in Clwyd.
▪ She could no longer hear the shouts of her father and brother but felt them on her back.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
erupt into laughter/shouting etc
laugh/shout/scream etc your head off
▪ By this time Irene was emitting a steady gurgle of contentment, when she wasn't laughing her head off.
▪ If Hancock himself had been around, he would have doubtless squirmed as the audience laughed their heads off.
▪ Joey stood in the door laughing his head off and Noreen peered over his shoulder, her hands over her mouth.
▪ Louise: Ursula would have laughed her head off.
▪ Old Warleigh would laugh his head off if I put reasons like that to him.
▪ Then he tips her down and she's screaming her head off.
▪ Tony races past, laughing his head off.
▪ You were screaming your head off.
read/shout etc sth out (loud)
▪ Everything I had read before turned out to be outdated.
▪ He comes up to my room in the evenings so that I can read them out to him.
▪ He read it out loud to his colleagues, quite sarcastically, expecting them to agree that it was ridiculous.
▪ He shouts her out into the street for a harlot.
▪ Laura listened attentively while Yoyo read the speech out loud, and in the end, her eyes were glistening too.
▪ North read it out at his trial four years later as evidence of approval, but it was all delightfully vague.
▪ She brings her notes about it to the meeting and reads them out.
▪ We can read the books children are reading, find out what happens in class, ask what the guidance counselor said.
sing/shout at the top of your voice
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ As we got near the stadium, we could hear the shouts of the crowd.
▪ He gave a shout of joy as he realised he'd won the race.
▪ Just then Angie burst in with a shout of excitement.
▪ Lisa's voice rose to a shout.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A shout made them look up.
▪ At each round the Confederate artillerymen gave a shout, which seemed surprisingly near.
▪ Dowd felt his master's hand on his neck, and heard shouts of horror on all sides.
▪ Just then Grant heard shouts and running feet from various parts of the house, converging on the sounds of gunfire.
▪ Suffice it to say that the whisper eventually turned into a shout and the five-foot pile of dirt was reduced considerably.
▪ The urgent shout had come in through his unlatched gate as he was about to take a sip of the broth.
▪ There were songs and testimonies, spontaneous sermons and exhortations, joyous shouts and prayers punctuated by sobs and tears.
▪ You swagger in here, into my lady's chamber, and shout allegations yet show no evidence.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Shout

Shout \Shout\, v. t.

  1. To utter with a shout; to cry; -- sometimes with out; as, to shout, or to shout out, a man's name.

  2. To treat with shouts or clamor.
    --Bp. Hall.

  3. To treat (one) to something; also, to give (something) by way of treating. [Slang, Australia & U. S.]

Shout

Shout \Shout\ (shout), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Shouted; p. pr. & vb. n. Shouting.] [OE. shouten, of unknown origin; perhaps akin to shoot; cf. Icel. sk[=u]ta, sk[=u]ti, a taunt.]

  1. To utter a sudden and loud outcry, as in joy, triumph, or exultation, or to attract attention, to animate soldiers, etc.

    Shouting of the men and women eke.
    --Chaucer.

    They shouted thrice: what was the last cry for?
    --Shak.

  2. To entertain with refreshments or the like gratuitously; to treat. [Slang, Australia & U. S.]

    To shout at, to utter shouts at; to deride or revile with shouts.

Shout

Shout \Shout\, n.

  1. A loud burst of voice or voices; a vehement and sudden outcry, especially of a multitudes expressing joy, triumph, exultation, or animated courage.

    The Rhodians, seeing the enemy turn their backs, gave a great shout in derision.
    --Knolles.

  2. A gratuitous entertainment, with refreshments or the like; a treat. [Slang, Australia & U. S.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
shout

c.1300, schowten "to call or cry out loudly," of unknown origin; perhaps from the root of shoot (v.) on the notion of "throw the voice out loudly," or related to Old Norse skuta "a taunt" (compare scout (v.2)). Related: Shouted; shouting.

shout

late 14c., from shout (v.).

Wiktionary
shout

n. 1 A loud burst of voice or voices; a vehement and sudden outcry, especially that of a multitude expressing joy, triumph, exultation, or animated courage. 2 (context UK Australia New Zealand slang English) A round of drinks in a pub; the turn to pay the shot or scot; an act of paying for a round of drinks. 3 (context UK Australia jargon slang English) A call-out for an emergency services team. vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To utter a sudden and loud outcry, as in joy, triumph, or exultation, or to attract attention, to animate soldiers, etc. 2 (context transitive English) To utter with a shout; to cry; -- sometimes with out; as, to shout, or to shout out, a man's name. 3 (context transitive obsolete English) To treat with shouts or clamor. 4 (context colloquial English) To pay for food, drink or entertainment for others. 5 (context Internet English) To post a text message (for example, email) in upper case.

WordNet
shout
  1. v. utter in a loud voice; talk in a loud voice (usually denoting characteristic manner of speaking); "My grandmother is hard of hearing--you'll have to shout" [ant: whisper]

  2. utter a sudden loud cry; "she cried with pain when the doctor inserted the needle"; "I yelled to her from the window but she couldn't hear me" [syn: shout out, cry, call, yell, scream, holler, hollo, squall]

  3. utter aloud; often with surprise, horror, or joy; "`I won!' he exclaimed"; "`Help!' she cried"; "`I'm here,' the mother shouted when she saw her child looking lost" [syn: exclaim, cry, cry out, outcry, call out]

  4. use foul or abusive language towards; "The actress abused the policeman who gave her a parking ticket"; "The angry mother shouted at the teacher" [syn: abuse, clapperclaw, blackguard]

shout

n. a loud utterance; often in protest or opposition; "the speaker was interrupted by loud cries from the rear of the audience" [syn: cry, outcry, call, yell, vociferation]

Wikipedia
Shout (The Isley Brothers song)

"Shout" is an American popular song, originally recorded by the Isley Brothers. Released in 1959, it was written by the brothers themselves as a call and response answer to Jackie Wilson's " Lonely Teardrops", which they would occasionally cover in live performances.

Shout (Devo album)

Shout is the sixth studio album by the American new wave band Devo. It was originally released in October 1984, on the labels Warner Bros., and Virgin, two years after their previous album, Oh, No! It's Devo. The album was recorded over a period of ten months between July 1983 and April 1984, in sessions that took place at the Record Plant in Los Angeles, California. The album retained the synthpop sound of their previous records, with an extensive focus on the then-new Fairlight CMISeries IIx digital sampling synthesizer. Despite the popularity of synthpop in 1984, the album was a critical and commercial failure, peaking at only #83 on the Billboard 200, and ultimately led to Warner Bros. dropping the band from the label. "Shout" was the second Devo album in which co-founder and bass guitarist Gerald Casale sang the majority of the lead vocals, which are usually performed by Mark Mothersbaugh.

Following its release, the band went on hiatus for four years. Although the band would release two studio albums through Enigma Records, they would not release another album through Warner Bros. until Something for Everybody in 2010. The band themselves have been quite vocal in that they were less satisfied with the album and Gerald Casale once said on Twitter in response to a question from a fan that recording the album was "too painful to talk about."

As with every Devo album, the band developed a new look for the album, eschewing the black T-shirts and slacks with white "Spud Ring" collars, and replacing it with the "Chinese-American Friendship Suits."

Shout

Shout or Shouts may refer to:

  • Shout (sound), a loud vocalization
  • An Australian, British, and New Zealand term referring to buying a round of drinks
  • Shout, a household cleaning product produced by S.C. Johnson
  • Shout, or ring shout, a religious dance originating among African slaves in the Americas
Shout (magazine)

Shout is a UK magazine for teenage girls, published by D. C. Thomson & Co. Ltd of Dundee, Scotland, since 1993.

It carries articles on fashion, celebrities, flowcharts, true stories, problems and embarrassing moments. It is printed fortnightly, normally at £2.99, and is read by over 520,000 people each fortnight.

The categories include a wide range of articles. The celebrity pages may have a topic (such as celebs who pick their noses, etc.) or can be just be embarrassing or enhancing pictures. Fashion shows clothes available at various stores and different ways to wear them and different ranges of colors and ways to apply make up to enhance one's features. Flow charts and polls let readers express their opinion and see what other people think on a topic. True stories contain stories of people's experiences, problems or ailments. "Problems" is a write-back system which allows girls to send in their problems which may appear in the magazine or receive a written reply. "Embarrassing moments" is a feature on readers' recent embarrassing moments. They are rated on how embarrassing they are: if the editors say 'Get over it', then it is deemed barely embarrassing; 'Slightly shameful' means it was embarrassing at the time but the reader should eventually get over it, and 'Completely cringey!' means she will never live it down. The magazine also features advice columns from youtubers Zoella and SprinkleofGlitter.

Another magazine, named Shout Secrets, was released in October 2008, after a survey which showed that readers wanted more true stories and celeb gossip. It features more of these and fewer of the flowcharts, style, fashion and quizzes. The magazine is on a trial run and so far has had good reviews. It costs £3.00.

Shout was launched by Jackie Brown and is currently edited by Maria T. Welch.

Shout (Tears for Fears song)

"Shout" is a song by the British band Tears for Fears, written by Roland Orzabal and Ian Stanley and sung by Orzabal (with Curt Smith duetting on the chorus). First released in the UK on 23 November 1984, it was the band's eighth single release (the second taken from their second album Songs from the Big Chair) and sixth UK Top 40 hit, peaking at no. 4 in January 1985. In the US, it reached no. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 on 3 August 1985 and remained there for three weeks. "Shout" would become one of the most successful songs of 1985, eventually reaching the Top Ten in 25 countries. "Shout" is regarded as one of the most recognisable songs from the mid-eighties and is also recognised as the group's signature song.

Shout (band)
For the church music sound, see Shout band

Shout was a Christian glam metal band formed in 1987 by Ken Tamplin. Musically the band was similar to Stryper, but the Encyclopedia of Contemporary Christian Music cites them as being "more competent than Stryper". Lyrically, their songs were generally more straightforward than other Christian metal bands such as Bloodgood. The band garnered a Dove Award after their breakup in 1989.

Shout (Black Tide song)
  1. redirect Light from Above

Category:2008 songs

Shout (Shout for England song)

"Shout" is 2010 single by Shout for England, an ensemble featuring Dizzee Rascal and James Corden. It was an unofficial anthem of the England football team for the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa. The song contains extracts from the Tears for Fears song " Shout" and " No Diggity" by Blackstreet and features additional lyrics written by Rascal. It was published by Syco Music in association with the telecommunications company TalkTalk.

Shout (film)

Shout is a 1991 American musical romance film directed by Jeffrey Hornaday and starring John Travolta as a music teacher who introduces rock and roll to a west Texas home for boys in 1955.

The film also features James Walters, Scott Coffey, Heather Graham, Charles Taylor, and Glenn Quinn as well as an early role for Gwyneth Paltrow.

Shout (Ant & Dec song)

"Shout" is the thirteenth single by Ant & Dec, formerly known as PJ & Duncan and the third to be taken from their final album, The Cult of Ant & Dec (1997). The single was released in March 1997, and reached number 10 in the UK Singles Chart. The song is in a pop rock style.

The song features backing vocals from Erasure's Andy Bell, and its chorus, "Shout.. come on, let it out" takes influence from the Tears for Fears' song " Shout" where the chorus begins with "Shout, shout, let it all out".

The music video sees Ant & Dec in a flat or hotel room singing the song. Dec plays the acoustic guitar in the video.

Usage examples of "shout".

Opening its affinity full, projecting a wordless shout of joy and sorrow over a spherical zone thirty astronomical units in radius.

Norman left his allotment shed, returned to his van, shouted abuse at it and drove homeward.

Theodore shouted as the ambulance zeroed in on the fountain like a magnet.

I saw nothing of the amphitheatre, nothing of the spectators, nothing but her, till, at the sudden shout from the crowd, I roused myself with a start.

Young couples would purchase that property, they would take up occupancy, they would quarrel, the quarreling would escalate to shouting and table-pounding, they would anathematize each other, and, presto, they would move out, not together but separately.

He wanted to before, but now that someone jumps off the starting high-flier and shouts his name plus his super annuated rank to the ends of the world, the meanwhile alderman and sharpshooter Heinrich Osterhues has lost all inclination and wants only to make himself scarce.

Listening to the shouting guardsmen, Peter gathered that emigrants were arriving from Sheffield as well as the three other Midland cities.

Her people heard over the loud--speakers the voices of the senior pilots assigning targets, the orders to attack and to withdraw and the shouts, curses and sobs of men delivering death in the face of death.

The Justice behaved like a Man at my telling him soe, that is to say, cut an Antick Caper and made the Parlour ring with Shouting, then was very meeke and bid me sit, to rest myself, then stand, that I might not crush the Babe, then sit again.

Taverik wanted to balk, shout to his father for help, sit down and refuse to move-but somehow his stiff knees bent and he stumbled, half-supported out the door.

The bargee shouted to the lock-keeper that it was his turn, that he would make an official complaint, and a great deal besides.

The youth whom Shan Kar had called Barin was shouting in a high, ringing voice, the other horsemen and the great beasts gathering toward him.

Nettuno barked audibly, and his master answered with another shout, for the sympathy of man in his kind is inextinguishable.

I thought the least he could do was crack another bottle of claret, seeing as he was getting eternal life dirt cheap and I was obtaining only half the profit from this bizarre transaction but he was temporarily blind and deaf to the world, barkening only to the invisible angels shouting in his ears, so I rapped loudly with the book upon the table and that brought one of his bullies in, at the double -- out of a door of a secret kind concealed in the panelling.

I started to laugh, but the bartender shouted to another young man shoveling quarters into a nearby slot.