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Crossword clues for put

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
put
verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an estimate puts sth at sth
▪ Independent estimates put the number of refugees at 50,000.
be put to death (=be killed as a punishment for something you have done)
▪ The rebels were defeated and their leaders put to death.
be (put/placed) on red alert
▪ All the hospitals are on red alert.
be/put sb on a drip
▪ At the hospital they put me on a drip.
enrol on a course/put your name down for a courseBritish English (= to arrange to officially join a course)
▪ How about enrolling on a sailing course?
erect/build/put up barriers
▪ Some kids have erected emotional barriers that stop them from learning.
go before/be put before parliament (=be considered by parliament)
▪ The Bill goes before Parliament on November 16.
impose/set/put a ceiling (on sth)
▪ The government imposed a ceiling on imports of foreign cars.
issue/release/put out a statement (=give a written statement to newspapers, TV etc)
▪ The Russian Foreign Ministry issued a short statement saying the meeting was ‘useful’.
keep/put sb on their mettle
▪ This was just his way of keeping me on my mettle.
keep/put sth in a safe place
▪ Keep your credit cards in a safe place.
lay on/put on entertainment (=organize and provide it)
▪ The organizers laid on some entertainment for the children.
let/put the cat out (=let it or make it go outside)
▪ Can you let the cat out?
nominate/put up a candidate (=put forward a candidate)
▪ Any member may nominate a candidate.
offer/put forward a suggestion
▪ A few suggestions were put forward.
place/put a burden on sb
▪ This situation places the main burden of family care on women.
place/put a high value on sth
▪ Our society places a high value on education.
place/put constraints on sb/sth
▪ Lack of funding is putting severe constraints on research.
place/put sb under arrest (=arrest someone)
place/put sth on record (=officially say something or write it down)
▪ I wish to put on record my objection to the scheme.
place/put/lay a bet on sth
▪ She placed a bet on a horse called Beethoven.
propose/introduce/put forward a resolution
▪ The resolution was proposed by the chairman of the committee.
propose/put forward/table a motion (=make a proposal)
▪ I’d like to propose a motion to move the weekly meetings to Thursdays.
put a battery in
▪ She had put new batteries in the radio.
put a bullet through/in sth
▪ He threatened to put a bullet through my brain.
put a dent in
▪ Eight years of effort have hardly put a dent in drug trafficking.
put a halt to sth (=stop something suddenly)
▪ The news put a halt to our celebrations.
put a key in a lock/the door
▪ I put the key in the lock, but it wouldn’t turn.
put a limit on sth
▪ We have to put a limit on the number of participants.
put a perspective on sth
▪ This new evidence put a whole new perspective on the case.
put a proposition to sb (also make (sb) a proposition)
▪ A proposition was put to Owen, and he is considering it.
▪ I’m going to make you a proposition.
put a question to sb (=ask a question in a formal situation)
▪ I recently put some of these questions to a psychologist.
put a spell on sb (=make magic affect someone)
▪ The fairy put a terrible spell on the princess.
put a stop on
▪ I put a stop on that check to the store.
put a value on sth (=say how much it is worth)
▪ It’s hard to put a value on something so unusual.
put air into sth (=fill a tyre, balloon etc with air)
▪ I need to put some air in the tyres.
put an end to sth (=make something end)
▪ A shoulder injury put an end to his baseball career.
put an estimate on sth (=say the amount that you think something is)
▪ It is impossible to put an estimate on the value of the manuscript.
put aside
▪ You must put aside your pride and call her.
put a...spin on
▪ They tried to put a positive spin on the sales figures.
put down the telephone
▪ Before he could respond, she’d put down the telephone.
put down/replace the receiver
put effort into (doing) sth (=try hard to do something)
▪ Let’s try again, only put more effort into it this time.
put emphasis on sth
▪ We need to put greater emphasis on planning.
▪ The airline is accused of placing more emphasis on profit than on safety.
put forward/submit a proposal
▪ They put forward a proposal for a joint research project.
put handcuffs on
▪ They put handcuffs on the two men and led them away.
put in a bid
▪ A big property developer has put in a bid for the land.
put in a good word
▪ Dan put in a good word for you at the meeting.
put in detention
▪ She was always getting put in detention.
put in overtime (=work overtime)
▪ To earn enough money, he puts in a lot of overtime.
put in/submit an application
▪ The company has submitted a planning application.
put in/up a (good/bad etc) performance
▪ Liverpool put in a marvellous performance in the second half.
put it on...tab
▪ I’ll put it on your tab and you can pay tomorrow.
put on a CD (=play it)
▪ She put on her favourite CD and lay on the sofa.
put on a concert (also stage a concertformal) (= arrange one)
▪ The music club puts on regular concerts throughout the year.
put on a nappy (=put a nappy on a baby)
▪ I put a clean nappy on her half an hour ago.
put on a play (=arrange for it to be performed)
▪ The school puts on a Nativity play every Christmas.
put on a ventilator
▪ He was put on a ventilator but died two hours later.
put on a waiting list
▪ I was then put on a waiting list to see a specialist at the local hospital.
put on alert
▪ Troops in the vicinity were put on alert.
put on an accent (=deliberately speak with a different accent from your usual one)
▪ When mum’s on the phone, she puts on a funny accent.
put on an exhibition (=have an exhibition)
▪ Last summer the museum put on some wonderful exhibitions for children.
put on earrings
▪ I forgot to put on my new earrings.
put on make-up (also apply make-upformal)
▪ Gloria watched her mother put on her make-up.
put on weight (also gain weightformal)
▪ He had put on weight since she last saw him.
put on your coat
▪ Mark stood up and put on his coat.
put on your glasses
▪ He put on his glasses and read through the instructions.
put on/pull on your gloves
▪ Eleanor put on her gloves and stood up.
put on/show a front
▪ Jenny didn’t want Adam to see how worried she was. So she put on a brave front.
put on/take off/remove your cap
▪ He opened the door, took off his cap, and threw it on a hook.
put our watches forward
▪ We put our watches forward by 2 hours.
put out a fire (also extinguish a fireformal) (= stop a fire burning)
▪ Firemen successfully extinguished the fire.
put out
▪ She felt put out that she hadn’t been consulted.
put out/extinguish a blaze
▪ Staff managed to put out the blaze before firemen arrived.
put out/extinguish the flames (=make them stop burning)
▪ The firemen successfully put out the flames.
put out/stub out a cigarette (=stop it burning)
▪ Kit stubbed out her cigarette in the fireplace.
put paint on sth
▪ Don’t put the paint on too thick.
put poison down (=put it somewhere to kill an animal)
▪ One way of getting rid of rats or mice is to put poison down.
put poison in sth
▪ She put poison in his wine.
put pressure on sb
▪ We’ve decided to set up a campaign to put pressure on the Government.
put sb in contact with sb (=give someone the name, telephone number etc of another person)
▪ I can put you in contact with a friend of mine in Paris.
put sb in jail
▪ The government would put him in jail if he stayed in the country.
put sb in prison
▪ Mentally ill people should not be put in prison.
put sb in the lead (=make someone be in the lead)
▪ Ronaldo’s goal put Portugal in the lead.
put sb on trial
▪ They should never have been put on trial, let alone convicted.
put sb to bed (=put a child in their bed)
▪ I put the baby to bed at 7 o'clock as usual.
put sb to rout (=defeat sb completely)
put sb under pressure (=put a lot of pressure on them)
▪ They were put under pressure to sign confessions.
put sb/sb’s life in danger
▪ Firemen put their own lives in danger as part of their job.
put sb/sth forward as a candidate (=suggest someone for election)
▪ He allowed his name to be put forward as a candidate for governor.
put sb/sth into categories
▪ People are individuals and you can’t really put them into categories.
put sb/sth on a list
▪ I was put on a waiting list to see a specialist at the hospital.
put some distance between yourself and sb/sth (=go quite a long way from them)
▪ He wanted to put some distance between himself and his pursuers.
put some energy into sth
▪ Try to put more energy into your game.
put sth in a container
▪ The food is then put in special containers.
put sth in the post (=put it in a box to be collected)
▪ I put it in the post on Friday, so it should have arrived today.
put sth in your pocket
▪ I put the £5 note in my pocket.
put sth in/into a pile
▪ She tidied up the books and put them in neat piles.
put sth in/into context (=consider something in context)
▪ These statistics need to be put into context.
put sth into action (=start doing something you have planned to do)
▪ She was looking forward to putting her plans into action.
▪ The committee uses the expertise of local organisations to put these ideas into action.
put sth into/in perspective (=consider something in a sensible way by comparing it with something else, or to help you do this)
▪ Let's put this data into perspective.
▪ I saw their suffering, and it really put my own problems into perspective.
put sth on the agenda
▪ This incident has put the issue of racism firmly back on the agenda.
put sth on the fire
▪ Put another log on the fire.
put sth on your card (=pay by credit card)
▪ I’ll put the restaurant bill on my card.
put sth out to tenderBritish English (= to ask different companies to say how much they will charge for doing a particular job)
▪ The contract for building the houses will be put out to tender.
put sth to the board (=ask the board to consider something)
▪ Their proposals were put to the board.
put sth to the/a vote (=decide something by voting)
▪ Let’s put it to the vote. All those in favor raise your hands.
put sth up for auction (=try to sell something at an auction)
▪ This week 14 of his paintings were put up for auction.
put the brakes on (=use the brakes)
▪ Put the brakes on – you’re going too fast.
put the car etc into (first/second/third etc) gear
▪ He put the car into gear, and they moved slowly forwards.
put the car in the garage
▪ Dad's just putting the car in the garage.
put the final/finishing touches to sth
▪ Emma was putting the finishing touches to the cake.
Put the kettle on (=start boiling water in a kettle)
Put the kettle on, will you?
put the phone down
▪ I only remembered his name after I had put the phone down.
put the washing out (=hang it on a washing line)
▪ Could you put the washing out for me?
put through a call (=transfer or make one)
▪ She asked the switchboard to put the call through.
put to sea (=sail a boat away from land)
▪ The refugees put to sea in rickety rafts.
put up a building (also erect a buildingformal)
▪ They keep pulling down the old buildings and putting up new ones.
put up a house (=build a house, especially when it seems very quick)
▪ I think they’ve ruined the village by putting up these new houses.
put up a statue (also erect a statueformal) (= put it in a public place)
▪ They put up a statue of him in the main square.
▪ They should erect a statue to you for doing that.
put up resistance (=resist someone or something)
▪ If the rest of us are agreed, I don’t think he’ll put up much resistance.
put up...as collateral
▪ We put up our home as collateral in order to raise the money to invest in the scheme.
put up/hang curtains (=fix new curtains at a window )
▪ She was standing on a ladder hanging some new curtains.
put up/increase/raise a price
▪ Manufacturers have had to put their prices up.
put up...umbrella
▪ It started to rain, so Tricia stopped to put up her umbrella.
put your affairs in order (=organize them before you go somewhere or die)
▪ I have cancer so I know I’ve got to put my affairs in order.
put your clothes on
▪ I told him to get up and put some clothes on.
put your house on the market (=make it available for people to buy)
▪ They put the house on the market and began looking for an apartment.
put your shoes on
▪ Put your shoes on and get your coat.
put your socks on
▪ She sat on the bed beside him, putting on her socks.
put your success down to sth (=say that your success was the result of it)
▪ They put their success down to their excellent teamwork.
put your watch back (=make it show an earlier time)
▪ On Saturday night, don’t forget to put your watch back an hour.
put your watch forward (=make it show a later time)
▪ The passengers were reminded to put their watches forward three hours.
put yourself/your neck on the line (for sb) (=risk something bad happening to you)
▪ I’ve already put myself on the line for you once, and I’m not going to do it again.
put...ahead
▪ Two shots from Gardner put the Giants 80–75 ahead.
put/arrange sth in order
▪ Decide what points you want to talk about, and put them in order.
put...aside
▪ Could you put this cake aside for me?
put...cross
▪ I’ve put a cross on the map to mark where our street is.
put...curse on
▪ He believed that someone had put a curse on the house.
put/get in a plug (for sth)
▪ During the show she managed to put in a plug for her new book.
put/get your point across (=make people understand it)
▪ I think we got our point across.
put...hex on
▪ I think he’s trying to put a hex on me.
put...hood up
▪ Why don’t you put your hood up if you’re cold?
put...in an awkward position (=made it difficult for her to know what to do)
▪ Philip’s remarks put her in an awkward position.
put...in the wash
▪ You’d better put that shirt in the wash.
put...in touch with (=give you their address or phone number so you can talk to them)
▪ I can put you in touch with a local photography club .
put...interpretation on (=explain)
▪ It’s difficult to put an accurate interpretation on the survey results.
put...into first
▪ He put the car into first and roared away.
put/knock sb out of a competition (=defeat someone so that they are no longer in a competition)
▪ They put us out of the competition in the semi-final last year.
put...on probation
▪ I’m afraid I have no choice but to put you on probation.
put...on standby
▪ We can put you on standby.
put...on the market (=offered it for sale)
▪ They knew it wasn’t a good time to sell their house, but they still put it on the market.
put...on to boil
▪ She fried the chicken and put the vegetables on to boil.
Put...on
Put your coat on. It’s freezing outside.
put...on...guard
▪ Something in his tone put her on her guard.
put...on...walls
▪ I put some pictures up on the walls.
put...out of contention
▪ Injury has put him out of contention for the title.
put/pin the blame on sb (also lay/place the blame on sbwritten) (= blame someone, especially when it is not their fault)
▪ Don’t try to put the blame on me.
▪ Everyone laid the blame for the crisis on the government.
put/place (a) strain on sb/sth
▪ Living with my parents put quite a strain on our marriage.
put/place an advertisement in a paper/newspaper
▪ I tried putting an advertisement for lodgers in the local paper.
put/place obstacles in the way (=try to stop someone from doing something easily)
▪ Her father put several obstacles in the way of their marriage.
put/place restrictions on sth
▪ The authorities placed strict restrictions on diamond exports.
put/place sb at a disadvantage (=make someone less likely to be successful than others)
▪ Not speaking English might put you at a disadvantage.
put/place sb in a dilemma
▪ His divided loyalties placed him in a dilemma.
put/place sb in a good/awkward etc position
▪ I'm sorry if I put you in an awkward position.
put/place sb in command
▪ A third goal put Brazil in command of the game.
put/place sb on high alert
▪ Troops were put on high alert.
(put/place sb) on probation
▪ He pleaded guilty and was placed on probation.
put/place sth in jeopardy
▪ The killings could put the whole peace process in jeopardy.
put/place sth on a ... footing
▪ He wanted to put their relationship on a permanent footing.
put/place your faith in sb/sth
▪ The Conservative party put its faith in the free market.
put/place your trust in sb/sth
▪ You shouldn’t put your trust in a man like that.
put/place/impose a ban
▪ The government has imposed an outright ban on fox hunting.
put...price tag on (=say how much it costs)
▪ It’s difficult to put a price tag on such a project .
put/push sth to the back of your mind
▪ He tried to push these uncomfortable thoughts to the back of his mind.
put...signatures to
▪ The Ukrainians put their signatures to the Lisbon Protocol.
puts...in...tight spot
▪ This puts the chairman in a very tight spot.
put/switch/turn the heating on
▪ Why don't you put the heating on if you're cold?
put...through
▪ Please hold the line and I’ll put you through.
put/throw sth in the bin (also chuck sth in the bininformal)
▪ Shall I put this old bread in the bin?
Put...tick
Put a tick in the box if you agree with this statement.
putting a gloss on
▪ The minister was accused of putting a gloss on the government’s poor performance.
putting green
putting up posters
▪ A team of volunteers were putting up posters.
put/turn the spotlight on sth
▪ A new report has turned the spotlight on the problem of poverty in the inner cities.
put...up for adoption
▪ She decided to put the baby up for adoption.
put/wrap your arms around sb
▪ I put my arms around Bobby and gave him a hug.
raise/put up the rate
▪ If the banks raise interest rates, this will reduce the demand for credit.
shot put
▪ an Olympic shot putter
submit/put in a request (=make a formal request)
▪ The request was first submitted a number of months ago.
▪ He has put in a request for two weeks' holiday.
suggest/put forward a solution
▪ The chairman put forward a possible solution.
suppress/crush/put down a rebellion (=end it by force)
▪ Troops moved in to suppress the rebellion.
suppress/crush/put down a revolt (=end it by force)
▪ The Russians speedily crushed the revolt.
take/stand for/put up with crap (=to allow someone to treat you badly)
▪ I’m not going to take any more of this crap!
To put it bluntly
To put it bluntly, she’s not up to the job.
To put it simply
To put it simply, the tax cuts mean the average person will be about 3% better off.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
aside
▪ Wives are easily put aside, and the royal princess already looks upon me as a friend.
▪ Certainly, one ought to put aside for retirement more than Social Security.
▪ Hayling added to the confusion by taking away applications from blacks, which were put aside for positive consideration.
▪ There are times when you have to put aside your personal beliefs.
▪ She had put aside her own longings.
▪ When Juliette becomes depressed and finally suicidal, Alex and Marie put aside their jealousies to aid the girl.
▪ She hunted herself, putting aside all those pictures in which she appeared - not as child but as a grown woman.
▪ You must have the money put aside to cover this necessary start-up investment.
away
▪ It may be that tougher-looking delinquents are more liable to be put away than fragile looking ones.
▪ If toys are in there, they get put away.
▪ The vehicles are put away again, and the now cold and slightly unappetising evening meal is pushed back into the microwave.
▪ In pre-air-conditioning days, we switched to summer white clothes and put away the area rugs to leave floors bare.
▪ He had put away his Churchill and was reading a new book.
▪ The lessons of Gibbon are put away.
▪ The old sit-up-and-beg bicycle outside the shop is being put away.
▪ Play resumes and Krajicek puts away easy volley.
down
▪ When she finally put down the phone, she stared at it for a few seconds longer.
▪ My name was there, the last put down, across from the number nine.
▪ Taheb put down her wine, stood up, and crossed towards him.
▪ They put down sawdust but had insufficient to deal with the flooding to all areas of the factory.
▪ Either Quinn knew just what he was doing or he was going to provoke the kidnapper into putting down the phone.
▪ There was a brief exchange of hoots, and the clothed human put down the tray and went out again.
▪ Do I feel bad, exploited, put down?
▪ Blissfully unaware that I had no obligation to sign any agreement, I put down a ten-pound deposit the same afternoon.
forward
▪ The volume puts forward the case for a new discipline.
▪ Eventually I shall put forward my own suggestions.
▪ Many proposals have been put forward over more than 100 years.
▪ In fact, the 14-member group will put forward a more philosophical statement.
▪ One influential argument about urban decline has been put forward by Fothergill and Gudgin and their associates.
▪ Councillors commended the scheme put forward by Tilhill Economic Forestry for its design and consideration for sites of archaeological and scientific interest.
▪ Herbert Read in his book Education through Art took up the categories of types put forward by Jung.
▪ Michel Charasse has put forward an amendment which would allow cigarette advertising at the Grand Prix.
in
▪ Almost every word has been put in for a purpose and needs to be commented upon.
▪ They put in first at Lemnos, a strange island where only women lived.
▪ Geldings tend to be much wetter, therefore are better put in well drained stables.
▪ And I put in all these doors, see?
▪ Criticised for what actually went into it, now the sausage is singled out for the artificial colouring often put in.
▪ When they put in for repairs at Genoa and encounter Deronda at the hotel, she hopes to speak with him.
▪ And what was more, he had put in for a divorce.
▪ Polyester was too far gone, starting from where we were, and with the limited resources we could put in.
off
▪ But he has been right in saying that urgent measures have been put off for too long.
▪ He said that often important maintenance problems are put off until they create urgent problems.
▪ Even so, many expatriates are put off the offshore industry by its reputation for shady practices.
▪ Others are put off by the stark social and economic differences between the two communities.
▪ Stewart Skirving, of the community development project, said the disturbances associated with late-night drinking would put off many tourists.
▪ They, too, were put off.
▪ On two or three afternoons of the first week winds may be a little daunting; don't be put off.
▪ Antonio Cellini would not be put off so easily.
on
▪ It could be put on and off each day, although with difficulty.
▪ I shower in lukewarm water and decide on thick white running shorts and matching top which I put on in slow motion.
▪ The eyebrows and eyelashes were drawn in an then very pale washes were put on, the paint smooth and even.
▪ The cursed item can not be removed, either, once put on.
▪ This special afternoon sale will put on offer an album of fifty-eight previously unknown drawings by Henry Fuseli.
▪ The strong structure we have put on our example allows us easily to derive prices and output per fIrm.
out
▪ Most of these babies, put out to wet nurses, failed to survive infancy.
▪ As a result, the Minipod puts out a massive sound stage and places instruments exactly where they should be.
▪ In response the Society rejected the need to compel local authorities to put out aspects of their legal services to competitive tender.
▪ Alderman Marzullo puts out a 350-page ad book every year, at one hundred dollars a page.
▪ Most of the equipment must be locked away in storerooms and sheds at night and put out again every morning.
▪ They want to engineer products that put out a strong signal with minimal interference.
▪ She put out her hands on either side, intending to lean back and stretch in the sun.
▪ He joined a 20-member crew, digging ditches and helping to put out hot spots.
simply
▪ The mercenary ones simply put up with them and pretend that they love them for what they can get out of them.
▪ They simply put it out and let the music speak for itself.
▪ He simply put the letters on Arty's locker and turned away.
▪ Put simply, cardiac arrhythmia is an irregular heartbeat.
▪ Put simply, the necessary finance can be made available to you in return for Barclays taking a minority shareholding in your business.
▪ Put simply the new system had to work.
▪ Put simply, intellectual property is not an obstacle to access.
▪ Or, more simply put: Freemen to the east.
together
▪ Images of this type should be fairly simple, eyecatching and quick to put together.
▪ At that point, you should meet with management and put together a plan for further education and development.
▪ Bob Hope was off the scale altogether and Peter O'Toole was worse than the whole lot put together.
▪ Artistic Director Barbara Oliver has done more than put together a strong cast.
▪ That is, the human species is capable of experiencing sensations equal in total to those experienced by all other species put together.
▪ But at home, everything is not neatly packaged and put together, and I do not always feel clear or confident.
▪ What extra significance is added when different items are put together?
▪ For the first time, Alvin and the group could concentrate simply on creating dances and putting together performances.
up
▪ More than 70,000 shopkeepers have been forced to put up the shutters in the past year.
▪ The Unitariansthey put up a new one every week on their sign.
▪ But later - in the morning, when he could put up with the old boy's fussing.
▪ So he decided to put up the money out of his own pocket.
▪ A lot of that sarcasm is just bravado, and if I can put up with his teasing, can't you?
▪ Henry was infamous for his impatience and his refusal to put up with nonsense.
▪ There is nothing to stop pressure groups putting up candidates at parliamentary elections on specific and limited programmes.
▪ But former Rangers star Ferguson was having to put up with a torrent of abuse.
■ NOUN
arm
▪ She put an arm round the girl's waist.
▪ He sat down beside her, put an arm round her shoulders.
▪ The cast crowded around him and Gabby put her arms around him unselfconsciously and cried.
▪ He lay there, feeling very tender and protective, and put an arm rather tentatively around her.
▪ Pop put his arm around me.
▪ Wanted to put her arm around her, hug her, what the hell had super-brat been up to now?
▪ Edward, utterly wretched, put his arms about her and she raised her mouth to his.
back
▪ He could put green back on the trees, blue back into the sky, purple into the undergrowth.
▪ A couple of wrong moves in the commodities market put his back against the wall.
▪ Biddy put her head back and yelled with laughter.
▪ Here I built a small fire, and putting my back to the rock lit a cigarette.
▪ He put the photograph back and went upstairs.
▪ I really put my back into it, you know?
▪ The Government later backed advice that babies be put on their backs to sleep and not overheated by too many blankets.
▪ I can't put the clock back.
bed
▪ If possible, let the floor dry before putting the bed down again.
▪ Mommy, put the bed in that room.
▪ Sleep covered me like an eiderdown which some invisible nurse had picked up from the floor and put back on the bed.
▪ She intended to put her own bed into it.
▪ I put her to bed and sat there talking to her.
▪ Both of them were soldiers and both were wounded and put in the same bed.
▪ She took Annie up and put her to bed, then went to their bedroom to change herself.
▪ Another comes each evening to put him back in bed.
charge
▪ How can you get some one who was actively involved in events and put him in charge of the investigation?
▪ An old Bridgeport pal with no qualifications had been put in charge of the community conservation program.
▪ Rightwinger John Redwood has been put in charge of the Conservative party's parliamentary campaigns unit.
▪ The company put new managers in charge.
▪ He was told to put Gabriel in the charge of his daughter, and led the way.
▪ Arline: What is: They put John Kromko in charge of it?
effort
▪ The Profitboss will always investigate the complaint, putting personal time, effort and resource into resolving the issue.
▪ The men who had put such skill and effort into building Hsu Fu were not going to let the raft be destroyed.
▪ Instead of putting all her efforts into resisting him, she'd been more concerned about not admitting her love.
▪ Although listening devices and seismic instruments were put in place, efforts to pinpoint the source of the noise were unsuccessful.
▪ It either makes you appreciate what you've got and put even more effort in.
▪ Please help us consistently to put in the effort.
▪ Humans have managed to learn so much because generations of adults put effort into caring for children.
emphasis
▪ Nor will managers succeed by putting greater emphasis on planning or simply overlapping various stages in the development process.
▪ Unveiled last year, Pastrana's plan addresses drug issues, but puts greater emphasis on economic development.
▪ They put a strong emphasis on drama like we did.
▪ Wilzcek agreed that the newer, West Coast institutions probably put more emphasis on science than their more traditional East Coast counterparts.
▪ The Convention traditionally puts an emphasis on evangelism.
▪ Carter preferred to put the emphasis on the word separately rather than Defense.
▪ All this put the emphasis on the content and was consequently responsible for the heterogeneous nature of literary studies.
▪ In the primary grades, teachers put emphasis on language and reading skills.
end
▪ Thus the event of her puberty puts an end to her pure childhood.
▪ The general theoretical discussion on concepts and definitions is therefore - perhaps surprisingly - put at the end.
▪ He could put an end to the suspense any time he chooses.
▪ Swiftly introduce new legislation to put an end to the trauma and misery suffered by child witnesses in court proceedings.
▪ I put points on the ends of the pieces.
▪ That, he decided, would put an end to Irina's career, if not to Irina.
▪ While happy to appear tired of the Gingrich fight, Clinton has done nothing to put an end to it.
face
▪ Historians now want to put a face on to the skull.
▪ They put on happy faces and hearts.
▪ With the way she had carried on smiling, stifling the grief, putting on her brave face to the world?
▪ She spent the next 18 months putting a brave face on her illness, with lots of loving support from George.
▪ Whether in denial or putting on a brave face, the delegates professed to be unperturbed by those numbers.
▪ Perhaps some of them are good at putting on a face, saving the grim reality for private moments.
▪ I had shut them when I put my face to the screen, like I was scared to look outside.
finger
▪ But Harriet Shakespeare put a finger on her wrist to stop her.
▪ He put his finger on them: Gordon Beauchamp, 41, sons Gordy, 16, and Ivan, 10.
▪ I've put the finger on seven members of the ring since lunch, but the big guy is slippery.
▪ But Harrison also put his finger on the real problem.
▪ She put the skull down on the table, took the ring out of her pocket, and put it on her finger.
▪ She had something too, Sly couldn't put his finger on it.
▪ The issues may be too delicate to handle or too difficult to put your finger on precisely.
▪ He put a finger to his lips: Shusssshhh ... then removed the sock from her mouth.
fire
▪ I refer to people who, as I speak, are sitting at home, unable to put on their electric fires.
▪ Nothing could put out that fire.
▪ Always put out an open fire before going to bed.
▪ They could be people passing buckets of water to put out a fire.
▪ But if nothing else, the McKenna decider served one purpose - it helped to put additional fire in Derry's bellies.
▪ Some grunts came up and put out the fire.
▪ They put it under the fire.
Fire engines have been sent for, to put out the fire.
foot
▪ Tammuz had dimmed the lights, put his feet up, and asked the computer to tune in the wall-screen.
▪ Limitations aside, Tagliabue still has it all over Bud Selig, who puts a foot down only to shuffle obsequiously.
▪ She didn't answer, just put her foot down and sent the Cortina faster and faster through the night.
▪ He pushed the ottoman over and I put my feet up.
▪ I put my foot down and the car began to move forward.
▪ Take off your coat and put your feet up.
▪ He says it gave him time to put his feet up and relax.
▪ Then he put his feet up on the bench and snored for ten minutes.
hand
▪ The girl put out her hand for one; he gave it to her.
▪ Primo puts his hand on her shoulder.
▪ She put her hand defiantly on his arm and glared at the ring of faces.
▪ She put her hands on my head and held them there, willing me to see.
▪ I put my hands behind my back.
▪ He put his hands over the back of his head, covering up.
▪ Athelstan put his hand gingerly into the small, dark space and brought out two rolls of parchment.
▪ One or two of the women put a hand on Margaret, but she was lost to us then.
head
▪ Sinking to his knees, the priest put his head in his hands and sobbed.
▪ When I saw him in court he was crying, and so was I.. He put his head down.
▪ Dash put his head in his hands, as if in pain.
▪ Once you put your head above the parapet these people clearly shot at it.
▪ Norm put his head back with his eyes closed while he smoked.
▪ The young man or woman sings along with the song again again, putting their head back as they do so.
▪ I veered off to the curb and put my head back on the seat, like a collapse.
hold
▪ She also had been able to put her feelings on hold as she concentrated on the problems facing her.
▪ That plan was put on hold after Rep.
▪ These projects have been put on hold indefinitely.
▪ Cold temperatures do not kill bacteria, they just put them on hold.
▪ All that was put on hold on March 20, 1990.
▪ We may put advertising on hold for a few months.
▪ For the second time since they had begun their desperate groping Polly and Jack were forced to put their passion on hold.
▪ Her own plans had to be put on hold.
idea
▪ Charles, however, was determined to use the farm at Highgrove as a model to put his ideas into practice.
▪ I had put the boyfriend idea on hold for a while.
▪ The Delacroix date put paid to that idea.
▪ Buffalo school leaders are now in the process of trying to put the council's ideas into action.
▪ It rather put paid to any idea she'd had of motoring around and discovering more of the area though.
▪ And his thought was very fruitful: fore-shadowing differential and integral calculus, he put forward the useful idea of a limit.
▪ Instead, he believes he can begin drafting new laws to put his ideas into practice.
▪ Brouwer first put forward his ideas in 1924, which was more than ten years before the work of Church and Turing.
mind
▪ He wants to know what happened to put his own mind at rest.
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ She would pick up the thought and put it outside her mind.
▪ They put their minds to it.
▪ It was then that she couldn't put Fen out of her mind.
▪ He could wake the dead when he put his mind to it.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ But Cose put my mind at ease in his introduction.
money
▪ A Victorian theme would attract many people and possibly put money back into council coffers.
▪ Fernando Chico Pardo, a Carso director, says investors could consider putting money in the as-yet-unnamed holding company.
▪ The customer dialled the publication he wanted, put in his money, and out came the book.
▪ I watched as he put the money in his jacket pocket.
▪ We should have been putting money by for a rainy day because that rainy day came.
▪ Many words are lavished on the need for workers to put money into retirement accounts.
▪ The investor decides on the currency most likely to appreciate against sterling and puts money on deposit in that currency.
▪ To put some big money back into the heavyweight-fight game, Sultan goes looking for a white contender.
mouth
▪ The researchers had given me an electric thermometer, a stalk of red plastic, to put in my mouth.
▪ Stop trying to put words into my mouth.
▪ He cut a plug from it, put it in his mouth, wrapped the meat, and took off his glasses.
▪ He should not put words in my mouth, however, or make false assumptions.
▪ Luckily, I discovered it before I put it into my mouth.
▪ His eyelids flickered and he put his sour unshaven mouth to hers.
name
▪ Emilio recognized the smell instantly but it was a moment before he could put a name to it.
▪ It was the first time in more than five years that he had put his own name in one of his notebooks.
▪ Consumers will be able to put their names on a register of people who don't want to receive sales calls.
▪ The money given the city by 3Com to put its name on the park is part of that project.
▪ Now he would have to return the money he had been given to put names forward for the vacancies.
▪ First, can we talk about the structure without putting names in the boxes?
▪ If so I'd like to put my name down for West Ham's lot, they're a bit tasty.
▪ We hope to put his name and his work back where people can see them for the first time.
paper
▪ Bob put down his papers at last, and sat looking towards the window.
▪ Floyd obeyed, and put away his papers.
▪ Then put it on paper in the evening.
▪ He put down the paper and watched the beads of rain race down the glass, one into another, ceaselessly.
▪ Island in the Sun James Conway put away his business papers and sat back in his seat.
▪ Then he tidies his desk, puts his papers in order, and locks up the office.
▪ He put the papers back into the drawer and locked the desk, but continued to sit there.
▪ She never put anything actual on paper until she had settled her house down at night.
phone
▪ When she finally put down the phone, she stared at it for a few seconds longer.
▪ That decision has been made for them by whoever put the phone in place.
▪ Culley put the phone down, then dialled Mike Dawson's number.
▪ There was more to the Steelers' resurgence than putting the phones on hold, however.
▪ Either Quinn knew just what he was doing or he was going to provoke the kidnapper into putting down the phone.
▪ Mackey put down the phone and walked across the windy plaza to his car.
▪ He asked two questions and put the phone down.
▪ He put the phone down on the cradle and stared at it.
place
▪ These can not be eliminated without putting something in its place.
▪ The technosphere is the scaffolding put in place to help Bio2 pop.
▪ The eggs need to be put in a warm place to hatch.
▪ Three of 12 reforms the board approved last month have been put into place.
▪ They can also include questions which ask pupils to put themselves in the place of some person in the past.
▪ We tried to emphasize a system where you put things in place and hire smart, hard-working people.
▪ His wife had been put in place as a Soviet agent.
▪ That decision has been made for them by whoever put the phone in place.
plan
▪ It is of no use to put forward a partial plan for the revitalization of our education.
▪ We are going to put abortion into the plan.
▪ It is important to put the plan in writing.
▪ She had put off her summer plans and decided to stay with him.
▪ But I've put a plan of the Lab in my office for you.
▪ Learn about the psychological impacts of life in this new work world, and put together a plan for handling them successfully.
▪ That means we can delay putting plans in for the reservoir.
▪ By Wednesday morning, however, director Henry Dean was ready to put a plan into action.
position
▪ Never must she put herself in a position where she might be tempted to betray the fact that she loved him.
▪ There is a certain boldness about her; she strikes me as refusing to be put in any subordinate position.
▪ But it wasn't, if you cared to put yourself in my position.
▪ The Board said that they deserved their percentage because they had put me in the position to attract the money.
▪ After some really lackluster efforts we are put in the uncomfortable position of rooting for an injury.
▪ Midlands 9, North 17 Hodgkinson put in a position of weakness as North march on.
▪ You will therefore be put in the position of paying two mortgages at the same time for a short period.
practice
▪ Gwynedd's chief executive Huw Thomas said many of the lessons of the Towyn flood disaster were being put into practice.
▪ The next step is to put them into practice.
▪ Trials Lack of resources to put your visions into practice.
▪ While the federal policy shift began a decade ago, forest managers have been slow to put it into practice.
▪ Let's hope some of our little fire raisers don't manage to get there and put the ad into practice.
▪ But he came gradually to see its viability and to contemplate ways of putting it into practice.
▪ Charles, however, was determined to use the farm at Highgrove as a model to put his ideas into practice.
▪ No eighteenth-century peace plan had the slightest chance of being put into practice.
pressure
▪ I put enough pressure on myself without having outside pressures as well.
▪ The potential for other oppressed groups to be autonomously organized also put pressure on the Union to question its structures and attitudes.
▪ Eaton said large institutional investors today are putting more pressure on publicly traded companies to increase their returns.
▪ Consequently Edinburgh and Sedgley put Kelly under pressure on the Leeds right.
▪ The administration's treatment of the National Fire Plan already indicates how budget cuts put new pressures on Congress.
▪ We were always putting pressure on him to jack it in.
▪ Just-in-time learning puts considerable pressure on organizations to figure out what training to provide when, and where.
proposal
▪ The results have to be published and should not be only of interest to the client group who put forward the proposal.
▪ From this the person is expected to identify strengths and weaknesses in performance and then put forward proposals for change.
▪ Chen has now put flesh on his proposal in an interview with Business Week.
▪ He put the proposals forward formally in a letter to the two houses of parliament and the Constitutional Court on Nov. 30.
▪ Mr. Taylor My right hon. Friend is putting forward and considering proposals for reform.
▪ They will do that because the Milk Marketing Board has put forward those proposals for reform.
▪ The legal profession has already put forward alternative proposals which would save the money the Lord Chancellor requires to save next year.
▪ Both are putting forward major expansion proposals designed to cater for the NorthWest's rapidly expanding demand for air travel.
question
▪ Let me put some questions to you: Would you trust your child to an unqualified teacher?
▪ It was accounted great discourtesy to put any question to a guest before his wants had been satisfied.
▪ It looks as if they had extorted permission to put their prepared question, naming Salamis.
▪ And I saw another man with a wheel on his head and put a question to him.
▪ Now tell us at once, has Fred put the question?
▪ John Langford contemplated this phenomenon without expression; then he began to put a series of questions to us both.
▪ There was one man who soon put that out of the question.
▪ I put this question to him now.
record
▪ Originally Abba's record company were going to put out their record in December.
▪ The extent of that secret onslaught needs to be put on the record.
▪ Let us put the record into perspective.
▪ She intends to put the Council on record as wanting to reduce the poverty level by 10 percent.
▪ I am happy to put that on the record once again.
▪ I think the band ought to put out a record once a year.
▪ Mrs Gore even risked the wrath of the record industry by campaigning to have warning labels put on particularly offensive records.
▪ In every case, you have a better chance of being considered if you are able to put your performance on record.
risk
▪ We further found that certain physical and physiologic profiles put children at risk for specific types of learning and psychological problems.
▪ It would be dangerous pinning Ebert down and he didn't want to put her at risk.
▪ I may have worried that being with Jasper, being passive with anybody, would put me at risk.
▪ Remember that you will put your job at risk if you allow your partner to distract you at work.
▪ The trade union representing the workforce at these plants had threatened to go on strike if their jobs are put at risk.
▪ In either case you can easily and very quickly dehydrate and put your life at risk.
▪ This is not the same form of heroism as those who put themselves at risk for others.
show
▪ What an awful humbug you must think me for putting on such a show of affection!
▪ He doesn't want to put on any show.
▪ Both men are employed by Sells-Floto Inc., which puts on the show.
▪ I remember we set about putting together a cabaret show.
▪ The Republicans put on an intimidating show, as they always intended, but it somehow rang hollow.
▪ No need to put on a show for me, or be anything but yourself.
▪ They do, however, put on a brave show.
stop
▪ The law officers should put a stop to the practice forthwith.
▪ If I do, my parents say I can put a stop to it.
▪ This should put a stop to the sort of attempt made by Hanson after it had successfully taken-over Imperial.
▪ I thought I'd put a stop to this nonsense!
▪ Obviously putting prints with stop all over will ruin your dev.
▪ Yet a polite, reasoned reply seldom puts a stop to the exchange.
▪ There are some very dubious practices and we want to put a stop to them.
▪ Like leapfrog and friendships with older girls the teachers always put a stop to it.
test
▪ Now Thatcherism is being put to the same test as Keynesianism was.
▪ On the latter, the new Republican Assembly will be put to the test shortly.
▪ This last fact means that many aspects of Salibi's theory can not as yet be put to the test.
▪ They put me though every test in the book to be sure I was healthy.
▪ It is highly desirable that from every product in regular production, samples be withdrawn periodically and put on long-term stability test.
▪ So she puts him to the test.
▪ Jealous voices reminded the Count of this again and again; eventually he decided to put her to the test.
▪ Now this knowledge will be put to a stern test.
touch
▪ Dyer was almost over for a try but put a foot in touch at the corner flag spoiled the effort.
▪ You know, put in the Williams touch.
▪ Perhaps one of Alfa Romeo's race engineers put him in touch with Enzo Ferrari?
▪ You may spot workers putting the finishing touches on the dome.
▪ They can put students in touch with teachers, regardless of the geographic location of either.
▪ She also puts me in touch with the man who owns the picture.
▪ They will spend Valentine's Day putting the final touches to their wedding following a whirlwind telephone romance.
▪ And they put young people in touch with adult role models who can help ease the shift into adulthood.
use
▪ If the building is no longer needed for its original purpose, could it be put to a new use?
▪ Recent Supreme Court decisions have put limits on the use of affirmative action to assure diversity in student bodies.
▪ The money raised will be put to good use.
▪ But the financing was also put to questionable use -- to buy the district out of an operating deficit.
▪ Its waters formerly turned many a mill wheel on the way, although they are no longer put to any commercial use.
▪ Can my hon. and diplomatic Friend assure us that these important diplomatic communications were not ultimately put to any ignoble use?
▪ Bones are also put to practical use, strung together to make a kind of aeolian harp or wind chime.
▪ But the timber is still much prized and Westonbirt arboretum hopes all the felled trunks will be put to good use.
weight
▪ His neck looked thicker, as if he'd put weight on, and the greasy blonde hair was a few inches longer.
▪ But both Ford and Kissinger gave the treaty their support, and Carter put the full weight of the presidency behind ratification.
▪ All the fish have put on weight, the Pictus especially have grown about half-an-inch.
▪ She cries a lot and is not putting on weight.
▪ During their youth Jane was more likely to put her weight and invective behind brother Charles than her kid sister.
▪ Had cabinet minister X put on even more weight from last year?
▪ The ice occasionally shears away as I put my weight on it.
▪ A friend has described it as worth putting on weight for.
word
▪ But above all, I needed something that at that time I was quite unable to put into words.
▪ I should put aside the harsh words that had been said, I should try to make the best of everything.
▪ And, no doubt, she was putting her own words into Franklyn's mouth again.
▪ How is it possible for a speaker to put thoughts into words and for a hearer to understand them?
▪ Stop trying to put words into my mouth.
▪ He also put out the word that he had mined the forests.
▪ It was suddenly quite impossible to put these living words back into page 300 of Vico and return them to Safe 5.
▪ I heave a sigh of resignation, knowing how notoriously difficult it is to put unity into words.
■ VERB
stay
▪ Catesby, if he had stayed, might have put a restraining hand upon the petty malice of his comrades.
▪ Those which happen to come to rest in a non-absorbing direction will absorb no more photons, and will thereafter stay put.
▪ He tries to drag her home, but she struggles to stay put.
▪ You expected them to stay put.
▪ He wanted simply to stay put.
▪ She told Clarissa to stay put and say no more until she herself came round to Clarissa's flat.
▪ So for the forseeable future the hamsters are staying put.
try
▪ And few cared to try to put him down.
▪ No matter how much he tried to put it off, he already knew that it was going to happen this week.
▪ Plenty of Christians have tried their hand at putting their beliefs into prose or poetry, usually with calamitous aesthetic results.
▪ I try to put my arm around him, but he shoves me off.
▪ They tried to put a bomb on a plane last year, didn't they, sir?
▪ When physicists try to put the two realms together, the answers they get are nonsense.
▪ If your hands are cold, try putting a hat on!
▪ She tries to put energy into her defensive game.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(put) daylight between yourself and sb
I wouldn't put it past sb (to do sth)
▪ I wouldn't put it past Colin to lie to his wife.
I'd put (my) money on sth
▪ Even the madmen wouldn't have him in real life, I 'd put money on it.
▪ Personally, I 'd put my money on accidental death without a second thought.
be hard put/pressed/pushed to do sth
▪ Aunt Edie was in such a rage about it that she was hard put to contain herself.
▪ Governments will then be hard put to get it on to their national statute books by mid-1993.
▪ I can assure you that any busybody would be hard put to it to prove maltreatment!
▪ Leinster will be hard pushed to keep the score within the respectable margins of defeat set by their predecessors.
▪ Once an apology is given, the defendant will be hard put to contest liability later.
▪ The slave's side ... and even Miss Phoebe would be hard put to understand.
▪ With his height and features, he was hard put to pass as a native.
▪ You will be hard pressed to choose a single main course because so many are mouth-watering.
cannot put a name to sth
get/put bums on seats
▪ When you can put bums on seats, then you can come and tell me what flights you want to travel on.
get/put sb's back up
▪ He treats everyone like children, and that's why he puts people's backs up.
▪ It really gets my back up when salesmen call round to the house.
▪ At Eagle Butte I stopped and got a clamp, got the pipe back up there some way.
▪ He had been around the scene for long enough to know how to manipulate meetings without getting everyone's back up.
▪ If you get his/her back up, even if you're right, you're dead!
▪ She'd even got Bert's back up proper, over his betting and poor old Floss.
▪ Simon naturally put people's backs up.
▪ You got to get back up.
get/put sb/sth out of your mind
get/put your head down
▪ He simply puts his head down and keeps on scoring goals - lots of them.
▪ He was as cranky as a bad-tempered goat, always putting his head down and charging into things that annoyed him.
▪ I put my head down and kept stroking.
▪ I put my head down into my hands and absented myself mentally.
▪ Instead of putting his head down and charging, Balshaw chipped and chased.
▪ When I saw him in court he was crying, and so was I.. He put his head down.
▪ You chuck down three of them, and then put your head down on your desk.
get/put your skates on
give sb ideas/put ideas into sb's head
go into reverse/put sth into reverse
keep/put something on ice
lay/put sth to rest
▪ Many of the public's doubts have now been laid to rest.
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ I think this definitely puts it to rest.
▪ Kwasniewski has said he may dissolve parliament to put the issue to rest and call for new elections.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ The time has come to put this to rest.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
not put a foot wrong
not to put too fine a point on it
▪ Everyone there - not to put too fine a point on it - was crazy.
▪ The dishes we tried tasted, not to put too fine a point on it, like gasoline.
not to put too fine a point on it
put (your) money on sth
▪ A lot of people are putting money on the line, hoping what Petruchio says he can do, he will do.
▪ Even the madmen wouldn't have him in real life, I'd put money on it.
▪ No one in their senses puts money on a horse other than in the hope of winning money.
▪ On the basis of what I told them, they put money on the line.
▪ She'd be willing to put money on that.
▪ The investor decides on the currency most likely to appreciate against sterling and puts money on deposit in that currency.
▪ The question this time, however, is would you still put your money on her?
▪ They put money on the table, too, perfect strangers expressing unmistakable monetary interest in the Tonelli Nation.
put a construction on sth
▪ The law does not say that specifically, but people have chosen to put that construction on it.
put a damper on sth
▪ The burglary put a damper on the family's Christmas.
▪ A couple of knee injuries put a damper on his football career.
▪ Analysts had figured the bad news from the giant microprocessor maker would put a damper on technology stocks.
▪ It really put a damper on everything.
▪ Lower prices for Treasury bonds helped put a damper on stock prices, traders said.
▪ Torrential rain put a damper on the event, sending bedraggled guests squelching across lawns to seek shelter.
put a different/new/fresh complexion on sth
▪ It may put a different complexion on things.
▪ To me, the fact that she hasn't been heard of again in seventeen years puts a different complexion on it.
put a figure on it/give an exact figure
put a human face on sth
▪ What he fails to do is to put a human face on these processes.
put a price on sth
▪ How can you put a price on Kryptonite, for instance?
▪ How do you put a price on nine years of being informed and entertained?
▪ Prominent ministers such as Henry Ward Beecher initially condemned the concept of putting a price on human life as sinful and sacrilegious.
▪ Then again, you can not put a price on what Augusta had to offer yesterday morning.
put a sock in it
▪ That sort does all sorts of silly things, till experience tells them to put a sock in it.
▪ To avoid upsetting the kids, Dad spoke to Mum more than once in private, telling her to put a sock in it.
put a spoke in sb's wheel
put a stop to sth
▪ She decided to put a stop to their relationship.
▪ An attempt to annex nearby Epizephyrian Lokri was put a stop to by Hiero in 478.
▪ But the inquest put a stop to all that.
▪ I thought I'd put a stop to this nonsense!
▪ If I remember correctly, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar put a stop to that.
▪ The law officers should put a stop to the practice forthwith.
▪ There are some very dubious practices and we want to put a stop to them.
▪ They was charging people a dollar to see him before West put a stop to it.
▪ This should put a stop to the sort of attempt made by Hanson after it had successfully taken-over Imperial.
put a/the lid on sth
▪ Alan and I put the lid on the coffin and screwed it down.
▪ He had left the Phillips screwdriver in the spare room after we'd put the lid on.
▪ He put the lid on the pan and picked up his wine glass and drank before saying anything else.
▪ His new responsibilities have put the lid on this.
▪ If it passes, the measure would be the first time that an Arizona community has put a lid on building permits.
put all your eggs in one basket
put down roots
▪ Just as I was putting down roots, our family had to move up north.
▪ For Ada, putting down roots opens a new life of discipline and learning.
▪ However, now that they had family responsibilities and were beginning to put down roots, they returned to their former church-going.
▪ I was going to put down roots, achieve something, give meaning to my existence.
▪ In their place, developers are building upscale subdivisions that tend to cater to newcomers less willing to put down roots.
▪ It puts down roots 10 feet deep, easily withstanding drought and even frequent fires.
▪ Meanwhile, people who might want to put down roots in the community are finding it prohibitively expensive.
▪ She's had 8 quarters, so it's hard to put down roots.
▪ What better way to put down roots, and what more suitable time than in the spring?
put flesh on sth
▪ Medical experts put flesh on the statistical data for the audience.
▪ Chen has now put flesh on his proposal in an interview with Business Week.
▪ The strength of this book is that it puts flesh on the bare bones of this argument.
put in a (good) word for sb
▪ I'll put in a good word for you with the management.
▪ He put in a good word for him at meetings of the Jockey Club.
▪ Only those who keep a dialogue going will be able to put in a word for persons in need of intercession.
put in an appearance/make an appearance
put in your two cents' worth
put on a brave face/front
▪ He was shattered, though he put on a brave face.
▪ I suppose parents have to put on a brave face.
▪ Leaving the court the families all tried to put on a brave face.
▪ Meanwhile, Llandundo put on a brave face yesterday and struggled to get back to normal after last week's devastating floods.
▪ Newspaper staff put on a brave face.
▪ No one said a word all of us were consciously putting on a brave face.
▪ Whether in denial or putting on a brave face, the delegates professed to be unperturbed by those numbers.
put on the dog
put on your thinking cap
▪ Instead, put on your thinking cap, and turn those prepared ingredients into new dishes.
put one over on sb
▪ Cantor was pleased to have put one over on their first violinist, Sol Minskoff.
▪ They were trying to put one over on us and would no longer get away with it.
put out feelers
▪ Their intelligence agency, the Kempeitai, put out feelers to nationalists like Ngo Dinh Diem.
put paid to sth
▪ But the glint of mockery in his dark eyes put paid to that fantasy.
▪ But Travis McKenna had put paid to that by being particularly vigilant.
▪ Hitler's assault in the summer of 1940 put paid to the agitation for peace negotiations.
▪ It rather put paid to any idea she'd had of motoring around and discovering more of the area though.
▪ Lefkowitz, a classicist and humanities professor at Wellesley College, puts paid to Afrocentric myth-making.
▪ People were cursing the Greenhouse Effect and swearing that it had put paid to surf in Hawaii for all time.
▪ This was the cause of his deafness, which put paid to a planned career in the army and in politics.
▪ Yet an inflamed shin almost put paid to Sampras in the first week.
put sb in mind of sb/sth
▪ But they put me in mind of trees in November.
▪ It put Luce in mind of a corrupt and rotting corpse.
▪ The fried bean curd put one in mind of oriental griddle cakes and needed the hot sauces to extract their inscrutable flavour.
▪ The Professor couldn't help thinking that he put him in mind of a young Jack Palance.
▪ What it put me in mind of was a very bad joke that once ran in my family.
put sb in their place
▪ I'd like to put her in her place - she thinks she's so special.
▪ Battered and beleaguered, Arsenal had been put firmly in their place.
▪ The Administration of Justice Act 1982 swept away the remaining ones without putting anything in their place.
▪ Was Morrissey helped put them in their place.
put sb off their stride
▪ Human experimenters have found it surprisingly difficult to put bats off their stride by playing loud artificial ultrasound at them.
put sb off their stroke
put sb on the spot
▪ I don't want to put you on the spot, but I'm really curious about how you know Tim.
▪ The reporter's questions were clearly designed to put the Senator on the spot.
▪ You shouldn't put friends on the spot by asking them to hire your family members.
▪ Now the Supreme Court has put him on the spot.
▪ That sure put you on the spot.
▪ The aim was to put them on the spot - or at least to impress the Inspector with your knowledge and concern.
▪ This put Charles on the spot.
put sb out to grass
put sb through the mill
▪ Candidates are put through the mill by the Senate.
put sb to the sword
▪ The High Elf army fell on the besiegers of Lothern, putting them to the sword.
put sb's nose out of joint
put sb/sth first
put sb/sth in the shade
▪ Coca Cola's prize-winning advertising campaign has put all others in the shade.
▪ The generous response of the public to the disaster puts the government's contribution somewhat in the shade.
▪ Even now, sugar employs one-seventh of the work force, putting tourism in the shade.
▪ Her meagre supply of water runs out, and she puts Ishmael in the shade of a bush to die.
▪ We put him in the shade, the doily wrapped around his little orange body except for his face.
put sb/sth through their paces
put sb/sth to shame
▪ Acapulco is a cosmopolitan city with a nightlife that puts Rio to shame.
▪ Matt's gourmet dinner really put my cooking to shame.
▪ The elegant way she was dressed put the rest of us to shame.
▪ He interviewed many of them, recording every detail with a care that put sighted journalists to shame.
▪ He puts us all to shame.
▪ He was immediately given some money which he took with the kind of abundant gratitude that puts the giver to shame.
▪ The cruel truth is that some animals put some humans to shame.
▪ They put the Instamatic to shame.
▪ They scarcely left it for the next two weeks, their passion putting her dreams to shame.
put sb/sth to sleep
▪ Anybody else would have put the mutt to sleep.
▪ During the first half of the 1980s, these cries actually put people to sleep.
▪ He puts you to sleep with those little jabs.
▪ Now I tend to find I need something else to put me to sleep.
▪ She had hoped to time her nightly visit to the nursery so that he was actually being put down to sleep.
▪ The shadow was flowing rhythmically, putting him to sleep.
▪ When harvest came, the people could put Hunger to sleep.
put sb/sth to the test
▪ Kathy's students are putting her patience to the test.
▪ The war is putting some of the military's expensive new technology to the test.
▪ Again, put them to the test.
▪ Jealous voices reminded the Count of this again and again; eventually he decided to put her to the test.
▪ More shaming had been his reluctance to put it to the test.
▪ Naturally the two officers protest that their girls are different, but Alfonso persuades them to put it to the test.
▪ Rain could not bring herself to put this to the test.
▪ So she puts him to the test.
▪ Will the Prime Minister now put it to the test through the ballot box and let the people decide on his record?
▪ With markets falling and input prices rising, this is the ideal time to put them to the test.
put sth in cold storage
put sth into practice
▪ A lot of these modern theories about teaching sound really good until you actually try and put them into practice.
▪ New safety guidelines for factory workers will be put into practice next month.
▪ The office has been slow to put the new proposals into practice.
▪ But he came gradually to see its viability and to contemplate ways of putting it into practice.
▪ Jeremy Taylor is some one who can afford to put his principles into practice.
▪ Last week appeared to be the point at which he put the promise into practice.
▪ Let's hope some of our little fire raisers don't manage to get there and put the ad into practice.
▪ Make a habit of putting your AH-HAs into practice as soon as possible alter reading them.
▪ The next step is to put them into practice.
▪ Trials Lack of resources to put your visions into practice.
▪ While the federal policy shift began a decade ago, forest managers have been slow to put it into practice.
put sth on the map
▪ It was Ray Kroc that really put McDonald's restaurants on the map.
▪ The French town of Albertville hoped the winter Olympics would put the town on the map.
▪ It is already sixteen years since we left London specifically to help put Norfolk on the map in the Medau world.
▪ It was inspired by Brendan Foster and it brought international athletics to the town and put it on the map.
▪ Lady Diana's engagement to Prince Charles really put Althorp on the map, and it became a full-time job for me.
▪ That would put us on the map, give us more respect.
▪ The range improvement program, though, really put me on the map.
▪ This tournament has put us on the map and we are keen to develop it further.
▪ Whoever did, she says, put Nanaimo on the map.
put sth on the slate
▪ Can I put it on the slate, and I'll pay at the end of the week?
put sth to (good) use
▪ I'd like a job where I could put my degree in languages to good use.
▪ But I am putting it to use.
▪ How do you put it to use in daily practice?
▪ It does not seem regressive to put it to use in the service of gay survival as well.
▪ Many large and medium size companies, government departments and Local authorities are putting Dataease to use somewhere within their organisations.
▪ Much of ecology is about this process: finding energy; putting it to use.
▪ The time has come to put your skills to use by developing a more useful and complex object orientated program.
▪ The trouble is we never stop long enough to put them to good use.
▪ Throughout the 1980s, researchers and company executives struggled with how to put Al to use.
put sth to bed
put sth to rights
▪ He wanted to put the world to rights.
▪ If you mean to put everything to rights between yourself and Benedict, you must make an effort on your own account.
▪ This month, however, is my chance to put all that to rights.
▪ This usually put Dad to rights but must have been pretty potent stuff as it ceased to be available after the war.
put sth under the microscope
▪ We put everything under the microscope.
put sth/sb out of their misery
put sth/sb out to pasture
put the boot in
▪ And putting the boot in ... the recycling service for wellies.
▪ And the judge, emboldened by the new case management powers decides to put the boot in.
▪ At her wedding Phil took spectacularly to the bottle and put the boot in with some brio.
▪ Gregory put the boot in ... metaphorically speaking!
▪ I think they just sucked up to David, and began to put the boot in really, quite unnecessarily and unfairly.
▪ I wouldn't like to be stuck down a dark alley at night with whoever put the boot in here.
▪ Low-brow pedestrians of all parties, egged on by the press, were only too happy to put the boot in.
▪ Time had put the boot in.
put the brakes on sth
▪ It's the government's latest effort to put the brakes on rising prices.
▪ He managed to touch-down at the threshold and put the brakes on.
▪ If Peres and Labor are defeated, the Likud Party has vowed to put the brakes on the peace movement.
▪ Laid crops and unsettled weather put the brakes on harvest for many growers this week.
▪ The Communists have climbed on the bandwagon, but only to put the brakes on.
▪ There are indications, however, that the government is now trying to put the brakes on further expansion.
▪ Those cars with all those springs that rock back and forwards like a see-saw when you put the brakes on.
put the cart before the horse
▪ It is Labour's insistence on putting the cart before the horse which fills me with gloom.
▪ It seems to me that Mr Topolski is putting the cart before the horse.
▪ This is putting the cart before the horse.
▪ This may sound like putting the cart before the horse and being unnecessarily pessimistic.
put the clock(s) back/forward
▪ Anyway, even if one wanted to, one couldn't put the clock back to an earlier age.
▪ I can't put the clock back.
▪ They were therefore accused of putting the clock back and bringing the best hope of Christendom to an impasse.
put the fear of God into sb
▪ The IRS tries to put the fear of God into people who don't pay enough tax.
put the frighteners on sb
▪ The animals, yes, putting the frighteners on.
▪ Why should this female start putting the frighteners on him now, after all this time?
put the kibosh on sth
▪ The collapse of the junk-bond market has put the kibosh on a management buy-out of Wickes, an engineering and home-furnishings company.
put the mockers on sth
put the roses back in sb's cheeks
put the skids under sth
▪ The paint that puts the skids under barnacles is being adopted by Porter International for protective coatings in the United States.
put the squeeze on sb
▪ Look, President Clinton might host some questionable coffees, but he never would put the squeeze on a Brownie!
▪ Secondly, its effect could only be to put the squeeze on landowners who sat in the path of the reservoir.
▪ The Treasury number two has targeted the most vulnerable in the drive to put the squeeze on government spending.
put the whammy on sb
put the wind up sb/get the wind up
put two and two together
▪ When we found the money and the drugs in his room, it was easy to put two and two together.
▪ As it is, Krauss is probably putting two and two together.
▪ He can be trusted to put two and two together.
▪ He saw the pits, he saw my father, and he put two and two together.
▪ His friends put two and two together, and so did the media, which beseiged his home by telephone and helicopter.
▪ If they found the coins they might put two and two together.
▪ In 1989 Congress put two and two together, in a programme to sell the government's houses to the poor.
▪ It is not difficult to put two and two together.
▪ Still nobody in the chemical industry put two and two together.
put two fingers up at sb
put up a good fight
put up a good/poor etc show
▪ He might have put up a good show the other day, but that was because he was frightened.
▪ She put up a better show in the 1980s.
put words into sb's mouth
▪ I didn't mean that at all -- you're just putting words into my mouth!
▪ Stop putting words into my mouth - I never said I disliked the job.
▪ You're putting words into her mouth. You don't know what she thinks.
▪ Stop trying to put words into my mouth.
put years on sb/take years off sb
put your back into it
▪ Come on, John. Stop messing around and put your back into it!
▪ I really put my back into it, you know?
put your face on
▪ Jill's still busy putting on her face.
▪ Then I put her face on her desk, supported by a heap of loose files.
put your feelings/thoughts etc into words
▪ However; they had done little to develop emotional ideas and emotional thinking, to help Kyle put his feelings into words.
put your feet up
▪ Well, at least put your feet up for a few minutes. Would you like a drink?
▪ When you're pregnant and doing a full-time job, you must find time to put your feet up.
▪ E for elevation, otherwise known as putting your feet up.
▪ He pushed the ottoman over and I put my feet up.
▪ He says it gave him time to put his feet up and relax.
▪ Take off your coat and put your feet up.
▪ Tammuz had dimmed the lights, put his feet up, and asked the computer to tune in the wall-screen.
▪ That boy needs a lot of teaching, he thought, putting his feet up.
▪ Then he put his feet up on the bench and snored for ten minutes.
put your finger on sth
▪ I can't put my finger on it, but there's something different about you.
▪ But what they were she could not quite put her finger on.
▪ Ezra put his finger on the photos.
▪ I can't put my finger on it.
▪ Lord Wyatt had put his finger on it: The hunts wouldn't let her in.
▪ Nightbreed almost does, but fails for some reason I can't quite put my finger on.
▪ One child put her finger on 17.
▪ Something was happening amongst the youth movement that so admired him and he couldn't quite put his finger on it.
▪ The Captain of the Lymington-Yarmouth ferry could not quite put his finger on what was wrong.
put your foot down
▪ Ed was talking about dropping out of school, but Mom and Dad put their foot down.
▪ I wanted to take a year off before college, but my mother put her foot down.
▪ You'd better put your foot down before those kids get completely out of control.
▪ I put my feet down carefully.
▪ I put my foot down and the car began to move forward.
▪ Justice puts its foot down on Oxie.
▪ Later still My silly wee sister has put her feet down and refuses to let me near her Power Pack.
▪ Rice, however, put his foot down and made what he called his first policy decision.
▪ She didn't answer, just put her foot down and sent the Cortina faster and faster through the night.
▪ They could have put their foot down and dragged us into court.
▪ We were nearing the camp, so I aimed for the ruts in the track and put my foot down.
put your foot in it
▪ She's a little weird isn't she? Oh no, have I put my foot in my mouth? Is she a friend of yours?
▪ Simon wanted to finish the conversation before he put his foot in it any further.
▪ As creative types, we're notoriously unpredictable, and thus liable to put our foot in it in front of touchy clients.
▪ Glover had put his foot in it somehow.
▪ I have put my foot in it.
▪ It was immediately clear that he had put his foot in it.
▪ It wasn't her fault if she had a gift for putting her foot in it.
▪ Somehow, with her usual clumsiness, she had opened her mouth and put her foot in it.
put your head/neck on the block
put your heads together
▪ 150 government leaders are putting their heads together to discuss how to curb the production of greenhouse gases.
▪ The challenge is to put our heads together and think of a new way of working.
▪ We'll put our heads together after work and see if we can come up with a solution.
▪ Anyway, we can put our heads together later and see if it means anything.
▪ Emily and I put our heads together after office hours and came up with the answers we needed.
▪ Fearing the ships might founder on coastal rocks, the admiral summoned all his navigators to put their heads together.
▪ He will be less easy to understand if you literally put your heads together.
▪ Stevie and I are going to put our heads together to try and reconstruct them for Midge.
▪ The next day Martha and I would put our heads together and decide what should be done.
▪ They put their heads together, from thousands of miles away.
put your money where your mouth is
▪ It's time for the governor to put his money where his mouth is.
put your shoulder to the wheel
put/add the finishing touches (to sth)
▪ Barry returned the next day to add the finishing touches.
▪ Its warmth and richness will add the finishing touches that are all important to the dress of your dreams.
▪ The band are currently putting the finishing touches to their third album, which should be out early in the summer.
▪ The birds whose selective predation put the finishing touches to their evolution must, at least collectively, have had excellently good vision.
▪ The more exacting you are in putting the finishing touches to the picture, the better the result will be.
▪ We can put the finishing touches to your programme.
▪ With most members of the task force now dismissed, Mr Magaziner is putting the finishing touches to his report.
put/bet/stake your shirt on sth
put/bring sth into effect
▪ The council will need more money to put the regulations into effect.
▪ He was the first football manager to appreciate the importance of such harmony and to put it into effect.
▪ It had developed contingency plans before the incident and put them into effect when water in the mine began to overflow.
▪ One of them should be chosen and be put rapidly into effect.
▪ So far, 24 of the 35 nations needed to put the treaty into effect have ratified it.
▪ The Hague conference is the last chance to determine how to put the accord into effect.
▪ The possibility of judicial review is constantly in the mind of Ministers and officials when preparing legislation and putting it into effect.
▪ To put these contentions into effect the applicant made two applications in the district court to which the cases had been transferred.
▪ We need to raise at least £50,000 to put our plans into effect.
put/dip a toe in the water
put/force sb on the defensive
▪ Motta always put him on the defensive.
▪ Simple as sneezing to put him on the defensive.
▪ The Conservative achievement in the 1980s was to put Labour on the defensive by presenting Thatcherism as a continuation of historic Conservatism.
▪ The Sangh has put Congress on the defensive by forcing it to dilute its secular tradition.
▪ These two seemed friendly enough, but their questions about Sweetheart put him on the defensive.
▪ This established licensing hours for the first time, and put brewers on the defensive.
▪ This puts people on the defensive, and they may become silent or get angry.
▪ You guys being a little bit aggressive at the beginning put him on the defensive.
put/hold a gun to sb's head
▪ He might as well have put a gun to my head.
put/keep sb in the picture
▪ Besides, I wanted to put you in the picture.
▪ Call it: putting you in the picture.
▪ He put Maclean in the picture about his letter to Wilson.
▪ Perhaps he did not like to argue with Jean-Claude, suspecting that my lover may have been put fully in the picture.
▪ Then she remembered that she had promised to keep Sybil in the picture but decided that could wait as well.
put/lay your cards on the table
▪ If they're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate, that's good.
▪ If we want to reach an agreement, we'll have to lay all our cards on the table.
▪ They're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate.
▪ Come on, you can lay your cards on the table in this house.
▪ The new rules appear to encourage parties to lay their cards on the table and facilitate early settlements.
put/lay/set down a marker
put/leave sth on the back burner
put/leave/set sth to one side
▪ Graham has no plans to fly this aircraft at present and will put it to one side as soon as assembly and testing is complete.
▪ She put it to one side, and opened the folder of photographs.
put/make a move on sb
put/place a premium on sth
▪ Modern economies place a premium on educated workers.
▪ Barbara, as usual, seemed to be placing a premium on maintaining her composure.
▪ In my own garden, I put a premium on fresh greens.
▪ International book-building puts a premium on intermediaries' experience and ability to sell to 300-odd investing institutions around the world.
▪ Up and down hill fences pose problems for the horse by placing a premium on balance and impulsion.
put/place sb on a pedestal
▪ My last boyfriend put me on a pedestal.
▪ Another will place philanthropy on a pedestal and yet have a resentful, unforgiving spirit.
▪ I was the most beautiful, wonderful woman and he put me on a pedestal.
▪ If it is going to be special, put it on a pedestal of sorts.
▪ Let's face it, possum, there are some who would put me on a pedestal.
put/press/push the pedal to the metal
▪ By the second half of the game, the Tigers had really started to put the pedal to the metal.
▪ Later, Brooks' brother alleged that racism helped put the pedal to the metal.
put/pump/pour money into sth
▪ Demand for most bonds is high because investors keep putting money into corporate bond funds.
▪ First, it has poured money into Xinjiang.
▪ I too had put money into the hat.
▪ If the possible reward is very high, I would put money into a business that could fail. 4.
▪ In addition, the company has soured some investors by pouring money into headlong expansion at the expense of earnings.
▪ Staff can add credit on to their cards by putting money into card machines in the building.
▪ The people believed, and many of them were putting money into improving their homes, modernizing their small businesses.
▪ This, he says, accounts for developers fighting shy of putting money into the city.
put/set pen to paper
▪ And striker Geoff Ferris is likely to put pen to paper for 12 months.
▪ Good old-fashioned motives for putting pen to paper.
▪ He then put pen to paper, and soon a stream of adjectives was flowing.
▪ I had written a very fine book in my head before arriving, without setting pen to paper.
▪ I have put pen to paper sparingly, aware that pictures speak louder than words.
▪ In February of 1942 and again in May of that year he had put pen to paper and logged his past.
▪ So if you are fun-loving and open-minded, put pen to paper.
▪ So why not put pen to paper and win a wardrobe of fashions.
put/set sb's mind at rest
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
put/set the cat among the pigeons
put/set/get your (own) house in order
▪ But Apple first must get its house in order.
▪ Commissioners are satisfied with the progress it is making to put its house in order.
▪ Following numerous complaints the Vicar of Woodford has been told to put his house in order.
▪ Henry had set his house in order but had no thoughts about setting off on crusade.
▪ Others have called on the council to step in and tell the firm to put its house in order.
▪ The Law Society no longer can support equally those who have put their house in order and those who have not.
put/set/turn your mind to sth
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ Across the table, Lalage put her mind to the subjugation of Dada.
▪ Anybody could do what I do if they put their mind to it.
▪ But he can turn his mind to detailed needs, like pensions, if he has to.
▪ He would put his mind to other issues, one of which was sobering in its own right.
▪ I turned my mind to Archie.
▪ Whatever you set your mind to, your personal total obsession, this is what kills you.
▪ When Medea knew the deed was done she turned her mind to one still more dreadful.
put/stick that in your pipe and smoke it
put/stick your head above the parapet
put/stick/get your oar in
▪ I heard him mention something about organs to another guest so I put my oar in and started such a nice conversation.
▪ She was talking to me just now, before you put your oar in.
▪ We were sorting it out quite nicely until you stuck your oar in.
put/take sb over your knee
put/throw a spanner in the works
put/tighten the screws on sb
put/turn sth to good account
▪ The extra time was turned to good account.
put/turn the clock back
▪ If I could turn the clock back, I don't think I'd study law again.
▪ It would be nice to put the clock back to the years when Mum and Dad were still alive.
▪ He thinks you can turn the clock back.
▪ It was almost like turning the clock back a couple of centuries.
▪ Not unless they fell into Morton's hands. Turn the clock back.
▪ Or not lie, maybe. Turn the clock back.
▪ The most important thing now is not to turn the clock back.
▪ This great divide can not be bridged by turning the clock back.
▪ We can not turn the clock back.
▪ What is past is past and you can not turn the clock back.
sb puts his pants on one leg at a time
set/put sb straight
set/put sb's mind at rest
▪ Just to put your mind at ease, we will get a second opinion from a cardiac specialist.
▪ The doctor set my mind at rest by explaining exactly what effect the drug would have on me.
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
set/put sth in motion
▪ The discovery set in motion two days of searching for the bodies.
▪ A tiny pilot light, if you like, that was necessary to set everything else in motion.
▪ Corot set the countryside in motion.
▪ He has set the ball in motion.
▪ How easy to see how a white kid could set this in motion with hardly any effort.
▪ It is both wasteful and irresponsible to set experiments in motion and omit to record and analyse what happens.
▪ Oliver corrected the clock and set it in motion.
▪ On Jan. 13, Vega said, Guzman set his plot in motion.
▪ The programme had lost the man responsible for setting it in motion.
set/put sth to music
▪ She sat at the piano for hours, putting one of her poems to music.
▪ The Greek tragedy "Elektra" was set to music by Richard Strauss.
▪ But if you have an extremely subtle story, how are you going to set it to music?
▪ For Robin, a place to put mind to music.
▪ What were you going to do, set it to music?
set/put the record straight
▪ Having set the record straight there is a paradox.
▪ He sets the record straight by a thorough reconsideration of Addison's Cato, that tragedy constantly overrated at the time.
▪ I want to set the record straight.
▪ Or a desire to put the record straight?
▪ Taylor was given the perfect platform to set the record straight at yesterday's press conference.
▪ They have a duty to set the record straight, otherwise they are conniving at falsehood.
set/put the world to rights
▪ He wanted to put the world to rights.
▪ More recently Lou has cleaned up his act and started setting the world to rights.
▪ That straightness of Time, that confining straightness, was one with the Western picture of setting the world to rights.
stay put
▪ He won't stay put long enough for me to take his photo.
▪ I'm just going to stay put unless you need me to help you.
▪ I've decided to stay put until after Christmas, but after that I want to start looking for a new apartment.
▪ If you stay put, you'll be even more miserable in a year's time.
▪ But since it was extremely dark and nearly dawn, we stayed put.
▪ Dear Prudence would dictate staying put and waiting for air to come and retrieve him.
▪ Everything falling in exactly the same way is what is natural, not everything staying put the same way.
▪ If we stay put they can stay up there and fry the valley bottom, and us with it.
▪ If you had been out in the middle of space, far from anything else, they would have stayed put.
▪ Locals were told to evacuate, but Duane stayed put.
▪ Water exchange is limited, and any pollution will just stay put.
▪ When she stayed put, the men began pounding their fists on the tables as well.
stick/put etc the knife in/into someone
take/put up with shit (from sb)
throw/put sb off the scent
▪ And why should I try to throw you off the scent?
▪ But he'd got to put Graham off the scent.
▪ Or were they trying to put him off the scent?
▪ That put them off the scent.
▪ The aspirant towards a more spiritual way of life will be thrown entirely off the scent.
to put it mildly
▪ He's a troubled youngster, to put it mildly.
▪ The movie contains some scenes that are, to put it mildly, rather difficult to watch.
▪ After one hundred days of world peace, all surviving were to put it mildly, a little bothered and regretful.
▪ Barkley, to put it mildly, is a bit more complicated.
▪ But the depth of the dislike of the Tory leadership surprised everybody, to put it mildly.
▪ But the testimony from the High Street is mixed, to put it mildly.
▪ On this view there is, to put it mildly, no urgency about a referendum.
▪ Traveling in pairs out here saves a lot of walking -- to put it mildly.
▪ Tucson audiences are passionate, to put it mildly.
▪ Unforthcoming, to put it mildly.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Grandmother was getting too frail to live on her own, so we had to put her in an old people's home.
▪ I'm not allowed to put up any posters in my bedroom.
▪ I put the coin in my pocket.
▪ I put the letter back in the envelope.
▪ I can't remember where I put my keys.
▪ I wrote to Marian, but I didn't put anything about Bill being arrested.
▪ It's time to put everything away now.
▪ Just put 'with love from Jason' on the card.
▪ Just put the bags on the table.
▪ She put the sales slip in the plastic bag with the dress.
▪ She picked up a porcelain figurine and put it down again.
▪ The photographer arranged the wedding guests, putting the smallest ones at the front.
▪ They put me in a room on my own and locked the door.
▪ This is music to put you in a relaxed mood.
▪ When did you last put oil in the car?
▪ Where did you put the newspaper?
▪ Winning their last six games has put Utah into first place.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Groover Records are now putting on a Monday night club at two different venues.
▪ He put himself through school with wages earned as a carpenter.
▪ I took my wallet out and took two fivers and put them on the table.
▪ Now they must try to put their dreams back together again.
▪ The ground crew can now work to refuel, clean the squashed bugs off the bubble and put the aircraft to bed.
▪ The stench and the bloody process we watched put me off tinned fish for many months.
▪ The time has come to put such a fee in place.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Put

Put \Put\, n. [OF. pute.] A prostitute. [Obs.]

Put

Put \Put\, n.

  1. The act of putting; an action; a movement; a thrust; a push; as, the put of a ball. ``A forced put.''
    --L'Estrange.

  2. A certain game at cards.
    --Young.

  3. (Finance) A privilege which one party buys of another to ``put'' (deliver) to him a certain amount of stock, grain, etc., at a certain price and date. [Brokers' Cant]

    A put and a call may be combined in one instrument, the holder of which may either buy or sell as he chooses at the fixed price.
    --Johnson's Cyc.

Put

Put \Put\ (put; often p[u^]t in def. 3), v. i.

  1. To go or move; as, when the air first puts up. [Obs.]
    --Bacon.

  2. To steer; to direct one's course; to go.

    His fury thus appeased, he puts to land.
    --Dryden.

  3. To play a card or a hand in the game called put. To put about (Naut.), to change direction; to tack. To put back (Naut.), to turn back; to return. ``The French . . . had put back to Toulon.'' --Southey. To put forth.

    1. To shoot, bud, or germinate. ``Take earth from under walls where nettles put forth.''
      --Bacon.

    2. To leave a port or haven, as a ship. --Shak. To put in (Naut.), to enter a harbor; to sail into port. To put in for.

      1. To make a request or claim; as, to put in for a share of profits.

      2. To go into covert; -- said of a bird escaping from a hawk.

    3. To offer one's self; to stand as a candidate for. --Locke. To put off, to go away; to depart; esp., to leave land, as a ship; to move from the shore. To put on, to hasten motion; to drive vehemently. To put over (Naut.), to sail over or across. To put to sea (Naut.), to set sail; to begin a voyage; to advance into the ocean. To put up.

      1. To take lodgings; to lodge.

      2. To offer one's self as a candidate. --L'Estrange. To put up to, to advance to. [Obs.] ``With this he put up to my lord.'' --Swift. To put up with.

        1. To overlook, or suffer without recompense, punishment, or resentment; as, to put up with an injury or affront.

        2. To take without opposition or expressed dissatisfaction; to endure; as, to put up with bad fare.

Put

Put \Put\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Put; p. pr. & vb. n. Putting.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.]

  1. To move in any direction; to impel; to thrust; to push; -- nearly obsolete, except with adverbs, as with by (to put by = to thrust aside; to divert); or with forth (to put forth = to thrust out).

    His chief designs are . . . to put thee by from thy spiritual employment.
    --Jer. Taylor.

  2. To bring to a position or place; to place; to lay; to set; figuratively, to cause to be or exist in a specified relation, condition, or the like; to bring to a stated mental or moral condition; as, to put one in fear; to put a theory in practice; to put an enemy to fight.

    This present dignity, In which that I have put you.
    --Chaucer.

    I will put enmity between thee and the woman.
    --Gen. iii. 15.

    He put no trust in his servants.
    --Job iv. 18.

    When God into the hands of their deliverer Puts invincible might.
    --Milton.

    In the mean time other measures were put in operation.
    --Sparks.

  3. To attach or attribute; to assign; as, to put a wrong construction on an act or expression.

  4. To lay down; to give up; to surrender. [Obs.]

    No man hath more love than this, that a man put his life for his friends.
    --Wyclif (John xv. 13).

  5. To set before one for judgment, acceptance, or rejection; to bring to the attention; to offer; to state; to express; figuratively, to assume; to suppose; -- formerly sometimes followed by that introducing a proposition; as, to put a question; to put a case.

    Let us now put that ye have leave.
    --Chaucer.

    Put the perception and you put the mind.
    --Berkeley.

    These verses, originally Greek, were put in Latin.
    --Milton.

    All this is ingeniously and ably put.
    --Hare.

  6. To incite; to entice; to urge; to constrain; to oblige.

    These wretches put us upon all mischief.
    --Swift.

    Put me not use the carnal weapon in my own defense.
    --Sir W. Scott.

    Thank him who puts me, loath, to this revenge.
    --Milton.

  7. To throw or cast with a pushing motion ``overhand,'' the hand being raised from the shoulder; a practice in athletics; as, to put the shot or weight.

  8. (Mining) To convey coal in the mine, as from the working to the tramway. --Raymond. Put case, formerly, an elliptical expression for, put or suppose the case to be. Put case that the soul after departure from the body may live. --Bp. Hall. To put about (Naut.), to turn, or change the course of, as a ship. To put away.

    1. To renounce; to discard; to expel.

    2. To divorce. To put back.

      1. To push or thrust backwards; hence, to hinder; to delay.

      2. To refuse; to deny.

        Coming from thee, I could not put him back.
        --Shak.

    3. To set, as the hands of a clock, to an earlier hour.

    4. To restore to the original place; to replace. To put by.

      1. To turn, set, or thrust, aside. ``Smiling put the question by.''
        --Tennyson.

      2. To lay aside; to keep; to sore up; as, to put by money. To put down.

        1. To lay down; to deposit; to set down.

        2. To lower; to diminish; as, to put down prices.

      3. To deprive of position or power; to put a stop to; to suppress; to abolish; to confute; as, to put down rebellion or traitors.

        Mark, how a plain tale shall put you down.
        --Shak.

        Sugar hath put down the use of honey.
        --Bacon.

      4. To subscribe; as, to put down one's name. To put forth.

        1. To thrust out; to extend, as the hand; to cause to come or push out; as, a tree puts forth leaves.

        2. To make manifest; to develop; also, to bring into action; to exert; as, to put forth strength.

        3. To propose, as a question, a riddle, and the like.

        4. To publish, as a book. To put forward.

          1. To advance to a position of prominence or responsibility; to promote.

          2. To cause to make progress; to aid.

          3. To set, as the hands of a clock, to a later hour. To put in.

            1. To introduce among others; to insert; sometimes, to introduce with difficulty; as, to put in a word while others are discoursing.

            2. (Naut.) To conduct into a harbor, as a ship.

            3. (Law) To place in due form before a court; to place among the records of a court.
              --Burrill.

          4. (Med.) To restore, as a dislocated part, to its place. To put off.

            1. To lay aside; to discard; as, to put off a robe; to put off mortality. ``Put off thy shoes from off thy feet.''
              --Ex. iii. 5.

            2. To turn aside; to elude; to disappoint; to frustrate; to baffle.

              I hoped for a demonstration, but Themistius hoped to put me off with an harangue.
              --Boyle.

              We might put him off with this answer.
              --Bentley.

            3. To delay; to defer; to postpone; as, to put off repentance.

            4. To get rid of; to dispose of; especially, to pass fraudulently; as, to put off a counterfeit note, or an ingenious theory.

    5. To push from land; as, to put off a boat. To put on or To put upon.

      1. To invest one's self with, as clothes; to assume. ``Mercury . . . put on the shape of a man.''
        --L'Estrange.

      2. To impute (something) to; to charge upon; as, to put blame on or upon another.

      3. To advance; to promote. [Obs.] ``This came handsomely to put on the peace.''
        --Bacon.

      4. To impose; to inflict. ``That which thou puttest on me, will I bear.''
        --2 Kings xviii. 14.

      5. To apply; as, to put on workmen; to put on steam.

    6. To deceive; to trick. ``The stork found he was put upon.''
      --L'Estrange.

    7. To place upon, as a means or condition; as, he put him upon bread and water. ``This caution will put them upon considering.''
      --Locke.

    8. (Law) To rest upon; to submit to; as, a defendant puts himself on or upon the country. --Burrill. To put out.

      1. To eject; as, to put out and intruder.

      2. To put forth; to shoot, as a bud, or sprout.

      3. To extinguish; as, to put out a candle, light, or fire.

      4. To place at interest; to loan; as, to put out funds.

      5. To provoke, as by insult; to displease; to vex; as, he was put out by my reply. [Colloq.]

      6. To protrude; to stretch forth; as, to put out the hand.

      7. To publish; to make public; as, to put out a pamphlet.

      8. To confuse; to disconcert; to interrupt; as, to put one out in reading or speaking.

    9. (Law) To open; as, to put out lights, that is, to open or cut windows.
      --Burrill.

    10. (Med.) To place out of joint; to dislocate; as, to put out the ankle.

    11. To cause to cease playing, or to prevent from playing longer in a certain inning, as in base ball.

    12. to engage in sexual intercourse; -- used of women; as, she's got a great bod, but she doesn't put out. To put over.

      1. To place (some one) in authority over; as, to put a general over a division of an army.

      2. To refer.

        For the certain knowledge of that truth I put you o'er to heaven and to my mother.
        --Shak.

      3. To defer; to postpone; as, the court put over the cause to the next term.

      4. To transfer (a person or thing) across; as, to put one over the river. To put the hand to or To put the hand unto.

        1. To take hold of, as of an instrument of labor; as, to put the hand to the plow; hence, to engage in (any task or affair); as, to put one's hand to the work.

        2. To take or seize, as in theft. ``He hath not put his hand unto his neighbor's goods.'' --Ex. xxii. 11. To put through, to cause to go through all conditions or stages of a progress; hence, to push to completion; to accomplish; as, he put through a measure of legislation; he put through a railroad enterprise. [U.S.] To put to.

          1. To add; to unite; as, to put one sum to another.

          2. To refer to; to expose; as, to put the safety of the state to hazard. ``That dares not put it to the touch.''
            --Montrose.

        3. To attach (something) to; to harness beasts to. --Dickens. To put to a stand, to stop; to arrest by obstacles or difficulties. To put to bed.

          1. To undress and place in bed, as a child.

          2. To deliver in, or to make ready for, childbirth. To put to death, to kill. To put together, to attach; to aggregate; to unite in one. To put this and that (or two and two) together, to draw an inference; to form a correct conclusion. To put to it, to distress; to press hard; to perplex; to give difficulty to. ``O gentle lady, do not put me to 't.'' --Shak. To put to rights, to arrange in proper order; to settle or compose rightly. To put to the sword, to kill with the sword; to slay. To put to trial, or on trial, to bring to a test; to try. To put trust in, to confide in; to repose confidence in. To put up.

            1. To pass unavenged; to overlook; not to punish or resent; to put up with; as, to put up indignities. [Obs.] ``Such national injuries are not to be put up.''
              --Addison.

            2. To send forth or upward; as, to put up goods for sale.

        4. To start from a cover, as game. ``She has been frightened; she has been put up.''
          --C. Kingsley.

      5. To hoard. ``Himself never put up any of the rent.''
        --Spelman.

      6. To lay side or preserve; to pack away; to store; to pickle; as, to put up pork, beef, or fish.

      7. To place out of sight, or away; to put in its proper place; as, put up that letter.
        --Shak.

      8. To incite; to instigate; -- followed by to; as, he put the lad up to mischief.

      9. To raise; to erect; to build; as, to put up a tent, or a house.

      10. To lodge; to entertain; as, to put up travelers.

        To put up a job, to arrange a plot. [Slang]

        Syn: To place; set; lay; cause; produce; propose; state.

        Usage: Put, Lay, Place, Set. These words agree in the idea of fixing the position of some object, and are often used interchangeably. To put is the least definite, denoting merely to move to a place. To place has more particular reference to the precise location, as to put with care in a certain or proper place. To set or to lay may be used when there is special reference to the position of the object.

Put

Put \Put\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Put; p. pr. & vb. n. Putting.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.]

  1. To move in any direction; to impel; to thrust; to push; -- nearly obsolete, except with adverbs, as with by (to put by = to thrust aside; to divert); or with forth (to put forth = to thrust out).

    His chief designs are . . . to put thee by from thy spiritual employment.
    --Jer. Taylor.

  2. To bring to a position or place; to place; to lay; to set; figuratively, to cause to be or exist in a specified relation, condition, or the like; to bring to a stated mental or moral condition; as, to put one in fear; to put a theory in practice; to put an enemy to fight.

    This present dignity, In which that I have put you.
    --Chaucer.

    I will put enmity between thee and the woman.
    --Gen. iii. 15.

    He put no trust in his servants.
    --Job iv. 18.

    When God into the hands of their deliverer Puts invincible might.
    --Milton.

    In the mean time other measures were put in operation.
    --Sparks.

  3. To attach or attribute; to assign; as, to put a wrong construction on an act or expression.

  4. To lay down; to give up; to surrender. [Obs.]

    No man hath more love than this, that a man put his life for his friends.
    --Wyclif (John xv. 13).

  5. To set before one for judgment, acceptance, or rejection; to bring to the attention; to offer; to state; to express; figuratively, to assume; to suppose; -- formerly sometimes followed by that introducing a proposition; as, to put a question; to put a case.

    Let us now put that ye have leave.
    --Chaucer.

    Put the perception and you put the mind.
    --Berkeley.

    These verses, originally Greek, were put in Latin.
    --Milton.

    All this is ingeniously and ably put.
    --Hare.

  6. To incite; to entice; to urge; to constrain; to oblige.

    These wretches put us upon all mischief.
    --Swift.

    Put me not use the carnal weapon in my own defense.
    --Sir W. Scott.

    Thank him who puts me, loath, to this revenge.
    --Milton.

  7. To throw or cast with a pushing motion ``overhand,'' the hand being raised from the shoulder; a practice in athletics; as, to put the shot or weight.

  8. (Mining) To convey coal in the mine, as from the working to the tramway. --Raymond. Put case, formerly, an elliptical expression for, put or suppose the case to be. Put case that the soul after departure from the body may live. --Bp. Hall. To put about (Naut.), to turn, or change the course of, as a ship. To put away.

    1. To renounce; to discard; to expel.

    2. To divorce. To put back.

      1. To push or thrust backwards; hence, to hinder; to delay.

      2. To refuse; to deny.

        Coming from thee, I could not put him back.
        --Shak.

    3. To set, as the hands of a clock, to an earlier hour.

    4. To restore to the original place; to replace. To put by.

      1. To turn, set, or thrust, aside. ``Smiling put the question by.''
        --Tennyson.

      2. To lay aside; to keep; to sore up; as, to put by money. To put down.

        1. To lay down; to deposit; to set down.

        2. To lower; to diminish; as, to put down prices.

      3. To deprive of position or power; to put a stop to; to suppress; to abolish; to confute; as, to put down rebellion or traitors.

        Mark, how a plain tale shall put you down.
        --Shak.

        Sugar hath put down the use of honey.
        --Bacon.

      4. To subscribe; as, to put down one's name. To put forth.

        1. To thrust out; to extend, as the hand; to cause to come or push out; as, a tree puts forth leaves.

        2. To make manifest; to develop; also, to bring into action; to exert; as, to put forth strength.

        3. To propose, as a question, a riddle, and the like.

        4. To publish, as a book. To put forward.

          1. To advance to a position of prominence or responsibility; to promote.

          2. To cause to make progress; to aid.

          3. To set, as the hands of a clock, to a later hour. To put in.

            1. To introduce among others; to insert; sometimes, to introduce with difficulty; as, to put in a word while others are discoursing.

            2. (Naut.) To conduct into a harbor, as a ship.

            3. (Law) To place in due form before a court; to place among the records of a court.
              --Burrill.

          4. (Med.) To restore, as a dislocated part, to its place. To put off.

            1. To lay aside; to discard; as, to put off a robe; to put off mortality. ``Put off thy shoes from off thy feet.''
              --Ex. iii. 5.

            2. To turn aside; to elude; to disappoint; to frustrate; to baffle.

              I hoped for a demonstration, but Themistius hoped to put me off with an harangue.
              --Boyle.

              We might put him off with this answer.
              --Bentley.

            3. To delay; to defer; to postpone; as, to put off repentance.

            4. To get rid of; to dispose of; especially, to pass fraudulently; as, to put off a counterfeit note, or an ingenious theory.

    5. To push from land; as, to put off a boat. To put on or To put upon.

      1. To invest one's self with, as clothes; to assume. ``Mercury . . . put on the shape of a man.''
        --L'Estrange.

      2. To impute (something) to; to charge upon; as, to put blame on or upon another.

      3. To advance; to promote. [Obs.] ``This came handsomely to put on the peace.''
        --Bacon.

      4. To impose; to inflict. ``That which thou puttest on me, will I bear.''
        --2 Kings xviii. 14.

      5. To apply; as, to put on workmen; to put on steam.

    6. To deceive; to trick. ``The stork found he was put upon.''
      --L'Estrange.

    7. To place upon, as a means or condition; as, he put him upon bread and water. ``This caution will put them upon considering.''
      --Locke.

    8. (Law) To rest upon; to submit to; as, a defendant puts himself on or upon the country. --Burrill. To put out.

      1. To eject; as, to put out and intruder.

      2. To put forth; to shoot, as a bud, or sprout.

      3. To extinguish; as, to put out a candle, light, or fire.

      4. To place at interest; to loan; as, to put out funds.

      5. To provoke, as by insult; to displease; to vex; as, he was put out by my reply. [Colloq.]

      6. To protrude; to stretch forth; as, to put out the hand.

      7. To publish; to make public; as, to put out a pamphlet.

      8. To confuse; to disconcert; to interrupt; as, to put one out in reading or speaking.

    9. (Law) To open; as, to put out lights, that is, to open or cut windows.
      --Burrill.

    10. (Med.) To place out of joint; to dislocate; as, to put out the ankle.

    11. To cause to cease playing, or to prevent from playing longer in a certain inning, as in base ball.

    12. to engage in sexual intercourse; -- used of women; as, she's got a great bod, but she doesn't put out. To put over.

      1. To place (some one) in authority over; as, to put a general over a division of an army.

      2. To refer.

        For the certain knowledge of that truth I put you o'er to heaven and to my mother.
        --Shak.

      3. To defer; to postpone; as, the court put over the cause to the next term.

      4. To transfer (a person or thing) across; as, to put one over the river. To put the hand to or To put the hand unto.

        1. To take hold of, as of an instrument of labor; as, to put the hand to the plow; hence, to engage in (any task or affair); as, to put one's hand to the work.

        2. To take or seize, as in theft. ``He hath not put his hand unto his neighbor's goods.'' --Ex. xxii. 11. To put through, to cause to go through all conditions or stages of a progress; hence, to push to completion; to accomplish; as, he put through a measure of legislation; he put through a railroad enterprise. [U.S.] To put to.

          1. To add; to unite; as, to put one sum to another.

          2. To refer to; to expose; as, to put the safety of the state to hazard. ``That dares not put it to the touch.''
            --Montrose.

        3. To attach (something) to; to harness beasts to. --Dickens. To put to a stand, to stop; to arrest by obstacles or difficulties. To put to bed.

          1. To undress and place in bed, as a child.

          2. To deliver in, or to make ready for, childbirth. To put to death, to kill. To put together, to attach; to aggregate; to unite in one. To put this and that (or two and two) together, to draw an inference; to form a correct conclusion. To put to it, to distress; to press hard; to perplex; to give difficulty to. ``O gentle lady, do not put me to 't.'' --Shak. To put to rights, to arrange in proper order; to settle or compose rightly. To put to the sword, to kill with the sword; to slay. To put to trial, or on trial, to bring to a test; to try. To put trust in, to confide in; to repose confidence in. To put up.

            1. To pass unavenged; to overlook; not to punish or resent; to put up with; as, to put up indignities. [Obs.] ``Such national injuries are not to be put up.''
              --Addison.

            2. To send forth or upward; as, to put up goods for sale.

        4. To start from a cover, as game. ``She has been frightened; she has been put up.''
          --C. Kingsley.

      5. To hoard. ``Himself never put up any of the rent.''
        --Spelman.

      6. To lay side or preserve; to pack away; to store; to pickle; as, to put up pork, beef, or fish.

      7. To place out of sight, or away; to put in its proper place; as, put up that letter.
        --Shak.

      8. To incite; to instigate; -- followed by to; as, he put the lad up to mischief.

      9. To raise; to erect; to build; as, to put up a tent, or a house.

      10. To lodge; to entertain; as, to put up travelers.

        To put up a job, to arrange a plot. [Slang]

        Syn: To place; set; lay; cause; produce; propose; state.

        Usage: Put, Lay, Place, Set. These words agree in the idea of fixing the position of some object, and are often used interchangeably. To put is the least definite, denoting merely to move to a place. To place has more particular reference to the precise location, as to put with care in a certain or proper place. To set or to lay may be used when there is special reference to the position of the object.

Put

Put \Put\, n. [Cf. W. pwt any short thing, pwt o ddyn a squab of a person, pwtog a short, thick woman.] A rustic; a clown; an awkward or uncouth person.

Queer country puts extol Queen Bess's reign.
--Bramston.

What droll puts the citizens seem in it all.
--F. Harrison.

Put

Put \Put\, obs. 3d pers. sing. pres. of Put, contracted from putteth.
--Chaucer.

Put

Put \Put\, n. [See Pit.] A pit. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
put

late Old English *putian, implied in putung "instigation, an urging," literally "a putting;" related to pytan "put out, thrust out" (of eyes), probably from a Germanic stem that also produced Danish putte "to put," Swedish dialectal putta; Middle Dutch pote "scion, plant," Dutch poten "to plant," Old Norse pota "to poke."\n

\nMeaning "act of casting a heavy stone overhead" (as a trial of strength) is attested from c.1300. Obsolete past tense form putted is attested 14c.-15c. To put down "end by force or authority" (a rebellion, etc.) is from c.1300. Adjective phrase put out "angry, upset" is first recorded 1887; to put out, of a woman, "to offer oneself for sex" is from 1947. To put upon (someone) "play a trick on, impose on" is from 1690s. To put up with "tolerate, accept" (1755) was originally to put up, as in "to pocket." To put (someone) on "deceive" is from 1958.

put

c.1300, "act of throwing a weight overhand as a test of strength," from put (v.). General meaning "act of putting" is from early 15c. Also compare putt (n.).

Wiktionary
put

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context business English) A right to sell something at a predetermined price. 2 (context finance English) A contract to sell a security at a set price on or before a certain date. 3 The act of putting; an action; a movement; a thrust; a push. 4 An old card game. vb. To place something somewhere. Etymology 2

n. (context obsolete English) An idiot; a foolish person. Etymology 3

n. (context obsolete English) A prostitute.

WordNet
put
  1. n. the option to sell a given stock (or stock index or commodity future) at a given price before a given date [syn: put option] [ant: call option]

  2. [also: putting]

put
  1. v. put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point" [syn: set, place, pose, position, lay]

  2. cause to be in a certain state; cause to be in a certain relation; "That song put me in awful good humor"

  3. formulate in a particular style or language; "I wouldn't put it that way"; "She cast her request in very polite language" [syn: frame, redact, cast, couch]

  4. attribute or give; "She put too much emphasis on her the last statement"; "He put all his efforts into this job"; "The teacher put an interesting twist to the interpretation of the story" [syn: assign]

  5. make an investment; "Put money into bonds" [syn: invest, commit, place] [ant: divest]

  6. estimate; "We put the time of arrival at 8 P.M." [syn: place, set]

  7. cause (someone) to undergo something; "He put her to the torture"

  8. adapt; "put these words to music"

  9. arrange thoughts, ideas, temporal events, etc.; "arrange my schedule"; "set up one's life"; "I put these memories with those of bygone times" [syn: arrange, set up, order]

  10. [also: putting]

Wikipedia
Put (band)

Put is a Croatian pop group from Rijeka.

It was selected from members of Putokazi, in order to appear at 1993 Eurovision Song Contest as the very first representative of independent Croatia, singing " Don't Ever Cry". The members of the group were Vivien Galletta, Angela Jeličić, Melita Sedić, Naim Ajra, Petar Cucak Migliaccio and Olja Desic.

Category:Croatian Eurovision Song Contest entrants Category:Eurovision Song Contest entrants of 1993 Category:Croatian pop music groups

Put (card game)

Put is an English tavern trick-taking card game first recorded in the 16th century and later castigated by 17th century moralists as one of ill repute. It belongs to a very ancient family of card games and clearly relates to a group known as Trut, Truque, also Tru, and the South American game Truco. Its more elaborate version is the Spanish game of Truc, which is still much played in many parts of Southern France and Spain.

Put

Put can refer to:

  • Put option, a financial contract between a buyer and a seller
  • Phut or Put, Biblical grandson of Noah
  • A Hypertext Transfer Protocol request method
  • A File Transfer Protocol option to copy a file to a remote system (see List of FTP commands)
  • Put (band), from Rijeka, Croatia
  • Put (card game), a 16th-century card game
  • An output procedure put in Pascal, Turing, and other programming languages
    • In C, simple functions, puts and [[C file input/output|puts ]], that put text on the screen

PUT may also be an acronym for:

  • Parameterized unit testing
  • Programmable unijunction transistor
  • Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan, Ahvaz, Mahmud Abad and Tehran, Iran
  • Poznań University of Technology, Poland
  • CBOE S&P 500 PutWrite Index, ticker symbol
  • Sri Sathya Sai Airport, Puttaparthi, Andhra Pradesh, India, IATA code

Usage examples of "put".

The Heir-Empress was an Aberrant, and the Empress in her hubris still seemed intent on putting her on the throne.

Rykor found it aberrational that the Emperor could believe that poverty could be cured by putting the poor in uniforms.

He seized, knew he was in trouble, and put himself out, using his ability as a dreamwalker.

Pender then went on to describe life aboard the ship for all of the hands, pleading with the admiral to intercede and put an end to this tyranny.

As soon as the Fortitude is loaded, put a prize crew aboard her and shape her a course for English Harbour.

It would have been a bad notion to put him aboard one of those frigates.

He was less concerned with looking good than with avoiding the kind of spectacular abseiling that might put an extra load on the anchor and himself in the morgue.

From their bases first at Turin, and then at Coblenz, they were accused of planning invasions of France on the heels of absolutist armies that would put good patriots and their women and children to the sword and raze their cities.

He wished to God Aby had agreed to the MacFarlane with him this year, which would have put Aby far to the south instead of on that road.

Let them accede, then, to his proposition for a committee, and he would pledge himself to explode the fallacy of agricultural protection, and to put an end to the present system within two years from the publication of its report.

The Zondarians quickly saw the wisdom in acceding to our gentle guidance, and put themselves under Thallonian rule.

Even under the accelerated building schedules produced in wartime, it would have taken ages to put one of those giants together.

I have the knack of putting an end to an intrigue when it has ceased to amuse me, I have no hesitation in accepting your proposal.

I highly recommend codeine and acetaminophen for putting your cares behind you.

The chalk had been put back over her and Granny Aching, who always said that the hills were in her bones, now had her bones in the hills.