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Crossword clues for lay

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
lay
I.
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bird lays its eggs
▪ The bird lays a single egg on the ground.
draw up/lay down a code (=create one)
▪ The syndicate decided to draw up a code of conduct for its members.
fit/lay a carpet (=cut it to fit a room and fix it to the floor)
▪ Will it cost extra to have the carpet fitted?
give your life/lay down your life (=die in order to save other people, or because of a strong belief)
▪ These men gave their lives during the war to keep us free.
laid down by statute (=established by law)
▪ Protection for the consumer is laid down by statute .
laid...groundwork
▪ His speech laid the groundwork for independence.
laid...wreath
▪ The prime minister laid a wreath at the war memorial.
lay a pipe
▪ They were digging a trench to lay water pipes.
lay down a principle (=describe a principle and make it accepted)
▪ The report lays down general principles for the teaching of English.
lay down/establish ground rules for sth
▪ Our book lays down the ground rules for building a patio successfully.
lay down/set/impose conditions (=say what sb must agree to)
▪ They laid down certain conditions before agreeing to the ceasefire.
lay flat on...back
▪ That night I lay flat on my back and stared up at the ceiling.
lay flat
▪ He lay flat on the floor.
lay mines (=put them in place)
▪ They learnt how to lay mines.
lay off employees (=stop employing them because there is no work for them to do)
▪ Unions fear that many part-time employees will be laid off.
lay on/put on entertainment (=organize and provide it)
▪ The organizers laid on some entertainment for the children.
lay reader
lay...eggs
▪ Blackbirds lay their eggs in March.
lay...foundations
▪ It took the builders three weeks to lay the foundations.
lay/place sth end to end (=in a line, with the ends touching)
▪ The roof tiles are laid end to end.
lay/run a cable (=put one in position somewhere)
▪ In the 1860s the first cables were laid under the oceans.
lay/set a trap (for sb)
▪ Mr Smith has walked straight into a trap laid by the Tories.
place/lay emphasis on sthformal
▪ The coach has placed the emphasis firmly on youth by including three teenagers in the team.
place/put/lay a bet on sth
▪ She placed a bet on a horse called Beethoven.
prepare/lay the ground (=to provide the situation or conditions in which something can develop successfully)
set/lay down a standard
▪ The government sets standards that all hospitals must reach.
set/lay the table (=put knives, forks etc on a table before a meal)
▪ The table was set for fourteen.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
ahead
▪ These early months gave him a brutally clear idea of what lay ahead.
▪ Although generally optimistic, Dan knew that more challenges lay ahead.
▪ Dark pines and yellow birches lay ahead, as the shoreline curved to meet me.
▪ And almost alone among the early Hmong arrivals, he could see that storm signals lay ahead.
▪ But that life was over now and a new one lay ahead.
▪ But no one was better equipped for the psychological warfare that lay ahead.
▪ Then the nakedness was covered: he had seen what lay ahead.
▪ The turning point into a new year was a thoughtful time, when one weighed the past against what lay ahead.
aside
▪ On the day of the wedding, just for a short while, all strife was laid aside.
▪ By then, he supposed, he would have enough laid aside to begin his own business.
▪ They must also lay aside their personal feelings.
▪ He could afford to lay aside his anger against the Trojans.
▪ There were of course occasions when Franz's great sword was laid aside, other instruments being required for the administration of justice.
▪ A few weeks later I laid aside my steak knife for good.
▪ Big sentences about Britain's place in the world have been laid aside.
▪ I clambered on to the wheelbarrow, to pray for a healing miracle, laying aside my glasses and hat.
down
▪ Strips of old carpet had been laid down in rows, like pews.
▪ When we halted... the rebels halted and lay down on the ground.
▪ Collective bargaining is a flexible instrument and can build upon the minimum standards which the law lays down.
▪ She raised her head off the bed, lay down on her side and curled up.
▪ She laid down her Cosmopolitan magazine, open at fashions, loose flowing shirts in jewel colours.
▪ I went into my parents' room and lay down on the bed.
▪ It is the sort of knowledge that may be laid down in rules and can be learned from books.
▪ There is no requirement that harm be sustained before the law may intervene to lay down moral standards.
off
▪ It is also laying off 230 of its 750 Coventry staff.
▪ Out of the last 15, three have been laid off because of more senior teachers taking their place.
▪ Certainly, an emergency on the first flight after a long lay off provides the potential for an incident.
▪ But there was a budget cut after a year, and I was laid off.
▪ The prescription is expected: lay off the climbing and get stuck into physiotherapy.
▪ The disenchantment affects all workers, even before they are ever laid off.
▪ Drunks would be laid off immediately, and could only return when sober.
▪ Dan Reynolds, a self-confident engineer with twenty years' experience with large companies, was laid off in 1992.
out
▪ Uncle Philip was laid out on a charcoal grill like a barbecued pork chop.
▪ Now he was laying out a polo field next to the house.
▪ The table of transition probabilities for the travel example would be laid out as shown in Table 6.2.
▪ Even the plastic gloves next to the tray were laid out carefully, as if the fingers were still in them.
▪ I lay out the old chipped Spode cups and saucers.
▪ The logic was good, the ingredients were laid out correctly - from them he should be able to recognise the receipt.
▪ To get it laid out in the most effective way.
■ NOUN
blame
▪ Whatever its cause, that decline makes it harder to lay blame for any recent severe weather on El Chichón.
▪ These stories choose to measure the price of things rather than to lay blame.
▪ Margolin lays the blame above all on Mao's ideological fanaticism.
▪ And when the results come back, Piccirillo avoids laying blame.
▪ It's difficult to know exactly where to lay the blame.
▪ The inquest laid no blame, and no one has ever been charged in connection with the case.
▪ It could have been switched around by anyone, hoping to lay the blame elsewhere.
carpet
▪ It had been shattered along with the glass tank, the debris of which lay scattered on the carpet.
▪ During the week I found work in town painting houses, laying carpets and delivering telephone books.
▪ Under a wooden veranda lay a spread of carpets and divans.
▪ We want to lay a plain carpet in our lounge, but we're not sure which way the pile should go.
▪ It was April, and a lozenge of sunlight lay across his carpet.
▪ The small grey and red-edged squares of the pamphlet and Time lay on the pale carpet of needles.
▪ We'd laid down on the carpet and the minute I'd put it in her I'd come.
▪ Along the narrow landing at Mrs Parvis's were laid pieces of carpet to cover the cracks in the lino.
claim
▪ No particular religion can ever embody the perfection of Religion or lay claim to a monopoly of Truth.
▪ You know, Earl, I never laid no claim for Beatrice.
▪ Mill's most famous innovation lay in his claim that quality of pleasure counts as well as quantity.
▪ Shoveling is considered so nasty that the tortured feel they must reward themselves by laying permanent claim to their handiwork.
▪ Do you mean that only Nobel laureates and their peers can lay claim to the hallowed occupation of research?
▪ Ray McGovern and the other protestors at the 9: 15 liturgy were laying claim to this legacy of principled dissent.
egg
▪ Look for a butterfly laying its eggs.
▪ They lay their eggs in midwinter, incubating their eggs and chicks through many blizzards.
▪ Within an hour or so of reaching the pond and becoming clasped in amplexus, females start to lay their eggs.
▪ A female toad may lay 20,000 eggs each season; perhaps a quarter of a million in her lifetime.
▪ On his way out, Jack stole the goose that laid the golden eggs.
▪ There is one other bizarre adaptation used by the female cuckoo in laying her eggs.
▪ An ugly duckling, like a printing press, was transformed into a well-behaved goose laying golden eggs.
emphasis
▪ The Labour government laid its emphasis upon local authority housing rather than on private building for sale.
▪ They laid little emphasis on the message of the prophets.
▪ They laid great emphasis on the value of a high level of participation by members of the lesbian and gay communities.
▪ Also, different kinds of organizations lay the emphasis on different views.
▪ Dobry laid great emphasis on consultations and meetings between applicants and the local planning authority, particularly in relation to Class B applications.
▪ Lord Watson laid the same emphasis in his speech, at p. 212.
▪ This view was so widely attractive that Themistokles himself was constrained to lay more emphasis on a nearer enemy, Aigina.
floor
▪ This time the front door was open and a swathe of sunlight lay across the red-tiled floor.
▪ A fat young man lay spread-eagled on the floor.
▪ I hobbled upstairs and lay on the floor to get my shorts off.
▪ Her skirt and top lay puddled on the floor where she had taken them off.
▪ She walked into the room, glancing only briefly at the shot CI5 man, who lay unconscious on the floor.
▪ I lay on the floor in the pale gauze of winter twilight, recalling all the Great Women of the Telephone.
▪ His binoculars lay abandoned on the floor.
▪ To examine the work, viewers must decide whether to tread on a flag laid neatly on the floor before it.
foundation
▪ But in Britain we have laid the foundations for recovery.
▪ Mr Knospe laid the foundation stone and drank his share of champagne at a party in his honor.
▪ The drama school training will only lay the foundations and prepare you for the profession you are joining.
▪ And in order to clarify his position he once more dives back into laying philosophical foundations.
▪ He laid some of the foundations of the Newtonian mechanics that was to replace Aristotle's.
▪ We are laying the foundations for further progress.
▪ In fact, I laid the foundation stone on his behalf on 29 March 1996.
groundwork
▪ What he is doing is laying the groundwork for the decisive moment and preparing his getaway.
▪ Commission officials, however, appeared to be laying the political groundwork to exclude Perot from upcoming debates.
▪ The project is intended to lay the groundwork for a subsequent full-scale study.
▪ They decided among themselves they needed to lay the groundwork.
▪ Fox is clearly laying the groundwork for peace talks to restart.
▪ It is a transitory work which lays the groundwork for themes and styles found in the theater sixty years later.
▪ Then the elite persuaded the newly elected mayor to appoint a committee to lay the groundwork for redevelopment.
▪ Their task, simply put, was to lay the scientific groundwork for the manned landing missions that were then being planned.
plan
▪ We therefore laid our plans and moved out in good order over a long period of time.
▪ We immediately began laying plans for subsequent operations to achieve what we had been unable to accomplish at Pearl Harbor.
▪ The two countries were laying plans for a jointly operated early-warning centre that might help this.
▪ We consult an architect, laying our current floor plan before her and describing our needs.
▪ Taking care to avoid certain members of his household ... So the rational mind lays its rational plans.
▪ Undaunted, Galvin laid out a ten-year plan to make Motorola the leader in the industry.
▪ Meanwhile, the moment there was a hint of spring in the air, she began to lay her plans.
▪ We then laid plans for the next voyage.
stress
▪ New legislation lays particular stress on appropriate assessment.
▪ Here we might look at the question why Gandhi should lay so much stress on the interrelation of Truth and ahi.
▪ In addition to the need for humility, discipline and singleminded devotion in the quest for Truth Gandhi lays stress on prayer.
▪ The Government are laying great stress on the possibility of a consumer-led recovery.
▪ She said that her interview had laid stress on personal circumstances rather than experience and qualifications.
▪ He lays particular stress on two consequences of this analysis, both of which are presented as advantages of Marx's theory.
▪ In the matter of ultimate aesthetic evaluation it laid stress on the intuitive response of the general public.
▪ Historically, she has laid much greater stress than her continental neighbours on sophisticated external examinations at the end of compulsory schooling.
table
▪ Facing the audience he lay back on the table, screaming and moaning, as if he were going into labor.
▪ All these notions are laid on the table and dissected one-by-one with razor sharp perception and humor.
▪ Then I hear Gary returning and I go down to lay the table.
▪ The gun lay on the table.
▪ She moved up the stairs past the few skins that lay on a table and made her way into the office.
▪ My gun lay on a small table.
▪ In the kitchen Anne and Millie are laying the table for dinner, talking seriously.
wreath
▪ He had gone there to lay a wreath on every visit since.
▪ Clinton laid a wreath of red and white roses before a majestic memorial at Piskaryevskoye Cemetery.
▪ He was speaking after laying a wreath on the spot where the protestors died.
▪ David C.. Bolles, eldest son of Don Bolles, helped her lay a wreath at the foot of the monument.
▪ Charles, who laid wreaths in Hong Kong yesterday, played polo on her birthday in July.
▪ Take Chancellor Adenauer, in 1970, at the site of the former Warsaw ghetto, laying a wreath.
▪ This year, and for years to come, they will walk hand-in-hand to lay a wreath at Suzanne's grave.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
kill the goose that lays the golden egg
▪ High taxes kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.
lay a guilt trip on sb
lay an egg
▪ The first episode of the series laid an egg.
▪ A few species laid eggs beneath mounds of rotten vegetation that warmed as it decayed.
▪ Adults grow to varying sizes, depending on food available, and lay eggs in late summer.
▪ Female brush turkeys visit the males' mounds, lay eggs in them, and depart.
▪ Gravid female fig wasps enter figs, lay eggs and die.
▪ In turn the later reptiles could diversify on land when they could lay eggs away from a watery environment.
▪ The wasp lays eggs inside the eggs laid by the whitefly, thereby destroying the whitefly eggs.
▪ These mate, fly away and the females find new plants to lay eggs on.
▪ Within it, they copulate and lay eggs.
lay it on with a trowel
lay sb to rest
▪ At nightfall she was tired and lay down to rest.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ We can't even lay him to rest.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
lay siege to sb/sth
▪ After his victory Edward rallied his troops and marched north to lay siege to Calais.
▪ Almost ten years had passed since they had first laid siege to the town, and it seemed as strong as ever.
▪ He laid siege to the fortress and gradually weakened it to the point of collapse.
▪ In 476 they laid siege to Eion, which guarded the Strymon bridge.
▪ In June 1176 Richard laid siege to Limoges; after a few days resistance Aimar's citadel capitulated.
▪ In less than two generations, since the Second World War, they have laid siege to the academic world.
▪ She had laid siege to the typists' room for some minutes before Marshall had persuaded her downstairs.
lay sth bare
▪ The depth of the problem is laid bare in the fact that 40% of 18- to 25- year-olds are unemployed.
▪ The excavation laid bare the streets of the ancient city.
lay your hands on sth
▪ Government reports, social legislation, anything she could lay her hands on that would better acquaint her with her work.
▪ He will sell anything he can lay his hands on in exchange for drugs, which includes any information he may have.
▪ I know exactly where to lay my hands on them.
▪ I like writing letters and reading anything I can lay my hands on!
▪ Kabari women use whatever birth control technology they can lay their hands on.
▪ Looters carried clothes out of shop windows along with anything else they could lay their hands on.
▪ Monday I felt driven to eat everything I could lay my hands on.
▪ Some one had to overturn the present political arrangements in the Limousin if he was ever to lay his hands on Hautefort.
lay/provide the foundation(s) for sth
▪ Tests on healthy people may lay the foundation for a vaccine to prevent AIDS.
▪ I think you have to lay the foundation for your success in terms of defense and rebounding.
▪ It laid the foundation for an organisation with greater appeal to the deaf themselves, particularly the young.
▪ These arguments provide the foundation for Simmel's account of the contradictory nature of modern life.
▪ This theory also laid the foundation for the modern revolution in our understanding of the deepest parts of the earth.
▪ To generate fundamental knowledge that can lay the foundation for future advances in high-performance computing and communications.
▪ We could say that she is laying the foundations for dressing herself later on.
▪ What is stressed rather is that the same phenomenon provides the foundation for both historical tendencies.
▪ While incomplete, the steps that were taken laid the foundation for Workplace 2000.
lay/put sth to rest
▪ Many of the public's doubts have now been laid to rest.
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ I think this definitely puts it to rest.
▪ Kwasniewski has said he may dissolve parliament to put the issue to rest and call for new elections.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ The time has come to put this to rest.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
new-made/new-formed/new-laid etc
not lay a finger on sb
put/lay your cards on the table
▪ If they're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate, that's good.
▪ If we want to reach an agreement, we'll have to lay all our cards on the table.
▪ They're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate.
▪ Come on, you can lay your cards on the table in this house.
▪ The new rules appear to encourage parties to lay their cards on the table and facilitate early settlements.
put/lay/set down a marker
set/lay/clap eyes on sb/sth
▪ Bedford disliked Halsey the minute he set eyes on him.
▪ How could she possibly know, since he had not set eyes on the girl?
▪ I bonded on the second night I laid eyes on Hyakutake.
▪ Just hours earlier she had set eyes on the pretty two-year-old and sister Anna-Camilla, seven, for the first time.
▪ Never anywhere have I set eyes on such a one.
▪ No sooner did she set eyes on the gentleman than she recognised his pecuniary position to be merely temporary.
▪ The couple fell in love before they had even set eyes on each other during a six-month long distance courtship.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Before you start packing, lay out all the clothes on the bed.
▪ Farley laid the gun down and surrendered.
▪ Moyers laid his case before the public.
▪ She laid $10 on the favorite, Golden Boy.
▪ She unfolded the map and laid it on the table.
▪ Turtles lay their eggs on the beach at night.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He laid the money on the table as they walked out to the stoop.
▪ He lay down against a wall.
▪ He was laid down on brittle pampas grass and then manhandled by the creatures.
▪ Hey, I told him to lay off of me in practice.
▪ It does little more than lay a foundation of principles.
▪ It was as if a fall lay within her that she wasn't able to make.
▪ She lay against the pillows, her whole body numb.
▪ There had been long weeks when he lay sunk in gloom and introspection.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
ahead
▪ These early months gave him a brutally clear idea of what lay ahead.
▪ Although generally optimistic, Dan knew that more challenges lay ahead.
▪ Dark pines and yellow birches lay ahead, as the shoreline curved to meet me.
▪ And almost alone among the early Hmong arrivals, he could see that storm signals lay ahead.
▪ Already she was terrified of what lay ahead.
▪ It had been a good spring for the President, but trouble lay ahead.
▪ But that life was over now and a new one lay ahead.
▪ But no one was better equipped for the psychological warfare that lay ahead.
■ NOUN
floor
▪ For half an hour she lay on the floor in pain before they finally left with a hoard of silverware.
▪ We consult an architect, laying our current floor plan before her and describing our needs.
▪ Changez lay writhing on the floor, unable to get up.
▪ A fat young man lay spread-eagled on the floor.
▪ A heavy iron bar lay on the floor beside my left hand.
▪ I followed him to a room in which bundles of magazines lay strewn on the floor.
▪ Breakfast was laid on the floor at the near end of the room.
▪ Dashed hopes lay all over the floor.
wreath
▪ He had gone there to lay a wreath on every visit since.
▪ Clinton laid a wreath of red and white roses before a majestic memorial at Piskaryevskoye Cemetery.
▪ He was speaking after laying a wreath on the spot where the protestors died.
▪ David C.. Bolles, eldest son of Don Bolles, helped her lay a wreath at the foot of the monument.
▪ Charles, who laid wreaths in Hong Kong yesterday, played polo on her birthday in July.
▪ Take Chancellor Adenauer, in 1970, at the site of the former Warsaw ghetto, laying a wreath.
▪ This year, and for years to come, they will walk hand-in-hand to lay a wreath at Suzanne's grave.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
lay a guilt trip on sb
lay an egg
▪ The first episode of the series laid an egg.
▪ A few species laid eggs beneath mounds of rotten vegetation that warmed as it decayed.
▪ Adults grow to varying sizes, depending on food available, and lay eggs in late summer.
▪ Female brush turkeys visit the males' mounds, lay eggs in them, and depart.
▪ Gravid female fig wasps enter figs, lay eggs and die.
▪ In turn the later reptiles could diversify on land when they could lay eggs away from a watery environment.
▪ The wasp lays eggs inside the eggs laid by the whitefly, thereby destroying the whitefly eggs.
▪ These mate, fly away and the females find new plants to lay eggs on.
▪ Within it, they copulate and lay eggs.
lay it on with a trowel
lay sb to rest
▪ At nightfall she was tired and lay down to rest.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ We can't even lay him to rest.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
lay siege to sb/sth
▪ After his victory Edward rallied his troops and marched north to lay siege to Calais.
▪ Almost ten years had passed since they had first laid siege to the town, and it seemed as strong as ever.
▪ He laid siege to the fortress and gradually weakened it to the point of collapse.
▪ In 476 they laid siege to Eion, which guarded the Strymon bridge.
▪ In June 1176 Richard laid siege to Limoges; after a few days resistance Aimar's citadel capitulated.
▪ In less than two generations, since the Second World War, they have laid siege to the academic world.
▪ She had laid siege to the typists' room for some minutes before Marshall had persuaded her downstairs.
lay sth bare
▪ The depth of the problem is laid bare in the fact that 40% of 18- to 25- year-olds are unemployed.
▪ The excavation laid bare the streets of the ancient city.
lay your hands on sth
▪ Government reports, social legislation, anything she could lay her hands on that would better acquaint her with her work.
▪ He will sell anything he can lay his hands on in exchange for drugs, which includes any information he may have.
▪ I know exactly where to lay my hands on them.
▪ I like writing letters and reading anything I can lay my hands on!
▪ Kabari women use whatever birth control technology they can lay their hands on.
▪ Looters carried clothes out of shop windows along with anything else they could lay their hands on.
▪ Monday I felt driven to eat everything I could lay my hands on.
▪ Some one had to overturn the present political arrangements in the Limousin if he was ever to lay his hands on Hautefort.
lay/provide the foundation(s) for sth
▪ Tests on healthy people may lay the foundation for a vaccine to prevent AIDS.
▪ I think you have to lay the foundation for your success in terms of defense and rebounding.
▪ It laid the foundation for an organisation with greater appeal to the deaf themselves, particularly the young.
▪ These arguments provide the foundation for Simmel's account of the contradictory nature of modern life.
▪ This theory also laid the foundation for the modern revolution in our understanding of the deepest parts of the earth.
▪ To generate fundamental knowledge that can lay the foundation for future advances in high-performance computing and communications.
▪ We could say that she is laying the foundations for dressing herself later on.
▪ What is stressed rather is that the same phenomenon provides the foundation for both historical tendencies.
▪ While incomplete, the steps that were taken laid the foundation for Workplace 2000.
lay/put sth to rest
▪ Many of the public's doubts have now been laid to rest.
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ I think this definitely puts it to rest.
▪ Kwasniewski has said he may dissolve parliament to put the issue to rest and call for new elections.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ The time has come to put this to rest.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
new-made/new-formed/new-laid etc
not lay a finger on sb
put/lay your cards on the table
▪ If they're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate, that's good.
▪ If we want to reach an agreement, we'll have to lay all our cards on the table.
▪ They're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate.
▪ Come on, you can lay your cards on the table in this house.
▪ The new rules appear to encourage parties to lay their cards on the table and facilitate early settlements.
put/lay/set down a marker
set/lay/clap eyes on sb/sth
▪ Bedford disliked Halsey the minute he set eyes on him.
▪ How could she possibly know, since he had not set eyes on the girl?
▪ I bonded on the second night I laid eyes on Hyakutake.
▪ Just hours earlier she had set eyes on the pretty two-year-old and sister Anna-Camilla, seven, for the first time.
▪ Never anywhere have I set eyes on such a one.
▪ No sooner did she set eyes on the gentleman than she recognised his pecuniary position to be merely temporary.
▪ The couple fell in love before they had even set eyes on each other during a six-month long distance courtship.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He laid the money on the table as they walked out to the stoop.
▪ He lay down against a wall.
▪ He was laid down on brittle pampas grass and then manhandled by the creatures.
▪ Hey, I told him to lay off of me in practice.
▪ It does little more than lay a foundation of principles.
▪ It was as if a fall lay within her that she wasn't able to make.
▪ She lay against the pillows, her whole body numb.
III.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
brother
▪ Ranulf watched Corbett, the lay brother acting as interpreter, in deep conversation with the tavern-keeper.
▪ The door opened and he staggered, almost fell, into the arms of the astonished lay brother.
▪ A lay brother let us in through a postern gate where others took care of our horses and baggage.
▪ The Cistercian monks with their lay brothers administered the abbey wool trade.
▪ A lay brother came by, keys clanking.
▪ The lay brothers brought the fleeces to hamlet and village and collected the spun yarn and woven cloth from the workers.
▪ The next day, with a lay brother as a guide, Corbett and Ranulf left the abbey and journeyed south.
member
▪ The lay members have the same say as the chairman.
▪ The review was carried out by Vivian Rubinstein, a lay member of the Health Authority.
▪ She is also a lay member of the Stockport Family Health Authority.
▪ The group consists of both professional and voluntary lay members.
people
▪ Yet lay people had almost no way of making themselves heard in Rome.
▪ There are many lay people who share and live out of the same insight.
▪ Muhlenberg came to the point of urging lay people not to give gratuities at all, even to the licensed pastors.
▪ Sophisticated equipment, white coats and medical jargon serve to make most lay people feel ignorant and less important.
▪ With his lay people he had good fortune.
▪ He did not possess a markedly religious temperament, and most of his concerns were those he could share with lay people.
▪ But that, of course, is the rub: scholars want to make explicit what lay people know implicitly.
person
▪ The weakness of these controls throws the spotlight on the Police Complaints Authority composed of lay persons.
▪ Had he been a lay person, the choice would have been easy: conscience.
▪ A lay person would appear to be able to do little in this direction, except perhaps check with local trade associations.
▪ The libraries are well stocked with books on the law, many of them designed to help the lay person.
▪ No lay person ever claimed that dignity.
▪ Attendance or help by paid lay persons can also properly be the subject of a claim for expenses.
▪ If lay persons can tell the difference, why not some of those with a claim to expertise on these matters?
preacher
▪ Nonni was the daughter of a prosperous dealer in scrap metal who had also been a lay preacher.
▪ A non-conformist lay preacher, he fought the November byelection.
▪ A lay preacher, his house was the meeting-place of a gathered church by 1649.
▪ Many of its earlier leaders were lay preachers who entered politics in order to apply their religious ideals in practical ways.
▪ Les was a bit of a lay preacher, but did not push his views on anyone.
public
▪ Most of these symbols, though unintelligible to the lay public, hold great meaning and value to the nurses.
▪ The navy yards are religious sanctuaries completely inviolate on the part of the lay public.
subsidy
▪ The 1275 lay subsidy of a fifteenth fell also upon their temporalities.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
kill the goose that lays the golden egg
▪ High taxes kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.
lay a guilt trip on sb
lay an egg
▪ The first episode of the series laid an egg.
▪ A few species laid eggs beneath mounds of rotten vegetation that warmed as it decayed.
▪ Adults grow to varying sizes, depending on food available, and lay eggs in late summer.
▪ Female brush turkeys visit the males' mounds, lay eggs in them, and depart.
▪ Gravid female fig wasps enter figs, lay eggs and die.
▪ In turn the later reptiles could diversify on land when they could lay eggs away from a watery environment.
▪ The wasp lays eggs inside the eggs laid by the whitefly, thereby destroying the whitefly eggs.
▪ These mate, fly away and the females find new plants to lay eggs on.
▪ Within it, they copulate and lay eggs.
lay it on with a trowel
lay sb to rest
▪ At nightfall she was tired and lay down to rest.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ We can't even lay him to rest.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
lay siege to sb/sth
▪ After his victory Edward rallied his troops and marched north to lay siege to Calais.
▪ Almost ten years had passed since they had first laid siege to the town, and it seemed as strong as ever.
▪ He laid siege to the fortress and gradually weakened it to the point of collapse.
▪ In 476 they laid siege to Eion, which guarded the Strymon bridge.
▪ In June 1176 Richard laid siege to Limoges; after a few days resistance Aimar's citadel capitulated.
▪ In less than two generations, since the Second World War, they have laid siege to the academic world.
▪ She had laid siege to the typists' room for some minutes before Marshall had persuaded her downstairs.
lay your hands on sth
▪ Government reports, social legislation, anything she could lay her hands on that would better acquaint her with her work.
▪ He will sell anything he can lay his hands on in exchange for drugs, which includes any information he may have.
▪ I know exactly where to lay my hands on them.
▪ I like writing letters and reading anything I can lay my hands on!
▪ Kabari women use whatever birth control technology they can lay their hands on.
▪ Looters carried clothes out of shop windows along with anything else they could lay their hands on.
▪ Monday I felt driven to eat everything I could lay my hands on.
▪ Some one had to overturn the present political arrangements in the Limousin if he was ever to lay his hands on Hautefort.
lay/provide the foundation(s) for sth
▪ Tests on healthy people may lay the foundation for a vaccine to prevent AIDS.
▪ I think you have to lay the foundation for your success in terms of defense and rebounding.
▪ It laid the foundation for an organisation with greater appeal to the deaf themselves, particularly the young.
▪ These arguments provide the foundation for Simmel's account of the contradictory nature of modern life.
▪ This theory also laid the foundation for the modern revolution in our understanding of the deepest parts of the earth.
▪ To generate fundamental knowledge that can lay the foundation for future advances in high-performance computing and communications.
▪ We could say that she is laying the foundations for dressing herself later on.
▪ What is stressed rather is that the same phenomenon provides the foundation for both historical tendencies.
▪ While incomplete, the steps that were taken laid the foundation for Workplace 2000.
lay/put sth to rest
▪ Many of the public's doubts have now been laid to rest.
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ I think this definitely puts it to rest.
▪ Kwasniewski has said he may dissolve parliament to put the issue to rest and call for new elections.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ The time has come to put this to rest.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
not lay a finger on sb
put/lay your cards on the table
▪ If they're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate, that's good.
▪ If we want to reach an agreement, we'll have to lay all our cards on the table.
▪ They're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate.
▪ Come on, you can lay your cards on the table in this house.
▪ The new rules appear to encourage parties to lay their cards on the table and facilitate early settlements.
put/lay/set down a marker
set/lay/clap eyes on sb/sth
▪ Bedford disliked Halsey the minute he set eyes on him.
▪ How could she possibly know, since he had not set eyes on the girl?
▪ I bonded on the second night I laid eyes on Hyakutake.
▪ Just hours earlier she had set eyes on the pretty two-year-old and sister Anna-Camilla, seven, for the first time.
▪ Never anywhere have I set eyes on such a one.
▪ No sooner did she set eyes on the gentleman than she recognised his pecuniary position to be merely temporary.
▪ The couple fell in love before they had even set eyes on each other during a six-month long distance courtship.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a lay minister
▪ To the lay observer, these technical terms are incomprehensible.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A non-conformist lay preacher, he fought the November byelection.
▪ At the same time, Louis summoned a series of assemblies involving both bishops and lay nobles.
▪ In contrast, many elders - leading lay people - are politically more conservative.
▪ On the other hand, there is the lay congregation, to whom biblical scholarship is totally unknown territory.
▪ The churches were bereft of most of their clergy and many of their most able lay members.
▪ The worship incorporates dreams, healing, trances, and a high degree of lay participation.
▪ With his dark good looks and meticulous personal style, he made a lasting, if rather forbidding impression on lay people.
IV.noun
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
kill the goose that lays the golden egg
▪ High taxes kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.
lay it on with a trowel
lay siege to sb/sth
▪ After his victory Edward rallied his troops and marched north to lay siege to Calais.
▪ Almost ten years had passed since they had first laid siege to the town, and it seemed as strong as ever.
▪ He laid siege to the fortress and gradually weakened it to the point of collapse.
▪ In 476 they laid siege to Eion, which guarded the Strymon bridge.
▪ In June 1176 Richard laid siege to Limoges; after a few days resistance Aimar's citadel capitulated.
▪ In less than two generations, since the Second World War, they have laid siege to the academic world.
▪ She had laid siege to the typists' room for some minutes before Marshall had persuaded her downstairs.
lay sth bare
▪ The depth of the problem is laid bare in the fact that 40% of 18- to 25- year-olds are unemployed.
▪ The excavation laid bare the streets of the ancient city.
lay your hands on sth
▪ Government reports, social legislation, anything she could lay her hands on that would better acquaint her with her work.
▪ He will sell anything he can lay his hands on in exchange for drugs, which includes any information he may have.
▪ I know exactly where to lay my hands on them.
▪ I like writing letters and reading anything I can lay my hands on!
▪ Kabari women use whatever birth control technology they can lay their hands on.
▪ Looters carried clothes out of shop windows along with anything else they could lay their hands on.
▪ Monday I felt driven to eat everything I could lay my hands on.
▪ Some one had to overturn the present political arrangements in the Limousin if he was ever to lay his hands on Hautefort.
lay/provide the foundation(s) for sth
▪ Tests on healthy people may lay the foundation for a vaccine to prevent AIDS.
▪ I think you have to lay the foundation for your success in terms of defense and rebounding.
▪ It laid the foundation for an organisation with greater appeal to the deaf themselves, particularly the young.
▪ These arguments provide the foundation for Simmel's account of the contradictory nature of modern life.
▪ This theory also laid the foundation for the modern revolution in our understanding of the deepest parts of the earth.
▪ To generate fundamental knowledge that can lay the foundation for future advances in high-performance computing and communications.
▪ We could say that she is laying the foundations for dressing herself later on.
▪ What is stressed rather is that the same phenomenon provides the foundation for both historical tendencies.
▪ While incomplete, the steps that were taken laid the foundation for Workplace 2000.
lay/put sth to rest
▪ Many of the public's doubts have now been laid to rest.
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ I think this definitely puts it to rest.
▪ Kwasniewski has said he may dissolve parliament to put the issue to rest and call for new elections.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ The time has come to put this to rest.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
new-made/new-formed/new-laid etc
put/lay your cards on the table
▪ If they're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate, that's good.
▪ If we want to reach an agreement, we'll have to lay all our cards on the table.
▪ They're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate.
▪ Come on, you can lay your cards on the table in this house.
▪ The new rules appear to encourage parties to lay their cards on the table and facilitate early settlements.
put/lay/set down a marker
set/lay/clap eyes on sb/sth
▪ Bedford disliked Halsey the minute he set eyes on him.
▪ How could she possibly know, since he had not set eyes on the girl?
▪ I bonded on the second night I laid eyes on Hyakutake.
▪ Just hours earlier she had set eyes on the pretty two-year-old and sister Anna-Camilla, seven, for the first time.
▪ Never anywhere have I set eyes on such a one.
▪ No sooner did she set eyes on the gentleman than she recognised his pecuniary position to be merely temporary.
▪ The couple fell in love before they had even set eyes on each other during a six-month long distance courtship.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And the great lays - you can learn them, meantime.
▪ Failure to recognise slopes until committed to landing Make a point of looking for the lay of the surrounding countryside.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
lay

Lathe \Lathe\ (l[=a][th]), n. [OE. lathe a granary; akin to G. lade a chest, Icel. hla[eth]a a storehouse, barn; but cf. also Icel. l["o][eth] a smith's lathe. Senses 2 and 3 are perh. of the same origin as lathe a granary, the original meaning being, a frame to hold something. If so, the word is from an older form of E. lade to load. See Lade to load.]

  1. A granary; a barn. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

  2. (Mach.) A machine for turning, that is, for shaping articles of wood, metal, or other material, by causing them to revolve while acted upon by a cutting tool.

  3. The movable swing frame of a loom, carrying the reed for separating the warp threads and beating up the weft; -- called also lay and batten.

    Blanchard lathe, a lathe for turning irregular forms after a given pattern, as lasts, gunstocks, and the like.

    Drill lathe, or Speed lathe, a small lathe which, from its high speed, is adapted for drilling; a hand lathe.

    Engine lathe, a turning lathe in which the cutting tool has an automatic feed; -- used chiefly for turning and boring metals, cutting screws, etc.

    Foot lathe, a lathe which is driven by a treadle worked by the foot.

    Geometric lathe. See under Geometric

    Hand lathe, a lathe operated by hand; a power turning lathe without an automatic feed for the tool.

    Slide lathe, an engine lathe.

    Throw lathe, a small lathe worked by one hand, while the cutting tool is held in the other.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
lay

Old English lecgan "to place on the ground (or other surface)," also "put down (often by striking)," from Proto-Germanic *lagjan (cognates: Old Saxon leggian, Old Norse leggja, Old Frisian ledza, Middle Dutch legghan, Dutch leggen, Old High German lecken, German legen, Gothic lagjan "to lay, put, place"), causative of lie (v.2). As a noun, from 1550s, "act of laying." Meaning "way in which something is laid" (as in lay of the land) first recorded 1819.\n

\nMeaning "have sex with" first recorded 1934, in U.S. slang, probably from sense of "deposit" (which was in Old English, as in lay an egg, lay a bet, etc.), perhaps reinforced by to lie with, a phrase frequently met in the Bible. The noun meaning "woman available for sexual intercourse" is attested from 1930, but there are suggestions of it in stage puns from as far back as 1767. To lay for (someone) "await a chance at revenge" is from late 15c.; lay low "stay inconspicuous" is from 1839. To lay (someone) low preserves the secondary Old English sense.

lay

"uneducated; non-clerical," early 14c., from Old French lai "secular, not of the clergy" (Modern French laïque), from Late Latin laicus, from Greek laikos "of the people," from laos "people," of unknown origin. In Middle English, contrasted with learned, a sense revived 1810 for "non-expert."

lay

"short song," mid-13c., from Old French lai "song, lyric," of unknown origin, perhaps from Celtic (compare Irish laid "song, poem," Gaelic laoidh "poem, verse, play") because the earliest verses so called were Arthurian ballads, but OED finds this "out of the question" and prefers a theory which traces it to a Germanic source, such as Old High German leich "play, melody, song."

Wiktionary
lay

Etymology 1 vb. (label en transitive) To place down in a position of rest, or in a horizontal position. Etymology 2

n. 1 Arrangement or relationship; layout. 2 A share of the profits in a business. 3 The direction a rope is twisted. 4 (context colloquial English) A casual sexual partner. 5 (context colloquial English) An act of sexual intercourse. 6 (context slang archaic English) A plan; a scheme. Etymology 3

n. A lake. Etymology 4

  1. Non-professional; not being a member of an organized institution. Etymology 5

    v

  2. 1 (en-simple pastlie) when pertaining to position. 2 (context proscribed English) To be in a horizontal position; to lie (from confusion with lie). Etymology 6

    n. A ballad or sung poem; a short poem or narrative, usually intended to be sung. Etymology 7

    n. (context obsolete English) A meadow; a le

    1. Etymology 8

      n. 1 (context obsolete English) A law. 2 (context obsolete English) An obligation; a vow. Etymology 9

      v

    2. (label en Judaism transitive) To don (gloss: put on) (tefillin (gloss phylactery phylacteries)).

WordNet
lay
  1. adj. concerning those not members of the clergy; "set his collar in laic rather than clerical position"; "the lay ministry"; "the choir sings both sacred and secular music" [syn: laic, secular]

  2. not of or from a profession; "a lay opinion as to the cause of the disease"

  3. [also: laid]

lay
  1. n. a narrative song with a recurrent refrain [syn: ballad]

  2. a narrative poem of popular origin [syn: ballad]

  3. [also: laid]

lay
  1. v. put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point" [syn: put, set, place, pose, position]

  2. put in a horizontal position; "lay the books on the table"; "lay the patient carefully onto the bed" [syn: put down, repose]

  3. prepare or position for action or operation; "lay a fire"; "lay the foundation for a new health care plan"

  4. lay eggs; "This hen doesn't lay"

  5. impose as a duty, burden, or punishment; "lay a responsibility on someone"

  6. [also: laid]

lie
  1. n. a statement that deviates from or perverts the truth [syn: prevarication]

  2. Norwegian diplomat who was the first Secretary General of the United Nations (1896-1968) [syn: Trygve Lie, Trygve Halvden Lie]

  3. position or manner in which something is situated

  4. [also: lying, lay, lain]

lay
  1. See lie

  2. [also: laid]

lie
  1. v. be located or situated somewhere; occupy a certain position

  2. be lying, be prostrate; be in a horizontal position; "The sick man lay in bed all day"; "the books are lying on the shelf" [ant: stand, sit]

  3. originate (in); "The problems dwell in the social injustices in this country" [syn: dwell, consist, belong, lie in]

  4. be and remain in a particular state or condition; "lie dormant"

  5. tell an untruth; pretend with intent to deceive; "Don't lie to your parents"; "She lied when she told me she was only 29"

  6. have a place in relation to something else; "The fate of Bosnia lies in the hands of the West"; "The responsibility rests with the Allies" [syn: rest]

  7. assume a reclining position; "lie down on the bed until you feel better" [syn: lie down] [ant: arise]

  8. [also: lying, lay, lain]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Lay

Lay may refer to:

Lay (river)

The Lay is a long river in the Vendée département, western France. Its source is at Saint-Pierre-du-Chemin. It flows generally southwest. It flows into the Bay of Biscay between La Faute-sur-Mer and L'Aiguillon-sur-Mer, northwest of La Rochelle.

Its main tributaries are the Yon and the Smagne.

Lay (surname)

Lay is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Alfred Morrison Lay (1836-1879), U.S. politician
  • Beirne Lay, Jr. (1909-1982), American author and World War II aviator
  • Benjamin Lay (1681-1760), English Quaker and abolitionist
  • Carol Lay (born 1952), American author
  • Cecil Howard Lay (1885–1956), English poet
  • Charles Downing Lay (1877–1956), American landscape architect
  • Donald P. Lay (1926–2007), American jurist
  • Elzy Lay (1868–1934), U.S. outlaw
  • George W. Lay (1798-1860), U.S. politician
  • George Tradescant Lay (c. 1800-1845), British naturalist, missionary and diplomat
  • Herman Lay (1909–1982), American businessman
  • Horatio Nelson Lay (1832–1898), British diplomat
  • Humberto Lay (born 25 September 1934), Peruvian evangelical pastor
  • Jeffrey Lay (born 1969), Canadian rower
  • John Louis Lay (1832–1899), American inventor
  • Josh Lay (born 1982), American football player
  • Kenneth Lay (1942–2006), U.S. businessman
  • Ken Lay (police officer) (born 1956), Australian police commissioner
  • Ko Lay (born 31 October 1931), Burmese politician
  • Oliver Ingraham Lay (1845-1890), American portrait painter.
  • Sam Lay (born 1935), American drummer and vocalist
  • Stan Lay (1906–2003), New Zealand track and field athlete
  • Susan Lay (born March 13, 1985), English actress, musician, and TV presenter
Lay (entertainer)

'''Zhang Yixing ''' (simplified Chinese: 张艺兴; born ), better known as Lay , is a Chinese singer, composer, author, dancer, and actor. He is a member and one of the main dancers of the South Korean-Chinese boy group Exo and its sub-unit Exo-M. He first became known after participating in the Chinese TV talent show Star Academy in 2005. In January 2015, Lay was ranked 5th on Baidu's "2014 Top 10 Most Popular Celebrities" list. In September 2015, he released his autobiography titled Standing Firm at 24, which broke several online book records. In July 2016, Lay was appointed by the Communist Youth League of China (CYLC) of Changsha as the publicity ambassador, the first celebrity to hold such title.

Usage examples of "lay".

He saw that the epicentre of Aberrancy always lay at the site of a Weaver monastery, and the monasteries were always built around the witchstones.

For the mind and the passion of Hitler - all the aberrations that possessed his feverish brain - had roots that lay deep in German experience and thought.

I will not wear thy soul with words about my grief and sorrow: but it is to be told that I sat now in a perilous place, and yet I might not step down from it and abide in that land, for then it was a sure thing, that some of my foes would have laid hand on me and brought me to judgment for being but myself, and I should have ended miserably.

Our bargain was for three nights, and for three nights I lay with him, for I do not abjure my promise.

She whirled, her right hand raised, but before she could use the controlling ring she lay sprawled on the floor, one side of her face ablaze from the blow of a phantom hand.

Kingsley looked out over the flower beds that, still abloom in spite of the lateness of the season, lay before Aylesberg Hall.

In many of his contemporaries also much the same fluctuation of mood was occurring, and to them as to Paul it seemed that the issue lay between the old faith, however modernized, and the complete abnegation of human dignity.

But no human being loved the aborigines more, nor stood ready to lay down her life for them if it were necessary.

This building abuts on the water, and there, in the clear depth, they could see big, blue sharks laying for the offal that is thrown from the slaughter house.

Fernbrake Lake, one of the four magical lakes in Achar, lay deep in the Bracken Ranges far to the south of the Avarinheim, and the Avar people had to travel secretly through the hostile Skarabost Plains to reach the lake they called the Mother.

And in that acoustically superb vaulted church -- cornerstone laid on March 28, 1343 -- a fat boy, supported by the main organ and the echo organ, sings a slender Credo.

He had ridden out with her once in the first week, and seemed to take pride in showing her the acreage belonging to the plantation, the fields in cane and food crops, the lay of the lands along the river.

On the fifth day the line of demarcation extended to the spine of the scapula, laying bare the bone and exposing the acromion process and involving the pectoral muscles.

He was a worthy man, fond of pleasure, a thorough-paced Epicurean, and had married an actress named Cochois, who had proved worthy of the honour he had laid on her.

Gromph saw that the dead ogres and their battering ram, which he had seen while scrying the House, no longer lay before the adamantine doors.