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Crossword clues for foot

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
foot
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
100 feet/30 metres etc high
▪ waves up to 40 metres high
▪ a ten-foot high statue
3 feet/1 cm/two inches etc thick
▪ The walls are about two meters thick.
5 metres/3 feet etc in breadth
▪ The boat measured 15 feet in length and 4 feet in breadth.
a height of 2,500 feet/10,000 metres etc
▪ The aircraft was flying at a height of 10,000 metres.
a height of six feet/ten metres etc
▪ Sunflowers can grow to a height of 15 feet.
a metre/foot etc in depth (=deep)
▪ a channel of two feet in depth
athlete's foot
body/shoulder/foot etc massage
▪ A full-body massage lasts around one hour.
club foot
crow's feet
every few feet/ten yards etc
▪ There were traffic lights every ten yards.
five miles/ten feet etc away
▪ Geneva is about 20 miles away.
flat feet
fleet of foot (=able to run quickly)
▪ Atalanta was fleet of foot .
foot and mouth disease
foot fault
foot locker
foot passengers (=passengers on a boat, who are not in a car or other vehicle)
▪ A queue of foot passengers was waiting to get on the ferry.
foot the bill/pick up the bill (=pay for something, especially when you do not want to)
▪ Taxpayers will probably have to foot the bill.
goofy footed
got to...feet (=stood up)
▪ Peter got to his feet.
grow to/reach a length of 2 metres/8 feet etc
▪ A blue whale can reach a length of 100 feet.
hand/foot pump (=operated by your hand or foot)
have a length of 1 metre/2 feet etc
▪ These leaves have a length of about 7 cm.
hind legs/feet/quarters/limbs
itchy feet (=the desire to go somewhere new)
▪ I’ve only been back home for a few months and I’ve already got itchy feet .
jumped to...feet
▪ She jumped to her feet and left.
leapt to...feet (=stood up quickly)
▪ She leapt to her feet and started shouting.
quick on...feet (=able to move about quickly)
▪ Boxers have to be quick on their feet.
regular footed
rushed off...feet (=extremely busy)
▪ I’ve been rushed off my feet all day.
scrambled to...feet (=stood up very quickly and awkwardly)
▪ Micky scrambled to his feet and hurried into the kitchen.
several inches/feet of snow
▪ More than eight inches of snow fell in 48 hours.
shaky on...feet (=not able to walk very well)
▪ Grandad was a little shaky on his feet.
six feet/ten metres etc in height
▪ None of these sculptures was less than three metres in height.
soles of...feet
▪ The soles of his feet were caked in mud.
sprang to his feet (=stood up suddenly)
▪ He sprang to his feet and rushed after her.
stamped...foot (=because he was angry)
▪ ‘I will not!’ Bert yelled and stamped his foot.
stamping...feet (=because she was cold)
▪ She stood at the bus stop stamping her feet.
ten feet/five metres etc across
▪ The river is 2 kilometres across.
the bottom/foot of a hill
▪ The house was at the bottom of a hill.
the bottom/foot of the page
▪ See the note at the bottom of page 38.
the bottom/foot of the stairs
▪ ‘Lisa,’ he cried from the foot of the stairs.
the foot brake (=one you apply with your foot, to slow the car down)
▪ He stamped on the foot brake.
the foot of a ladder (=the bottom of a ladder)
▪ Zach waited at the foot of the ladder while Sam climbed up.
the foot of a mountain (=the bottom of a mountain)
▪ We’ll take the car to the foot of the mountain and walk from there.
the foot/head of the bed (=the bottom/top of the bed)
▪ I woke up to find someone standing at the foot of the bed.
three feet/two metres etc in width
▪ It’s about six metres in width.
tie sb’s hands/arms/legs/feet
▪ One of them tied her hands behind her back.
two miles/six feet etc apart
▪ Place the two posts 6 metres apart.
unsteady on her feet (=she might fall over)
▪ She was quite unsteady on her feet.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bare
▪ Remember to adjust the straps at the beginning and the end of the season to accommodate either bare feet or boots.
▪ Wear your city brogues with bare feet and people will think you mugged some one for them.
▪ Beloved put her fists on her hips and commenced to skip on bare feet.
▪ Jack had kicked off his shoe beneath the table and as they ate his bare foot had lain between Polly's legs.
▪ She went over to the fire and squatted down beside the twins, warming her hands and bare feet.
▪ All the small buttocks somehow showed and, below that, the small muscled legs and tapering bare feet.
cold
▪ Unfortunately he, the lover, had got cold feet at the last minute.
▪ While Amelia is out dating, Laura is beset with a severe case of cold feet.
▪ Some are said to be getting cold feet.
▪ Juicy, tender and sinfully rich, I immodestly enjoyed every one when my companion got cold feet.
▪ He gets cold feet and phones his bank manager asking him to stop the cheque.
▪ Ringing in ears. Cold hands or feet.
▪ Two weeks ago he was forced out of a reserve match complaining of cold feet.
▪ He and his neighbors bought a fire truck to protect their area, but the neighbors got cold feet.
cubic
▪ The discovery well produced a prolific flow of 19.4 million cubic feet of gas from depths of almost 300 feet.
▪ On Friday, more than 60, 000 cubic feet came crashing down each second.
▪ The single four-barrel Holley carb can gulp down a staggering 750 cubic feet of air every minute at full throttle.
▪ It offers 118 cubic feet of cargo space, or five times the trunk space of a Buick Regal.
▪ All the pallets were of a standard size which Bob guessed to be about four feet square, about sixty-four cubic feet.
▪ It delivers about 700 million cubic feet of gas per day.
▪ Oil equivalent figures referred to in this document are based on 6,000 cubic feet of gas equalling one barrel of oil equivalent.
▪ Each pad, about a square inch, treats half a cubic foot.
left
▪ As she did so, a rusty trap sprang shut, clamping her left foot.
▪ With his left foot just outside the 3-point arc and 2. 0 seconds left, Edney dribbles for the final time.
▪ At this point the student should be supporting himself on his hands and the ball of his left foot.
▪ Turn the other way and put your left foot and left shoulder against the wall.
▪ Stanley Gascgoine, a green marvel with a two-pronged attack, left foot, right foot or head.
▪ The Bulls' forward has been suffering from a soft tissue injury on the bottom of his left foot.
▪ Blood was spouting from cuts on my right hand, and my left foot ached a bit and felt strange - no more.
▪ In 1990, the year they wed, Valerie had her left foot fused.
right
▪ His eyes were riveted to the overhead screen while the heel of his right foot tapped nervously on the floor.
▪ People said black dancers don't have the right body, the right feet.
▪ Hanging off the bottom stair; her right foot suspended above the floor.
▪ To ensure good luck, your daughter should leave home by the front door, stepping out with her right foot first.
▪ The fracture to her right foot seems to be less serious than she thought when she pulled out last month.
▪ The simplest way to pass the bulge is to kick your right foot up the wall behind you.
▪ The baby grasped her right foot in her left hand and in her excitement dropped her bottle.
square
▪ The area covered is 270,000 square feet of which the immense central hall occupied 79 feet by 183 feet.
▪ When Bill and Melanie Parsons began designing their house, they figured they had 2, 200 square feet to play with.
▪ This 64,000 square foot office block went for £3m.
▪ The three-bedroom home is about 2, 500 square feet.
▪ Plants 20 small plants per square foot looks densely planted.
▪ Its tallest building is 14 stories, while the two largest have nearly 500, 000 square feet each.
▪ Though there was no sail, there were thirteen square feet of cross-section for the wind to catch.
▪ From about $ 9 or $ 10 a square foot to $ 12 to $ 14, according to Hanhan.
■ NOUN
soldier
▪ The foot soldiers, however, did not benefit from looted oriental mail, or from the Western revolution in home manufacture.
▪ Could politics function effectively if there were no foot soldiers? 3.
▪ Barbarossa's foot soldiers were often still attired like this eleventh-century warrior.
▪ In such cases, the environment provides foot soldiers with confusing signals regarding the acceptable level and forms of political activism.
▪ The Jacobites, with 800 horse and 6300 infantry, easily outnumbered Argyll's 960 dragoons and 2200 foot soldiers.
▪ Hers was the record of, at best, a foot soldier in the feminist and abolitionist struggles of her day.
▪ Dreben says that he never talks about his experiences as a foot soldier, but they were certainly horrific.
▪ It is important to emphasize any explanation of the foot soldiers is highly contingent upon the environment in which they are operating.
■ VERB
drag
▪ Mr de Klerk's people say the Congress is dragging its feet because it is too disorganised to talk.
▪ Was it because he feared the Republicans were going to hammer him in the 1996 election for dragging his feet on enlargement?
▪ Her body was dragged over 70 feet on the front and underside of the car.
▪ On the other hand, the agency has been dragging its feet all the way in making the endangered determination.
▪ He is a middle-aged man who drags his feet as he walks.
▪ Despite the hoopla, the Admiralty dragged its feet for a year in arranging the formal trial.
▪ Kaas leant forward and dragged Adam to his feet as he yelled for the guards to come in and help him.
▪ Kennecott had been dragging its feet.
fall
▪ He fell five hundred feet from a New York apartment window last year.
▪ Small birds fell at my feet wherever, in my clumsy fashion, I trod.
▪ Abruptly the ground fell away from our feet, an awesome void opened before us.
▪ She unbuttoned her dress and let it fall around her feet.
▪ She watched it slip and slide this way and that to fall at her feet.
▪ We push ourselves higher and higher into the air and our shoes fall from our feet on to the concrete below us.
▪ If a stanza from Sappho, for instance, were to fall on your foot, it might hurt.
jump
▪ Shiona jumped to her feet, the adrenalin racing through her.
▪ Monday decided to jump in with both feet.
▪ He jumped to his feet, screeching, when Delia Sutherland's shadow fell across him.
▪ The governor jumped to his feet.
▪ Then she jumped to her feet and smoothed down the quilt.
▪ Time after time, Republicans jumped to their feet to join Democrats in applauding the president.
▪ So we don't jump in with both feet.
land
▪ However he landed on his feet.
▪ This is a company that tends to land on its feet.
▪ I landed near the feet of a huge policeman.
▪ Even in an industry that shrinks faster than microwave bacon, the good people landed on their feet.
▪ Whitlock clambered over the fence and landed nimbly on his feet.
▪ A couple virtually flew off, landing several feet away.
▪ She clasped it, landing at the foot of the dune with her face in the wet grass.
▪ Cliff plunge A man fell from a clifftop at Brighton early yesterday and landed only feet in front of a jogger on a path.
leap
▪ Sometimes one of them would leap to his feet and dance a jig before falling over.
▪ Laura leapt to her feet, a sign that she was about to deliver her own speech.
▪ David Laing had leapt to his feet again, spraying his neighbours with cold coffee.
▪ As she moved closer to him on the sofa, he leapt to his feet and began pacing the floor.
▪ He leapt to his feet, took Talbot's hand, and shook it vigorously.
▪ Now they leap to their feet as he runs in.
▪ Flames leapt hundreds of feet high, illuminating the jagged edges of the blocks.
▪ Duvall lashed backwards, but Jimmy had leapt to his feet, colliding with one of the hessian screens.
rise
▪ There was a heavy spate a week or two later and the river rose a good five feet higher than normal.
▪ Kay McGovern rose to his feet, cheering appreciatively when the performance ended.
▪ White-faced, too shocked for tears, she rose slowly to her feet.
▪ All at once Jeanne rose to her feet, and Ellen felt herself suddenly go on a physical alert.
▪ Maggie rose to her feet, and looked out of her window.
▪ The cars turned toward the Alabama Hills, a small range of barren rises at the foot of the Sierra escarpment.
▪ Near Wolfstein the roads run along a valley floor, the hills on either side rising to above 1,000 feet.
▪ The helicopter rose six feet into the air, tilted forward to gain airspeed, and buried its nose-wheel in the ground.
scramble
▪ He scrambled to his feet and charged full tilt down the side of the dell.
▪ He flushed, trying to scramble to his feet again.
▪ Gripping the butt of the revolver, he scrambled to his feet and pushed himself forward.
▪ He scrambled to his feet, knuckling sleep from his eyes with both fists.
▪ I scrambled to my feet a little sheepishly as one of the Officers had turned round and was observing me as I approached.
▪ As soon as the shooting stopped, he and his friends scrambled to their feet.
set
▪ Q I have recently set up a four foot tank which I furnished with rocks, caves and bogwood.
▪ Not a man sets foot on her till I have a signed waiver clearing me.
▪ Large tank required I am going to set up a two foot tank.
▪ After she sued, Harvard said it would file criminal trespass charges against Garzilli if she sets foot in the department.
▪ He seemed kind, too, putting out a hand to set her on her feet again.
▪ Streetsmart in Jersey City, many have never set foot in the big town across the Hudson.
▪ She had set foot in Skipton and passed through Keighley, but these were small country towns.
▪ Uninvited people were barred from even setting foot on the wide and well-tended road leading to his Pyongyang residence.
shoot
▪ This is another classic example of our ability to shoot ourselves in the feet.
▪ So they shot themselves in the foot.
▪ A classic case of shooting ourselves in the foot, the chairman, Sir Alan Cockshaw, admitted ruefully yesterday.
▪ But at the end of the day, they could end up shooting themselves in the foot.
▪ The only real hospital case was a travelling salesman who had been shot through the foot.
▪ Conceptually, the worst crime committed here is that the story shoots itself in the foot by making the political too personal.
▪ Yet when Labour's prospects are rosiest, it always seems to shoot itself in the foot.
▪ Red Death shot from your feet, fouling the air with its stench of rotting meat and rat feces.
shuffle
▪ She looked down and shuffled her feet inanely.
▪ So I breathe out long and slowly, and I shuffle my feet.
▪ Standing at the kitchen counter, shuffling his feet to the music, he caught himself smiling from ear to ear.
▪ Archie shuffled his feet and looked as if he'd like to vanish up his parlour chimney.
▪ People cease to cough or sniff or shuffle their feet.
▪ Des shuffles his feet, like he's just the driver and didn't oughta be around.
▪ The only sound was the occasional shuffling of feet as they unstuck their warmed-up rubber boots from the lino.
spring
▪ He rolled, sprang on to his feet, and started to wash himself.
▪ He wanted to walk on his land, to feel it springing under his feet even after only three days away.
▪ As Liz sprang to her feet, the house seemed to darken about her.
▪ Suddenly, Boz sprang to his feet and strode towards the group outside the caravan, his face screwed up in fury.
▪ Fedorov writhed from his attacker's grip and sprang to his feet.
▪ Both men sprang to their feet.
▪ Viol sprang to his feet, politely drawing back to allow his superior to precede him.
▪ District councillor S. Carmedy immediately sprang to his feet and proclaimed that what I had said was untrue.
stamp
▪ The guards who waited below them stamped their feet, beat down the snow beneath their boots.
▪ It stamped a foot and snorted briskly.
▪ He stamped his foot and looked around him like he was lost and might break out crying any minute.
▪ I stamp my feet to warm them up.
▪ One cradled a paper cup of coffee in both hands, stamping his feet as if it was cold.
▪ I stamped my feet on the cobbles as a sign that I was freezing.
▪ They stamped their feet for hello, and the ladies stamped back, Hello!
stand
▪ A pity so many kamikaze spectators chose to stand in the four foot to watch it go by.
▪ She could hardly stand with her feet abreast.
▪ Accordingly it stood five feet high, surrounded by a low rail and of course covered with straw.
▪ A faded yellow skip stood a couple of feet from the door, well within diving distance.
▪ In the first one, the person stood with her feet against the wall.
▪ Chopra stood unsteadily on his feet.
▪ On March 23, 1935, it stood 726 feet and 5 inches tall.
tap
▪ He tapped his feet to the music.
▪ Clanahan, also listening in, tapped his foot.
▪ The orchestra was playing a polka and the audience tapped their feet in time to the rhythm.
▪ He taps his foot, sets his hands on his hips and looks angrily down at the floor.
▪ He was tapping his foot impatiently, picking imaginary specks of lint from the sleeve of his coat.
▪ I look up at the ceiling and tap my foot when my father and I argue, and this makes him furious.
▪ After a short time had passed he began to tap his foot on the kerb impatiently.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
as little as £5/3 months/10 feet etc
be light on your feet
cut the ground from under sb's feet
drag your feet/heels
▪ And don't drag your feet.
▪ Elsewhere they dragged their feet until it became clear that the laws were unenforceable.
▪ Mr de Klerk's people say the Congress is dragging its feet because it is too disorganised to talk.
▪ On the other hand, the agency has been dragging its feet all the way in making the endangered determination.
▪ On this occasion, their leaders have dragged their heels at every stage, without giving any of the ideas a chance.
▪ The council was informed about the anniversary two years ago but has dragged its heels over putting it on any agenda.
▪ They thus exhibit a strong tendency to drag their feet as doomsday draws nearer.
▪ Was it because he feared the Republicans were going to hammer him in the 1996 election for dragging his feet on enlargement?
find your feet
▪ I asked Susie if I could stay with her till I found my feet.
▪ Susie said I could stay at her place for a while, just until I found my feet.
▪ This organization's role is to help refugees find their feet when they arrive in the host country.
▪ But Cambridge found their feet and took an audacious lead.
▪ If this means raising their chair, workers may find their feet are dangling.
▪ It yielded after causing only moderate cranial discomfort, but as it did I found my feet caught up in something.
▪ Lord Airlie also went out of his way to help me find my feet.
▪ New democracies have been born, struggling against appalling odds to find their feet, with hyper-inflation and national rivalries.
▪ New teachers in their first year or so are still very much in the process of finding their feet.
▪ We have to help them find their feet.
five feet/two metres etc square
get off on the wrong foot
▪ We just got off on the wrong foot the other day.
▪ Unfortunately, Pope got off on the wrong foot with his new troops.
▪ We got off on the wrong foot the other day and it was my fault.
get/have cold feet
▪ They later got cold feet and canceled the order.
▪ But the prince got cold feet and failed to turn up.
▪ He and his neighbors bought a fire truck to protect their area, but the neighbors got cold feet.
▪ He gets cold feet and phones his bank manager asking him to stop the cheque.
▪ I began to get cold feet, but these other two guys were totally positive and they were absolutely right.
▪ Juicy, tender and sinfully rich, I immodestly enjoyed every one when my companion got cold feet.
▪ Some are said to be getting cold feet.
▪ Unfortunately he, the lover, had got cold feet at the last minute.
▪ We are all tired, and have cold feet and hands.
have a sure hold/footing
have the world at your feet
have two left feet
in your stockinged/stocking feet
▪ It would be too bad if the Panzers overran our positions and we were found to be in our stocking feet.
land on your feet
▪ Capra lost his job, but landed on his feet when Columbia Pictures hired him.
▪ After some ups and downs, young Mr Davison has landed on his feet.
▪ Even in an industry that shrinks faster than microwave bacon, the good people landed on their feet.
▪ He pushed the floor, and flipped over in the air, landing on his feet.
▪ However he landed on his feet.
▪ This is a company that tends to land on its feet.
not let the grass grow under your feet
on equal terms/on an equal footing
pick your feet up
▪ Ronnie, stop shuffling and pick your feet up.
pull the rug (out) from under sb/sb's feet
pull yourself up/to your feet etc
▪ Behind Duvall, Jimmy could see that Barbara was pulling herself to her feet.
▪ Granny pulled herself to her feet and tottered over to the bench, where Hodgesaargh had left his jar of flame.
▪ On March 4 she caught hold of the end of her buggy and twice pulled herself to her feet.
▪ Weary now that the excitement of the film was no longer sweeping her along, she pulled herself to her feet.
▪ Whitlock pulled himself to his feet and winced as a sharp pain shot through his left leg.
put your hand/foot/arm out
▪ Everyone puts his hand out, from cabinet ministers to loan underwriters.
▪ He put his hand out and there was Lily, quiet and warm beside him.
▪ He put his hand out, touching his father's cheek.
▪ Minna put her hands out and I handed her the divorce.
▪ She tottered, and put her arms out.
▪ Vern put his hand out this time.
▪ When she put her hand out, trying to rise, she skittled a row of bottles.
rest your feet/legs/eyes etc
▪ Fit in periods away from people, giving yourself the opportunity to renew your energy and rest your eyes.
▪ He rested his eyes on her, very conscious of the smooth skin and her flowery perfume.
▪ I took off my shoes and rested my feet on her thighs as she massaged them.
▪ In fact I was having trouble finding a place to rest my eyes.
▪ Should children with defective vision be resting their eyes?
▪ Slinging his mac over the back of a pew he sat down and rested his feet on the one in front.
scuff your feet/heels
shoot yourself in the foot
▪ If we just let him keep talking, pretty soon he's going to shoot himself in the foot.
▪ Once again, the government has shot itself in the foot -- this time by reducing widows' pensions.
▪ A classic case of shooting ourselves in the foot, the chairman, Sir Alan Cockshaw, admitted ruefully yesterday.
▪ But at the end of the day, they could end up shooting themselves in the foot.
▪ Conceptually, the worst crime committed here is that the story shoots itself in the foot by making the political too personal.
▪ He certainly shot himself in the foot, pulling out of Glastonbury and playing Finsbury Park.
▪ Men shot themselves in the foot, like in wartime.
▪ So they shot themselves in the foot.
▪ This is another classic example of our ability to shoot ourselves in the feet.
▪ Yet when Labour's prospects are rosiest, it always seems to shoot itself in the foot.
shuffle your feet
▪ Monica shuffled her feet nervously and stared at the floor.
▪ Archie shuffled his feet and looked as if he'd like to vanish up his parlour chimney.
▪ Des shuffles his feet, like he's just the driver and didn't oughta be around.
▪ People cease to cough or sniff or shuffle their feet.
▪ She looked down and shuffled her feet inanely.
▪ So I breathe out long and slowly, and I shuffle my feet.
▪ Standing at the kitchen counter, shuffling his feet to the music, he caught himself smiling from ear to ear.
▪ This only discomfited the coroner further, he stared down at the floor and shuffled his feet like some clumsy schoolboy.
stand on your own (two) feet
▪ Able to stand on her own feet.
▪ I guess I shall have to learn to stand on my own feet.
▪ Out-and-out competitive in the world market standing on our own feet?
▪ She's very kind, but we ought to stand on our own feet.
▪ She, who'd always stood on her own feet, fought her own battles.
▪ Such beliefs are able to stand on their own feet, without support from others.
▪ Using the market price means that each division must stand on its own feet, as though it were an independent company.
sweep sb off their feet
▪ Donald absolutely swept me off my feet.
▪ She's just waiting to be swept off her feet by a handsome stranger.
▪ Then Peter came into my life and swept me off my feet.
take the weight off your feet
▪ Come in, take the weight off your feet.
▪ Make the bed - then you can lie down and take the weight off your feet while we talk.
the ball of the foot/hand
▪ Calluses grow on the ball of the foot and do not have a nucleus.
▪ However, I would suggest that you subsequently attack employing the ball of the foot rather than the injured instep.
▪ Raise your back heel and rest your weight on the ball of the foot.
▪ The heel of your leading foot should touch the ground, just before the ball of the foot and toes.
▪ The jumping turning kick: strike with the ball of the foot, keeping the back leg tucked up.
the boot is on the other foot
the patter of tiny feet
▪ Are we going to hear the patter of tiny feet?
the tramp of feet/boots
▪ She glanced through the open gateway, her attention caught by the tramp of boots.
think on your feet
▪ He can think on his feet quicker than anyone I've ever met.
▪ I've always been good at thinking on my feet.
▪ Industry today needs workers who can think on their feet and relearn their jobs constantly.
▪ She clasped them and tried to think on her feet.
▪ She had to use a lot of initiative and think on her feet.
▪ Stay alert and think on your feet.
▪ Their ability to think on their feet impressed the boss.
▪ This will probably be to see if you can think on your feet and react well under stress.
▪ You must not be afraid of thinking on your feet and adding good ideas that occur to you as you speak.
tie/bind sb hand and foot
▪ We're bound hand and foot by all these safety regulations.
▪ Then, before she realised what was happening, he fastened her in the double stirrups, binding her hands and feet.
vote with your feet
▪ Women are voting with their feet and leaving the party in large numbers.
▪ If not, they will vote with their feet when they are old enough to do so.
▪ Perhaps it is not surprising that many younger doctors are voting with their feet.
▪ The Derbyshire Times noted that defiant parents were voting with their feet by keeping children away from school.
wait on sb hand and foot
▪ Oliver expects us to wait on him hand and foot.
walk sb off their feet
within two feet/ten years etc either way
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a two-foot-long board
▪ He's six feet tall, with blonde hair and a mustache.
▪ Is Daddy tickling your feet, Lisa?
▪ My foot hurts.
▪ There's a run in the foot of my nylons.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And there was sand beneath my feet.
▪ Fat ewes topped at £49 and ewes with lambs at foot £68.50.
▪ It was always worse going down, and spiral stairs were the very devil in the dark if you had big feet.
▪ She crossed backwards, blindfolded, wearing peach baskets on her feet.
▪ We fell asleep listening to the surf chisel away at the foot of the cliff below.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
bill
▪ Actually, once the fund has footed a bill, it has in the past successfully pursued a polluter through the courts.
▪ Individuals in dysfunctional environments often be-come dysfunctional in other aspects of their lives, with their organizations ultimately footing the bill.
▪ These two mindless cads decided to bring the girl along to the East and have her foot the bill.
▪ It follows talks with some of the unhappy policyholders without guaranteed annuities who will have to foot some of the bill.
▪ The National Science Foundation, which was footing the bill, decided to hire an independent contractor to complete the project.
▪ Gloucestershire County Council is footing the bill.
mouth
▪ Just footballers, that very peculiar animal much prone to foot in the mouth.
▪ But as we know, foot and mouth is fairly harmless, though highly contagious.
taxpayer
▪ If taxpayers footed the bill, those costs might well be higher.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
as little as £5/3 months/10 feet etc
be light on your feet
five feet/two metres etc square
get off on the wrong foot
▪ We just got off on the wrong foot the other day.
▪ Unfortunately, Pope got off on the wrong foot with his new troops.
▪ We got off on the wrong foot the other day and it was my fault.
get/have cold feet
▪ They later got cold feet and canceled the order.
▪ But the prince got cold feet and failed to turn up.
▪ He and his neighbors bought a fire truck to protect their area, but the neighbors got cold feet.
▪ He gets cold feet and phones his bank manager asking him to stop the cheque.
▪ I began to get cold feet, but these other two guys were totally positive and they were absolutely right.
▪ Juicy, tender and sinfully rich, I immodestly enjoyed every one when my companion got cold feet.
▪ Some are said to be getting cold feet.
▪ Unfortunately he, the lover, had got cold feet at the last minute.
▪ We are all tired, and have cold feet and hands.
have a sure hold/footing
have the world at your feet
have two left feet
in your stockinged/stocking feet
▪ It would be too bad if the Panzers overran our positions and we were found to be in our stocking feet.
not let the grass grow under your feet
on equal terms/on an equal footing
pull the rug (out) from under sb/sb's feet
take the weight off your feet
▪ Come in, take the weight off your feet.
▪ Make the bed - then you can lie down and take the weight off your feet while we talk.
the ball of the foot/hand
▪ Calluses grow on the ball of the foot and do not have a nucleus.
▪ However, I would suggest that you subsequently attack employing the ball of the foot rather than the injured instep.
▪ Raise your back heel and rest your weight on the ball of the foot.
▪ The heel of your leading foot should touch the ground, just before the ball of the foot and toes.
▪ The jumping turning kick: strike with the ball of the foot, keeping the back leg tucked up.
the boot is on the other foot
the patter of tiny feet
▪ Are we going to hear the patter of tiny feet?
the tramp of feet/boots
▪ She glanced through the open gateway, her attention caught by the tramp of boots.
tie/bind sb hand and foot
▪ We're bound hand and foot by all these safety regulations.
▪ Then, before she realised what was happening, he fastened her in the double stirrups, binding her hands and feet.
within two feet/ten years etc either way
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But, though local firms contributed, the public still footed much of the bill.
▪ The National Science Foundation, which was footing the bill, decided to hire an independent contractor to complete the project.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Foot

Foot \Foot\ (f[oo^]t), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Footed; p. pr. & vb. n. Footing.]

  1. To tread to measure or music; to dance; to trip; to skip.
    --Dryden.

  2. To walk; -- opposed to ride or fly.
    --Shak.

Foot

Foot \Foot\, v. t.

  1. To kick with the foot; to spurn.
    --Shak.

  2. To set on foot; to establish; to land. [Obs.]

    What confederacy have you with the traitors Late footed in the kingdom?
    --Shak.

  3. To tread; as, to foot the green.
    --Tickell.

  4. To sum up, as the numbers in a column; -- sometimes with up; as, to foot (or foot up) an account.

  5. To seize or strike with the talon. [Poet.]
    --Shak.

  6. To renew the foot of, as of a stocking.
    --Shak.

    To foot a bill, to pay it. [Colloq.] -- To foot it, to walk; also, to dance.

    If you are for a merry jaunt, I'll try, for once, who can foot it farthest.
    --Dryden.

Foot

Foot \Foot\ (f[oo^]t), n.; pl. Feet (f[=e]t). [OE. fot, foot, pl. fet, feet. AS. f[=o]t, pl. f[=e]t; akin to D. voet, OHG. fuoz, G. fuss, Icel. f[=o]tr, Sw. fot, Dan. fod, Goth. f[=o]tus, L. pes, Gr. poy`s, Skr. p[=a]d, Icel. fet step, pace measure of a foot, feta to step, find one's way. [root]77, 250. Cf. Antipodes, Cap-a-pie, Expedient, Fet to fetch, Fetlock, Fetter, Pawn a piece in chess, Pedal.]

  1. (Anat.) The terminal part of the leg of man or an animal; esp., the part below the ankle or wrist; that part of an animal upon which it rests when standing, or moves. See Manus, and Pes.

  2. (Zo["o]l.) The muscular locomotive organ of a mollusk. It is a median organ arising from the ventral region of body, often in the form of a flat disk, as in snails. See Illust. of Buccinum.

  3. That which corresponds to the foot of a man or animal; as, the foot of a table; the foot of a stocking.

  4. The lowest part or base; the ground part; the bottom, as of a mountain, column, or page; also, the last of a row or series; the end or extremity, esp. if associated with inferiority; as, the foot of a hill; the foot of the procession; the foot of a class; the foot of the bed;; the foot of the page.

    And now at foot Of heaven's ascent they lift their feet.
    --Milton.

  5. Fundamental principle; basis; plan; -- used only in the singular.

    Answer directly upon the foot of dry reason.
    --Berkeley.

  6. Recognized condition; rank; footing; -- used only in the singular. [R.]

    As to his being on the foot of a servant.
    --Walpole.

  7. A measure of length equivalent to twelve inches; one third of a yard. See Yard.

    Note: This measure is supposed to be taken from the length of a man's foot. It differs in length in different countries. In the United States and in England it is 304.8 millimeters.

  8. (Mil.) Soldiers who march and fight on foot; the infantry, usually designated as the foot, in distinction from the cavalry. ``Both horse and foot.''
    --Milton.

  9. (Pros.) A combination of syllables consisting a metrical element of a verse, the syllables being formerly distinguished by their quantity or length, but in modern poetry by the accent.

  10. (Naut.) The lower edge of a sail. Note: Foot is often used adjectively, signifying of or pertaining to a foot or the feet, or to the base or lower part. It is also much used as the first of compounds. Foot artillery. (Mil.)

    1. Artillery soldiers serving in foot.

    2. Heavy artillery. --Farrow. Foot bank (Fort.), a raised way within a parapet. Foot barracks (Mil.), barracks for infantery. Foot bellows, a bellows worked by a treadle. --Knight. Foot company (Mil.), a company of infantry. --Milton. Foot gear, covering for the feet, as stocking, shoes, or boots. Foot hammer (Mach.), a small tilt hammer moved by a treadle. Foot iron.

      1. The step of a carriage.

      2. A fetter. Foot jaw. (Zo["o]l.) See Maxilliped. Foot key (Mus.), an organ pedal. Foot level (Gunnery), a form of level used in giving any proposed angle of elevation to a piece of ordnance. --Farrow. Foot mantle, a long garment to protect the dress in riding; a riding skirt. [Obs.] Foot page, an errand boy; an attendant. [Obs.] Foot passenger, one who passes on foot, as over a road or bridge. Foot pavement, a paved way for foot passengers; a footway; a trottoir. Foot poet, an inferior poet; a poetaster. [R.] --Dryden. Foot post.

        1. A letter carrier who travels on foot.

        2. A mail delivery by means of such carriers. Fot pound, & Foot poundal. (Mech.) See Foot pound and Foot poundal, in the Vocabulary. Foot press (Mach.), a cutting, embossing, or printing press, moved by a treadle. Foot race, a race run by persons on foot. --Cowper. Foot rail, a railroad rail, with a wide flat flange on the lower side. Foot rot, an ulcer in the feet of sheep; claw sickness. Foot rule, a rule or measure twelve inches long. Foot screw, an adjusting screw which forms a foot, and serves to give a machine or table a level standing on an uneven place. Foot secretion. (Zo["o]l.) See Sclerobase. Foot soldier, a soldier who serves on foot. Foot stick (Printing), a beveled piece of furniture placed against the foot of the page, to hold the type in place. Foot stove, a small box, with an iron pan, to hold hot coals for warming the feet. Foot tubercle. (Zo["o]l.) See Parapodium. Foot valve (Steam Engine), the valve that opens to the air pump from the condenser. Foot vise, a kind of vise the jaws of which are operated by a treadle. Foot waling (Naut.), the inside planks or lining of a vessel over the floor timbers. --Totten. Foot wall (Mining), the under wall of an inclosed vein. By foot, or On foot, by walking; as, to pass a stream on foot. Cubic foot. See under Cubic. Foot and mouth disease, a contagious disease (Eczema epizo["o]tica) of cattle, sheep, swine, etc., characterized by the formation of vesicles and ulcers in the mouth and about the hoofs. Foot of the fine (Law), the concluding portion of an acknowledgment in court by which, formerly, the title of land was conveyed. See Fine of land, under Fine, n.; also Chirograph. (b). Square foot. See under Square. To be on foot, to be in motion, action, or process of execution. To keep the foot (Script.), to preserve decorum. ``Keep thy foot when thou goest to the house of God.'' --Eccl. v. 1. To put one's foot down, to take a resolute stand; to be determined. [Colloq.] To put the best foot foremost, to make a good appearance; to do one's best. [Colloq.] To set on foot, to put in motion; to originate; as, to set on foot a subscription. To put one on his feet, or set one on his feet, to put one in a position to go on; to assist to start. Under foot.

          1. Under the feet; (Fig.) at one's mercy; as, to trample under foot.
            --Gibbon.

          2. Below par. [Obs.] ``They would be forced to sell . . . far under foot.''
            --Bacon.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
foot

"terminal part of the leg of a vertebrate animal," Old English fot "foot," from Proto-Germanic *fot (cognates: Old Frisian fot, Old Saxon fot, Old Norse fotr, Danish fod, Swedish fot, Dutch voet, Old High German fuoz, German Fuß, Gothic fotus "foot"), from PIE *ped- (1) "a foot" (cognates: Avestan pad-; Sanskrit pad-, accusative padam "foot;" Greek pos, Attic pous, genitive podos; Latin pes, genitive pedis "foot;" Lithuanian padas "sole," peda "footstep"). Plural form feet is an instance of i-mutation.\n

\nThe linear measure was in Old English (the exact length has varied over time), this being considered the length of a man's foot; a unit of measure used widely and anciently. In this sense the plural is often foot. The current inch and foot are implied from measurements in 12c. English churches (Flinders Petrie, "Inductive Metrology"), but the most usual length of a "foot" in medieval England was the foot of 13.2 inches common throughout the ancient Mediterranean. The Anglo-Saxon foot apparently was between the two. All three correspond to units used by the Romans, and possibly all three lengths were picked up by the Anglo-Saxons from the Romano-Britons. "That the Saxon units should descend to mediæval times is most probable, as the Normans were a ruling, and not a working, class." [Flinders Petrie, 1877]. The medieval Paul's Foot (late 14c.) was a measuring standard cut into the base of a column at the old St. Paul's cathedral in London. The metrical foot (late Old English, translating Latin pes, Greek pous in the same sense) is commonly taken to represent one rise and one fall of a foot: keeping time according to some, dancing according to others.\n

\nIn Middle English also "a person" (c.1200), hence non-foot "nobody." Meaning "bottom or lowest part of anything eminent or upright" is from c.1200. Of a bed, grave, etc., from c.1300. On foot "by walking" is from c.1300. To get off on the wrong foot is from 1905 (the right foot is by 1907); to put one's best foot foremost first recorded 1849 (Shakespeare has the better foot before, 1596); Middle English had evil-foot (adv.) "through mischance, unluckily." To put one's foot in (one's) mouth "say something stupid" is attested by 1942; the expression put (one's) foot in something "make a mess of it" is from 1823. To have one foot in the grave "be near death" is from 1844. Colloquial exclamation my foot! expressing "contemptuous contradiction" [OED] is attested by 1923, probably euphemistic for my ass in the same sense, which dates to 1796 (also see eyewash).

foot

c.1400, "to dance," also "to move or travel on foot," from foot (n.). From mid-15c. as "make a footing or foundation." To foot a bill "pay the entirety of" is attested from 1848, from the process of tallying the expenses and writing the figure at the bottom ("foot") of the sheet; foot (v.) as "add up and set the sum at the foot of" is from late 15c. (compare footnote (n.)). The Old English verb gefotian meant "to hasten up." Related: Footed; footing.

Wiktionary
foot

n. 1 (context countable English) A biological structure found in many animals that is used for locomotion and that is frequently a separate organ at the terminal part of the leg. (jump body part t) 2 (context countable anatomy English) Specifically, a human foot, which is found below the ankle and is used for standing and walking. (jump human body part t) 3 (context uncountable often used attributively English) Travel by walking. (jump: walking) 4 (context countable English) The base or bottom of anything. (jump base t) 5 (context countable English) The part of a flat surface on which the feet customarily rest. 6 (context countable English) The end of a rectangular table opposite the head. (jump end of a table co) 7 (context countable English) A short foot-like projection on the bottom of an object to support it. (jump support t) 8 (context countable English) A unit of measure equal to twelve inches or one third of a yard, equal to exactly 30.48 centimetres. (jump unit of length u co) vb. 1 (context transitive English) To use the foot to kick (usually a ball). 2 (context transitive English) To pay (a bill). 3 To tread to measure or music; to dance; to trip; to skip. 4 To walk. 5 To tread. 6 (context obsolete English) To set on foot; to establish; to land. 7 To renew the foot of (a stocking, etc.). 8 To sum up, as the numbers in a column; sometimes with ''up''.

WordNet
foot
  1. v. pay for something; "pick up the tab"; "pick up the burden of high-interest mortgages"; "foot the bill" [syn: pick]

  2. walk; "let's hoof it to the disco" [syn: leg it, hoof, hoof it]

  3. add a column of numbers [syn: foot up]

  4. [also: feet (pl)]

foot
  1. n. a linear unit of length equal to 12 inches or a third of a yard; "he is six feet tall" [syn: ft]

  2. the foot of a human being; "his bare feet projected from his trousers"; "armored from head to foot" [syn: human foot, pes]

  3. the lower part of anything; "curled up on the foot of the bed"; "the foot of the page"; "the foot of the list"; "the foot of the mountain" [ant: head]

  4. travel by foot; "he followed on foot"; "the swiftest of foot"

  5. a foot of a vertebrate other than a human being [syn: animal foot]

  6. a support resembling a pedal extremity; "one foot of the chair was on the carpet"

  7. lowest support of a structure; "it was built on a base of solid rock"; "he stood at the foot of the tower" [syn: foundation, base, fundament, groundwork, substructure, understructure]

  8. any of various organs of locomotion or attachment in invertebrates [syn: invertebrate foot]

  9. an army unit consisting of soldiers who fight on foot; "there came ten thousand horsemen and as many fully-armed foot" [syn: infantry]

  10. a member of a surveillance team who works on foot or rides as a passenger

  11. a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm [syn: metrical foot, metrical unit]

  12. [also: feet (pl)]

Wikipedia
Foot

The foot (plural feet) is an anatomical structure found in many vertebrates. It is the terminal portion of a limb which bears weight and allows locomotion. In many animals with feet, the foot is a separate organ at the terminal part of the leg made up of one or more segments or bones, generally including claws or nails.

Foot (hieroglyph)

The Ancient EgyptianFoot hieroglyph, Gardiner sign listed no. D58 is a side view of the human foot and the lower leg.

The foot hieroglyph is used in the Ancient Egyptian language hieroglyphs for the alphabetic consonant letter b.

Foot (unit)

A footfeet; abbreviation: ft; symbol: , the prime symbol) is a unit of length in the imperial and US customary systems of measurement. Since 1959, both units have been defined by international agreement as equivalent to 0.3048  meters exactly. In both systems, the foot comprises 12  inches and three feet compose a yard.

Historically the "foot" was a part of many local systems of units, including the Greek, Roman, Chinese, French, and English systems. It varied in length from country to country, from city to city, and sometimes from trade to trade. Its length was usually between 250 mm and 335 mm and was generally, but not always, subdivided into 12 inches or 16  digits.

The United States is the only industrialized nation that uses the international foot and the survey foot (a customary unit of length) in preference to the meter in its commercial, engineering, and standards activities. The foot is legally recognized in the United Kingdom; road signs must use imperial units (however distances on road signs are always marked in yards, not feet), while its usage is widespread among the British public as a measurement of height. The foot is recognized as an alternative expression of length in Canada officially defined as a unit derived from the meter although both have partially metricated their units of measurement. The measurement of altitude in the aviation industry is one of the few areas where the foot is widely used outside the English-speaking world.

Foot (prosody)

The foot is the basic metrical unit that forms part of a line of verse in most Western traditions of poetry, including English accentual-syllabic verse and the quantitative meter of classical ancient Greek and Latin poetry. The unit is composed of syllables, the number of which is limited, with a few variations, by the sound pattern the foot represents. The most common feet in English are the iamb, trochee, dactyl, and anapest. Contrasting with stress-timed languages such as English, in syllable-timed languages such as French, a foot is a single syllable.

The lines of verse are classified according to the number of feet they contain, e.g. pentameter. However some lines of verse are not considered to be made up of feet, e.g. hendecasyllable.

The English word "foot" is a translation of the Latin term pes, plural pedes. The foot might be compared to a measure in musical notation.

The foot is a purely metrical unit; there is no inherent relation to a word or phrase as a unit of meaning or syntax, though the interplay between these is an aspect of the poet's skill and artistry.

Foot (furniture)

A foot is the floor level termination of furniture legs. Legless furniture may be slightly raised off of the floor by their feet.

Foot (disambiguation)

The foot is an anatomical structure found in many vertebrates.

Foot may also refer to:

  • Foot (unit), a unit of length, now usually 0.3048 m or 12 inches
  • Foot of a perpendicular, in geometry, a point where perpendicular lines intersect
  • Foot, an alternate name for the fotmal, a unit of weight usually equal to 70 pounds
  • Foot (surname)
  • Foot (hieroglyph), an ancient Egyptian symbol
  • Foot (prosody), meter in poetry
  • Foot (sewing), part of a sewing machine
  • Foot (sailing), the lower edge of a sail
  • Infantry; see List of Regiments of Foot
  • Foot Clan, a group of ninja in the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles series
  • Foot (mollusc), part of the typical mollusc body plan along with the shell, viscera, and mantle
  • Foot Lake, a lake in Minnesota
  • Foot orienteering, the sport of orienteering

FOOT may also refer to:

  • ICAO code for Tchibanga Airport
  • The Faculty of Optics and Optometry of Terrassa, Polytechnic University of Catalonia
  • Foothill Independent Bancorp (NASDAQ: FOOT), California bank acquired in 2005 by First National Bancorp, now PacWest Bancorp
Foot (surname)

Foot is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Caroline Foot (born 1965), former British swimmer
  • David Foot, Canadian economist
  • Dingle Foot (1905–1978), British lawyer and politician
  • Henry Foot (1805–1857), English-born Australian cricketer
  • Hugh Foot, Baron Caradon (1907–1990), British colonial administrator and diplomat
  • Isaac Foot (1880–1960), British politician and solicitor
  • John Foot, Baron Foot (1909–1999), British Liberal Party politician
  • John Foot (academic) (born 1964), British historian specialising in Italy
  • Michael Foot (1913–2010), British politician and journalist, Labour Party leader (1980-83)
  • M. R. D. Foot (1919-2012), British historian
  • Paul Foot (1937–2004), British journalist
  • Philippa Foot (1920–2010), British philosopher
  • Robert Foot (1889–1973), director general of the BBC (1942–1944)
  • Samuel A. Foot (1780–1846), U.S. representative and senator
  • Sarah Foot (born 1961), British historian
  • Solomon Foot (1802–1866), lawyer and senator from Vermont
  • Victorine Foot (1920-2000), British painter

Usage examples of "foot".

The spider legs of the Aberrant flexed within a few feet of her, each as thick as her arm, encircling the heaving flanks of the thrashing beast.

In response to his gesture, eyes now fully formed and ablaze, the two clouds of sooty vapor that had been hovering impatiently by his steel-booted feet ballooned to the size of black buffalo as they sped gleefully away from the dais to intercept the impudent, foolhardy human.

The abomination of it all, the vengeance of destiny which exacted this sacrilege, filled her with such a feeling of revolt that at the moment when vertigo was about to seize her and the flooring began to flee from beneath her feet, she was lashed by it and kept erect.

Her bare foot dragged across it, abrading the skin and producing a burning pain that somehow seemed far worse than any of the aches and stings emanating from the other injuries Mrs.

Then the courage came into his body, and with a great might he abraid upon his feet, and smote the black and yellow knight upon the helm by an overstroke so fierce that the sword sheared away the third part of his head, as it had been a rotten cheese.

Once the two-hundred-foot abseiling rope was on the ground, Joe and Fat Boy would start to ease themselves out of the heli so that their feet were on the deck and their bodies were at forty-five degrees to the ground.

Aurelia in Pistoja, to fall with tears at her feet, to be pardoned and absolved, to rise to the life of honour and respect once more.

The lower lip curved outward, making a platform that abutted at the height of perhaps a hundred feet upon a sinister-looking gorge below.

Banish coming down hard on top of the girl with the baby and the gun and Abies falling forward from the act of Fagin being blown back off his feet and settling still on the ground.

There I drank it, my feet resting on acanthus, my eyes wandering from sea to mountain, or peering at little shells niched in the crumbling surface of the sacred stone.

George nor Gracie accelerates, their perspectives are on precisely equal footing.

Similarly, if your compartment is being accelerated upward you will feel the force of the floor on your feet.

On the accession of Claudius, an old woman threw herself at his feet, and complained that a general of the late emperor had obtained an arbitrary grant of her patrimony.

Sachs dressed in the white Tyvek suit and accessorized with rubber bands around her feet.

Swearing under his breath, Ace hurried to help the abused woman to her feet.