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Crossword clues for better

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
better
I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a better/greater/deeper understanding
▪ All of this will lead to a better understanding of the overseas market.
a bit better/older/easier etc
▪ I feel a bit better now.
a good/better option
▪ Renting a house may be a better option than buying.
a little more/better/further etc
▪ We’ll have to wait a little longer to see what happens.
a shade better/quicker/faster etc
▪ The results were a shade better than we expected.
against your better judgment (=even though you think your action might be wrong)
▪ I lent him the money, against my better judgment.
are better left unsaid (=it is better not to mention them)
▪ Some things are better left unsaid.
be better off doing sth (=used to give advice or an opinion)
▪ He’d be better off starting with something simpler.
better nature (=his feelings of kindness)
▪ I tried appealing to his better nature but he wouldn’t agree to help us.
better off
▪ She’ll be about £50 a week better off.
better or worse
▪ I wasn’t sure whether his behaviour was getting better or worse.
curiosity gets the better of sb/overcomes sb (=makes you do something that you are trying not to do)
▪ Curiosity got the better of me and I opened her diary.
deserve better (also deserve a better deal) (= deserve to be treated better or to be in a better situation)
▪ They treated him badly at work and I thought he deserved better.
far better/easier etc
▪ The new system is far better than the old one.
▪ There are a far greater number of women working in television than twenty years ago.
greater/better protection
▪ The law should give greater protection to victims.
heaps better/bigger etc (=much better, bigger etc)
higher/better
▪ Workers demanded higher pay.
how much better/nicer/easier etc
▪ I was surprised to see how much better she was looking.
▪ How much better life would be if we returned to the values of the past!
judge it best/better to do sth (=think that something is the best thing to do)
▪ Robert wanted to go and help him, but judged it best to stay where he was.
knew better than to
▪ Eva knew better than to interrupt one of Mark’s jokes.
little more/better etc (than sth)
▪ His voice was little more than a whisper.
move on to higher/better things (=get a better job or social position – used humorously)
▪ Jeremy’s leaving the company to move on to higher things.
much better/greater/easier etc
▪ Henry’s room is much bigger than mine.
▪ These shoes are much more comfortable.
prevention is better than cureBritish English, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure American English (= used to say that it is better to prevent illness than to cure it)
prevention is better than cure (=it is better to stop something bad from happening than to remove the problem once it has happened)
▪ You know what they say, prevention is better than cure.
sb is old enough to know better (=used when you think someone should behave more sensibly)
▪ He’s old enough to know better, but he went and did it anyway!
should know better
▪ It’s just prejudice from educated people who should know better.
significantly better/greater/worse etc
▪ Delia’s work has been significantly better this year.
slightly higher/lower/better/larger etc
▪ January’s sales were slightly better than average.
take a turn for the worse/better
▪ Two days after the operation, Dad took a turn for the worse.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(get) a bigger/better etc bang for your buck
I couldn't wish for a nicer/better etc ...
I must/I'd better be getting along
I'd better mosey along/be moseying along
I/you can't/couldn't ask for a better sth
a (damn/darned/darn) sight more/better etc
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
▪ If he listened to Anthony Scrivener, he would be a darned sight better.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
▪ The Galapagos finch was a darn sight more valuable than Sandra Willmot.
▪ We were a darned sight better than them.
all the better/easier/more etc
▪ He offsets Roberts' operatic evil with a performance that commands all the more notice for its minimalism.
▪ His job was made all the more easier by drivers who hadn't bothered to take measures to stop people like him.
▪ If there is some meat left on the bones, all the better.
▪ It makes it all the more opportune.
▪ Superb defence by Karpov, all the more praiseworthy in that he was now in desperate time trouble.
▪ The dispute was all the more bitter because a prize was at stake.
▪ The inadequacy and treachery of the old leaderships of the working class have made the need all the more imperative.
▪ Weather experts say it was a relatively dry winter which makes the water recovery all the more remarkable.
appeal to sb's better nature/sense of justice etc
better late than never
▪ While ongoing self-monitoring is urged, it is always better late than never.
better luck next time
▪ Ah well, better luck next time, Andy.
▪ And if you didn't win, better luck next time.
▪ Back to the West Indies with it, and better luck next time.
better the devil you know (than the devil you don't)
better/harder/worse etc still
▪ And 245 specialty stock funds that focus on particular industries did better still, averaging a 6. 5 percent gain.
▪ But perhaps the early evening was better still?
▪ He didn't talk because he was afraid of losing the pole or, worse still, falling in.
▪ I started to hunt for a cheap restaurant or, better still, a snack shop.
▪ I thought that it would soon pass, and it did - for you to work harder still.
▪ Or better still, make a real talent show instead.
▪ Or better still, there was the village school practically next door!
▪ With hindsight, it would have better still to lock in a few more gains.
come off best/better/worst etc
▪ Alec Davidson, for example, was one of those who came off worst.
▪ Bullock comes off best because her complaining seems so valid.
▪ His foster-child comes off best, but in addition each of two nurses receives a tenth of his estate.
▪ It may seem, so far, that in terms of clearly defined benefits, the client comes off best out of the deal.
▪ Prior to that Meath had come off best when they accounted for Down in the 1990 league decider.
▪ The lightning, it seemed to Lydia, had undoubtedly come off best in that encounter.
▪ The problem is that history sometimes comes off better.
couldn't be better/worse/more pleased etc
discretion is the better part of valour
even bigger/better/brighter etc
▪ But he actually proved even better than I thought.
▪ He had hoped to play an even bigger, more traditional role.
▪ I sort of thought the accident would make us play even better.
▪ It was even better when I got a hug and a kiss from the former Miss Minnesota!
▪ Many companies do so because smart managers know the importance of rewarding good work and inspiring even better efforts.
▪ There was something spontaneous and lively in his manner of speaking that made whatever he was saying sound even better.
▪ This show will be even better than the last one and is not to be missed!
▪ What is the best way of stemming this decline or, even better, of regenerating the economy?
fare well/badly/better etc
▪ I think the men fared better than the women.
▪ It can be seen that, whilst all regions reflected the higher national unemployment rate, some regions fared better than others.
▪ It still fared better than the broader market.
▪ Life may be regarded as an austere struggle, blighted by fate, where only the rich and the lucky fare well.
▪ Not faring well, but resting.
▪ Obviously some clothiers fared better than others for there were quite a large number of bankruptcies between 1800 and 1840.
▪ The Bloomberg Indiana Index fared better than the benchmark Standard&.
▪ There is no reason to believe that diabetic patients fare better and they may do less well.
for want of a better word/phrase etc
▪ Just horses and ploughs and, for want of a better word, peasants.
▪ Now, hands are, well, handed for want of a better word.
for want of anything better (to do)
good/better/healthy etc start (in life)
▪ A good start is one where you pass close behind the start boat going at speed.
▪ But it wasn't a good start in the lessons of love, and left me very arid in such matters.
▪ He had better start by accepting that if he does the right things, they will not be popular ones.
▪ It wasn't a very good start.
▪ Not a good start, but a start, nevertheless.
▪ The auditor may enjoy the gifts, but he had better start looking for a sympathy engram not yet suspected or tapped.
▪ The problem was the middle and end, when the team sacrificed rebounding for getting out to a good start.
▪ They will, however, be getting a new center, and that is a good start, he believes.
greater/more/better etc than the sum of its parts
▪ Or is the organisation more than the sum of its parts?
half a loaf (is better than none)
have seen better days
▪ Ms. Davis's car had certainly seen better days.
▪ Virginia's car had definitely seen better days.
▪ We are working at Nanking University, in rather cramped and primitive conditions, for the buildings have seen better days.
hotter/colder/better etc than ever
▪ And that incentive was increased when they got personal recognition and satisfaction from doing it better than ever before.
▪ He says the new films are better than ever.
▪ Organised by the Alton and District Arts Council, the week promises to be better than ever.
▪ The moviemaking machine that Walt Disney created sixty years ago is working better than ever today.
▪ The National Health Service is now better than ever.
▪ The opportunities now are better than ever.
▪ This year's attractions are bigger and better than ever, with events running from Tuesday to Saturday.
▪ Watermen talked about their catches so far this year, which they said have been better than ever.
kiss sth better
know better
▪ Parents should know better than their children, but they don't always necessarily do.
▪ The man said it was an 18 carat diamond, but Dina knew better.
▪ But there were some rules he knew better than she ever would.
▪ Even people who should know better have ended up paying a price for denying what they are feeling.
▪ Guess he should have known better.
▪ Now you know better, thass all.
▪ Then I would have known better.
▪ Time you knew better, young lady.
▪ Yamazaki seems unconcerned by the fact that he's taking on problems that have defeated many who should have known better.
light years ahead/better etc than sth
miles older/better/too difficult etc
none the worse/better etc (for sth)
▪ Although the animal glowed rosy-pink, it appeared none the worse for its ordeal.
▪ I recovered, my mouth none the worse for it, after all.
▪ Peter's little pet was clearly none the worse for its time in the underworld.
not know any better
▪ Before Sinai, one could argue, the people had the excuse of not knowing any better.
sb had better/best do sth
sb's elders (and betters)
▪ For our purposes it may be more helpful to use the idea of desire when assessing elders.
▪ He roused himself wearily to exchange greetings with the elders as they passed him, and went in to his foster-father.
▪ In this respect at least, the procedures reflected those of a lineage or tribal meeting of elders and shaikhs.
▪ Indeed, the absence of official elders was a source of wonder to visitors from systems run by a selected few.
▪ Some, like Monta o, believe to this day that the city killed their elders.
▪ The Oaks are the Elders of the Forest and the others are aware of it.
▪ The weary elders of the 1980s take revenge at last upon the hapless victims of the 1960s.
the best/better part of sth
▪ Almost any child will assert that recess is the best part of the school day.
▪ Another child makes the family wretched with his crying for the better part of an hour.
▪ Converse drank the better part of the rum.
▪ For the better part of the next forty years they were to be the decisive restraints.
▪ I spent the better part of my time moping around the house, too dejected to think about practicing my stunts.
▪ It is not widely taught or particularly popular be-cause it takes the better part of a lifetime to master.
▪ This was it, the confrontation-point which he had been dreading for the best part of a week.
the sooner ( ... ) the better
▪ The sooner we get these bills paid off, the better.
▪ They knew they had to leave town, and the sooner the better.
think better of it
▪ She felt like slapping him in the face, but thought better of it.
▪ But he thought better of it and slowly breathed out the air through his nose.
▪ But then she thought better of it.
▪ Cowher said later he momentarily contemplated tackling Hudson, but thought better of it.
▪ He thought better of it, and despite a case of galloping homesickness, decided not to go home at all.
▪ He could have forced the window in time, anyone could, but he seemed suddenly to think better of it.
▪ He passed Miguel the joint but Miguel thought better of it.
▪ Then he thought better of it.
two heads are better than one
you'd better believe it!
▪ "Do they make money on them?" "You'd better believe it!"
your better half/other half
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Angie spent last week painting her bedroom -- it looks much better.
▪ Consumers are demanding lower prices, better quality, and a larger selection of goods.
▪ Here, this one is better - try it.
▪ His latest novel is far better than anything he's written before.
▪ I don't think you should go swimming until you're better.
▪ Lucy's better at mathematics than I am.
▪ My sister is a better student than me.
▪ People's general health is a lot better these days than it used to be.
▪ She's a little better than she was yesterday.
▪ She bought a better car.
▪ The sales figures were better than we expected.
▪ We could either go to Florida or California -- which do you think is better?
▪ You'll get a better deal from a mail-order company.
▪ Your job is better than mine.
▪ Your Spanish is definitely getting better.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Caffeine received no better press in the twentieth century.
▪ He turned down what any of his peers would have called a much better deal today.
▪ Still, he is impressive as the surly, enigmatic intellectual who offers Jane a glimmer of hope for a better life.
▪ Tell the students that you are going to conduct an activity to find out if two ears are better than one.
▪ Women are little better, only weaker in carrying out their ill intentions.
II.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
able
▪ The result is an epidermis which is better able to mimic the softness and freshness of younger skin.
▪ As a child becomes better able to generalize across stimuli, schemata become more refined.
▪ Handling and ride in the 5-Series is already legendary, and this engine is better able to make the most of it.
▪ She is better able to focus on simpler pictures.
▪ Before the recession, businesses were better able to absorb the problem.
▪ A watercourse viewed primarily as an effluent carrier will be thought better able to tolerate further pollution.
▪ It was agreed that he might return to work from the hospital when he felt better able to cope.
▪ Burns and Stalker found that organic structures were better able to respond to change than mechanistic ones.
■ VERB
become
▪ The first is that Luftwaffe defences became better, too, and that caused a high price to be paid in terms of casualties.
▪ And that might help them become better socialized.
▪ This section will therefore only touch on some of the techniques which have become better understood as the result of scientific research.
▪ You can become better at distinguishing between team versus individual and process versus function only by making choices and moving forward.
▪ At the same time both the army and the navy became better equipped.
▪ Independence and transcending childhood require personality development, not becoming better at a particular task, or doing battle with external difficulties.
▪ The little-known cast is unlikely to become better known.
▪ As a child becomes better able to generalize across stimuli, schemata become more refined.
deserve
▪ Surely they deserve better than this.
▪ I do remember thinking he deserved better.
▪ Surely he deserves better of me than to gaze at him with my policeman's eyes.
▪ Most of the time, though I knew she deserved better, I went ahead and sent them anyway.
▪ They're worth watching and they deserve better than they're getting, but they've got to sharpen up in front of goal.
▪ I figured he deserved better from Ryan, and said so.
▪ He thought she deserved better than that after all her troubles.
▪ Starostin deserves better: he virtually made Spartak.
do
▪ He did better junior year, despite the fact that he spent nearly all of it arguing with the priests.
▪ Hoffert said the business grossed about $ 285,000 last year, and will do better in 2000.
▪ The Labour party did badly in May 1997 and can do better.
▪ Only the Crabbe Huson Special Fund did better.
▪ Alamaro and Patrick think they can do better.
▪ At this she played cards with a bridge-a-matic, that she might do better in the neighborhood club.
▪ Not only do girls generally do better with language, reading, and writing; they are also socially more adept.
▪ It is rarely about disloyalty but invariably about clients believing they can do better.
equip
▪ Few orchestras are better equipped, so you would think, than the Chicago Symphony.
▪ Each bit of progress makes the individual child better equipped to deal with the demands of life.
▪ Confiscated boats and planes could be used by law enforcement agencies and seized money used to train and better equip the forces.
▪ But no one was better equipped for the psychological warfare that lay ahead.
▪ Sometimes they are better equipped than the police itself and have good connections with the West.
▪ In every way save one, this is a campaign that Bush is still better equipped than McCain to fight and win.
▪ Few hotels are better equipped for a Club holiday.
▪ With books like this we shall be much better equipped lo make a contribution.
fare
▪ It can be seen that, whilst all regions reflected the higher national unemployment rate, some regions fared better than others.
▪ Other home builders are thought to have fared better.
▪ There is no reason to believe that diabetic patients fare better and they may do less well.
▪ But investors in the rest of the Southeast fared better.
▪ The Nationalists fared better in their foreign dealings.
▪ Dance based on ethnic themes fared better.
▪ After lunch he fared better returning a 76, taking only 35 shots on the inward nine.
▪ If managing diversity comes to be viewed as a business issue rather than an ethical one, minorities might actually fare better.
feel
▪ Regular exercise could help you - and your child - to feel better, look better and be more alert.
▪ A few choice words here and there can make you feel better, and they might get your point across.
▪ We'd got some work behind us at last, and felt better for it.
▪ The reduction in scrolling and window swapping has made the whole computer feel better and more relaxing to use.
▪ It makes people feel better to pretend otherwise.
▪ After a few minutes he felt better, so he rose and walked upstairs.
▪ I better feel your glove, Ting.
get
▪ She'd better get used to it, Guy thought inflexibly.
▪ Things are going good now and they can only get better.
▪ It was then getting on for three in the morning, but in the last quarter of an hour things had been getting better.
▪ This four-day Grandaddy of Arizona ethnic celebrations just keeps getting better.
▪ When I was getting better, he told me some of the local news.
▪ The neighborhood has been getting better and better, he said.
▪ Look, Neil, you'd better get along to the blue drawing room.
▪ On the one hand, sophomore shows are getting better, as some of the third-year shows did before them.
inform
▪ However, for the twelfth century we are much better informed about the rapidly expanding wine trade.
▪ The task of assessing this forceful leader must necessarily be left to others more competent and better informed than myself.
▪ But you'd better inform Freddy Swanson immediately that there is a problem.
▪ As companies get leaner and better informed, they are much quicker to take action.
▪ An editorial in the latest issue said the event would be a unique opportunity to become better informed and to browse.
▪ You'd better inform Toronto and Montreal.
▪ And being better informed they say, will help those like Gillis to a better recovery.
know
▪ The basic premise is that they think they know better than anyone else.
▪ This astonishing question was asked by a corporate medical department nurse who should know better.
▪ Once established in Bactria, the Yuezhi are far better known in the West as the Kushans.
▪ Kubo is better known for his skill as a political strategist than for his financial acumen.
▪ I knew better than to inquire.
▪ If their pediatrician is telling them to wait, that their child will outgrow it, the parents know better.
leave
▪ Now, if that's all I'd better leave.
▪ Some things were better left unsaid.
▪ I told them there was nothing much more we could usefully do there and we'd better leave before we were ejected.
▪ In fact, for both economic and cultural reasons, elite Western workers are often better left behind these days.
▪ Maybe some things were better left to the natural course of time.
▪ He has invented a special fish dish which he calls Salmon Butter Yaki, better left undescribed.
▪ In that case we had better leave.
▪ Some subjects, I'd learned during the weeks I followed Oscar Wilde, were better left only as implications.
look
▪ It looked better inland, so we decided to go and have a look.
▪ Then they began to look better.
▪ Women who looked better as they got older.
▪ Shaq himself has always looked better in commercials than on the court.
▪ The love affair gave him new life, he looked better, drank less and stayed away from the cafés.
▪ We were ecstatically happy together, and life had never looked better.
▪ Meadows and woodlands are better looked after, but that still leaves many different habitats that do not have sufficient protection.
▪ He stirred again, but she saw that he looked better.
place
▪ They may be better placed financially than many tenants, but their security of tenure can end with retirement.
▪ The world will be a much better place to live in in about 1, 000 days.
▪ And the wretched thing is that Gore is no better placed.
▪ But what better place for Swindon to score their first league win of the season.
▪ What better place to start than on our own doorstep, with the world famous collections of the Barber Institute?
▪ Unionists had a majority in Lloyd George's war cabinet, but were little better placed in his government as a whole.
play
▪ The team plays better with Strachan out!!!
▪ It just makes us play better.
▪ In fact, his colleagues know that if Levi is challenging, they had better play their best golf.
▪ Worldwide, there might be two hundred people who play better than Peter.
▪ But Jahangir admitted Dittmar had never played better.
▪ It might have played better at five hours, rather than six.
▪ The three works collected here have never before been better played.
▪ Some people thought Peter would play better if he spent more money, but he failed to see any logic in that.
serve
▪ Apparently the networks-feeling that minorities were better served elsewhere-decided they themselves had no obligation to show minority faces.
▪ Also, are my present investments wise, and if not, where might my money better serve me?
▪ Other origins for the structure might be as well or better served by hot dark matter.
▪ Kelvim Escobar did a strong job setting up closer Billy Koch, but the team is better served if he can start.
▪ In terms both of quantity and quality, few composers before 1600 have been better served by the record industry.
▪ Surely justice has never been better served.
▪ With his great hands, Jimmy returned the fast serve better than anyone in the history of the game.
▪ Since 1990 it has looked to career academies as a way to restructure its high schools and better serve its students.
start
▪ So you'd better start packing - don't forget a cagoule.
▪ Those other guys better start working harder.
▪ If she wanted to hang on to the shreds of her professional reputation she'd better start by controlling her haywire emotions.
▪ He had better start by accepting that if he does the right things, they will not be popular ones.
▪ But they'd better start thinking about how they are going to pay for it.
▪ I think I'd better go for Dersingham and you'd better start keeping tabs on Hereward.
suit
▪ On the whole, feminists throughout the period agreed that women were better suited by nature to home-related tasks than were men.
▪ On any other label, this could be the recipe for lackluster recordings by players better suited for small groups.
▪ I decided the bird was far better suited to the conditions than me.
▪ Rain had fallen all morning, leaving the field better suited for mud wrestling than for football.
▪ The system is a heavy user of both men and machines and so is probably better suited to contractors and larger farmers.
▪ Light and nimble, it was better suited to the terrain.
▪ She is much better suited to this B format, and coronet is reissuing its titles in B during this year.
▪ Nubby fabrics, for example, better suit a casual style, while smooth fabrics are more formal.
think
▪ He is incredulous when she says that some people might think better of Jason for confessing his fear.
▪ He passed Miguel the joint but Miguel thought better of it.
▪ Then he thought better of it.
▪ Cowher said later he momentarily contemplated tackling Hudson, but thought better of it.
▪ But he thought better of it and slowly breathed out the air through his nose.
▪ Only the mother of the frightened girl started to say something, but thought better of it.
▪ But then she thought better of it.
▪ Norms are changing, and men better think about what they do.
understand
▪ Now he has had a chance to work with them and perhaps better understands the intricacies of their job.
▪ We often watch Western women to understand better how to act like a man.
▪ But it is possible to understand better the man behind those achievements.
▪ S Department of Defense in the hopes of understanding better the concept of deception.
▪ It does help our chances of success however, if we can better understand why reef fish are aggressive towards each other.
▪ Promote effective two-way communication between employees at all levels to understand better the problems and concerns that affect productivity; 7.
▪ Perhaps in the future we may come to better understand more complex processes, such as memory and learning.
▪ But it is better understood as a shift in the continuity-producing frame.
work
▪ Raise the tank temperature to 70°F. before adding it as it works better at higher temperatures.
▪ When you make both the software and the hardware, as Apple does, things work better.
▪ If it is run twice on similar data, it will probably work better the second time.
▪ We continue to have the races working better together.
▪ According to the researchers, the new cell actually works better under cloud cover than in full sunlight.
▪ Graphic animal prints usually work better with strong colors than pastels.
▪ Gel is less sticky than mousse and works better with curly hair.
▪ Newer ones are said to work better, and there are things you can do to increase your comfort level.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(get) a bigger/better etc bang for your buck
(just) that little bit better/easier etc
▪ We have put together a few of the most popular itineraries to help make your choice that little bit easier.
I couldn't wish for a nicer/better etc ...
I must/I'd better be getting along
I'd better mosey along/be moseying along
I/you can't/couldn't ask for a better sth
a (damn/darned/darn) sight more/better etc
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
▪ If he listened to Anthony Scrivener, he would be a darned sight better.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
▪ The Galapagos finch was a darn sight more valuable than Sandra Willmot.
▪ We were a darned sight better than them.
a damn sight more/better etc
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
a darn sight better/harder etc
all the better/easier/more etc
▪ He offsets Roberts' operatic evil with a performance that commands all the more notice for its minimalism.
▪ His job was made all the more easier by drivers who hadn't bothered to take measures to stop people like him.
▪ If there is some meat left on the bones, all the better.
▪ It makes it all the more opportune.
▪ Superb defence by Karpov, all the more praiseworthy in that he was now in desperate time trouble.
▪ The dispute was all the more bitter because a prize was at stake.
▪ The inadequacy and treachery of the old leaderships of the working class have made the need all the more imperative.
▪ Weather experts say it was a relatively dry winter which makes the water recovery all the more remarkable.
appeal to sb's better nature/sense of justice etc
better (to be) safe than sorry
▪ I think I'll take my umbrella along - better safe than sorry.
▪ Anyway, better safe than sorry.
▪ The overall message of precaution-better safe than sorry-has intuitive appeal.
better Red than dead
better late than never
▪ While ongoing self-monitoring is urged, it is always better late than never.
better luck next time
▪ Ah well, better luck next time, Andy.
▪ And if you didn't win, better luck next time.
▪ Back to the West Indies with it, and better luck next time.
better the devil you know (than the devil you don't)
better/harder/worse etc still
▪ And 245 specialty stock funds that focus on particular industries did better still, averaging a 6. 5 percent gain.
▪ But perhaps the early evening was better still?
▪ He didn't talk because he was afraid of losing the pole or, worse still, falling in.
▪ I started to hunt for a cheap restaurant or, better still, a snack shop.
▪ I thought that it would soon pass, and it did - for you to work harder still.
▪ Or better still, make a real talent show instead.
▪ Or better still, there was the village school practically next door!
▪ With hindsight, it would have better still to lock in a few more gains.
come off best/better/worst etc
▪ Alec Davidson, for example, was one of those who came off worst.
▪ Bullock comes off best because her complaining seems so valid.
▪ His foster-child comes off best, but in addition each of two nurses receives a tenth of his estate.
▪ It may seem, so far, that in terms of clearly defined benefits, the client comes off best out of the deal.
▪ Prior to that Meath had come off best when they accounted for Down in the 1990 league decider.
▪ The lightning, it seemed to Lydia, had undoubtedly come off best in that encounter.
▪ The problem is that history sometimes comes off better.
couldn't be better/worse/more pleased etc
discretion is the better part of valour
even bigger/better/brighter etc
▪ But he actually proved even better than I thought.
▪ He had hoped to play an even bigger, more traditional role.
▪ I sort of thought the accident would make us play even better.
▪ It was even better when I got a hug and a kiss from the former Miss Minnesota!
▪ Many companies do so because smart managers know the importance of rewarding good work and inspiring even better efforts.
▪ There was something spontaneous and lively in his manner of speaking that made whatever he was saying sound even better.
▪ This show will be even better than the last one and is not to be missed!
▪ What is the best way of stemming this decline or, even better, of regenerating the economy?
fare well/badly/better etc
▪ I think the men fared better than the women.
▪ It can be seen that, whilst all regions reflected the higher national unemployment rate, some regions fared better than others.
▪ It still fared better than the broader market.
▪ Life may be regarded as an austere struggle, blighted by fate, where only the rich and the lucky fare well.
▪ Not faring well, but resting.
▪ Obviously some clothiers fared better than others for there were quite a large number of bankruptcies between 1800 and 1840.
▪ The Bloomberg Indiana Index fared better than the benchmark Standard&.
▪ There is no reason to believe that diabetic patients fare better and they may do less well.
for want of a better word/phrase etc
▪ Just horses and ploughs and, for want of a better word, peasants.
▪ Now, hands are, well, handed for want of a better word.
for want of anything better (to do)
good/better/healthy etc start (in life)
▪ A good start is one where you pass close behind the start boat going at speed.
▪ But it wasn't a good start in the lessons of love, and left me very arid in such matters.
▪ He had better start by accepting that if he does the right things, they will not be popular ones.
▪ It wasn't a very good start.
▪ Not a good start, but a start, nevertheless.
▪ The auditor may enjoy the gifts, but he had better start looking for a sympathy engram not yet suspected or tapped.
▪ The problem was the middle and end, when the team sacrificed rebounding for getting out to a good start.
▪ They will, however, be getting a new center, and that is a good start, he believes.
greater/more/better etc than the sum of its parts
▪ Or is the organisation more than the sum of its parts?
half a loaf (is better than none)
have seen better days
▪ Ms. Davis's car had certainly seen better days.
▪ Virginia's car had definitely seen better days.
▪ We are working at Nanking University, in rather cramped and primitive conditions, for the buildings have seen better days.
hotter/colder/better etc than ever
▪ And that incentive was increased when they got personal recognition and satisfaction from doing it better than ever before.
▪ He says the new films are better than ever.
▪ Organised by the Alton and District Arts Council, the week promises to be better than ever.
▪ The moviemaking machine that Walt Disney created sixty years ago is working better than ever today.
▪ The National Health Service is now better than ever.
▪ The opportunities now are better than ever.
▪ This year's attractions are bigger and better than ever, with events running from Tuesday to Saturday.
▪ Watermen talked about their catches so far this year, which they said have been better than ever.
kiss sth better
know better
▪ Parents should know better than their children, but they don't always necessarily do.
▪ The man said it was an 18 carat diamond, but Dina knew better.
▪ But there were some rules he knew better than she ever would.
▪ Even people who should know better have ended up paying a price for denying what they are feeling.
▪ Guess he should have known better.
▪ Now you know better, thass all.
▪ Then I would have known better.
▪ Time you knew better, young lady.
▪ Yamazaki seems unconcerned by the fact that he's taking on problems that have defeated many who should have known better.
light years ahead/better etc than sth
miles older/better/too difficult etc
none the worse/better etc (for sth)
▪ Although the animal glowed rosy-pink, it appeared none the worse for its ordeal.
▪ I recovered, my mouth none the worse for it, after all.
▪ Peter's little pet was clearly none the worse for its time in the underworld.
not know any better
▪ Before Sinai, one could argue, the people had the excuse of not knowing any better.
sb had better/best do sth
sb's elders (and betters)
▪ For our purposes it may be more helpful to use the idea of desire when assessing elders.
▪ He roused himself wearily to exchange greetings with the elders as they passed him, and went in to his foster-father.
▪ In this respect at least, the procedures reflected those of a lineage or tribal meeting of elders and shaikhs.
▪ Indeed, the absence of official elders was a source of wonder to visitors from systems run by a selected few.
▪ Some, like Monta o, believe to this day that the city killed their elders.
▪ The Oaks are the Elders of the Forest and the others are aware of it.
▪ The weary elders of the 1980s take revenge at last upon the hapless victims of the 1960s.
the best/better part of sth
▪ Almost any child will assert that recess is the best part of the school day.
▪ Another child makes the family wretched with his crying for the better part of an hour.
▪ Converse drank the better part of the rum.
▪ For the better part of the next forty years they were to be the decisive restraints.
▪ I spent the better part of my time moping around the house, too dejected to think about practicing my stunts.
▪ It is not widely taught or particularly popular be-cause it takes the better part of a lifetime to master.
▪ This was it, the confrontation-point which he had been dreading for the best part of a week.
the sooner ( ... ) the better
▪ The sooner we get these bills paid off, the better.
▪ They knew they had to leave town, and the sooner the better.
think better of it
▪ She felt like slapping him in the face, but thought better of it.
▪ But he thought better of it and slowly breathed out the air through his nose.
▪ But then she thought better of it.
▪ Cowher said later he momentarily contemplated tackling Hudson, but thought better of it.
▪ He thought better of it, and despite a case of galloping homesickness, decided not to go home at all.
▪ He could have forced the window in time, anyone could, but he seemed suddenly to think better of it.
▪ He passed Miguel the joint but Miguel thought better of it.
▪ Then he thought better of it.
two heads are better than one
you'd better believe it!
▪ "Do they make money on them?" "You'd better believe it!"
your better half/other half
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Hospitals are much better equipped now.
▪ I liked his last movie better.
▪ Ralph would be able to explain this a lot better than I can.
▪ Relief agencies are hoping to cope better with the famine than they did in 1990.
▪ The car is running much better since I put in new spark plugs.
▪ This country's people are wealthier, healthier, and better educated than ever before.
▪ Vidal is better known as a novelist.
▪ You can see much better from up here.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Apparently the networks-feeling that minorities were better served elsewhere-decided they themselves had no obligation to show minority faces.
▪ I thought we played much better in the third period.
III.noun
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(get) a bigger/better etc bang for your buck
(just) that little bit better/easier etc
▪ We have put together a few of the most popular itineraries to help make your choice that little bit easier.
I couldn't wish for a nicer/better etc ...
I must/I'd better be getting along
I'd better mosey along/be moseying along
I/you can't/couldn't ask for a better sth
a (damn/darned/darn) sight more/better etc
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
▪ If he listened to Anthony Scrivener, he would be a darned sight better.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
▪ The Galapagos finch was a darn sight more valuable than Sandra Willmot.
▪ We were a darned sight better than them.
a damn sight more/better etc
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
a darn sight better/harder etc
all the better/easier/more etc
▪ He offsets Roberts' operatic evil with a performance that commands all the more notice for its minimalism.
▪ His job was made all the more easier by drivers who hadn't bothered to take measures to stop people like him.
▪ If there is some meat left on the bones, all the better.
▪ It makes it all the more opportune.
▪ Superb defence by Karpov, all the more praiseworthy in that he was now in desperate time trouble.
▪ The dispute was all the more bitter because a prize was at stake.
▪ The inadequacy and treachery of the old leaderships of the working class have made the need all the more imperative.
▪ Weather experts say it was a relatively dry winter which makes the water recovery all the more remarkable.
appeal to sb's better nature/sense of justice etc
better (to be) safe than sorry
▪ I think I'll take my umbrella along - better safe than sorry.
▪ Anyway, better safe than sorry.
▪ The overall message of precaution-better safe than sorry-has intuitive appeal.
better Red than dead
better late than never
▪ While ongoing self-monitoring is urged, it is always better late than never.
better luck next time
▪ Ah well, better luck next time, Andy.
▪ And if you didn't win, better luck next time.
▪ Back to the West Indies with it, and better luck next time.
better/harder/worse etc still
▪ And 245 specialty stock funds that focus on particular industries did better still, averaging a 6. 5 percent gain.
▪ But perhaps the early evening was better still?
▪ He didn't talk because he was afraid of losing the pole or, worse still, falling in.
▪ I started to hunt for a cheap restaurant or, better still, a snack shop.
▪ I thought that it would soon pass, and it did - for you to work harder still.
▪ Or better still, make a real talent show instead.
▪ Or better still, there was the village school practically next door!
▪ With hindsight, it would have better still to lock in a few more gains.
come off best/better/worst etc
▪ Alec Davidson, for example, was one of those who came off worst.
▪ Bullock comes off best because her complaining seems so valid.
▪ His foster-child comes off best, but in addition each of two nurses receives a tenth of his estate.
▪ It may seem, so far, that in terms of clearly defined benefits, the client comes off best out of the deal.
▪ Prior to that Meath had come off best when they accounted for Down in the 1990 league decider.
▪ The lightning, it seemed to Lydia, had undoubtedly come off best in that encounter.
▪ The problem is that history sometimes comes off better.
couldn't be better/worse/more pleased etc
discretion is the better part of valour
even bigger/better/brighter etc
▪ But he actually proved even better than I thought.
▪ He had hoped to play an even bigger, more traditional role.
▪ I sort of thought the accident would make us play even better.
▪ It was even better when I got a hug and a kiss from the former Miss Minnesota!
▪ Many companies do so because smart managers know the importance of rewarding good work and inspiring even better efforts.
▪ There was something spontaneous and lively in his manner of speaking that made whatever he was saying sound even better.
▪ This show will be even better than the last one and is not to be missed!
▪ What is the best way of stemming this decline or, even better, of regenerating the economy?
fare well/badly/better etc
▪ I think the men fared better than the women.
▪ It can be seen that, whilst all regions reflected the higher national unemployment rate, some regions fared better than others.
▪ It still fared better than the broader market.
▪ Life may be regarded as an austere struggle, blighted by fate, where only the rich and the lucky fare well.
▪ Not faring well, but resting.
▪ Obviously some clothiers fared better than others for there were quite a large number of bankruptcies between 1800 and 1840.
▪ The Bloomberg Indiana Index fared better than the benchmark Standard&.
▪ There is no reason to believe that diabetic patients fare better and they may do less well.
for want of a better word/phrase etc
▪ Just horses and ploughs and, for want of a better word, peasants.
▪ Now, hands are, well, handed for want of a better word.
for want of anything better (to do)
good/better/healthy etc start (in life)
▪ A good start is one where you pass close behind the start boat going at speed.
▪ But it wasn't a good start in the lessons of love, and left me very arid in such matters.
▪ He had better start by accepting that if he does the right things, they will not be popular ones.
▪ It wasn't a very good start.
▪ Not a good start, but a start, nevertheless.
▪ The auditor may enjoy the gifts, but he had better start looking for a sympathy engram not yet suspected or tapped.
▪ The problem was the middle and end, when the team sacrificed rebounding for getting out to a good start.
▪ They will, however, be getting a new center, and that is a good start, he believes.
greater/more/better etc than the sum of its parts
▪ Or is the organisation more than the sum of its parts?
half a loaf (is better than none)
have seen better days
▪ Ms. Davis's car had certainly seen better days.
▪ Virginia's car had definitely seen better days.
▪ We are working at Nanking University, in rather cramped and primitive conditions, for the buildings have seen better days.
hotter/colder/better etc than ever
▪ And that incentive was increased when they got personal recognition and satisfaction from doing it better than ever before.
▪ He says the new films are better than ever.
▪ Organised by the Alton and District Arts Council, the week promises to be better than ever.
▪ The moviemaking machine that Walt Disney created sixty years ago is working better than ever today.
▪ The National Health Service is now better than ever.
▪ The opportunities now are better than ever.
▪ This year's attractions are bigger and better than ever, with events running from Tuesday to Saturday.
▪ Watermen talked about their catches so far this year, which they said have been better than ever.
kiss sth better
know better
▪ Parents should know better than their children, but they don't always necessarily do.
▪ The man said it was an 18 carat diamond, but Dina knew better.
▪ But there were some rules he knew better than she ever would.
▪ Even people who should know better have ended up paying a price for denying what they are feeling.
▪ Guess he should have known better.
▪ Now you know better, thass all.
▪ Then I would have known better.
▪ Time you knew better, young lady.
▪ Yamazaki seems unconcerned by the fact that he's taking on problems that have defeated many who should have known better.
light years ahead/better etc than sth
miles older/better/too difficult etc
none the worse/better etc (for sth)
▪ Although the animal glowed rosy-pink, it appeared none the worse for its ordeal.
▪ I recovered, my mouth none the worse for it, after all.
▪ Peter's little pet was clearly none the worse for its time in the underworld.
not know any better
▪ Before Sinai, one could argue, the people had the excuse of not knowing any better.
sb had better/best do sth
sb's elders (and betters)
▪ For our purposes it may be more helpful to use the idea of desire when assessing elders.
▪ He roused himself wearily to exchange greetings with the elders as they passed him, and went in to his foster-father.
▪ In this respect at least, the procedures reflected those of a lineage or tribal meeting of elders and shaikhs.
▪ Indeed, the absence of official elders was a source of wonder to visitors from systems run by a selected few.
▪ Some, like Monta o, believe to this day that the city killed their elders.
▪ The Oaks are the Elders of the Forest and the others are aware of it.
▪ The weary elders of the 1980s take revenge at last upon the hapless victims of the 1960s.
the best/better part of sth
▪ Almost any child will assert that recess is the best part of the school day.
▪ Another child makes the family wretched with his crying for the better part of an hour.
▪ Converse drank the better part of the rum.
▪ For the better part of the next forty years they were to be the decisive restraints.
▪ I spent the better part of my time moping around the house, too dejected to think about practicing my stunts.
▪ It is not widely taught or particularly popular be-cause it takes the better part of a lifetime to master.
▪ This was it, the confrontation-point which he had been dreading for the best part of a week.
the sooner ( ... ) the better
▪ The sooner we get these bills paid off, the better.
▪ They knew they had to leave town, and the sooner the better.
think better of it
▪ She felt like slapping him in the face, but thought better of it.
▪ But he thought better of it and slowly breathed out the air through his nose.
▪ But then she thought better of it.
▪ Cowher said later he momentarily contemplated tackling Hudson, but thought better of it.
▪ He thought better of it, and despite a case of galloping homesickness, decided not to go home at all.
▪ He could have forced the window in time, anyone could, but he seemed suddenly to think better of it.
▪ He passed Miguel the joint but Miguel thought better of it.
▪ Then he thought better of it.
two heads are better than one
you'd better believe it!
▪ "Do they make money on them?" "You'd better believe it!"
your better half/other half
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Bored in the isolation of his taxi, curiosity and perhaps hunger got the better of him.
▪ On many other issues where he and Mr Bush differ we similarly believe Mr Gore has the better of the argument.
IV.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
lot
▪ And for the sheriff with his bog Buick, yes, lots better.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(get) a bigger/better etc bang for your buck
(just) that little bit better/easier etc
▪ We have put together a few of the most popular itineraries to help make your choice that little bit easier.
a (damn/darned/darn) sight more/better etc
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
▪ If he listened to Anthony Scrivener, he would be a darned sight better.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
▪ The Galapagos finch was a darn sight more valuable than Sandra Willmot.
▪ We were a darned sight better than them.
a damn sight more/better etc
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
a darn sight better/harder etc
all the better/easier/more etc
▪ He offsets Roberts' operatic evil with a performance that commands all the more notice for its minimalism.
▪ His job was made all the more easier by drivers who hadn't bothered to take measures to stop people like him.
▪ If there is some meat left on the bones, all the better.
▪ It makes it all the more opportune.
▪ Superb defence by Karpov, all the more praiseworthy in that he was now in desperate time trouble.
▪ The dispute was all the more bitter because a prize was at stake.
▪ The inadequacy and treachery of the old leaderships of the working class have made the need all the more imperative.
▪ Weather experts say it was a relatively dry winter which makes the water recovery all the more remarkable.
better (to be) safe than sorry
▪ I think I'll take my umbrella along - better safe than sorry.
▪ Anyway, better safe than sorry.
▪ The overall message of precaution-better safe than sorry-has intuitive appeal.
better Red than dead
better late than never
▪ While ongoing self-monitoring is urged, it is always better late than never.
better luck next time
▪ Ah well, better luck next time, Andy.
▪ And if you didn't win, better luck next time.
▪ Back to the West Indies with it, and better luck next time.
better the devil you know (than the devil you don't)
better/harder/worse etc still
▪ And 245 specialty stock funds that focus on particular industries did better still, averaging a 6. 5 percent gain.
▪ But perhaps the early evening was better still?
▪ He didn't talk because he was afraid of losing the pole or, worse still, falling in.
▪ I started to hunt for a cheap restaurant or, better still, a snack shop.
▪ I thought that it would soon pass, and it did - for you to work harder still.
▪ Or better still, make a real talent show instead.
▪ Or better still, there was the village school practically next door!
▪ With hindsight, it would have better still to lock in a few more gains.
couldn't be better/worse/more pleased etc
discretion is the better part of valour
even bigger/better/brighter etc
▪ But he actually proved even better than I thought.
▪ He had hoped to play an even bigger, more traditional role.
▪ I sort of thought the accident would make us play even better.
▪ It was even better when I got a hug and a kiss from the former Miss Minnesota!
▪ Many companies do so because smart managers know the importance of rewarding good work and inspiring even better efforts.
▪ There was something spontaneous and lively in his manner of speaking that made whatever he was saying sound even better.
▪ This show will be even better than the last one and is not to be missed!
▪ What is the best way of stemming this decline or, even better, of regenerating the economy?
for want of a better word/phrase etc
▪ Just horses and ploughs and, for want of a better word, peasants.
▪ Now, hands are, well, handed for want of a better word.
for want of anything better (to do)
good/better/healthy etc start (in life)
▪ A good start is one where you pass close behind the start boat going at speed.
▪ But it wasn't a good start in the lessons of love, and left me very arid in such matters.
▪ He had better start by accepting that if he does the right things, they will not be popular ones.
▪ It wasn't a very good start.
▪ Not a good start, but a start, nevertheless.
▪ The auditor may enjoy the gifts, but he had better start looking for a sympathy engram not yet suspected or tapped.
▪ The problem was the middle and end, when the team sacrificed rebounding for getting out to a good start.
▪ They will, however, be getting a new center, and that is a good start, he believes.
greater/more/better etc than the sum of its parts
▪ Or is the organisation more than the sum of its parts?
half a loaf (is better than none)
hotter/colder/better etc than ever
▪ And that incentive was increased when they got personal recognition and satisfaction from doing it better than ever before.
▪ He says the new films are better than ever.
▪ Organised by the Alton and District Arts Council, the week promises to be better than ever.
▪ The moviemaking machine that Walt Disney created sixty years ago is working better than ever today.
▪ The National Health Service is now better than ever.
▪ The opportunities now are better than ever.
▪ This year's attractions are bigger and better than ever, with events running from Tuesday to Saturday.
▪ Watermen talked about their catches so far this year, which they said have been better than ever.
light years ahead/better etc than sth
miles older/better/too difficult etc
none the worse/better etc (for sth)
▪ Although the animal glowed rosy-pink, it appeared none the worse for its ordeal.
▪ I recovered, my mouth none the worse for it, after all.
▪ Peter's little pet was clearly none the worse for its time in the underworld.
sb had better/best do sth
sb's elders (and betters)
▪ For our purposes it may be more helpful to use the idea of desire when assessing elders.
▪ He roused himself wearily to exchange greetings with the elders as they passed him, and went in to his foster-father.
▪ In this respect at least, the procedures reflected those of a lineage or tribal meeting of elders and shaikhs.
▪ Indeed, the absence of official elders was a source of wonder to visitors from systems run by a selected few.
▪ Some, like Monta o, believe to this day that the city killed their elders.
▪ The Oaks are the Elders of the Forest and the others are aware of it.
▪ The weary elders of the 1980s take revenge at last upon the hapless victims of the 1960s.
the best/better part of sth
▪ Almost any child will assert that recess is the best part of the school day.
▪ Another child makes the family wretched with his crying for the better part of an hour.
▪ Converse drank the better part of the rum.
▪ For the better part of the next forty years they were to be the decisive restraints.
▪ I spent the better part of my time moping around the house, too dejected to think about practicing my stunts.
▪ It is not widely taught or particularly popular be-cause it takes the better part of a lifetime to master.
▪ This was it, the confrontation-point which he had been dreading for the best part of a week.
the sooner ( ... ) the better
▪ The sooner we get these bills paid off, the better.
▪ They knew they had to leave town, and the sooner the better.
two heads are better than one
your better half/other half
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ new laws aimed at bettering economic conditions
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ I think you can always better programs.
▪ In my view nothing betters a good ferret box.
▪ Rockefeller believed society could be bettered by public spending and public architecture.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Better

Better \Bet"ter\, a.; compar. of Good. [OE. betere, bettre, and as adv. bet, AS. betera, adj., and bet, adv.; akin to Icel. betri, adj., betr, adv., Goth. batiza, adj., OHG. bezziro, adj., baz, adv., G. besser, adj. and adv., bass, adv., E. boot, and prob. to Skr. bhadra excellent. See Boot advantage, and cf. Best, Batful.]

  1. Having good qualities in a greater degree than another; as, a better man; a better physician; a better house; a better air.

    Could make the worse appear The better reason.
    --Milton.

  2. Preferable in regard to rank, value, use, fitness, acceptableness, safety, or in any other respect.

    To obey is better than sacrifice.
    --1 Sam. xv. 22.

    It is better to trust in the Lord than to put confidence in princes.
    --Ps. cxviii. 9.

  3. Greater in amount; larger; more.

  4. Improved in health; less affected with disease; as, the patient is better.

  5. More advanced; more perfect; as, upon better acquaintance; a better knowledge of the subject.

    All the better. See under All, adv.

    Better half, an expression used to designate one's wife.

    My dear, my better half (said he), I find I must now leave thee.
    --Sir P. Sidney.

    To be better off, to be in a better condition.

    Had better. (See under Had).

    Note: The phrase had better, followed by an infinitive without to, is idiomatic. The earliest form of construction was ``were better'' with a dative; as, ``Him were better go beside.'' (
    --Gower.) i. e., It would be better for him, etc. At length the nominative (I, he, they, etc.) supplanted the dative and had took the place of were. Thus we have the construction now used.

    By all that's holy, he had better starve Than but once think this place becomes thee not.
    --Shak.

Better

Better \Bet"ter\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bettered; p. pr. & vb. n. Bettering.] [AS. beterian, betrian, fr. betera better. See Better, a.]

  1. To improve or ameliorate; to increase the good qualities of.

    Love betters what is best.
    --Wordsworth.

    He thought to better his circumstances.
    --Thackeray.

  2. To improve the condition of, morally, physically, financially, socially, or otherwise.

    The constant effort of every man to better himself.
    --Macaulay.

  3. To surpass in excellence; to exceed; to excel.

    The works of nature do always aim at that which can not be bettered.
    --Hooker.

  4. To give advantage to; to support; to advance the interest of. [Obs.]

    Weapons more violent, when next we meet, May serve to better us and worse our foes.
    --Milton.

    Syn: To improve; meliorate; ameliorate; mend; amend; correct; emend; reform; advance; promote.

Better

Better \Bet"ter\, n.

  1. Advantage, superiority, or victory; -- usually with of; as, to get the better of an enemy.

  2. One who has a claim to precedence; a superior, as in merit, social standing, etc.; -- usually in the plural.

    Their betters would hardly be found.
    --Hooker.

    For the better, in the way of improvement; so as to produce improvement. ``If I have altered him anywhere for the better.''
    --Dryden.

Better

Better \Bet"ter\, adv.; compar. of Well.

  1. In a superior or more excellent manner; with more skill and wisdom, courage, virtue, advantage, or success; as, Henry writes better than John; veterans fight better than recruits.

    I could have better spared a better man.
    --Shak.

  2. More correctly or thoroughly.

    The better to understand the extent of our knowledge.
    --Locke.

  3. In a higher or greater degree; more; as, to love one better than another.

    Never was monarch better feared, and loved.
    --Shak.

  4. More, in reference to value, distance, time, etc.; as, ten miles and better. [Colloq.]

    To think better of (any one), to have a more favorable opinion of any one.

    To think better of (an opinion, resolution, etc.), to reconsider and alter one's decision.

Better

Better \Bet"ter\, v. i. To become better; to improve.
--Carlyle.

Better

Better \Bet"ter\, n. One who bets or lays a wager.

Better

Good \Good\, a. [Compar. Better; superl. Best. These words, though used as the comparative and superlative of good, are from a different root.] [AS. G[=o]d, akin to D. goed, OS. g[=o]d, OHG. guot, G. gut, Icel. g[=o][eth]r, Sw. & Dan. god, Goth. g[=o]ds; prob. orig., fitting, belonging together, and akin to E. gather. [root]29 Cf. Gather.]

  1. Possessing desirable qualities; adapted to answer the end designed; promoting success, welfare, or happiness; serviceable; useful; fit; excellent; admirable; commendable; not bad, corrupt, evil, noxious, offensive, or troublesome, etc.

    And God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good.
    --Gen. i. 31.

    Good company, good wine, good welcome.
    --Shak.

  2. Possessing moral excellence or virtue; virtuous; pious; religious; -- said of persons or actions.

    In all things showing thyself a pattern of good works.
    --Tit. ii. 7.

  3. Kind; benevolent; humane; merciful; gracious; polite; propitious; friendly; well-disposed; -- often followed by to or toward, also formerly by unto.

    The men were very good unto us.
    --1 Sam. xxv. 15.

  4. Serviceable; suited; adapted; suitable; of use; to be relied upon; -- followed especially by for.

    All quality that is good for anything is founded originally in merit.
    --Collier.

  5. Clever; skillful; dexterous; ready; handy; -- followed especially by at.

    He . . . is a good workman; a very good tailor.
    --Shak.

    Those are generally good at flattering who are good for nothing else.
    --South.

  6. Adequate; sufficient; competent; sound; not fallacious; valid; in a commercial sense, to be depended on for the discharge of obligations incurred; having pecuniary ability; of unimpaired credit.

    My reasons are both good and weighty.
    --Shak.

    My meaning in saying he is a good man is . . . that he is sufficient . . . I think I may take his bond.
    --Shak.

  7. Real; actual; serious; as in the phrases in good earnest; in good sooth.

    Love no man in good earnest.
    --Shak.

  8. Not small, insignificant, or of no account; considerable; esp., in the phrases a good deal, a good way, a good degree, a good share or part, etc.

  9. Not lacking or deficient; full; complete.

    Good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over.
    --Luke vi. 38.

  10. Not blemished or impeached; fair; honorable; unsullied; as in the phrases a good name, a good report, good repute, etc. A good name is better than precious ointment. --Eccl. vii.

    1. As good as. See under As. For good, or For good and all, completely and finally; fully; truly. The good woman never died after this, till she came to die for good and all. --L'Estrange. Good breeding, polite or polished manners, formed by education; a polite education. Distinguished by good humor and good breeding. --Macaulay. Good cheap, literally, good bargain; reasonably cheap. Good consideration (Law).

      1. A consideration of blood or of natural love and affection.
        --Blackstone.

      2. A valuable consideration, or one which will sustain a contract. Good fellow, a person of companionable qualities. Good folk, or Good people, fairies; brownies; pixies, etc. [Colloq. Eng. & Scot.] Good for nothing.

        1. Of no value; useless; worthless.

        2. Used substantively, an idle, worthless person. My father always said I was born to be a good for nothing. --Ld. Lytton. Good Friday, the Friday of Holy Week, kept in some churches as a fast, in memoory of our Savior's passion or suffering; the anniversary of the crucifixion. Good humor, or Good-humor, a cheerful or pleasant temper or state of mind. Good humor man, a travelling vendor who sells Good Humor ice-cream (or some similar ice-cream) from a small refrigerated truck; he usually drives slowly through residential neighborhoods in summertime, loudly playing some distinctive recorded music to announce his presence. Good nature, or Good-nature, habitual kindness or mildness of temper or disposition; amiability; state of being in good humor. The good nature and generosity which belonged to his character. --Macaulay. The young count's good nature and easy persuadability were among his best characteristics. --Hawthorne. Good people. See Good folk (above). Good speed, good luck; good success; godspeed; -- an old form of wishing success. See Speed. Good turn, an act of kidness; a favor. Good will.

          1. Benevolence; well wishing; kindly feeling.

          2. (Law) The custom of any trade or business; the tendency or inclination of persons, old customers and others, to resort to an established place of business; the advantage accruing from tendency or inclination. The good will of a trade is nothing more than the probability that the old customers will resort to the old place. --Lord Eldon. In good time.

            1. Promptly; punctually; opportunely; not too soon nor too late.

            2. (Mus.) Correctly; in proper time.

              To hold good, to remain true or valid; to be operative; to remain in force or effect; as, his promise holds good; the condition still holds good.

              To make good, to fulfill; to establish; to maintain; to supply (a defect or deficiency); to indemmify; to prove or verify (an accusation); to prove to be blameless; to clear; to vindicate.

              Each word made good and true.
              --Shak.

              Of no power to make his wishes good.
              --Shak.

              I . . . would by combat make her good.
              --Shak.

              Convenient numbers to make good the city.
              --Shak.

              To think good, to approve; to be pleased or satisfied with; to consider expedient or proper.

              If ye think good, give me my price; and if not, forbear.
              --Zech. xi. 1

    2. Note: Good, in the sense of wishing well, is much used in greeting and leave-taking; as, good day, good night, good evening, good morning, etc.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
better

Old English bettra, earlier betera, from Proto-Germanic *batizo-, from PIE *bhad- "good;" see best. Comparative adjective of good in the older Germanic languages (compare Old Frisian betera, Old Saxon betiro, Old Norse betr, Danish bedre, Old High German bezziro, German besser, Gothic batiza). In English it superseded bet in the adverbial sense by 1600. Better half "wife" is first attested 1570s.

better

Old English *beterian "improve, amend, make better," from Proto-Germanic *batizojan (cognates: Old Frisian beteria, Dutch beteren, Old Norse betra, Old High German baziron, German bessern), from *batiz- (see better (adj.)). Related: Bettered; bettering.

better

late 12c., "that which is better," from better (adj.). Specific meaning "one's superior" is from early 14c. To get the better of (someone) is from 1650s, from better in a sense of "superiority, mastery," which is recorded from mid-15c.

Wiktionary
better

Etymology 1

  1. (en-comparativegood) adv. 1 (en-comparative of well POS=adverb) 2 More, in reference to value, distance, time, etc. n. An entity, usually animate, deemed superior to another; one who has a claim to precedence; a superior. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To improve. 2 (context intransitive English) To become better; to improve. 3 (context transitive English) To surpass in excellence; to exceed; to excel. 4 (context transitive English) To give advantage to; to support; to advance the interest of. 5 (context slang English) had better. Etymology 2

    n. (alternative spelling of bettor English)

WordNet
well
  1. adj. in good health especially after having suffered illness or injury; "appears to be entirely well"; "the wound is nearly well"; "a well man"; "I think I'm well; at least I feel well" [ant: ill]

  2. resulting favorably; "its a good thing that I wasn't there"; "it is good that you stayed"; "it is well that no one saw you"; "all's well that ends well" [syn: good, well(p)]

  3. wise or advantageous and hence advisable; "it would be well to start early" [syn: well(p)]

  4. [also: better, best]

well
  1. n. a deep hole or shaft dug or drilled to obtain water or oil or gas or brine

  2. a cavity or vessel used to contain liquid

  3. an abundant source; "she was a well of information" [syn: wellspring, fountainhead]

  4. an open shaft through the floors of a building (as for a stairway)

  5. an enclosed compartment in a ship or plane for holding something as e.g. fish or a plane's landing gear or for protecting something as e.g. a ship's pumps

  6. [also: better, best]

well
  1. adv. (often used as a combining form) in a good or proper or satisfactory manner or to a high standard (`good' is a nonstandard dialectal variant for `well'); "the children behaved well"; "a task well done"; "the party went well"; "he slept well"; "a well-argued thesis"; "a well-planned party"; "the baby can walk pretty good" [syn: good] [ant: ill]

  2. thoroughly or completely; fully; often used as a combining form; "The problem is well understood"; "she was well informed"; "shake well before using"; "in order to avoid food poisoning be sure the meat is well cooked"; "well-done beef", "well-satisfied customers"; "well-educated"

  3. indicating high probability; in all likelihood; "I might well do it"; "a mistake that could easily have ended in disaster"; "you may well need your umbrella"; "he could equally well be trying to deceive us" [syn: easily]

  4. (used for emphasis or as an intensifier) entirely or fully; "a book well worth reading"; "was well aware of the difficulties ahead"; "suspected only too well what might be going on"

  5. to a suitable or appropriate extent or degree; "the project was well underway"; "the fetus has well developed organs"; "his father was well pleased with his grades"

  6. favorably; with approval; "their neighbors spoke well of them"; "he thought well of the book" [ant: ill]

  7. to a great extent or degree; "I'm afraid the film was well over budget"; "painting the room white made it seem considerably (or substantially) larger"; "the house has fallen considerably in value"; "the price went up substantially" [syn: considerably, substantially]

  8. with great or especially intimate knowledge; "we knew them well" [syn: intimately]

  9. with prudence or propriety; "You would do well to say nothing more"; "could not well refuse"

  10. with skill or in a pleasing manner; "she dances well"; "he writes well" [ant: badly]

  11. in a manner affording benefit or advantage; "she married well"; "The children were settled advantageously in Seattle" [syn: advantageously] [ant: badly, badly]

  12. in financial comfort; "They live well"; "she has been able to live comfortably since her husband died" [syn: comfortably]

  13. without unusual distress or resentment; with good humor; "took the joke well"; "took the tragic news well" [ant: badly]

  14. [also: better, best]

well
  1. v. come up; "Tears well in her eyes" [syn: swell]

  2. [also: better, best]

better

See well

better
  1. adj. (comparative of `good') superior to another (of the same class or set or kind) in excellence or quality or desirability or suitability; more highly skilled than another; "You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din"; "a better coat"; "a better type of car"; "a suit with a better fit"; "a better chance of success"; "produced a better mousetrap"; "she's better in math than in history" [ant: worse]

  2. (comparative of `good') changed for the better in health or fitness; "her health is better now"; "I feel better" [ant: worse]

  3. (comparative and superlative of `well') wiser or more advantageous and hence advisable; "it would be better to speak to him"; "the White House thought it best not to respond" [syn: better(p), best(p)]

  4. more than half; "argued for the better part of an hour"

better
  1. n. one having claim to precedence; a superior; "the common man has been kept in his place by his betters"

  2. someone who bets [syn: bettor, wagerer, punter]

  3. the superior one of two alternatives; "chose the better of the two"

better
  1. adv. comparative of `well'; in a better or more excellent manner or more advantageously or attractively or to a greater degree etc.; "She had never sung better"; "a deed better left undone"; "better suited to the job"

  2. from a position of superiority or authority; "father knows best"; "I know better." [syn: best]

  3. v. surpass in excellence; "She bettered her own record"; "break a record" [syn: break]

  4. to make better; "The editor improved the manuscript with his changes" [syn: improve, amend, ameliorate, meliorate] [ant: worsen]

  5. get better; "The weather improved toward evening" [syn: improve, ameliorate, meliorate] [ant: worsen]

better

See good

good
  1. n. benefit; "for your own good"; "what's the good of worrying?"

  2. moral excellence or admirableness; "there is much good to be found in people" [syn: goodness] [ant: evil, evil]

  3. that which is good or valuable or useful; "weigh the good against the bad"; "among the highest goods of all are happiness and self-realization" [syn: goodness] [ant: bad, bad]

  4. [also: better, best]

good
  1. adv. (often used as a combining form) in a good or proper or satisfactory manner or to a high standard (`good' is a nonstandard dialectal variant for `well'); "the children behaved well"; "a task well done"; "the party went well"; "he slept well"; "a well-argued thesis"; "a well-planned party"; "the baby can walk pretty good" [syn: well] [ant: ill]

  2. in a complete and thorough manner (`good' is sometimes used informally for `thoroughly'); "he was soundly defeated"; "we beat him good" [syn: thoroughly, soundly]

  3. [also: better, best]

good
  1. adj. having desirable or positive qualities especially those suitable for a thing specified; "good news from the hospital"; "a good report card"; "when she was good she was very very good"; "a good knife is one good for cutting"; "this stump will make a good picnic table"; "a good check"; "a good joke"; "a good exterior paint"; "a good secretary"; "a good dress for the office" [ant: bad]

  2. having the normally expected amount; "gives full measure"; "gives good measure"; "a good mile from here" [syn: full]

  3. morally admirable [ant: evil]

  4. deserving of esteem and respect; "all respectable companies give guarantees"; "ruined the family's good name" [syn: estimable, honorable, respectable]

  5. promoting or enhancing well-being; "an arms limitation agreement beneficial to all countries"; "the beneficial effects of a temperate climate"; "the experience was good for her" [syn: beneficial]

  6. superior to the average; "in fine spirits"; "a fine student"; "made good grades"; "morale was good"; "had good weather for the parade" [syn: fine]

  7. agreeable or pleasing; "we all had a good time"; "good manners"

  8. of moral excellence; "a genuinely good person"; "a just cause"; "an upright and respectable man"; "the life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous"- Frederick Douglass [syn: just, upright, virtuous]

  9. having or showing knowledge and skill and aptitude; "adept in handicrafts"; "an adept juggler"; "an expert job"; "a good mechanic"; "a practiced marksman"; "a proficient engineer"; "a lesser-known but no less skillful composer"; "the effect was achieved by skillful retouching" [syn: adept, expert, practiced, proficient, skillful, skilful]

  10. thorough; "had a good workout"; "gave the house a good cleaning"

  11. with or in a close or intimate relationship; "a good friend"; "my sisters and brothers are near and dear" [syn: dear, near]

  12. having or showing or arising from a desire to promote the welfare or happiness of others; "his benevolent smile"; "a benevolent nature" [syn: benevolent] [ant: malevolent]

  13. financially sound; "a good investment"; "a secure investment" [syn: dependable, safe, secure]

  14. most suitable or right for a particular purpose; "a good time to plant tomatoes"; "the right time to act"; "the time is ripe for great sociological changes" [syn: right, ripe]

  15. resulting favorably; "its a good thing that I wasn't there"; "it is good that you stayed"; "it is well that no one saw you"; "all's well that ends well" [syn: well(p)]

  16. exerting force or influence; "the law is effective immediately"; "a warranty good for two years"; "the law is already in effect (or in force)" [syn: effective, in effect(p), in force(p)]

  17. feeling healthy and free of aches and pains; "I feel good" [syn: good(p)]

  18. capable of pleasing; "good looks"

  19. appealing to the mind; "good music"; "a serious book" [syn: serious]

  20. in excellent physical condition; "good teeth"; "I still have one good leg"; "a sound mind in a sound body" [syn: sound]

  21. tending to promote physical well-being; beneficial to health; "beneficial effects of a balanced diet"; "a good night's sleep"; "the salutary influence of pure air" [syn: beneficial, salutary]

  22. not forged; "a good dollar bill"

  23. not left to spoil; "the meat is still good" [syn: unspoiled, unspoilt]

  24. generally admired; "good taste"

  25. [also: better, best]

Wikipedia
Better (Brooke Fraser song)

"Better" is the debut single by Brooke Fraser from her multi-platinum and award-winning album What to Do with Daylight.

Better

Better may refer to:

  • "to better" as a verb, meaning to undergo betterment
  • better, an alternate spelling of bettor, someone who bets ( gambles)
Better (Guns N' Roses song)

"Better" is a song by American rock band Guns N' Roses, featured on their 2008 sixth studio album Chinese Democracy. It was sent out as the second radio promo from the album, after " Chinese Democracy", but was not commercially released as a single eligible for international sales charts.

Better (Tom Baxter song)

"Better" is a song originally recorded and released as part of the album Skybound, released by independent British singer-songwriter Tom Baxter in January 2008. Baxter's version was also used on the soundtrack for the motion picture Run Fatboy Run. The first version of the song to chart was a cover by Boyzone, released in December 2008 as the second and final single from their second greatest hits compilation, Back Again... No Matter What.

Better (album)

Better is the fourth studio album by American R&B recording artist Chrisette Michele. The album was released on June 11, 2013. The album features guest appearances from 2 Chainz, Wale, Bilal, Dunson and Nello Luchi.

Better (Maggie Rose song)

"Better" is a song recorded by American country music singer Maggie Rose. It was released in February 2013 as the second single from her first studio album, Cut to Impress. The song was written by Candy Cameron, Deanna Bryant and Dave Berg.

Better (Kim Hyung-jun song)

"Better" is the second Japanese single by South Korean entertainer Kim Hyung-jun, after "Long Night". It was released on November 19, 2014 on the Swave E&T label. The single was also released on DVD.

Better (Haley Reinhart song)

"Better" is the lead single from American singer Haley Reinhart's sophomore album, Better. It was written by Reinhart in collaboration with Alex Reid and Anders Grahn and produced by Grahn. The single was released on April 8, 2016 through music publishers ole and red dot. The single received positive reviews from critics upon release, notably for its production and Reinhart's vocal performance.

Better (Brian McKnight album)

"Better" is the 12th studio album by American recording artist Brian McKnight. It was released on February 26, 2016.

Better (TV series)

The Better Show was a syndicated lifestyle and celebrity focused daytime talk show. It aired weekdays on 160 stations across the United States. The program was produced and distributed by Meredith Corporation. The Better Show got its name from and is based on Meredith's flagship publication, Better Homes and Gardens. The show also tapped its other magazine's expert's in home, shelter and parenting.

This was not Better Homes and Gardens' first foray into television; in the 1990s, the magazine presented a similar syndicated weekly series, Better Your Home with Better Homes and Gardens. In addition, the Australian version of the magazine has their TV series as well.

The hour-long daytime strip show Better allows eight minutes of local content. While in Kansas City, the national version on KSMO-TV was also compliment by a total localized version, Better Kansas City, on KCTV. At least with Meredith stations those with some localized content gave a local version of the name. For example, WNEM-TV's version was called Better Mid-Michigan. while WGCL-TV's edition was known as Better Mornings Atlanta; and KPHO-TV's show was called Better Arizona. WPHL-TV (a Tribune-owned Better affiliate) aired the national version in the morning with local cut-ins throughout the hour, branded as Better Philly.

Better (Haley Reinhart album)

Better is the second studio album by American singer and songwriter Haley Reinhart. It was released on April 29, 2016 by music publishers ole and red dot. Reinhart's cover of Elvis Presley's " Can't Help Falling in Love" was released as the album's first promotional single on October 9, 2015. The lead single, " Better", was released on April 8, 2016, the same day that the album became available for pre-order. The album was met with positive reviews from critics, who praised its production, its fusion of genres and eras, Reinhart's voice and personality, and the album's overall message of empowerment. Better debuted at number 22 on the Independent Albums chart and sold 7,500 units in its first two weeks of release.

Usage examples of "better".

With what experience we have had with the hog, and that by no means an agreeable one, we can devise no better method of accommodation than this here described, and it certainly is the cheapest.

Thus, it by no means believes in an equality of races, but along with their difference it recognizes their higher or lesser value and feels itself obligated to promote the victory of the better and stronger, and demand the subordination of the inferior and weaker in accordance with the eternal will that dominates this universe.

Necker, as usual, was better prepared to deal with the impossible accoustics in the 120-foot-long Salle des Menus Plaisirs.

It is better for the workman that he should prosper, for the fund of capital accumulated is that upon which they depend to give them wages in a dull time.

They no doubt believed that if England attained this commanding position, the accumulated wealth would raise all classes into better conditions.

But he said nothing, determined that today the acrophobia would not get the better of him.

I was useless to myself and family and had about persuaded myself it would be better to take my life, and I think I should have done so had not a copy of the Common Sense Medical Adviser happened to fall into my hands.

In many malls, upscale stores are clustered together so the affluent shopper can drift from one to the other, looking not just for the good life but for the better life.

By the time the Culture came to know the Affront better - shortly after the long distraction of the Idiran war - the Affront were a rapidly developing and swiftly maturing species, and short of another war there was no practical way of quickly changing either their nature or behaviour.

Even if destitute of any formal or official enunciation of those important truths, which even in a cultivated age it was often found inexpedient to assert except under a veil of allegory, and which moreover lose their dignity and value in proportion as they are learned mechanically as dogmas, the shows of the Mysteries certainly contained suggestions if not lessons, which in the opinion not of one competent witness only, but of many, were adapted to elevate the character of the spectators, enabling them to augur something of the purposes of existence, as well as of the means of improving it, to live better and to die happier.

So I spent the better part of Tuesday calling each on the phone, dropping by in person in the case of the nurse-practitioner, the allergy doctor, and our minister, to explain the situation and ask if I might give the GAL their names.

It was effaced as easily as it had been evoked by an allocution from Mr Candidate Mulligan in that vein of pleasantry which none better than he knew how to affect, postulating as the supremest object of desire a nice clean old man.

Of course your old allopathist can still fight better than I can, and I still get the headaches to prove it.

The light of our world can be allocated because it springs from a corporeal mass of known position, but conceive an immaterial entity, independent of body as being of earlier nature than all body, a nature firmly self-based or, better, without need of base: such a principle, incorporeal, autonomous, having no source for its rising, coming from no place, attached to no material mass, this cannot be allotted part here and part there: that would be to give it both a previous position and a present attachment.

The General, during this, was tactless enough to allude to the quality of the basic weapon, with the French being praised for their ability to build better ships.