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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
stroke
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a piece/stroke of luck (=something good that happens by chance)
▪ What a piece of luck that he arrived when he did!
a stroke of genius (=a very clever idea)
▪ At the time, his appointment seemed a stroke of genius.
at/on the stroke of midnight (=at exactly midnight)
▪ The treaty will come into force on the stroke of midnight tonight.
ground stroke
massive stroke/heart attack etc
▪ He suffered a massive stroke.
stroke a cat
▪ Our cat won't let you stroke it.
stroke/rub your chin (=stroke it in a way that shows you are thinking about something)
▪ He stroked his chin and then seemed to come to a decision.
suffer a heart attack/stroke
▪ He died after suffering a massive heart attack.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bold
▪ Mr Major has taken plenty of decisions - Norman Lamont's budget was full of bold strokes.
▪ Hess's synthesis was a bold stroke of intuition.
▪ One or two more bold strokes of the pen could wrap it up for Kenny!
▪ A single bold stroke can not resolve political difficulties as fundamental as those Mondale faced and Dole now confronts.
▪ Dole can opt for some one out of the blue, making a bold stroke and hoping to demonstrate a spirit of adventure.
broad
▪ All the orchestral music from 1784 onwards is conceived in broader strokes, while the solo parts become ever more complex.
▪ The broadest strokes of that blueprint are already in place.
long
▪ He used small gouges to carve little tufts of fur with long, controlled strokes, following the marked lines.
▪ Shave legs with long smooth strokes from ankle to knee and from knee to thigh.
▪ He says that you must start on the triangle and continue in long strokes.
▪ Return to the long stroke with which you began in Step 1.
▪ The Veronese prefer a longer, Gothic stroke.
massive
▪ He died suddenly of another massive stroke three and a half years after his original illness.
▪ In April 1991, ten months after reelection, Molly suffered a massive stroke that incapacitated her for months.
▪ But I am sorry to tell you that he passed away on after a massive stroke.
▪ Bill Dailey, 54, a bartender at the downtown Radisson Hotel, also bounded back from a massive stroke.
short
▪ Start at your palms with soft, short strokes and brush towards the heart.
▪ To apply, stretch your eyelid until it is taut, and line with a series of short, connected strokes.
▪ In the plane of the sunlit grass, for example, the paint is applied in short strokes laid over one another.
▪ The short flats are good for this; they are also useful for blocking in colour and for short strokes.
single
▪ At a single stroke of fate, Mikhail Vologsky was nothing, with only uncertainty to look forward to.
▪ A single bold stroke can not resolve political difficulties as fundamental as those Mondale faced and Dole now confronts.
▪ The recognition of cursive script is much more difficult because several characters can be written with a single stroke.
▪ Each path was only a single stroke, as in a pencil rubbing from a leaf.
▪ These strokes are very much more effective than single strokes.
▪ Eddie won by a single stroke only after a back nine countback.
▪ The evolution of such a plant could not have been achieved at a single stroke.
▪ A macro is a string of instructions executed with a single key stroke.
■ NOUN
brush
▪ Her brush strokes mimic the uncertainty.
▪ Every brush stroke told a story.
▪ From the corner of my eye, I saw my frightened cousins obediently practicing their first brush strokes.
paddle
▪ The current classic paddle strokes are fine in certain circumstance but there are other occasions when different techniques are needed.
▪ Having defined our new paddle stroke we need to check it.
▪ A paddle stroke is like any other model or diagram which is used to pass on information.
▪ Compare this map with the forward sweep paddle stroke that we teach in the Star tests.
▪ Like the map, the taught sweep paddle stroke is unlike the real sweep stroke but still very useful.
▪ Our new paddle stroke is therefore probably correct.
▪ The real stroke and the paddle stroke will drift apart in style over the years.
▪ We now need to respond to this change by adopting a new forward paddle stroke when coaching in shorter boats.
patient
▪ We acknowledge that stroke patients may be classified in the progressive or non-progressive disorder category.
▪ Surprisingly, the language problems produced by other forms of damage do not necessarily follow these principles derived from stroke patients.
▪ Those available will be busy rehabilitating stroke patients, who take priority.
▪ He had been caring for a stroke patient who seemed to understand much of what was said to him.
▪ The care of stroke patients involves a plethora of different health and social care workers.
▪ A 75-year-old stroke patient died there last December when he fell from a trolley outside the casualty unit.
▪ These studies are intended to describe precisely the types of difficulty in recognising faces experienced by some stroke patients.
▪ It may also help to boost the spirits and is used in the care of stroke patients who are left feeling despondent.
penalty
▪ He saved a penalty stroke from Simon Dawson six minutes from the end of normal time.
▪ Green scored from a penalty stroke and a fine open-play goal before Yvonne Ayshford got Midlands' consolation goal almost on time.
▪ The changes proved successful and Gregs won an early, though dubious, penalty stroke.
▪ They won Saturday's game 1-0, Vickey Dixon scoring from a penalty stroke.
victim
▪ Mrs thomas, a stroke victim who walked with the aid of a zimmer frame, collapsed and died just after.
▪ Some stroke victims recover on their own; the study will determine how many, and whether mo re recover on tPA.
▪ Later Caroline specialised in Special Needs classes and introduced the first class to help stroke victims.
▪ Members are involved in Cambuslang with a club for stroke victims.
■ VERB
die
▪ Frail Kathleen Lillyman, 61, died of a stroke after Raymond Oxborough's attack.
▪ On 10 April 1911 Ras Tasamma, the Regent, died of a stroke.
▪ But the funeral of Mr Whitelaw, who died of a stroke, will go ahead as planned today.
play
▪ DeFreitas played a daffy stroke: he tried to pull one from Cairns which was not short enough.
▪ He had already blown his chances and perhaps that was why he played a relaxed stroke.
suffer
▪ The rebel Duke had suffered five strokes of the axe.
▪ It was always at this point that Takat seemed to suffer a stroke.
▪ Early in 1934 she suffered a stroke and died 10 January peacefully in her sleep.
▪ Mr Kelly, who had suffered strokes in 1994 and 1995, died in his sleep, his publicist said.
▪ Some people's behaviour changes after they have suffered a stroke.
▪ In April 1991, ten months after reelection, Molly suffered a massive stroke that incapacitated her for months.
▪ He's suffered 3 strokes in the last year and chose one of the wettest days of autumn to have a go.
▪ King Fahd, 73, suffered a mild stroke in November.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
oblique line/stroke etc
▪ Also it should be lit at night and have traffic cones placed in an oblique line on the approach to it.
▪ The apparent movement of both the lion and the Cupids along an imaginary, oblique line is largely responsible for this effect.
▪ The gill openings were arranged in an oblique line as in lampreys.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Aspin died suddenly of a stroke.
▪ He paints the pictures with a series of quick strokes.
▪ If we talked back to the teacher, we got two strokes on the palm.
▪ the back stroke
▪ The most complex Chinese character contains 64 strokes.
▪ With our first paddle strokes, the canoe started moving rapidly down the river.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But this latest phase has now also emboldened Bush to press forward with his agenda in strong, conservative strokes.
▪ The stroke that brought my father down was enveloped in its own ironies.
▪ The next stroke is called pulling, and is done along the sides of the body.
▪ We all long for the grand stroke that will turn schools around and suddenly solve all our problems.
▪ What is temporary paralysis in half the face next to the crippling paralysis of a stroke?
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
gently
▪ However, by patient wheedling and soft talk I managed to touch her and gently stroked her cheek with one finger.
▪ Late one night I stirred from a deep sleep to find Dad sitting beside my bed, gently stroking my hair.
▪ With the other he gently stroked his hair.
Gently stroke the entire face with gentle upward movements as in Step 4. 14.
▪ She saw he was nervous, and encouraged him by gently stroking his neck and shoulders.
■ NOUN
arm
▪ As Pamela walked towards them Tim stroked his wife's arm in a long, slow, sensual gesture.
▪ She strokes her arm, pats her shoulder, smiles up at her.
▪ I stroked her arms and her back.
▪ Tiny hands stroked his arms and began to explore his outer pockets.
▪ At one point I began stroking his arm to slow him down.
▪ I stroke his arm and I notice the hairs are raised in their follicles.
ball
▪ And he remained ice cool to stroke the ball home with his renowned touch of arrogance.
beard
▪ The MI5 man pondered for a moment and stroked his beard.
▪ That at least made Pinkus stroke his beard again.
▪ He laughed a bit and stroked his beard a bit.
▪ Exactly, White answers, stroking his beard.
▪ Tait stroked his beard again with long, elegant fingers, appraising her with colourless eyes.
▪ He stroked his beard and then scratched irritably through it.
▪ He stroked at his beard for a second.
cat
▪ Why does a cat sometimes bite the hand that strokes it?
▪ First the owner starts to stroke the cat, tickle its ear, or gently rub its head.
cheek
▪ However, by patient wheedling and soft talk I managed to touch her and gently stroked her cheek with one finger.
▪ I stroke her lifeless cheek, and as I do the deep purple bruises seem to fade a little.
▪ She was stroking Louis's cheek and whispering to him reassuringly.
▪ Mary had spent a little time in close conversation with him and even stroked his cheek at one stage.
▪ When he rolled away from her, she idly pulled a frond of fern and stroked it down his cheek.
chin
▪ She reached up and stroked his chin.
▪ Derek began to stroke his double chin.
▪ He began thoughtfully stroking his chin.
▪ Cantor slowly stroked his chin while staring at Stafford.
▪ Lufkin stroked his chin, as if contemplating her request.
ego
▪ The strange thing is that we often offer ego stroking to those we love, but forget to do it for ourselves!
▪ The Ego likes to be stroked.
▪ Feeding and nurturing comes next and we can call these the ego stroking exercises.
face
▪ She stroked his face, traced his strongly-curved lips with her finger, and kissed him lightly.
▪ They come to me and sit down on my bed, singing songs and stroking my face.
▪ Tallis went to the makeshift corral and let the animal out, stroking her bruised face, patting her flanks.
▪ Gently stroke the entire face with gentle upward movements as in Step 4. 14.
▪ The man stroked her face and hair, soothed her whimpering, kissed her bruises, shushed in her ear.
finger
▪ Something like a rough finger stroked the back of her neck.
forehead
▪ She stroked Anna's forehead, as much to quieten her own resentment as to soothe Anna.
▪ He sat on the stool at the head of the bed and stroked my forehead and my hair.
▪ I stroke Timmy's forehead more and more lightly, until I am stroking empty air.
▪ She would get really worried and stroke my forehead and plead with me not to talk about dying.
fur
▪ We watched as Christopher's expression changed slowly from shock to amazement to joy as he stroked the animal's fur.
hair
▪ Fingers ran through her hair, stroked her throat, gently probed her mouth.
▪ There was lots of kissing and hair-stroking going on, which always makes onlookers feel rather frigid and inadequate.
▪ He felt his hair being stroked and opened both eyes.
▪ She felt the comfort of his hand against her hair, stroking back the curls.
hand
▪ Her hands stroked the silk of his skin with bold pleasure.
▪ He was starting to feel nervous; his hands stroked the steering wheel.
▪ Ludens knew that Patrick longed to touch Marcus, to hold his hand, to stroke his sleeve, but dared not.
▪ He flexed his hand and stroked a talon across his own forearm.
▪ She took him in her hand, stroked him.
▪ Her eyes flew open as Roman kissed her again, his hands stroking the soft shoulders, revealed by her scanty nightdress.
▪ His hand was stroking a rug flung over the stable door.
head
▪ I shift myself a stair higher, so that I can reach up and stroke my son's head.
▪ Maggie crooned to him and stroked his head.
▪ I would stroke his head and hand to let him know I was lying there beside him.
▪ I half hope he's awake, so that I can go in and sit with him, and stroke his head.
▪ I should stroke his head, but how can I do a thing like that?
▪ With my other hand I stroked his head, the side of his face.
neck
▪ Instead, she stroked his neck and then closed her hand very gently over him.
▪ One handler, cradling his bird in his arms, whispers to it and strokes its neck.
▪ Her jealous rage subsided; she stroked the horse's neck.
▪ She stroked its neck, led it away from the interested crowd and over to the grass.
▪ She saw he was nervous, and encouraged him by gently stroking his neck and shoulders.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Ann took the baby in her arms and stroked his cheek.
▪ Figo stroked the ball over Martinez's head.
▪ He knew he had to tolerate Haley, stroke him some, and wait for his rage to subside.
▪ Her mother sat beside her and stroked her forehead until she fell asleep again.
▪ Miss Poole calmed herself by stroking the cat's fur.
▪ The old priest stroked his white beard as he listened.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He laughed a bit and stroked his beard a bit.
▪ Lyn stroked him and reminded him she would be back at lunchtime.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Stroke

Stroke \Stroke\, obs. imp. of Strike. Struck.

Stroke

Stroke \Stroke\, n. [OE. strok, strook, strak, fr. striken. See Strike, v. t.]

  1. The act of striking; a blow; a hit; a knock; esp., a violent or hostile attack made with the arm or hand, or with an instrument or weapon.

    His hand fetcheth a stroke with the ax to cut down the tree.
    --Deut. xix. 5.

    A fool's lips enter into contention and his mouth calleth for strokes.
    --Prov. xviii. 6.

    He entered and won the whole kingdom of Naples without striking a stroke.
    --Bacon.

  2. The result of effect of a striking; injury or affliction; soreness.

    In the day that Lord bindeth up the breach of his people, and healeth the stroke of their wound.
    --Isa. xxx. 26.

  3. The striking of the clock to tell the hour.

    Well, but what's o'clock? - Upon the stroke of ten. -- Well, let is strike.
    --Shak.

  4. A gentle, caressing touch or movement upon something; a stroking.
    --Dryden.

  5. A mark or dash in writing or printing; a line; the touch of a pen or pencil; as, an up stroke; a firm stroke.

    O, lasting as those colors may they shine, Free as thy stroke, yet faultless as thy line.
    --Pope.

  6. Hence, by extension, an addition or amandment to a written composition; a touch; as, to give some finishing strokes to an essay.
    --Addison.

  7. A sudden attack of disease; especially, a fatal attack; a severe disaster; any affliction or calamity, especially a sudden one; as, a stroke of apoplexy; the stroke of death.

    At this one stroke the man looked dead in law.
    --Harte.

  8. A throb or beat, as of the heart.
    --Tennyson.

  9. One of a series of beats or movements against a resisting medium, by means of which movement through or upon it is accomplished; as, the stroke of a bird's wing in flying, or an oar in rowing, of a skater, swimmer, etc.; also: (Rowing)

    1. The rate of succession of stroke; as, a quick stroke.

    2. The oar nearest the stern of a boat, by which the other oars are guided; -- called also stroke oar.

    3. The rower who pulls the stroke oar; the strokesman.

  10. A powerful or sudden effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished; also, something done or accomplished by such an effort; as, a stroke of genius; a stroke of business; a master stroke of policy.

  11. (Mach.) The movement, in either direction, of the piston plunger, piston rod, crosshead, etc., as of a steam engine or a pump, in which these parts have a reciprocating motion; as, the forward stroke of a piston; also, the entire distance passed through, as by a piston, in such a movement; as, the piston is at half stroke.

    Note: The respective strokes are distinguished as up and down strokes, outward and inward strokes, forward and back strokes, the forward stroke in stationary steam engines being toward the crosshead, but in locomotives toward the front of the vehicle.

  12. Power; influence. [Obs.] ``Where money beareth [hath] all the stroke.''
    --Robynson (More's Utopia).

    He has a great stroke with the reader.
    --Dryden.

  13. Appetite. [Obs.]
    --Swift.

    To keep stroke, to make strokes in unison.

    The oars where silver, Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke.
    --Shak.

Stroke

Stroke \Stroke\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Strokeed; p. pr. & vb. n. Strokeing.] [OE. stroken, straken, AS. str[=a]cian, fr. str[=i]can to go over, pass. See Strike, v. t., and cf. Straggle.]

  1. To strike. [Obs.]

    Ye mote with the plat sword again Stroken him in the wound, and it will close.
    --Chaucer.

  2. To rib gently in one direction; especially, to pass the hand gently over by way of expressing kindness or tenderness; to caress; to soothe.

    He dried the falling drops, and, yet more kind, He stroked her cheeks.
    --Dryden.

  3. To make smooth by rubbing.
    --Longfellow.

  4. (Masonry) To give a finely fluted surface to.

  5. To row the stroke oar of; as, to stroke a boat.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
stroke

"act of striking," c.1300, probably from Old English *strac "stroke," from Proto-Germanic *straik- (cognates: Middle Low German strek, German streich, Gothic striks "stroke"); see stroke (v.).\n

\nThe meaning "mark of a pen" is from 1560s; that of "a striking of a clock" is from mid-15c. Sense of "feat, achievement" (as in stroke of luck, 1853) first found 1670s; the meaning "single pull of an oar or single movement of machinery" is from 1731. Meaning "apoplectic seizure" is from 1590s (originally the Stroke of God's Hand). Swimming sense is from 1800.

stroke

"pass the hand gently over," Old English stracian "to stroke," related to strican "pass over lightly," from Proto-Germanic *straik-, from PIE root *streig- "to stroke, rub, press" (see strigil). Figurative sense of "soothe, flatter" is recorded from 1510s. The noun meaning "a stroking movement of the hand" is recorded from 1630s. Related: Stroked; stroking.

Wiktionary
stroke

Etymology 1 alt. 1 An act of #Verb (gloss: moving one's hand over a surface). 2 A blow or hit. 3 A single movement with a tool. 4 # (context golf English) A single act of striking at the ball with a club. 5 # (context tennis English) The hitting of a ball with a racket, or the movement of the racket and arm that produces that impact. 6 # (context rowing English) The movement of an oar or paddle through water, either the ''pull'' which actually propels the vessel or a single entire cycle of movement including the pull. 7 # (context cricket English) The action of hitting the ball with the bat; a shot. 8 # A thrust of a piston. 9 One of a series of beats or movements against a resisting medium, by means of which movement through or upon it is accomplished. 10 A powerful or sudden effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished; also, something done or accomplished by such an effort. 11 A line drawn with a pen or other writing implement. 12 # (context hence British English) The symbol (term: /). 13 # (context linguistics English) A line of a Chinese, Japanese or Korean character. 14 The time when a clock strikes. n. 1 An act of #Verb (gloss: moving one's hand over a surface). 2 A blow or hit. 3 A single movement with a tool. 4 # (context golf English) A single act of striking at the ball with a club. 5 # (context tennis English) The hitting of a ball with a racket, or the movement of the racket and arm that produces that impact. 6 # (context rowing English) The movement of an oar or paddle through water, either the ''pull'' which actually propels the vessel or a single entire cycle of movement including the pull. 7 # (context cricket English) The action of hitting the ball with the bat; a shot. 8 # A thrust of a piston. 9 One of a series of beats or movements against a resisting medium, by means of which movement through or upon it is accomplished. 10 A powerful or sudden effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished; also, something done or accomplished by such an effort. 11 A line drawn with a pen or other writing implement. 12 # (context hence British English) The symbol (term: /). 13 # (context linguistics English) A line of a Chinese, Japanese or Korean character. 14 The time when a clock strikes. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (context transitive English) To move one's hand or an object (such as a broom) along (a surface) in one direction. 2 (context transitive cricket English) To hit the ball with the bat in a flowing motion. 3 (context masonry English) To give a finely fluted surface to. 4 (context transitive English) To row the stroke oar of.

WordNet
stroke
  1. v. touch lightly and with affection, with brushing motions; "He stroked his long beard" [syn: fondle]

  2. strike a ball with a smooth blow

  3. row at a particular rate

  4. treat gingerly or carefully; "You have to stroke the boss"

stroke
  1. n. (sports) the act of swinging or striking at a ball with a club or racket or bat or cue or hand; "it took two strokes to get out of the bunker"; "a good shot require good balance and tempo"; "he left me an almost impossible shot" [syn: shot]

  2. the maximum movement available to a pivoted or reciprocating piece by a cam [syn: throw, cam stroke]

  3. a sudden loss of consciousness resulting when the rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel leads to oxygen lack in the brain [syn: apoplexy, cerebrovascular accident, CVA]

  4. a light touch

  5. a light touch with the hands [syn: stroking]

  6. the oarsman nearest the stern of the shell who sets the pace for the rest of the crew

  7. a punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information [syn: solidus, slash, virgule, diagonal, separatrix]

  8. a mark made by a writing implement (as in cursive writing)

  9. any one of the repeated movements of the limbs and body used for locomotion in swimming or rowing

  10. a single complete movement

Wikipedia
Stroke (disambiguation)

A stroke or stroking may refer to

Stroke (CJKV character)

CJKV strokes are the calligraphic strokes needed to write the Chinese characters in regular script used in East Asia. CJK strokes are the classified set of line patterns that may be arranged and combined to form Chinese characters (also known as Hanzi) in use in China, Japan, Korea, and to a lesser extent in Vietnam (see CJK characters).

Stroke (engine)

Reciprocating motion, used in reciprocating engines and other mechanisms, is back-and-forth motion. Each cycle of reciprocation consists of two opposite motions: there is a motion in one direction, and then a motion back in the opposite direction. Each of these is called a stroke. The term is also used to mean the length of the stroke.

In a steam locomotive, or in a steam, Otto, Diesel or piston engine, a stroke is the action of a piston travelling the full length of its locomotive cylinder or engine cylinder in one direction.

The stroke length is determined by the cranks on the crankshaft. Stroke can also refer to the distance the piston travels. Engine displacement is dependent on both the diameter of the cylinder, known as its bore, and the stroke of the Piston.

In a pistonless rotary engine, the term is applied to the corresponding rotor movement, see dead centre.

Stroke (rowing)

In rowing, stroke is the action of propelling the boat with oars, and also a rower seated closest to the stern of the boat. The stroke side is the port side of the boat.

Stroke (composition)

Stroke is an orchestral composition by the American composer Joan Tower. The work was commissioned by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and is dedicated to the composer's brother, who suffered from a debilitating stroke in 2008. It was first performed in Pittsburgh on May 13, 2011, by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra under the conductor Manfred Honeck.

Stroke

Stroke is when poor blood flow to the brain results in cell death. There are two main types of stroke: ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, and hemorrhagic, due to bleeding. They result in part of the brain not functioning properly. Signs and symptoms of a stroke may include an inability to move or feel on one side of the body, problems understanding or speaking, feeling like the world is spinning, or loss of vision to one side among others. Signs and symptoms often appear soon after the stroke has occurred. If symptoms last less than one or two hours it is known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA). Hemorrhagic strokes may also be associated with a severe headache. The symptoms of a stroke can be permanent. Long term complications may include pneumonia or loss of bladder control.

The main risk factor for stroke is high blood pressure. Other risk factors include tobacco smoking, obesity, high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, previous TIA, and atrial fibrillation. An ischemic stroke is typically caused by blockage of a blood vessel. A hemorrhagic stroke is caused by bleeding either directly into the brain or into the space surrounding the brain. Bleeding may occur due to a brain aneurysm. Diagnosis is typically with medical imaging such as a computerized axial tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan along with a physical exam. Other tests such as an electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood tests are done to determine risk factors and rule out other possible causes. Low blood sugar may cause similar symptoms.

Prevention includes decreasing risk factors as well as possibly aspirin, statins, surgery to open up the arteries to the brain in those with problematic narrowing, and warfarin in those with atrial fibrillation. A stroke often requires emergency care. An ischemic stroke, if detected within three to four and half hours, may be treatable with a medication that can break down the clot. Aspirin should be used. Some hemorrhagic strokes benefit from surgery. Treatment to try recover lost function is called stroke rehabilitation and ideally takes place in a stroke unit; however, these are not available in much of the world.

In 2013 approximately 6.9 million people had an ischemic stroke and 3.4 million people had a hemorrhagic stroke. In 2010 there were about 33 million people who had previously had a stroke and were still alive. Between 1990 and 2010 the number of strokes which occurred each year decreased by approximately 10% in the developed world and increased by 10% in the developing world. In 2013, stroke was the second most frequent cause of death after coronary artery disease, accounting for 6.4 million deaths (12% of the total). About 3.3 million deaths resulted from ischemic stroke while 3.2 million deaths resulted from hemorrhagic stroke. About half of people who have had a stroke live less than one year. Overall, two thirds of strokes occurred in those over 65 years old.

Stroke (journal)

Stroke is a peer-reviewed medical journal published monthly by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins on behalf of the American Heart Association. It covers research on cerebral circulation and related diseases, including clinical research on assessment of risk for stroke, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment, as well as rehabilitation. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2014 impact factor of 5.723, ranking it 13th out of 192 journals in the category "Clinical Neurology" and fifth out of 60 journals in the category "Peripheral Vascular Disease". The current editor-in-chief is Marc Fisher ( University of Massachusetts Medical School).

Usage examples of "stroke".

This pleased rupert but then he had found out she was renting a small bedsit in Vauxhall, rammed to the ceiling with pottery turtles, leatherette footstools and flowery, applique table mats, where she would sneak off as if visiting a lover and would sit for hours, rocking backwards and forwards stroking a ceramic clown amidst a mountain of knick-knacks.

Nowe hauing in some sorte spoken of the right vse of architecturie, and the direct waye and meanes by order and rule, to finde out, the set downe deuise, and solyde bodye or grounde of the woorke, with facilitie that beeing found out, the architector may vse sundrye deuisions in diuerse perfections, not vnlike vnto a cunning Musition, who hauing deuised his plaine grounde in right measure, with full strokes, afterwarde wyll proportion the same into deuisions, by cromatycall and delyghtfull minims crotchets, and quauers, curiously reporting vpon his plaine song.

The Christians applauded, in lofty and ambiguous strains, the stroke of divine vengeance, which had been so long suspended over the guilty head of Julian.

It had been a pure stroke of luck, being offered his position here at the High Energy Astrophysics Center.

Instead of stroking his ego about a bardship, it offered a blunt assessment: Give it up and accept being a voyageur.

With fearful strokes of its talons it was tearing the basto to shreds.

It was Guzman Bento who died, not by the knife thrust of a conspirator, but from a stroke of apoplexy, and Dr.

A feeling of weariness stopped him, a kind of torpor benumbed him for long minutes, during which he did not give a single stroke with the brush.

But the walls of the city withstood the strokes of their battering-rams: and the besiegers pitched their tents on the neighboring mountain of Jaushan.

As she leaned against Blad, she allowed her hand to stroke a sensitive area of his body, unseen by the king.

General Blitzkrieg had hit something over a hundred balls, but by incredibly selective scorekeeping, had managed to put only forty-two strokes down on his scorecard.

He continued stroking Bounder, but it was Mackenzie he watched, Mackenzie he wanted to touch.

There, too, were a number of the lords, each with a band of brilliantly attired attendants, and prominent among them was Nasta, stroking his black beard meditatively and looking unusually pleasant.

Lorraine knelt beside Brit and began stroking his forehead softly, as is the soothing way of women with their sick.

He stroked his immense nose with the pipe for a moment, burnishing the dark brown bowl.