Find the word definition

Crossword clues for shot

shot
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
shot
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cover photo/shot (=picture on the front cover)
▪ The picture became the July 4th cover shot.
a warning shot
▪ Troops fired warning shots over the heads of demonstrators.
be arrested/imprisoned/shot etc as a spy
▪ Anyone caught working with the Resistance was shot as a spy.
big shot
▪ His father’s a big shot and he thinks he is, too.
by a long way/shotinformal (also by a long chalk British English) (= used when something is much better, quicker, cheaper etc)
▪ It was his best performance this year, by a long way.
cheap shot
▪ His remark was a cheap shot at short people.
drop shot
fired...shots
▪ The police fired two shots at the suspects before they surrendered.
jump shot
not by a long way/shotinformal (also not by a long chalk British English) (= not at all or not nearly)
▪ He had not told Rory everything, not by a long shot.
pot shot
▪ The boy took a pot shot at a pigeon with his air gun.
shot put
▪ an Olympic shot putter
sliced...shot
▪ With an open goal in front of him, Wiltord sliced his shot wide of the left post.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bad
▪ He never hit a bad shot off the tee; it just didn't come back as far as he thought it would.
▪ At the beginning, they made me take bad shots.
▪ Tom played a bad shot out of the bunker, and he does no more than charge straight at this press guy.
▪ Mobley scored 33 points but took bad shots and was out of control.
▪ To hit all my bad shots down the side of the fairways where the lines of spectators are the deepest. 9.
▪ That much was the least expected of a hunter who had made a bad shot.
▪ If I hit a bad shot, I try to minimize its effect.
▪ In both halves, the Owls had difficulty setting up their offense and often rushed bad shots to beat the 35-second clock.
big
▪ As a young player I look for subtlety and skill, not big top spin shots all the time.
▪ Among Western Conference big shots, only San Antonio seems trouble-free right now.
▪ This is a matter between the big shots.
▪ I gave my opinion but, of course, it was a big shot so early in the game.
▪ You see, all the artists wanted to be big shots.
▪ He will be a big shot one day, she thinks.
▪ Malone, however, choked when it came to making his two biggest shots of the game.
cheap
▪ It was a cheap shot but an effective one.
▪ Green Bay players complained that the Cowboys are taught to apply cheap shots.
▪ What if it's just a cheap take-over shot and Madreidetic aren't the guilty ones?
▪ Take cheap shots and distort facts in order to get ahead?
▪ He deserves better than to be criticised by gay activists with such a cheap shot.
▪ Or, analysts say, it could be a cheap shot by an employee at an Apple competitor.
▪ There is increased range flexibility, it is cheaper shot for shot and it leaves a much more saleable end-product.
good
▪ Confidence is the result of good shots and they come from good technique.
▪ And then they hit Macintosh with their best shot.
▪ This meant I didn't have to get risk life and limb to get a good close up shot.
▪ I climbed a chestnut tree and got a good shot of them together.
▪ Ed Kelley was a good shot.
▪ He was following good shots with excellent shots-an inspired round.
▪ Hopefully he can recover and regain his test place and give it his best shot.
▪ You have to get 80 or 81 percent of it and then take your best shot and go on to something else.
long
▪ He had not told Rory everything, not by a long shot.
▪ City officials and securities experts think the activists are betting on a long shot.
▪ That's a long shot though.
▪ The 45-year-old candidate remains the longest of long shots for the Republican nomination.
▪ Tracer laid stitches across the sky: the bombers still in formation were firing long shots at him.
▪ This is a long shot, but I still want to try it.
▪ I think it's a long shot him signing for Leeds.
low
▪ Kevin Wilson was given space by Clarke's precise header to beat Strakosha with a low cross shot.
▪ Two minutes after the interval he darted on to a long through ball and scored with a low shot.
▪ They fell further behind when excellent Chiddingfold approach work ended with Leigh Allaker scoring with a fierce low shot.
▪ Mooney scored the goal of the game when he burst down the left and hit a low shot into the far corner.
▪ Grobbelaar flapped at McGee's cross and when Miller drove in a low shot Sanchez turned the ball into the net.
▪ Herobbed Guppy just outside the area and swept a low shot past keeper Paul Hyde.
single
▪ It has been used twice before to kill, and each time a single shot was fired.
▪ Ruestman died from a single shot to his heart after answering a knock at the front door of his mobile home.
▪ The latter was essential as the police only fired single shots.
▪ From the hut behind them they had heard a single shot.
▪ For scripting movies, there is a standard format in which each line represents a single shot.
▪ Align bolt thrower on target and declare single or multiple shot.
▪ When it is your turn to shoot, declare whether you are firing a single shot or a volley.
▪ He disappeared into some trees and Charlie distinctly heard a single shot somewhere above the noise of battle.
■ NOUN
action
▪ The papers received their photo of the band with Best but also scurried to their files to find their own action shots.
▪ Below it there is an action shot of Jackie Robinson sliding into second base.
▪ The new series kicks off with brilliant action shots taken at SummerSlam, the record breaking Wembley event.
▪ Photographers from this Unit were to take some of the finest action shots of the war.
▪ It fits snugly into the hands and is ideal for grabbing action shots with a minimum of fuss.
jump
▪ Then, we have to start trapping with other guys, and they end up with open jump shots.
▪ Tiffany is 12 years old, and she had just retooled her jump shot.
▪ Then, all of a sudden, we just started taking jump shots.
▪ For Spurs guard Vinny Del Negro, who was trying to realign his jump shot, this might have posed a distraction.
▪ We said we wanted Smith to work on his jump shot, not turn it into a career path.
▪ He is 7-1 and he loves 15-foot jump shots.
▪ Chris Carr can play; what he needs are 500 jump shots a day and a dose of maturity.
▪ They were Mo Taylor getting himself rolling consistently toward the basket and dropping in finger rolls and jump shots.
tee
▪ His tee shot lacked the necessary left-to-right spin and finished in one of the two fairway bunkers.
▪ Nobody else would have dared such a tee shot.
▪ His tee shot ended up in the rough and from there he could only slash the ball 50 yards over the green.
▪ The good tee shot was played to the far right of the fairway to set up a second shot to the left.
▪ His playing partner, however, responded with what was probably his worst tee shot of the week.
▪ He hits a decent tee shot.
▪ Woosnam was instantly plunged into the blackest of moods and after hitting his tee shot he marched off muttering.
warning
▪ Before she could investigate further, her own dim worm fired a warning shot.
▪ Private Morrison's boat was fired on when he ignored warning shots.
▪ Reset those guns to fire warning shots, and try to keep us safe till dawn.
■ VERB
block
▪ A police car emerged from the other alleyway and screeched to a halt ten yards in front of Whitlock, blocking his shot.
▪ He can make shots, he can block shots....
▪ His one chance came just before half-time when a defender's shins blocked his shot.
▪ He can go through a slump and still block shots.
▪ Six minutes from the end Murdoch again came to the visitors' rescue when he dived to block a shot from Hateley.
▪ McCoy returned a few minutes later and quickly hit two mid-range jumpers and blocked two Bryant Boston shots in succession.
▪ Five minutes later Hislop blocked a shot from Andy Cole, and Sheringham wafted the rebound over the bar.
▪ And any time the Cardinal ventured into the lane, McCoy was there to block or alter shots.
call
▪ Cant about the free market creating opportunities for poor people is meaningless when wealth calls all the shots.
▪ Traditionally, Tucson Water officials have also been allowed to call the shots.
▪ But chaps who try chat-up lines of their own get the boot-because she likes to call the shots.
▪ Not many years ago, they called all the shots.
▪ Watching outsiders call the shots is not easy.
▪ The condition was that the transaction be conducted in whorehouse terms: he paid the trick, he called the shots.
▪ He had been in another program, where he got to call all the shots.
drop
▪ Mickelson dropped a shot, and the two-stroke swing created a three-stroke gap.
▪ The blue-barred stag twisted away from the steel and found height, dipping like a lapwing, and dropping for a head shot.
▪ Watson dropped shots down the stretch, while Levi completed a round of 69 that sealed a four-shot win over Payne Stewart.
▪ He dropped three further shots but finished with a trio of pars for a share of third place.
▪ Even if we drop a shot because Jacklin makes four, it still keeps us in the Open.
▪ He was also badly bunkered at the fifth to drop another shot.
fire
▪ They identified themselves as Federal Police and forced an entry, firing shots wildly into the house.
▪ In 1871 Henry James fired a warning shot in the Nation, a magazine that Olmsted had helped found.
▪ Rob Madgwick dispossessed Wright and fired in a shot that was well saved by Stuart Burt.
▪ If you miss then you can not fire any further shots that turn.
▪ He took out his new gun and fired off a few shots at an ugly chimney on the roof.
▪ As the group advanced on him, the constable fired off another shot, this time hitting Jones in the upper thigh.
▪ Clark had reportedly fired one shot but it could not be shown whether he fired before or after the police began shooting.
get
▪ I can get some notes for my article in Granada and Mitch can get some shots.
▪ This is war, and defectors get shot.
▪ But foxes in chicken runs get shot, and now the Israelites get the plague.
▪ But the real appeal to cities turned out to be getting a walloping fiscal shot in the arm.
▪ They don't care about the family man getting shot, they don't care about the families.
▪ The Trojans brought the ball up but could not get off a decent shot.
▪ You get shot, you're shot - you survive or you die.
give
▪ I just have a feeling that we have given it our best shot.
▪ The districts had been created under the Voting Rights Act of 1965 to give minorities a special shot at winning public office.
▪ The band gave it their best shot, until the arrival of the blue meanies put an end to the proceedings.
▪ Near the end, it was Barbara who gave her the shots of Demerol.
▪ I'd have given it my best shot, and that was all anyone could demand from me.
▪ Robey was a pioneer who gave black talent a shot, a black surviving in a racist industry.
▪ We wanted into the book badly, and gave it a shot one afternoon.
▪ The medics had given Mike a shot, and he was unconscious all the way.
hear
▪ Neither of us spoke but we both knew that if we heard shots it meant that the operation had failed.
▪ She said Hernandez Machin told them she slowed down, then heard a shot that hit Valdez Lopez in the back.
▪ From the hut behind them they had heard a single shot.
▪ She worried whether Jack had killed the two men when she later heard the two shots and the screaming.
▪ I saw people running down from the house, I heard some shots, but that was all.
▪ Martin said he then heard three shots.
▪ Local shopkeepers who heard the shots went to investigate.
▪ In the meantime Timante, alone, hears some shots and sees two men appear in a launch.
hit
▪ Johnny Miller hit his shots high, ballooned them, and that was no good this year.
▪ When he hits an errant golf shot, or makes a mental error on the course, he gets aggravated.
▪ Peter Allis has turned golf into a kind of harmless interview where public figures hit a few shots and chat about themselves.
▪ A 72. 7 percent free throw shooter, he hit the shot, and the score was tied.
▪ These measurements were vital to Jack Mason who relied upon me to confirm where he should hit his shots and how hard.
▪ Airoso then walked before Hurd hit the final shot.
▪ Cink hit a poor shot through the green, into a horrible lie.
▪ Williams hit an arching shot from the wing, capping a game-ending 8-0 run.
miss
▪ Well, Tod looks to have missed with both his shots.
▪ Ferdinand, who missed her first four shots, helped jump-start an 18-4 run with seven straight points.
▪ If he misses then the shot is his last for that turn.
▪ They had three chances to take the lead but failed each time and eventually missed eight straight shots.
▪ The Trojans shot 41 percent from the field, missed easy inside shots and lost Wilson, their best rebounder.
▪ I never knew you to miss a shot like that before, Papa.
▪ She remembers only the turnovers, the missed shots.
play
▪ The 3-wood serves as a driver and the 5-wood for playing fairway shots.
▪ Does that mean Woosnam can play shots that Peter can not?
▪ Lord said he was at a loss to find room to play his shots in the first two games.
▪ In fact, Roy disdains the cowardice of anyone who plays the easier shot.
▪ Here's how I play this shot.
▪ By now I was well into the groove and I can't remember playing a defensive shot in the innings.
▪ Then there was Payne Stewart in waterproofs and also in water, playing splash shots like a rabbit.
▪ The secret of playing these shots is to adopt the stance you are comfortable with.
take
▪ I take a shot at the odd one that flies over Uskair strictly illegal, I know.
▪ Yeltsin is taking shots from Communists, ultranationalists and even the progressive democrats who used to be his allies.
▪ Some publications like to take their own shots and others are not illustrated.
▪ Mobley scored 33 points but took bad shots and was out of control.
▪ Dozens of men and boys take turns trading shots with him.
▪ He doesn't have to take as many shots and gives more time to each one he wants.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
call the shots/tune
▪ But chaps who try chat-up lines of their own get the boot-because she likes to call the shots.
▪ Does not the divine drama seem to suggest that the Devil is calling the tune?
▪ It was the businessmen, not the lords, who called the tune when the industrial system began.
▪ Now, those calling the shots for the company began to realize that the whole damn case was getting too risky.
▪ Strug, the Houstonian with powerful floor and vault routines, may benefit from having Karolyi calling the shots.
▪ Traditionally, Tucson Water officials have also been allowed to call the shots.
▪ Watching outsiders call the shots is not easy.
▪ You young girls can call the tune nowadays.
crack shot
▪ A crack shot and a notorious gambler.
▪ And of course the doctor is a crack shot...
▪ Dirk, nearly sixteen, is a crack shot.
▪ The book centres on young blonde Donna, a crack shot with a.45 Magnum.
give sth a try/shot/whirl
▪ Are you having trouble fixing the printer? Let me give it a shot.
▪ But on this case, I can not give it a try - that is the point.
▪ He says he thought he'd give it a try, but he got stuck.
▪ Joe gives her the shot twice a week.
▪ Magnus grew fat on brown wholemeal scraps and Gina gave up trying to keep him away.
▪ She had given up trying to read to him, play with him, teach him anything: he could not learn.
▪ Vladimir finally gave up trying to teach me and returned to his sketching.
▪ We wanted into the book badly, and gave it a shot one afternoon.
have shot your bolt
long shot
▪ City officials and securities experts think the activists are betting on a long shot.
▪ He had not told Rory everything, not by a long shot.
▪ It's a long shot, but well worth trying.
▪ Its brief revival was sparked by Dziekanowski who fed Tarasiewicz and for once a long shot had Shilton in trouble.
▪ She had looked everywhere else and, although it seemed a long shot, she might as well look in there.
▪ The 45-year-old candidate remains the longest of long shots for the Republican nomination.
▪ This is a long shot, but I still want to try it.
▪ With all the interest the article had generated, Fanshawe no longer seemed like such a long shot.
parting shot
▪ As Eve was leaving, she couldn't resist a parting shot at Brian: "I never loved you anyway!"
▪ As it will be the best remembered part of your presentation, your parting shot needs to be powerful.
▪ Gilliland, however, had a parting shot to fire in his paper in Astrophysical Journal.
▪ He left with a parting shot at Supervisor Mike Boyd.
▪ He was strong enough now to attribute the man's parting shot about his drawings to sheer malice.
▪ It's no coincidence that it originated in Moscow - this was the Communist old guard's parting shot.
▪ The ultimate parting shot from an ungrateful aircraft that had enjoyed every care and attention.
take a pot shot at sb/sth
▪ There is a small but vocal minority that likes to take pot shots at the United Nations.
▪ It would be easy, even tempting, to take a pot shot at us.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ His first shot missed. The second hit its target.
▪ I got some great shots of Mount Fuji with the sun setting behind it.
▪ Police fired shots into the air and used water cannon to disperse the crowd.
▪ Shaw made the shot and turned to run down the court.
▪ The cars went past so quickly that she only had time to take a couple of shots.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As Charlie dived for cover behind the altar, a second shot went off.
▪ Denver 105, Bulls 99: Bulls made 39. 8 percent of their shots.
▪ In the second round he muffed a shot about 90 yards and banged his ball against a tree.
▪ It wasn't too windy, but windy enough to cause the occasional shot to go astray.
▪ Many times the Bruins appeared unprepared for the shots and were in poor rebounding position.
▪ Peter Jacobsen despatched the first serious shot of the Masters.
▪ This was not a candid shot.
▪ With rigid body, I waited for the shots, but none came.
II.adjective
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
call the shots/tune
▪ But chaps who try chat-up lines of their own get the boot-because she likes to call the shots.
▪ Does not the divine drama seem to suggest that the Devil is calling the tune?
▪ It was the businessmen, not the lords, who called the tune when the industrial system began.
▪ Now, those calling the shots for the company began to realize that the whole damn case was getting too risky.
▪ Strug, the Houstonian with powerful floor and vault routines, may benefit from having Karolyi calling the shots.
▪ Traditionally, Tucson Water officials have also been allowed to call the shots.
▪ Watching outsiders call the shots is not easy.
▪ You young girls can call the tune nowadays.
give sth a try/shot/whirl
▪ Are you having trouble fixing the printer? Let me give it a shot.
▪ But on this case, I can not give it a try - that is the point.
▪ He says he thought he'd give it a try, but he got stuck.
▪ Joe gives her the shot twice a week.
▪ Magnus grew fat on brown wholemeal scraps and Gina gave up trying to keep him away.
▪ She had given up trying to read to him, play with him, teach him anything: he could not learn.
▪ Vladimir finally gave up trying to teach me and returned to his sketching.
▪ We wanted into the book badly, and gave it a shot one afternoon.
have shot your bolt
take a pot shot at sb/sth
▪ There is a small but vocal minority that likes to take pot shots at the United Nations.
▪ It would be easy, even tempting, to take a pot shot at us.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Shot

Shoot \Shoot\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shot; p. pr. & vb. n. Shooting. The old participle Shotten is obsolete. See Shotten.] [OE. shotien, schotien, AS. scotian, v. i., sce['o]tan; akin to D. schieten, G. schie?en, OHG. sciozan, Icel. skj?ta, Sw. skjuta, Dan. skyde; cf. Skr. skund to jump. [root]159. Cf. Scot a contribution, Scout to reject, Scud, Scuttle, v. i., Shot, Sheet, Shut, Shuttle, Skittish, Skittles.]

  1. To let fly, or cause to be driven, with force, as an arrow or a bullet; -- followed by a word denoting the missile, as an object.

    If you please To shoot an arrow that self way.
    --Shak.

  2. To discharge, causing a missile to be driven forth; -- followed by a word denoting the weapon or instrument, as an object; -- often with off; as, to shoot a gun.

    The two ends od a bow, shot off, fly from one another.
    --Boyle.

  3. To strike with anything shot; to hit with a missile; often, to kill or wound with a firearm; -- followed by a word denoting the person or thing hit, as an object.

    When Roger shot the hawk hovering over his master's dove house.
    --A. Tucker.

  4. To send out or forth, especially with a rapid or sudden motion; to cast with the hand; to hurl; to discharge; to emit.

    An honest weaver as ever shot shuttle.
    --Beau. & Fl.

    A pit into which the dead carts had nightly shot corpses by scores.
    --Macaulay.

  5. To push or thrust forward; to project; to protrude; -- often with out; as, a plant shoots out a bud.

    They shoot out the lip, they shake the head.
    --Ps. xxii. 7.

    Beware the secret snake that shoots a sting.
    --Dryden.

  6. (Carp.) To plane straight; to fit by planing.

    Two pieces of wood that are shot, that is, planed or else pared with a paring chisel.
    --Moxon.

  7. To pass rapidly through, over, or under; as, to shoot a rapid or a bridge; to shoot a sand bar.

    She . . . shoots the Stygian sound.
    --Dryden.

  8. To variegate as if by sprinkling or intermingling; to color in spots or patches.

    The tangled water courses slept, Shot over with purple, and green, and yellow.
    --Tennyson.

    To be shot of, to be discharged, cleared, or rid of. [Colloq.] ``Are you not glad to be shot of him?''
    --Sir W. Scott.

Shot

Shot \Shot\, imp. & p. p. of Shoot.

Shot

Shot \Shot\, a. Woven in such a way as to produce an effect of variegation, of changeable tints, or of being figured; as, shot silks. See Shoot, v. t., 8.

Shot

Shot \Shot\, n. [AS. scot, sceot, fr. sce['o]tan to shoot; akin to D. sschot, Icel. skot. [root]159. See Scot a share, Shoot, v. t., and cf. Shot a shooting.] A share or proportion; a reckoning; a scot.

Here no shots are where all shares be.
--Chapman.

A man is never . . . welcome to a place till some certain shot be paid and the hostess say ``Welcome.''
--Shak.

Shot

Shot \Shot\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shotted; p. pr. & vb. n. Shotting.] To load with shot, as a gun.
--Totten.

Shot

Shot \Shot\, n.; pl. Shotor Shots. [OE. shot, schot, AS. gesceot a missile; akin to D. schot a shot, shoot, G. schuss, geschoss a missile, Icel. skot a throwing, a javelin, and E. shoot, v.t. [root]159. See Shoot, and cf. Shot a share.]

  1. The act of shooting; discharge of a firearm or other weapon which throws a missile.

    He caused twenty shot of his greatest cannon to be made at the king's army.
    --Clarendon.

  2. A missile weapon, particularly a ball or bullet; specifically, whatever is discharged as a projectile from firearms or cannon by the force of an explosive.

    Note: Shot used in war is of various kinds, classified according to the material of which it is composed, into lead, wrought-iron, and cast-iron; according to form, into spherical and oblong; according to structure and modes of operation, into solid, hollow, and case. See Bar shot, Chain shot, etc., under Bar, Chain, etc.

  3. Small globular masses of lead, of various sizes, -- used chiefly as the projectiles in shotguns for killing game; as, bird shot; buckshot.

  4. The flight of a missile, or the distance which it is, or can be, thrown; as, the vessel was distant more than a cannon shot.

  5. A marksman; one who practices shooting; as, an exellent shot.

  6. (Fisheries)

    1. A cast of a net.

    2. The entire throw of nets at one time.

    3. A place or spot for setting nets.

    4. A single draft or catch of fish made.

  7. (Athletics) A spherical weight, to be put, or thrown, in competition for distance.

  8. A stroke, throw, or other action to propel a ball or other game piece in certain games, as in billiards, hockey, basketball, curling, etc.; also, a move, as in chess.

  9. A guess; conjecture; also, an attempt. [Colloq.] ``I'll take a shot at it.''

    Shot belt, a belt having a pouch or compartment for carrying shot.

    Shot cartridge, a cartridge containing powder and small shot, forming a charge for a shotgun.

    Shot garland (Naut.), a wooden frame to contain shot, secured to the coamings and ledges round the hatchways of a ship.

    Shot gauge, an instrument for measuring the diameter of round shot.
    --Totten.

    shot hole, a hole made by a shot or bullet discharged.

    Shot locker (Naut.), a strongly framed compartment in the hold of a vessel, for containing shot.

    Shot of a cable (Naut.), the splicing of two or more cables together, or the whole length of the cables thus united.

    Shot prop (Naut.), a wooden prop covered with tarred hemp, to stop a hole made by the shot of an enemy in a ship's side.

    Shot tower, a lofty tower for making shot, by dropping from its summit melted lead in slender streams. The lead forms spherical drops which cool in the descent, and are received in water or other liquid.

    Shot window, a window projecting from the wall. Ritson, quoted by Halliwell, explains it as a window that opens and shuts; and Wodrow describes it as a window of shutters made of timber and a few inches of glass above them.

Shot

Shot \Shot\, n.; pl. Shotor Shots. [OE. shot, schot, AS. gesceot a missile; akin to D. schot a shot, shoot, G. schuss, geschoss a missile, Icel. skot a throwing, a javelin, and E. shoot, v.t. [root]159. See Shoot, and cf. Shot a share.]

  1. The act of shooting; discharge of a firearm or other weapon which throws a missile.

    He caused twenty shot of his greatest cannon to be made at the king's army.
    --Clarendon.

  2. A missile weapon, particularly a ball or bullet; specifically, whatever is discharged as a projectile from firearms or cannon by the force of an explosive.

    Note: Shot used in war is of various kinds, classified according to the material of which it is composed, into lead, wrought-iron, and cast-iron; according to form, into spherical and oblong; according to structure and modes of operation, into solid, hollow, and case. See Bar shot, Chain shot, etc., under Bar, Chain, etc.

  3. Small globular masses of lead, of various sizes, -- used chiefly as the projectiles in shotguns for killing game; as, bird shot; buckshot.

  4. The flight of a missile, or the distance which it is, or can be, thrown; as, the vessel was distant more than a cannon shot.

  5. A marksman; one who practices shooting; as, an exellent shot.

  6. (Fisheries)

    1. A cast of a net.

    2. The entire throw of nets at one time.

    3. A place or spot for setting nets.

    4. A single draft or catch of fish made.

  7. (Athletics) A spherical weight, to be put, or thrown, in competition for distance.

  8. A stroke, throw, or other action to propel a ball or other game piece in certain games, as in billiards, hockey, basketball, curling, etc.; also, a move, as in chess.

  9. A guess; conjecture; also, an attempt. [Colloq.] ``I'll take a shot at it.''

    Shot belt, a belt having a pouch or compartment for carrying shot.

    Shot cartridge, a cartridge containing powder and small shot, forming a charge for a shotgun.

    Shot garland (Naut.), a wooden frame to contain shot, secured to the coamings and ledges round the hatchways of a ship.

    Shot gauge, an instrument for measuring the diameter of round shot.
    --Totten.

    shot hole, a hole made by a shot or bullet discharged.

    Shot locker (Naut.), a strongly framed compartment in the hold of a vessel, for containing shot.

    Shot of a cable (Naut.), the splicing of two or more cables together, or the whole length of the cables thus united.

    Shot prop (Naut.), a wooden prop covered with tarred hemp, to stop a hole made by the shot of an enemy in a ship's side.

    Shot tower, a lofty tower for making shot, by dropping from its summit melted lead in slender streams. The lead forms spherical drops which cool in the descent, and are received in water or other liquid.

    Shot window, a window projecting from the wall. Ritson, quoted by Halliwell, explains it as a window that opens and shuts; and Wodrow describes it as a window of shutters made of timber and a few inches of glass above them.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
shot

Old English scot, sceot "a shot, a shooting, an act of shooting; that which is discharged in shooting, what is shot forth; darting, rapid motion," from Proto-Germanic *skutan (cognates: Old Norse skutr, Old Frisian skete, Middle Dutch scote, German Schuß "a shot"), related to sceotan "to shoot" (see shoot (v.)).\n

\nMeaning "discharge of a bow, missile," also is from related Old English gesceot. Extended to other projectiles in Middle English, and to sports (hockey, basketball, etc.) 1868. Another original meaning, "payment" (perhaps literally "money thrown down") is preserved in scot-free. "Throwing down" might also have led to the meaning "a drink," first attested 1670s, the more precise meaning "small drink of straight liquor" by 1928 (shot glass by 1955). Camera view sense is from 1958. Sense of "hypodermic injection" first attested 1904; figurative phrase shot in the arm "stimulant" first recorded 1922. Meaning "try, attempt" is from 1756; sense of "remark meant to wound" is recorded from 184

  1. Meaning "an expert in shooting" is from 1780. To call the shots "control events, make decisions" is American English, 1922, perhaps from sport shooting. Shot in the dark "uninformed guess" is from 1885. Big shot "important person" is from 1861.

shot

early 15c., past participle adjective from from shoot (v.). Meaning "wounded or killed by a bullet or other projectile" is from 1837. Figurative sense "ruined, worn out" is from 1833.

Wiktionary
shot

Etymology 1

  1. 1 (context colloquial English) worn out or broken. 2 (Of material, especially silk) Woven from warp and weft strands of different colours, resulting in an iridescent appearance. 3 tired, weary 4 Discharged, cleared, or rid ''of'' something. n. 1 The result of launching a projectile or bullet. 2 (context sports English) The act of launching a ball or similar object toward a goal. v

  2. (en-past of: shoot) Etymology 2

    n. A charge to be pay, a scot or shout. Etymology 3

    interj. (context colloquial South Africa English) Thank you.

WordNet
shot
  1. adj. varying in color when seen in different lights or from different angles; "changeable taffeta"; "chatoyant (or shot) silk"; "a dragonfly hovered, vibrating and iridescent" [syn: changeable, chatoyant, iridescent]

  2. [also: shotting, shotted]

shoot
  1. n. a new branch

  2. the act of shooting at targets; "they hold a shoot every weekend during the summer"

  3. [also: shot]

shot
  1. See shoot

  2. [also: shotting, shotted]

shot
  1. n. an attempt to score in a game

  2. (sports) the act of swinging or striking at a ball with a club or racket or bat or cue or hand; "it took two strokes to get out of the bunker"; "a good shot require good balance and tempo"; "he left me an almost impossible shot" [syn: stroke]

  3. the act of firing a projectile; "his shooting was slow but accurate" [syn: shooting]

  4. a chance to do something; "he wanted a shot at the champion" [syn: crack]

  5. the act of putting a liquid into the body by means of a syringe; "the nurse gave him a flu shot" [syn: injection]

  6. a solid missile discharged from a firearm; "the shot buzzed past his ear" [syn: pellet]

  7. an informal photograph; usually made with a small hand-held camera; "my snapshots haven't been developed yet"; "he tried to get unposed shots of his friends" [syn: snapshot, snap]

  8. a consecutive series of pictures that constitutes a unit of action in a film [syn: scene]

  9. informal words for any attempt or effort; "he gave it his best shot"; "he took a stab at forecasting" [syn: stab]

  10. an aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effect; "his parting shot was `drop dead'"; "she threw shafts of sarcasm"; "she takes a dig at me every chance she gets" [syn: shaft, slam, dig, barb, jibe, gibe]

  11. a blow hard enough to cause injury; "he is still recovering from a shot to his leg"; "I caught him with a solid shot to the chin"

  12. a small drink of liquor; "he poured a shot of whiskey" [syn: nip]

  13. sports equipment consisting of a heavy metal ball used in the shot put; "he trained at putting the shot"

  14. a person who shoots (usually with respect to their ability to shoot); "he is a crack shot"; "a poor shooter" [syn: shooter]

  15. the launching of a missile or spacecraft to a specified destination [syn: blastoff]

  16. an explosive charge used in blasting

  17. an estimate based on little or no information [syn: guess, guesswork, guessing, dead reckoning]

  18. [also: shotting, shotted]

shoot
  1. v. hit with a missile from a weapon [syn: hit, pip]

  2. kill by firing a missile [syn: pip]

  3. fire a shot

  4. make a film or photograph of something; "take a scene"; "shoot a movie" [syn: film, take]

  5. send forth suddenly, intensely, swiftly; "shoot a glance"

  6. run or move very quickly or hastily; "She dashed into the yard" [syn: dart, dash, scoot, scud, flash]

  7. move quickly and violently; "The car tore down the street"; "He came charging into my office" [syn: tear, shoot down, charge, buck]

  8. throw or propel in a specific direction or towards a specific objective; "shoot craps"; "shoot a golf ball"

  9. record on photographic film; "I photographed the scene of the accident"; "She snapped a picture of the President" [syn: photograph, snap]

  10. emit (as light, flame, or fumes) suddenly and forcefully; "The dragon shot fumes and flames out of its mouth"

  11. cause a sharp and sudden pain in; "The pain shot up her leg"

  12. force or drive (a fluid or gas) into by piercing; "inject hydrogen into the balloon" [syn: inject]

  13. variegate by interweaving weft threads of different colors; "shoot cloth"

  14. throw dice, as in a crap game

  15. spend frivolously and unwisely; "Fritter away one's inheritance" [syn: fritter, frivol away, dissipate, fritter away, fool, fool away]

  16. score; "shoot a basket"; "shoot a goal"

  17. utter fast and forcefully; "She shot back an answer"

  18. measure the altitude of by using a sextant; "shoot a star"

  19. produce buds, branches, or germinate; "the potatoes sprouted" [syn: spud, germinate, pullulate, bourgeon, burgeon forth, sprout]

  20. give an injection to; "We injected the glucose into the patient's vein" [syn: inject]

  21. [also: shot]

Wikipedia
Shot (ice hockey)

A shot in ice hockey is an attempt by a player to score a goal by striking or snapping the puck with their stick in the direction of the net.

Shot (filmmaking)

In filmmaking and video production, a shot is a series of frames, that runs for an uninterrupted period of time. Film shots are an essential aspect of a movie where angles, transitions and cuts are used to further express emotion, ideas and movement. The term "shot" can refer to two different parts of the filmmaking process:

  1. In production, a shot is the moment that the camera starts rolling until the moment it stops.
  2. In film editing, a shot is the continuous footage or sequence between two edits or cuts.
Shot (song)

Shot is a song by the Finnish alternative rock band The Rasmus, originally released on the band's sixth studio album Hide from the Sun on September 2, 2006. The single was released on March 30, 2006.

This is the last single to be released from Hide from the Sun. The song "Immortal" was later released as a music video, but there was no single.

The song reached #6 on the Finland Singles Chart.

Shot

Shot may refer to:

  • Shot (filmmaking), a part of a film between two cuts
  • Shot (medicine), an injection
  • Shot silk, a type of silk
  • Showt or Shoţ, the city in Iran
  • Line length, a fifteen fathom length of anchor chain
  • Shot, (or shott), a group of adjacent strips or furlongs in the medieval open field system

SHOT is an acronym for:

  • Society for the History of Technology, a professional organization for historians of technology
  • Shooting, Hunting, and Outdoor Trade Show, an annual trade show for the shooting, hunting, and firearms industry
  • Serious Hazards of Transfusion, an organisation monitoring blood transfusion errors in the UK
Shot (pellet)

Shot is a collective term for small balls or pellets, often made of lead. These were the original projectiles for shotguns and are still fired primarily from shotguns, although shot shells are available in many pistol calibers in a configuration called "bird shot" or "rat-shot". Lead shot is also used for a variety of other purposes such as filling cavities with dense material for weight/balance. Some versions may be plated with other metals. Lead shot was originally made by pouring molten lead through screens into water, forming what was known as "swan shot", and, later, more economically mass-produced at higher quality using a shot tower. The Bliemeister method has supplanted the shot tower method since the early 1960s.

Shot (album)

Shot is an album by the band The Jesus Lizard, its first release on Capitol Records. Impressed by his work on the album Houdini by Melvins, the band hired producer GGGarth to record Shot. Of note on this album is the very different production of David Yow's vocals, which are now much clearer and higher in the mix than on previous recordings. Bassist David Wm. Sims has cited this as his favorite record by the Jesus Lizard.

This is the first studio album by the band that was not produced by Steve Albini. It has been widely held that Steve Albini refused to work with the band because they had signed to a major label, although Albini himself denied this in comments made to a review of the 2009 reissue of the Touch and Go catalog that appears on the Paste Magazine web site.

Usage examples of "shot".

Coming abreast of each other, Harry held his fire, prepared to suffer the shots of the four-pounders.

Tooe shot through it, flipping over to bounce off the ceiling and accelerating down through the short cabin toward the control section.

I should have shot the bastard, Ace thought as he continued on to the bar.

There is a case on record of a boy of fourteen who was shot in the right shoulder, the bullet entering through the right upper border of the trapezius, two inches from the acromion process.

There were still some addax antelope down in the dunes, but mostly the local sheiks had sportingly shot them out, using high-powered rifles with telescopic sights from the backs of Land Rovers.

Such were the remonstrances made to his catholic majesty with respect to the illegality of the prize, which the French East India company asserted was taken within shot of a neutral port, that the Penthievre was first violently wrested out of the hands of the captors, then detained as a deposit, with sealed hatches, and a Spanish guard on board, till the claims of both parties could be examined, and at last adjudged to be an illegal capture, and consequently restored to the French, to the great disappointment of the owners of the privateer.

The seventeen doomed men were offered a meal and an opportunity to speak with a priest before they were lined up along an adobe wall and shot.

I must confess she did not seem at all sorry to have me taken off her hands, for after cautioning me to beware of a number of things I did not so much as know by name, she shot off like a respectable old aerolite with a black trail streaming out behind.

He told himself that it was the other aeronaut that had been shot in the fight and fallen out of the saddle as he strove to land.

The rest had been shot and slashed to pieces by Afghani tribesmen, the women with them killed or taken hostage.

Any honest afrit would by now have grown wings and shot down to find me, but without a nearby ledge or roof to hop to, the skeleton was stymied.

McDermitt was the first SEAL down the hatch of the aft escape trunk after Morris shot the Chinese guard who had been lying in ambush inside.

A few moments later Aristarchi had placed her in his boat, the heavy bundle of spoils lay at her feet, and the craft shot swiftly from the door of the house of the Agnus Dei.

A sudden, agonizing fiery ball of pain shot through him, choking his words, making him stagger slightly.

Several pigs, agoutis, kangaroos, and other rodents were seen, also two or three koalas, at which Pencroft longed to have a shot.