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Crossword clues for short

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
short
I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a brief/short description
▪ There's only a brief description of the hotel on the Internet.
a brief/short message
▪ She left a short message on his answering machine.
a brief/short spell
▪ After a brief spell in a florist's shop, she became a hairdresser.
a brief/short visit
▪ Miss Russell was only able to pay a brief visit.
a brief/short/long hiatus
▪ There was a brief hiatus in the war.
a brief/short/slight pause
▪ "Well, that was a surprise," he said after a brief pause.
a light/short sentence (=a short time in prison)
▪ We’re hoping that he gets off with a light sentence.
a little/short rest
▪ He decided to stop and take a short rest.
a little/short sleep
▪ I always have a little sleep in the afternoon.
a little/short while ago
▪ Tom got a letter from him just a little while ago.
a little/short while
▪ Wait a little while before deciding.
a long/short illness
▪ She nursed him through his long illness.
▪ Arthur died following a short illness.
a quick/short temper (=likely to get angry very easily)
▪ He’s got a quick temper, which gets him into trouble.
a short account
▪ What follows is a short account of the legal procedure.
a short course
▪ I did a short course on website design.
a short distance
▪ I quickly walked the short distance to the car.
a short story
▪ He has published two collections of short stories.
a short time
▪ A short time later, she heard him drive away.
a short vacation
▪ a short vacation at the beach
a short walk
▪ The house is only a short walk from local shops.
a short word
▪ a short word beginning with ‘d’ and ending with ‘g’
a short/brief ceremony
▪ He became acting president in a brief ceremony yesterday.
a short/brief period
▪ He lived for a short period in Manchester.
a short/brief silence
▪ After a brief silence, Katherine nodded.
a short/brief statement
▪ Police last night issued a brief statement about the incident.
a short/brief stay
▪ No visa is required for short stays.
a short/little nap
▪ A short nap may make you feel better.
a short/little/small laugh
▪ He let out a nervous little laugh.
a short/long ride
▪ I climbed slowly aboard the bus for the long ride to Hawkesworth.
a short/quick break
▪ Shall we have a quick five-minute break?
a short/short-term lease
▪ These flats are let on short leases to students.
a slight/short delay
▪ There was a slight delay in the departure of the plane.
(as) thick as two short planks (=very stupid)
at short notice (=without much time to prepare)
▪ Thank you for coming to help at such short notice.
be short of breath (=be unable to breathe easily because you are ill, old etc)
▪ Near the top of the mountain I started to feel short of breath.
Bermuda shorts
bicycle shorts
board shorts
boxer shorts
brief/short
▪ The band had rather a brief existence.
▪ The show's existence was extremely short.
cycling shorts
fall below/fall short of sb's expectations (=be worse that someone hoped or expected)
▪ Our profits last year fell below expectations.
fall short of a target (=achieve less than you wanted to)
▪ Car production at the plant has fallen short of its target by 5%.
fall short of your ideals (=not be as good as you think something should be)
▪ In appearance, she fell somewhat short of his ideals.
have a short memory (=if you have a short memory, you soon forget things)
▪ Voters have short memories.
Jockey shorts
long/short blast
▪ a long trumpet blast
long/short
▪ I was very tired after the long flight.
long/short
▪ She was thrilled to get a long letter from her son.
long/short
▪ He read out a long list of errors.
on short rations (=given a smaller amount than usual)
▪ We were on short rations .
short and snappy
▪ Keep your answer short and snappy.
short attention span
▪ Children often have a short attention span.
short back and sides
short circuit
short cut
▪ Carlos decided to take a short-cut home.
short hop
▪ It’s just a short hop from Cleveland to Detroit.
short list
▪ Davies was on the shortlist for the Booker Prize.
short on...but long on
▪ He was short on patience, but long on a sense of his own worth.
short story
short wave
short
▪ Her nails were short and uneven.
short
▪ They were married last month after a short engagement.
short
▪ These mowers only work efficiently on short grass.
short
▪ I like your hair when it’s short like that.
short
▪ Its tail is short and pointed.
short/brief
▪ The chairman opened the meeting with a brief speech.
short/long skirt
▪ a short skirt and high heels
sth is nothing short of a miracle (=it is extremely unexpected and you are very pleased about it)
▪ What has happened is nothing short of a miracle.
stop dead/short/in your tracks (=stop walking suddenly)
▪ Sally saw the ambulance and stopped short.
the quickest/shortest route
▪ We took the shortest route back to the hotel.
the short answer is ... (=used when giving a simple, honest, or direct answer to a difficult question)
▪ ‘How does homeopathy work?’ ‘The short answer to this question is that we do not know how homeopathic remedies work.’
walk a mile/200 metres/a short distance etc
▪ We must have walked ten miles today.
▪ I walked all the way to San Rafael.
well short of
▪ This total falls well short of the sum required.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
far
▪ Above all, the coercive force at the disposal of the Tsar fell far short of its imposing image.
▪ This enterprise has so far fallen far short of its targets, but it remains a high priority.
▪ In fact Carter's performance in office fell far short of his and other people's expectations.
▪ But the plan fell far short of the integrated approach to neighborhood conservation that was being called for.
▪ But just how far short is anyone's guess - and a guess that few are prepared to make.
▪ As expected, the 240-159 vote fell far short of the two-thirds majority needed to prevail.
▪ It will fall far short of actual experimentation.
▪ But the evidence is that most of these mergers have fallen far short of their promise.
just
▪ Zone-five players were not just shorter than their opponents.
▪ Cornerback Darnell Walker stopping Williams just short of a first down, killing a critical fourth-quarter Dallas drive.
▪ Fifteen seconds earlier he had been knocked down and lay on the canvas as the referee counted just short of a knockout.
▪ Here are the stories of some who stopped just short of that precipice.
▪ This was the railway which crossed over the Corporation tramway just short of the Selby Road boundary.
▪ He was knocked out just short, but Young quickly got the touchdown on a sneak.
▪ Poor man, he died in 1989, just short of his eightieth birthday.
▪ Critics stopped just short of charging the Spin Doctors with malpractice.
much
▪ Some projects may have a much shorter cycle.
▪ The petiole is much shorter than the blade.
▪ Set gill-nets are much shorter, and are used mostly in shallow coastal seas, where they are anchored to the seabed.
▪ Also, she learned that she had been under anesthesia for a much shorter time than she had thought.
▪ Mercifully, the remaining two complaint stories of the Numbers series are much shorter.
▪ Brennan points out that Westminster Cathedral contains far more bodies than Newgrange, from a much shorter period of use.
▪ The dorsal arm spines are the longest nearly two arm segments in length, the ventral arm spines are much shorter.
▪ Five hours is much shorter than normal Voice over Cotwold Council officers say they're not running a vendetta against the Hintons.
relatively
▪ Schools Specialised buildings for the education of children have a relatively short history in Britain.
▪ Thus the bulk of Laurentia came together in the relatively short time span of 150 million years.
▪ On the whole, though, relatively short sentences offer the advantage of helping you to keep your writing clear and understandable.
▪ Most of those are autopsied and then released to a mortuary in a relatively short period of time.
▪ Even those with relatively short memories in either country should be aware of that.
▪ During the relatively short treatment, the therapist helped the patient to begin discussing her feelings with her family.
▪ Successes such as this suggest that remedial actions are feasible and can bring beneficial effects in a relatively short time.
so
▪ How could she have possibly imagined how dramatically her feelings towards him would have changed in so short a time?
▪ Graham complains that some sound bites that survived the editing process were so short as to defy understanding.
▪ Was it because he had no hope that he had lasted so short a time?
▪ Kenny, this is so short!
▪ Life is so, so short.
▪ The fish feed in the breakers, so shorter casts work better.
▪ No wonder the days were so short and the nights so long.
▪ Since money is so short she has gone by herself most of the time.
too
▪ Life, for me, is certainly not too short to stuff a mushroom.
▪ Was hope in too short supply in our home?
▪ However, notice which is too short is unlikely to comply with the underlying spirit of the Rule.
▪ Each of our thoughts is too short.
▪ But study stints that are too short will merely increase your anxiety.
▪ And often the time allotted is too short for fluency.
▪ Life is too short to continue hating anyone for a long time.
▪ No one is ever going to tell you that a proposal is too long or too short.
very
▪ The stone fell very short, landing not far from his hiding-place.
▪ One year is a very short time.
▪ She was given a very short expectation of life by the doctors.
▪ Phone conversations should be very short.
▪ It is a very short leap from euphoria to despair and back again.
▪ After a very short time, potassium diffuses out of the cell and the previous electrical situation is restored - repolarisation.
▪ I stayed with Venturous throughout the seventies with the occasional trip on Valiant and a very short period on Vigilant.
▪ But very short time limits may be vulnerable under the principle.
■ NOUN
answer
▪ That short answer gives rise to two further questions.
▪ The short answer is yes, some but not nearly enough.
▪ The short answer to that is that we don't know.
▪ A well-structured short answer is better than a weakly-structured long answer.
▪ A: The short answer is no.
▪ Well, the short answer to this comes in one word, experience.
▪ The short answer is that nobody knows.
course
▪ The project's residential workers are not qualified therapists, though many have received external training on short courses.
▪ I receive a short course in geophysics, punctuated by the tectonic lessons of the region through which we are driving.
▪ For external short courses we are concerned to get value for money.
▪ Special short courses are available in July and August.
▪ You may find it helpful to take a short course on managing continence.
▪ Books and short courses can provide you with more ideas.
▪ For dairy farmers shorter courses were run but travel could still be considerable and some found it very difficult to attend.
▪ This can be fulfilled mainly by attendance at short courses, conferences and lectures.
cut
▪ Moral: minor roads are only a short cut if you know where you are!
▪ Oncoming bikers seemed intent on taking the short cut up and over the Aussie's Nissan.
▪ Cars daren't risk taking the short cut.
▪ Pen Lane, now widened for parking, was one of the original short cuts around the church.
▪ Under pressure, an advice worker may be tempted to take short cuts.
▪ She took them by a short cut to the Weinbaum Canal.
▪ She died because she took a short cut across waste ground even though she knew that the murderer was at large in that area.
▪ In the pressure to get to the Moon by the end of the decade, management short cuts had been taken.
distance
▪ They had then walked the short distance to Park Lane, her hand in the crook of James's arm.
▪ A short distance away lay Emain Macha, royal seat of the hereditary kings of Ulster.
▪ She walked the short distance to work, seeing nothing of the beauty of the day.
▪ A short distance away was the overturned buggy, but there was no sign of either the horse or the Ellingwood5.
▪ The vehicles will go through deep drifts for short distances when the momentum of the vehicle will carry it through.
▪ The shortest distance between two points appeared to be a zigzag.
▪ There are many social facilities available and also Farmoor reservoir only a short distance away.
▪ As I approached Lovat and the two Officers, a shell burst a short distance away.
drive
▪ No dinner is offered but there are many and varied eating establishments within a short drive.
▪ The Greco-Roman ruins, a short drive away, were thronged, but this amplified, rather than diminished, our visit.
▪ Unfortunately, this is not the case with many millions of people whose backache is worse after even a short drive.
▪ The park, a short drive south of downtown, is open from late May to early October.
▪ A short drive will take you to the Downs and Ashdown Forest.
▪ Woodbridge is 10 minutes away, several other courses within a short drive.
▪ It was a short drive from the city.
flight
▪ Access to the dining room in the north-east corner of the main block was then made via a short flight of stairs.
▪ He watches four men trying to drag a doorless refrigerator up the short flight of steps into the band shell.
▪ Those who do not fancy long haul can share short flights between two or three budding pilots.
▪ It was a short flight, only a hundred miles.
▪ Both Langkawi and Kuantan are reached by short flights.
▪ Frankie stared towards the shorter flight of steps leading to the landing.
▪ They sat on stubby pillars at the bottom of a short flight of steps leading to the parade square.
▪ The upper-level dining gallery and sitting-room are reached from the living-room via short flight of open-riser timber stairs.
hair
▪ A medallion in Hughes Hall portrays her with short hair, an aquiline nose, and a determined chin.
▪ To this day, I believe the only thing that saved him from a beating was his short hair.
▪ The wind was blowing over the top of Jinny's head, fluttering the loose, short hairs round her forehead.
▪ He is tall, a marathoner, with salt-and-pepper short hair.
▪ If you get in a fight, short hair is an advantage since your opponent can not grasp it.
▪ She ran her hands through her short hair.
▪ You've got short hair, you've got a moustache now, and you wear glasses.
▪ It is useful for short hair, and can be fingered in wherever you need it.
life
▪ The courageous two-year-old has spent all his short life in hospital.
▪ He was dreaming; maybe it was the way he would dream for the rest of his short life.
▪ Evidence suggests that shrews probably have the shortest lives.
▪ Jessica Dubroff developed a passion for airplanes and horses in her short life.
▪ Newspapers, toilet paper or tissues are all short life items which could be made from recycled reserves.
▪ In his short life, he had been a paratrooper and a physician, specializing in infectious diseases.
▪ Ricotta has a very short life and should be bought and used daily.
▪ This means that the parasites live shorter lives and pass through more generations in a given time than their hosts.
list
▪ Readers at Borders Books shops helped to choose the short list.
▪ The equity department was planning a boat trip to become further acquainted with the trainees on its short list.
▪ By the end of 1981 Corby was chosen from a very short list of places.
▪ It gave her a short list of problems and asked her to solve them.
▪ The previous year, four of the six novels on the short list were about growing up in the Soviet era.
▪ This year, six titles made the short list, out of 200 submitted.
▪ Successive rounds of screening bring into play more criteria until the short list is reached.
▪ After being selected from a short list of five people, I was finally not offered the position.
notice
▪ Working conditions may not be up to much, and as a casual employee you can be fired at short notice.
▪ His armour was piled not three yards away, arrayed ready to be donned at short notice.
▪ They're also prepared to do the ground spraying on short notice.
▪ When a march is organised at short notice, as much notice as practicable must be given.
▪ Part C. A short notice teaching session - 20 minutes.
▪ You have no idea how difficult it was to find a hundred overalls and hats at such short notice.
▪ The Helsinki summit, arranged at very short notice, dealt almost exclusively with the specific issue of a major regional conflict.
order
▪ A piece of good news for Bill Clinton in Congress was followed, in short order, by the opposite.
▪ We got to Pecos in short order and turned north for Carlsbad.
▪ Collectively they squandered their pricing power in short order.
▪ He gave me his curriculum vitae in short order.
▪ It did, and in pretty short order.
▪ But, in short order, Lott orchestrated deals on a range of stalled legislation, from welfare reform to health care.
▪ A short order may be made, for example, to give a parent the opportunity to return to court with legal representation.
▪ I charmed him in short order.
period
▪ In 1902 he lived for a short period in Clerkenwell, east London.
▪ The necessary hours of light can not be replaced by more intensive light sources operating for a shorter period of time.
▪ This will enable the distribution to be completed over a shorter period.
▪ Generally, this condition persists for only a short period as the enzyme system usually becomes functional within several days after birth.
▪ Occasionally, however, this current is displaced and a warm southward-flowing current prevails for short periods.
▪ Affected fish are dipped in such a solution for a short period and then can be safely returned to the pool.
▪ These have short periods, from a few days to a few weeks.
▪ Those with the longer periods received higher payments than those with shorter periods and were more likely to have retired early.
range
▪ The Helblaster has a strength of 5 at short range and 4 at long range.
▪ Most significantly in the short range, it could leave 49ers' offensive tackle Steve Wallace twisting in the wind.
▪ Morris claimed the third from short range.
▪ Normal saving throw modifiers apply: -2 at short range and -1 at long range.
▪ The heavy armament comprised 1,000 artillery pieces, but many were obsolete or short range.
▪ Viewed head-on from short range the animal is exceedingly hard to spot, provided it stands still.
▪ Another situation where I have been prepared to use a tube stem is for short range drifting.
▪ No need to be particularly careful at such short range.
run
▪ However, in the short run, numerous factors may operate to cause changes in supply.
▪ Of course, IRAs cost the Treasury in the short run.
▪ Governments, like theoretical economists, tend to be mainly concerned with the short run.
▪ The Stanislaus River is dammed fourteen times on its short run to the sea.
▪ Although this is the socially efficient output in the short run it is not efficient in the long run.
▪ Restructuring will lead to declining continuity in the short run, even if improved organizational balance eventually develops.
▪ This could follow if the capital goods producing industries faced capacity constraints in their attempt to raise output in the short run.
▪ The problem worsens with the relentless financial pressures for immediate performance in the short run.
sentence
▪ Use short sentences to make your points clearly.
▪ A proper language allows you to pack a lot of meaning into a short sentence.
▪ Notoriously, he wrote in very short sentences.
▪ These books contain short sentences, simple words, and repetitive phrases, designed for early readers.
▪ Go through each group separately, thinking of two short sentences about each name in the group.
▪ Hemingway's short sentences derive their power from their revolt against earlier, more discursive styles.
▪ They will have to pass shorter sentences.
▪ It is easier to think clearly with short sentences than long ones.
shrift
▪ Commanders who undervalued or ignored Ultra get short shrift.
▪ Therefore, any management book worthy of the name should have that as a pivotal issue, not give it short shrift.
▪ I gave that idea short shrift.
▪ The notion got short shrift in Washington.
▪ Unfortunately the deeper issues surrounding the cloning of a human being have received short shrift or no attention at all.
▪ And in government, accounting systems give the long term short shrift.
▪ As we shall see later these sources often receive short shrift in many of the papers.
▪ A lot of people are uncomfortable praising others; they give the good points short shrift.
skirt
▪ The shorts were pleated about the waist and flared widely, giving an illusion of being a too short skirt.
▪ She was wearing a uniform with a very short skirt and a white col-lar and lapels.
▪ I felt so cross with myself, so stupid for wearing a short skirt.
▪ I didn't wear a short skirt for ages after that.
space
▪ Life, for the short space of a few weeks, was better than she had ever known it.
▪ In fact it took them a very short space of time only three weeks to build the test raft ready to launch.
▪ Within a short space I have been concerned to make two basic points in this chapter.
▪ In such a short space of time, he had plunged from the pinnacle of success to the depths of defeat.
▪ It is of course an impossible task to examine the record of Marxism in such a short space as I have available.
▪ That was an extraordinarily fine achievement in such a short space of time.
▪ I had to find out a lot of things about you in a short space of time.
▪ The problem was more one of having to absorb a vast amount of information in a short space of time.
spell
▪ A short spell of hard work in quiet surroundings would not be a bad thing.
▪ No one will benefit from such a short spell.
▪ We assumed that for each participant the occurrence of short spells followed a Poisson distribution.
▪ Considerable excess residual variation was found in the rate of sickness absence for short spells.
▪ Thus, an illness that tends to require frequent short spells in hospital will appear to have a high incidence.
▪ Quiet at Bidford, but short spells of action with chub and roach around midday at Welford.
▪ There were even short spells when I sculled without error, helping to create a reasonably smooth pattern with my illustrious partner.
▪ This seems to happen after a short spell off road.
stay
▪ During his short stay in Madeira, he was a great benefactor of the island.
▪ Gandhi stayed in Champaran seven months, and returned for two shorter stays.
▪ Very often they moved on again after a short stay, for they found that reality was harsher than their dreams.
▪ They promised short stays, more contacts with the outside world and treatment that stressed returning children home whenever possible.
▪ I went every day at the same time, in fact, over the period of my short stay.
▪ Two troops deployed nearby to the west, awaiting a short stay at camp.
▪ Anyway, her short stay on board had at least served some purpose.
▪ Lamm also expects to spend some of his short stay in Silicon Valley chatting with potential donors.
story
▪ F fable A short story in prose or verse which is written so that a moral may be learnt from it.
▪ In these short stories Asimov gives us an unforgettable and terrifying vision of the future.
▪ James McMurtry is an unusual singer-songwriter, a gentle, thoughtful troubadour who writes songs that unfold like short stories.
▪ What they do have, though, is a literary tradition, which reveres the short story.
▪ I wrote four or five fairly short stories a week.
▪ Pandora also promote short story writers by publishing Storia, a twice-yearly short story magazine.
▪ In this type of short story, large claims are made about the effect of the reading experience.
supply
▪ We could only use candles it night if we were working, because they were in very short supply.
▪ People embody intelligence, by far the most precious resource in the universe and one in terribly short supply.
▪ Rural housing within reach of farm workers has come to be in even shorter supply.
▪ Food was in such short supply that she was genuinely concerned that her two babies might get scurvy.
▪ Here, where clean drinking water is in short supply, expensive drugs are beyond ordinary people's reach.
▪ And it was true that accredited math teachers were in short supply.
▪ And that's really the story for this afternoon, with sunshine in short supply.
▪ The automaker was particularly vulnerable because it keeps only a short supply of extra parts to save costs.
term
▪ Fund raising campaigns are simpler to organise and sustain when they are short term sprints aimed at quickly achievable goals.
▪ In the short term, the administration budget would produce lower payments by the government for each visit, the official predicted.
▪ I've had a very short term contract for each show.
▪ But they say that around £100 million is needed to ensure such projects are economically viable in the short term.
▪ It seemed as if he received a shorter term in jail because he was a doctor.
▪ You will be pleased to know that the discomfort is only short term and should not occur in the future.
▪ In the short term the road to Nice has plenty of hurdles.
▪ Even marriage into the royal family only assured such support in the short term.
time
▪ Sartori had disappeared a short time later.
▪ As a result of her actions, Amelia became even more popular and within a short time was practically running Ogontz.
▪ He stayed there only a short time before moving to Gloucestershire where he has been ever since.
▪ Despite all the talk expected to come from both sides, they know they are operating in a short time frame.
▪ Sekers Service Supreme Breaking all records, Sekers supplied a customer with specially woven cloth in an amazingly short time.
▪ He passed me a short time ago.
▪ To improve, she attended an art class in Sheffield for a short time.
▪ I do not feel able to postpone an order for possession for more than a very short time indeed.
walk
▪ I decide to go out for cigarettes; a short walk will do me good.
▪ From La Fonda it was only a short walk to the Ernest Blumenschein house.
▪ It is next to Friston Forest with its forest walks and picnic areas, and is a short walk from the sea.
▪ The next day I left the house only once, for a short walk to the pond.
▪ Compared to the previous day this is a short walk whether you choose the high or low route.
▪ Afternoons ended at the Gundy, the school teahouse, a short walk up the hill.
▪ The house is only a short walk from local shops and there are regular buses to the City Centre.
▪ The coeducational school was just a short walk for all of them.
while
▪ On the day of the wedding, just for a short while, all strife was laid aside.
▪ Just got here a short while ago.
▪ Odd individuals kept swimming away, only to return a short while later.
▪ The few dollars collected would help to maintain the cause, at least for a short while.
▪ He went out and Sisteradmission-ward came in for a short while, and we reconstructed the story.
▪ After a short while, Nelson reluctantly entered the testing room with the psychologist.
▪ Sure enough, in a short while a girl called Mitti turned up.
▪ When she returned a short while later, she found the 27-year-old Cosby fatally wounded.
work
▪ It is fair to warn anglers that thousands of crabs soon make short work of rag and lugworm.
▪ Flexible and shorter work weeks are a win-win situation for both the employee and employer.
▪ It made short work of our Windows performance tests, WinTach, clocking up an impressive index of over 9.3.
▪ Use quotation marks around the names of short works such as newsletter articles.
▪ Carmen would have made short work of Michael too.
▪ In spite of the shorter work day, total production increased and hourly production increased dramatically.
▪ Guernsey made short work of the opposition when they won the event on home soil in 1990.
▪ The second game we pull away early and make short work of it.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(since sb was) in short pants
a short fuse
▪ And you don't fool with those because things are on a shorter fuse in Beirut.
▪ Every nerve smouldered on a short fuse.
▪ She was standing there crammed full of enthusiasm and energy like a bomb on a short fuse.
▪ Tom's a chap with a temper on a short fuse anyway.
▪ Wright has a short fuse, and without the goals going in his situation is worsening.
▪ You may find your temper on a short fuse when confronting your child or teenager for the umpteenth time.
a short space of time
▪ I had to find out a lot of things about you in a short space of time.
▪ In old age several major losses may occur within a short space of time.
▪ In such a short space of time, he had plunged from the pinnacle of success to the depths of defeat.
▪ Just how much things can change in a short space of time.
▪ Still, he had been knocked out twice in a short space of time and would appreciate some rest.
▪ That was an extraordinarily fine achievement in such a short space of time.
▪ The problem is getting the material under control in order to reach ambitious learning goals in a short space of time.
▪ The problem was more one of having to absorb a vast amount of information in a short space of time.
at short notice
▪ Both players pulled out of the competition yesterday at short notice.
▪ Occasionally, tours may have to be cancelled at short notice.
▪ One of the players dropped out at short notice.
▪ He was called in at short notice due to the unfortunate motor accident involving Design Director, Bill Naysmith.
▪ Many laboratories have cooperated at short notice and are analysing large numbers of samples.
▪ Many of the more glamorous film and photographic opportunities crop up at short notice, so you have to be flexible.
▪ Occasionally tours may be cancelled at short notice owing to circumstances beyond our control.
▪ The landlord could also terminate the arrangements at short notice.
▪ There is an aversion to holding meetings at short notice with a diminished complement.
▪ These alternatives will not always be available at short notice but it might be possible to plan for them.
▪ Working conditions may not be up to much, and as a casual employee you can be fired at short notice.
bring sb up short/with a start
cut sb short
▪ I tried to explain but she cut me short.
▪ I was halfway through my explanation when Walter cut me short.
cut sth short
▪ His death at the age of 38 cut short a brilliant career.
▪ The ten-day mission was cut short when one of the shuttle's navigation devices failed.
draw the short straw
▪ I'm only here because I drew the short straw.
▪ Rose had drawn the short straw, and was thus forced to seek Lord Westbourne clasping the Romanov dagger.
fall short of sth
▪ The results fell far short of our expectations.
▪ Anything less than this is a measure of the extent to which the research falls short of scientific standards.
▪ By 1951 the Labour government had built 900,000 houses, falling short of its target of 240,000 dwellings a year.
▪ Even in the best of years, Journal news coverage inevitably falls short of perfection.
▪ On the other hand, if the firm falls short of covering its fixed costs, a loss will be incurred.
▪ Reality has a way of falling short of the ideal.
▪ The results fell short of eight analysts' forecasts of profit between 130 million and 127 million pounds.
▪ The trainers suggest that, as guards, they fell short of expectations.
flexible/short-time etc working
▪ An outside problem can sometimes be helped by, say, more flexible working hours and so be resolved at management level.
▪ Earnings might vary because of piece-work, overtime or short-time working.
▪ Flexible Hours Question: Has consideration been given to the introduction of flexible working hours?
▪ Meanwhile, solicitors were last week urged to consider flexible working for staff in line with the government's family friendly policies.
▪ Recruitment procedures focus on individual skills and potential for flexible working.
▪ Through grants to local authorities, we are financing schemes to introduce more flexible working practices - such as job sharing.
▪ Vauxhall bosses admit that the threat of short-time working at Ellesmere Port still remains a possibility.
▪ Wage freezes have been brought in across most of the company and some short-time working introduced.
in the long/short/medium term
in the short run
▪ Although this is the socially efficient output in the short run it is not efficient in the long run.
▪ He predicted more volatile dealings in the short run.
▪ However, in the short run, numerous factors may operate to cause changes in supply.
▪ It showed the company that Orrick was willing to make a commitment to them by losing some money in the short run.
▪ Of course, IRAs cost the Treasury in the short run.
▪ The problem worsens with the relentless financial pressures for immediate performance in the short run.
▪ The recipients did not, and in the short run simply could not, spend the majority of their extra revenue.
▪ This could follow if the capital goods producing industries faced capacity constraints in their attempt to raise output in the short run.
life's too short
long-stemmed/short-stemmed etc
make short/light work of sth
▪ But she made light work of polishing off the shopping at a supermarket near her West London home.
▪ Carmen would have made short work of Michael too.
▪ Fourth placed Guisborough made short work of the opposition at Saltburn.
▪ Guernsey made short work of the opposition when they won the event on home soil in 1990.
▪ It is fair to warn anglers that thousands of crabs soon make short work of rag and lugworm.
▪ It made short work of our Windows performance tests, WinTach, clocking up an impressive index of over 9.3.
▪ The second game we pull away early and make short work of it.
▪ Willie Thorne made light work of the promising Nottinghamshire youngster, Anthony Hamilton, as he eased into the last 16.
sell sb/sth short
▪ Don't sell this guy short - there's more to him than just good looks.
stop short of (doing) sth
▪ Shepherd stopped short of calling him a liar.
▪ Doctors stop short of saying the disease is always fatal, but medical literature paints a bleak picture.
▪ Eric Gray charged back up the court before stopping short of the center line.
▪ Even if it stops short of this extreme, retroactive cost justification is largely ineffective.
▪ He stopped short of making recommendations about weapons programs in his 90-minute meeting at the White House.
▪ I know people who would maim and yet stop short of murder.
▪ In fact, no general pattern is discernible, except that almost all stop short of full accountability to Parliament.
▪ Yet the argument against Ashdown's triumphalism has to stop short of encouraging the same fatal hubris among Labour politicians.
to cut a long story short
▪ I was a waitress in a bar and he was one of my customers, and that, to cut a long story short, is how we met.
to cut a long story short
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ 'What does she look like?' 'She's short and fat, with brown hair.'
▪ a short-sleeved T-shirt
▪ a short course in aromatherapy
▪ a short pause in the conversation
▪ A short while later, the doorbell rang.
▪ a short, stocky man with powerful shoulders
▪ a book of short stories
▪ Brad is fairly short and stocky.
▪ Chris went for a short walk to clear his head.
▪ Do you know any short cuts to the hospital?
▪ Graham made a short speech of thanks after the ceremony.
▪ I've just been living here a short time.
▪ It's a short drive from the airport.
▪ It would have been better if they'd closed the road for a short period of time while the repairs were done.
▪ Ken gave a short speech at the award ceremony.
▪ Mr Haddad was several inches shorter than his wife.
▪ Please write a short paragraph explaining your reasons for applying to this college.
▪ Sandy took a short cut home.
▪ She has short curly hair and wears glasses.
▪ The chapters are really short, so I read a couple every night.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But it was always widely feared that the narrow time frame was far too short and would work against an effective peace.
▪ I really do feel this way for a short time.
▪ I said after a short pause.
▪ Perhaps more significant are the events in the remaining and short history of the Rochdale Co-operative Manufacturing Society.
▪ Suddenly, every day seems just that little bit shorter.
▪ The problem worsens with the relentless financial pressures for immediate performance in the short run.
II.adverb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(since sb was) in short pants
a short fuse
▪ And you don't fool with those because things are on a shorter fuse in Beirut.
▪ Every nerve smouldered on a short fuse.
▪ She was standing there crammed full of enthusiasm and energy like a bomb on a short fuse.
▪ Tom's a chap with a temper on a short fuse anyway.
▪ Wright has a short fuse, and without the goals going in his situation is worsening.
▪ You may find your temper on a short fuse when confronting your child or teenager for the umpteenth time.
a short space of time
▪ I had to find out a lot of things about you in a short space of time.
▪ In old age several major losses may occur within a short space of time.
▪ In such a short space of time, he had plunged from the pinnacle of success to the depths of defeat.
▪ Just how much things can change in a short space of time.
▪ Still, he had been knocked out twice in a short space of time and would appreciate some rest.
▪ That was an extraordinarily fine achievement in such a short space of time.
▪ The problem is getting the material under control in order to reach ambitious learning goals in a short space of time.
▪ The problem was more one of having to absorb a vast amount of information in a short space of time.
at short notice
▪ Both players pulled out of the competition yesterday at short notice.
▪ Occasionally, tours may have to be cancelled at short notice.
▪ One of the players dropped out at short notice.
▪ He was called in at short notice due to the unfortunate motor accident involving Design Director, Bill Naysmith.
▪ Many laboratories have cooperated at short notice and are analysing large numbers of samples.
▪ Many of the more glamorous film and photographic opportunities crop up at short notice, so you have to be flexible.
▪ Occasionally tours may be cancelled at short notice owing to circumstances beyond our control.
▪ The landlord could also terminate the arrangements at short notice.
▪ There is an aversion to holding meetings at short notice with a diminished complement.
▪ These alternatives will not always be available at short notice but it might be possible to plan for them.
▪ Working conditions may not be up to much, and as a casual employee you can be fired at short notice.
bring sb up short/with a start
cut sb short
▪ I tried to explain but she cut me short.
▪ I was halfway through my explanation when Walter cut me short.
cut sth short
▪ His death at the age of 38 cut short a brilliant career.
▪ The ten-day mission was cut short when one of the shuttle's navigation devices failed.
draw the short straw
▪ I'm only here because I drew the short straw.
▪ Rose had drawn the short straw, and was thus forced to seek Lord Westbourne clasping the Romanov dagger.
fall short of sth
▪ The results fell far short of our expectations.
▪ Anything less than this is a measure of the extent to which the research falls short of scientific standards.
▪ By 1951 the Labour government had built 900,000 houses, falling short of its target of 240,000 dwellings a year.
▪ Even in the best of years, Journal news coverage inevitably falls short of perfection.
▪ On the other hand, if the firm falls short of covering its fixed costs, a loss will be incurred.
▪ Reality has a way of falling short of the ideal.
▪ The results fell short of eight analysts' forecasts of profit between 130 million and 127 million pounds.
▪ The trainers suggest that, as guards, they fell short of expectations.
flexible/short-time etc working
▪ An outside problem can sometimes be helped by, say, more flexible working hours and so be resolved at management level.
▪ Earnings might vary because of piece-work, overtime or short-time working.
▪ Flexible Hours Question: Has consideration been given to the introduction of flexible working hours?
▪ Meanwhile, solicitors were last week urged to consider flexible working for staff in line with the government's family friendly policies.
▪ Recruitment procedures focus on individual skills and potential for flexible working.
▪ Through grants to local authorities, we are financing schemes to introduce more flexible working practices - such as job sharing.
▪ Vauxhall bosses admit that the threat of short-time working at Ellesmere Port still remains a possibility.
▪ Wage freezes have been brought in across most of the company and some short-time working introduced.
in the long/short/medium term
in the short run
▪ Although this is the socially efficient output in the short run it is not efficient in the long run.
▪ He predicted more volatile dealings in the short run.
▪ However, in the short run, numerous factors may operate to cause changes in supply.
▪ It showed the company that Orrick was willing to make a commitment to them by losing some money in the short run.
▪ Of course, IRAs cost the Treasury in the short run.
▪ The problem worsens with the relentless financial pressures for immediate performance in the short run.
▪ The recipients did not, and in the short run simply could not, spend the majority of their extra revenue.
▪ This could follow if the capital goods producing industries faced capacity constraints in their attempt to raise output in the short run.
life's too short
long-stemmed/short-stemmed etc
make short/light work of sth
▪ But she made light work of polishing off the shopping at a supermarket near her West London home.
▪ Carmen would have made short work of Michael too.
▪ Fourth placed Guisborough made short work of the opposition at Saltburn.
▪ Guernsey made short work of the opposition when they won the event on home soil in 1990.
▪ It is fair to warn anglers that thousands of crabs soon make short work of rag and lugworm.
▪ It made short work of our Windows performance tests, WinTach, clocking up an impressive index of over 9.3.
▪ The second game we pull away early and make short work of it.
▪ Willie Thorne made light work of the promising Nottinghamshire youngster, Anthony Hamilton, as he eased into the last 16.
sell sb/sth short
▪ Don't sell this guy short - there's more to him than just good looks.
stop short of (doing) sth
▪ Shepherd stopped short of calling him a liar.
▪ Doctors stop short of saying the disease is always fatal, but medical literature paints a bleak picture.
▪ Eric Gray charged back up the court before stopping short of the center line.
▪ Even if it stops short of this extreme, retroactive cost justification is largely ineffective.
▪ He stopped short of making recommendations about weapons programs in his 90-minute meeting at the White House.
▪ I know people who would maim and yet stop short of murder.
▪ In fact, no general pattern is discernible, except that almost all stop short of full accountability to Parliament.
▪ Yet the argument against Ashdown's triumphalism has to stop short of encouraging the same fatal hubris among Labour politicians.
the long and (the) short of it
▪ The long and short of it is that I had too much to drink and said something I shouldn't have.
▪ There you are, the long and the short of it.
to cut a long story short
▪ I was a waitress in a bar and he was one of my customers, and that, to cut a long story short, is how we met.
to cut a long story short
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Attempts to introduce drift-nets into neighbouring New Zealand waters were more short lived.
▪ Charles was short, heavyset, and forty-three years old.
▪ He had short black hair, a scruffy moustache and a pointed nose.
▪ It is the record of a glory that was short lived, but makes an illustrious event in Aarau's history.
III.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
baggy
▪ He dressed in baggy shorts and Hawaiian print shirts, but there was nothing relaxed about his working methods.
▪ She wore a pair of baggy blue shorts and a U of M sweatshirt.
▪ He started hinting at this: stood in the doorway in those baggy navy shorts of his, bowlegged.
▪ Wu Tak Seng himself is sitting on a varnished wooden chair in his doorway, in singlet and baggy shorts.
blue
▪ He was wearing black or navy blue shorts.
▪ She wore a pair of baggy blue shorts and a U of M sweatshirt.
▪ Two workers casually dressed in navy blue shorts and singlets were already in the process of unloading the unwieldy hospital bed.
▪ I pointed to the blue shorts.
khaki
▪ Servants bow and scrape. Khaki shorts replaced by abrasive long trousers for the evening.
▪ A guy in khaki shorts was carrying a video camera.
▪ He rather looked like one of the comics on television who will always wear his khaki shorts half way to his ankles.
▪ The Hong Kong police wore khaki shorts and stockings.
▪ He wore a pair of khaki shorts and a faded blue shirt, with sandals on his feet.
▪ A shaggy bearded bear of a man in a smock and khaki shorts.
▪ Long, muscled legs were shown to full advantage by a pair of crisp khaki shorts.
long
▪ Players want longer shorts for practical reasons as much as anything and the nostalgic look is simply another trend.
running
▪ Prague was the last stadium where I wore conventional running shorts.
▪ In moments he was kitted out in a singlet and a pair of running shorts.
white
▪ I looked up and saw Jamila hurrying towards me in black T-shirt and white shorts.
▪ I sat on the rocky slope above Gay Acres, not wanting to stain my white shorts on the grass.
▪ Top, from left: Red and white striped shorts £5.99, Hennes.
▪ I shower in lukewarm water and decide on thick white running shorts and matching top which I put on in slow motion.
▪ Hugh wore a pair of neat white shorts which made him look ready for tennis.
▪ She wore white shorts and a blue blouse with white stars.
■ NOUN
boxer
▪ He strips down to his T-shirt and striped boxer shorts.
▪ Joe explained that oversized jeans were necessary to showcase wildly patterned boxer shorts.
▪ With stars'n' stripes boxer shorts worn on the outside.
▪ He dressed like a willful teenager, favoring jeans so tattered you could see his boxer shorts through them.
▪ Standing over her is an overweight middle-aged man in a pair of paisley boxer shorts.
▪ In his boxer shorts, wearing his glasses, Wyatt felt himself shaking.
▪ But those boxer shorts were Calvin Klein and nearly new.
▪ Can you imagine a male presenter wearing peek-a-boo boxer shorts showing more than a hint of his you-know-what?
■ VERB
dress
▪ She was dressed in white shorts, a pale jacket and flat shoes.
▪ Two workers casually dressed in navy blue shorts and singlets were already in the process of unloading the unwieldy hospital bed.
▪ He dressed in baggy shorts and Hawaiian print shirts, but there was nothing relaxed about his working methods.
▪ She'd dressed for breakfast in shorts and T-shirt and it wasn't the ideal outfit for talking business with hotel managers.
wear
▪ I saw young men with disheveled hair and shirts of all colors and hairy-legged youths wearing shorts.
▪ Today, all-round utility player, Clive Smott, will wear the keepers' shorts even though Slack is two sizes bigger.
▪ Heck, I wear tank tops and shorts all the time.
▪ Prague was the last stadium where I wore conventional running shorts.
▪ They wore shorts and halters, shirts and jeans.
▪ The big question is: Will Dessie wear cycle shorts?
▪ The bike agents have the same uniforms as other agents except that they wear shorts instead of pants.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(since sb was) in short pants
a short fuse
▪ And you don't fool with those because things are on a shorter fuse in Beirut.
▪ Every nerve smouldered on a short fuse.
▪ She was standing there crammed full of enthusiasm and energy like a bomb on a short fuse.
▪ Tom's a chap with a temper on a short fuse anyway.
▪ Wright has a short fuse, and without the goals going in his situation is worsening.
▪ You may find your temper on a short fuse when confronting your child or teenager for the umpteenth time.
a short space of time
▪ I had to find out a lot of things about you in a short space of time.
▪ In old age several major losses may occur within a short space of time.
▪ In such a short space of time, he had plunged from the pinnacle of success to the depths of defeat.
▪ Just how much things can change in a short space of time.
▪ Still, he had been knocked out twice in a short space of time and would appreciate some rest.
▪ That was an extraordinarily fine achievement in such a short space of time.
▪ The problem is getting the material under control in order to reach ambitious learning goals in a short space of time.
▪ The problem was more one of having to absorb a vast amount of information in a short space of time.
at short notice
▪ Both players pulled out of the competition yesterday at short notice.
▪ Occasionally, tours may have to be cancelled at short notice.
▪ One of the players dropped out at short notice.
▪ He was called in at short notice due to the unfortunate motor accident involving Design Director, Bill Naysmith.
▪ Many laboratories have cooperated at short notice and are analysing large numbers of samples.
▪ Many of the more glamorous film and photographic opportunities crop up at short notice, so you have to be flexible.
▪ Occasionally tours may be cancelled at short notice owing to circumstances beyond our control.
▪ The landlord could also terminate the arrangements at short notice.
▪ There is an aversion to holding meetings at short notice with a diminished complement.
▪ These alternatives will not always be available at short notice but it might be possible to plan for them.
▪ Working conditions may not be up to much, and as a casual employee you can be fired at short notice.
bring sb up short/with a start
cut sb short
▪ I tried to explain but she cut me short.
▪ I was halfway through my explanation when Walter cut me short.
cut sth short
▪ His death at the age of 38 cut short a brilliant career.
▪ The ten-day mission was cut short when one of the shuttle's navigation devices failed.
draw the short straw
▪ I'm only here because I drew the short straw.
▪ Rose had drawn the short straw, and was thus forced to seek Lord Westbourne clasping the Romanov dagger.
fall short of sth
▪ The results fell far short of our expectations.
▪ Anything less than this is a measure of the extent to which the research falls short of scientific standards.
▪ By 1951 the Labour government had built 900,000 houses, falling short of its target of 240,000 dwellings a year.
▪ Even in the best of years, Journal news coverage inevitably falls short of perfection.
▪ On the other hand, if the firm falls short of covering its fixed costs, a loss will be incurred.
▪ Reality has a way of falling short of the ideal.
▪ The results fell short of eight analysts' forecasts of profit between 130 million and 127 million pounds.
▪ The trainers suggest that, as guards, they fell short of expectations.
flexible/short-time etc working
▪ An outside problem can sometimes be helped by, say, more flexible working hours and so be resolved at management level.
▪ Earnings might vary because of piece-work, overtime or short-time working.
▪ Flexible Hours Question: Has consideration been given to the introduction of flexible working hours?
▪ Meanwhile, solicitors were last week urged to consider flexible working for staff in line with the government's family friendly policies.
▪ Recruitment procedures focus on individual skills and potential for flexible working.
▪ Through grants to local authorities, we are financing schemes to introduce more flexible working practices - such as job sharing.
▪ Vauxhall bosses admit that the threat of short-time working at Ellesmere Port still remains a possibility.
▪ Wage freezes have been brought in across most of the company and some short-time working introduced.
in the long/short/medium term
in the short run
▪ Although this is the socially efficient output in the short run it is not efficient in the long run.
▪ He predicted more volatile dealings in the short run.
▪ However, in the short run, numerous factors may operate to cause changes in supply.
▪ It showed the company that Orrick was willing to make a commitment to them by losing some money in the short run.
▪ Of course, IRAs cost the Treasury in the short run.
▪ The problem worsens with the relentless financial pressures for immediate performance in the short run.
▪ The recipients did not, and in the short run simply could not, spend the majority of their extra revenue.
▪ This could follow if the capital goods producing industries faced capacity constraints in their attempt to raise output in the short run.
life's too short
make short/light work of sth
▪ But she made light work of polishing off the shopping at a supermarket near her West London home.
▪ Carmen would have made short work of Michael too.
▪ Fourth placed Guisborough made short work of the opposition at Saltburn.
▪ Guernsey made short work of the opposition when they won the event on home soil in 1990.
▪ It is fair to warn anglers that thousands of crabs soon make short work of rag and lugworm.
▪ It made short work of our Windows performance tests, WinTach, clocking up an impressive index of over 9.3.
▪ The second game we pull away early and make short work of it.
▪ Willie Thorne made light work of the promising Nottinghamshire youngster, Anthony Hamilton, as he eased into the last 16.
sell sb/sth short
▪ Don't sell this guy short - there's more to him than just good looks.
stop short of (doing) sth
▪ Shepherd stopped short of calling him a liar.
▪ Doctors stop short of saying the disease is always fatal, but medical literature paints a bleak picture.
▪ Eric Gray charged back up the court before stopping short of the center line.
▪ Even if it stops short of this extreme, retroactive cost justification is largely ineffective.
▪ He stopped short of making recommendations about weapons programs in his 90-minute meeting at the White House.
▪ I know people who would maim and yet stop short of murder.
▪ In fact, no general pattern is discernible, except that almost all stop short of full accountability to Parliament.
▪ Yet the argument against Ashdown's triumphalism has to stop short of encouraging the same fatal hubris among Labour politicians.
the long and (the) short of it
▪ The long and short of it is that I had too much to drink and said something I shouldn't have.
▪ There you are, the long and the short of it.
to cut a long story short
▪ I was a waitress in a bar and he was one of my customers, and that, to cut a long story short, is how we met.
to cut a long story short
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ There must be a short in the system.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He jerked down his shorts, and sat with legs spread on the edge of a slope-backed chair.
▪ He smiled, taking in Willie's crumpled grey shorts and jersey.
▪ He was pale; the portion of his legs between his socks and shorts was white.
▪ I sat on the rocky slope above Gay Acres, not wanting to stain my white shorts on the grass.
▪ Joe explained that oversized jeans were necessary to showcase wildly patterned boxer shorts.
▪ The odd thing is that it isn't the big chaps in shorts who are under fire.
IV.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(since sb was) in short pants
a short fuse
▪ And you don't fool with those because things are on a shorter fuse in Beirut.
▪ Every nerve smouldered on a short fuse.
▪ She was standing there crammed full of enthusiasm and energy like a bomb on a short fuse.
▪ Tom's a chap with a temper on a short fuse anyway.
▪ Wright has a short fuse, and without the goals going in his situation is worsening.
▪ You may find your temper on a short fuse when confronting your child or teenager for the umpteenth time.
a short space of time
▪ I had to find out a lot of things about you in a short space of time.
▪ In old age several major losses may occur within a short space of time.
▪ In such a short space of time, he had plunged from the pinnacle of success to the depths of defeat.
▪ Just how much things can change in a short space of time.
▪ Still, he had been knocked out twice in a short space of time and would appreciate some rest.
▪ That was an extraordinarily fine achievement in such a short space of time.
▪ The problem is getting the material under control in order to reach ambitious learning goals in a short space of time.
▪ The problem was more one of having to absorb a vast amount of information in a short space of time.
at short notice
▪ Both players pulled out of the competition yesterday at short notice.
▪ Occasionally, tours may have to be cancelled at short notice.
▪ One of the players dropped out at short notice.
▪ He was called in at short notice due to the unfortunate motor accident involving Design Director, Bill Naysmith.
▪ Many laboratories have cooperated at short notice and are analysing large numbers of samples.
▪ Many of the more glamorous film and photographic opportunities crop up at short notice, so you have to be flexible.
▪ Occasionally tours may be cancelled at short notice owing to circumstances beyond our control.
▪ The landlord could also terminate the arrangements at short notice.
▪ There is an aversion to holding meetings at short notice with a diminished complement.
▪ These alternatives will not always be available at short notice but it might be possible to plan for them.
▪ Working conditions may not be up to much, and as a casual employee you can be fired at short notice.
flexible/short-time etc working
▪ An outside problem can sometimes be helped by, say, more flexible working hours and so be resolved at management level.
▪ Earnings might vary because of piece-work, overtime or short-time working.
▪ Flexible Hours Question: Has consideration been given to the introduction of flexible working hours?
▪ Meanwhile, solicitors were last week urged to consider flexible working for staff in line with the government's family friendly policies.
▪ Recruitment procedures focus on individual skills and potential for flexible working.
▪ Through grants to local authorities, we are financing schemes to introduce more flexible working practices - such as job sharing.
▪ Vauxhall bosses admit that the threat of short-time working at Ellesmere Port still remains a possibility.
▪ Wage freezes have been brought in across most of the company and some short-time working introduced.
in the long/short/medium term
in the short run
▪ Although this is the socially efficient output in the short run it is not efficient in the long run.
▪ He predicted more volatile dealings in the short run.
▪ However, in the short run, numerous factors may operate to cause changes in supply.
▪ It showed the company that Orrick was willing to make a commitment to them by losing some money in the short run.
▪ Of course, IRAs cost the Treasury in the short run.
▪ The problem worsens with the relentless financial pressures for immediate performance in the short run.
▪ The recipients did not, and in the short run simply could not, spend the majority of their extra revenue.
▪ This could follow if the capital goods producing industries faced capacity constraints in their attempt to raise output in the short run.
life's too short
long-stemmed/short-stemmed etc
make short/light work of sth
▪ But she made light work of polishing off the shopping at a supermarket near her West London home.
▪ Carmen would have made short work of Michael too.
▪ Fourth placed Guisborough made short work of the opposition at Saltburn.
▪ Guernsey made short work of the opposition when they won the event on home soil in 1990.
▪ It is fair to warn anglers that thousands of crabs soon make short work of rag and lugworm.
▪ It made short work of our Windows performance tests, WinTach, clocking up an impressive index of over 9.3.
▪ The second game we pull away early and make short work of it.
▪ Willie Thorne made light work of the promising Nottinghamshire youngster, Anthony Hamilton, as he eased into the last 16.
the long and (the) short of it
▪ The long and short of it is that I had too much to drink and said something I shouldn't have.
▪ There you are, the long and the short of it.
to cut a long story short
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Customers were being shorted about two ounces per glass of beer.
▪ The fire was caused by a toaster that shorted out.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Short

Short \Short\, a. [Compar. Shorter; superl. Shortest.] [OE. short, schort, AS. scort, sceort; akin to OHG. scurz, Icel. skorta to be short of, to lack, and perhaps to E. shear, v. t. Cf. Shirt.]

  1. Not long; having brief length or linear extension; as, a short distance; a short piece of timber; a short flight.

    The bed is shorter than that a man can stretch himself on it.
    --Isa. xxviii. 20.

  2. Not extended in time; having very limited duration; not protracted; as, short breath.

    The life so short, the craft so long to learn.
    --Chaucer.

    To short absense I could yield.
    --Milton.

  3. Limited in quantity; inadequate; insufficient; scanty; as, a short supply of provisions, or of water.

  4. Insufficiently provided; inadequately supplied; scantily furnished; lacking; not coming up to a resonable, or the ordinary, standard; -- usually with of; as, to be short of money.

    We shall be short in our provision.
    --Shak.

  5. Deficient; defective; imperfect; not coming up, as to a measure or standard; as, an account which is short of the trith.

  6. Not distant in time; near at hand.

    Marinell was sore offended That his departure thence should be so short.
    --Spenser.

    He commanded those who were appointed to attend him to be ready by a short day.
    --Clarendon.

  7. Limited in intellectual power or grasp; not comprehensive; narrow; not tenacious, as memory.

    Their own short understandings reach No farther than the present.
    --Rowe.

  8. Less important, efficaceous, or powerful; not equal or equivalent; less (than); -- with of.

    Hardly anything short of an invasion could rouse them again to war.
    --Landor.

  9. Abrupt; brief; pointed; petulant; as, he gave a short answer to the question.

  10. (Cookery) Breaking or crumbling readily in the mouth; crisp; as, short pastry.

  11. (Metal) Brittle.

    Note: Metals that are brittle when hot are called ?ot-short; as, cast iron may be hot-short, owing to the presence of sulphur. Those that are brittle when cold are called cold-short; as, cast iron may be cold-short, on account of the presence of phosphorus.

  12. (Stock Exchange) Engaging or engaged to deliver what is not possessed; as, short contracts; to be short of stock. See The shorts, under Short, n., and To sell short, under Short, adv.

    Note: In mercantile transactions, a note or bill is sometimes made payable at short sight, that is, in a little time after being presented to the payer.

  13. (Phon.) Not prolonged, or relatively less prolonged, in utterance; -- opposed to long, and applied to vowels or to syllables. In English, the long and short of the same letter are not, in most cases, the long and short of the same sound; thus, the i in ill is the short sound, not of i in isle, but of ee in eel, and the e in pet is the short sound of a in pate, etc. See Quantity, and Guide to Pronunciation, [sect][sect]22, 30.

    Note: Short is much used with participles to form numerous self-explaining compounds; as, short-armed, short-billed, short-fingered, short-haired, short-necked, short-sleeved, short-tailed, short-winged, short-wooled, etc.

    At short notice, in a brief time; promptly.

    Short rib (Anat.), one of the false ribs.

    Short suit (Whist), any suit having only three cards, or less than three.
    --R. A. Proctor.

    To come short, To cut short, To fall short, etc. See under Come, Cut, etc.

Short

Short \Short\, n.

  1. A summary account.

    The short and the long is, our play is preferred.
    --Shak.

  2. pl. The part of milled grain sifted out which is next finer than the bran.

    The first remove above bran is shorts.
    --Halliwell.

  3. pl. Short, inferior hemp.

  4. pl. Breeches; shortclothes. [Slang]
    --Dickens.

  5. (Phonetics) A short sound, syllable, or vowel.

    If we compare the nearest conventional shorts and longs in English, as in ``bit'' and ``beat,'' ``not'' and ``naught,'' we find that the short vowels are generally wide, the long narrow, besides being generally diphthongic as well. Hence, originally short vowels can be lengthened and yet kept quite distinct from the original longs.
    --H. Sweet.

    In short, in few words; in brief; briefly.

    The long and the short, the whole; a brief summing up.

    The shorts (Stock Exchange), those who are unsupplied with stocks which they contracted to deliver.

Short

Short \Short\, adv. In a short manner; briefly; limitedly; abruptly; quickly; as, to stop short in one's course; to turn short.

He was taken up very short, and adjudged corrigible for such presumptuous language.
--Howell.

To sell short (Stock Exchange), to sell, for future delivery, what the party selling does not own, but hopes to buy at a lower rate.

Short

Short \Short\, v. t. [AS. sceortian.] To shorten. [Obs.]

Short

Short \Short\, v. i. To fail; to decrease. [Obs.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
short

1580s, the short "the result, the total," from short (adj.). Meaning "electrical short circuit" first recorded 1906 (see short circuit). Meaning "contraction of a name or phrase" is from 1873 (as in for short). Slang meaning "car" is attested from 1897; originally "street car," so called because street cars (or the rides taken in them) were "shorter" than railroad cars.

short

Old English sceortian "to grow short, become short; run short, fail," from the source of short (adj.). Transitive meaning "make short" is from late 12c. Meaning "to short-circuit" is by 1904. Related: Shorted; shorting.

short

Old English sceort, scort "short, not long, not tall; brief," probably from Proto-Germanic *skurta- (cognates: Old Norse skorta "to be short of," skort "shortness;" Old High German scurz "short"), from PIE root *(s)ker- (1) "to cut," with notion of "something cut off" (cognates: Sanskrit krdhuh "shortened, maimed, small;" Latin curtus "short," cordus "late-born," originally "stunted in growth;" Old Church Slavonic kratuku, Russian korotkij "short;" Lithuanian skurstu "to be stunted," skardus "steep;" Old Irish cert "small," Middle Irish corr "stunted, dwarfish").\n

\nMeaning "having an insufficient quantity" is from 1690s. Meaning "rude" is attested from late 14c. Meaning "easily provoked" is from 1590s; perhaps the notion is of being "not long in tolerating." Short fuse in figurative sense of "quick temper" first attested 1968. To fall short is from archery. Short run "relatively brief period of time" is from 1879. Short story first recorded 1877. To make short work of "dispose of quickly" is first attested 1570s. Phrase short and sweet is from 1530s. To be short by the knees (1733) was to be kneeling; to be short by the head (1540s) was to be beheaded.

Wiktionary
short
  1. 1 Having a small distance from one end or edge to another, either horizontally or vertically. 2 (context of a person English) Of comparatively little height. 3 Having little duration; opposite of long. adv. 1 abruptly, curtly, briefly. 2 unawares. 3 Without achieving a goal or requirement. 4 (context cricket of the manner of bounce of a cricket ball English) Relatively far from the batsman and hence bouncing higher than normal; opposite of full. 5 (context finance English) With a negative ownership position. n. 1 A short circuit. 2 A short film. 3 (non-gloss definition: Used to indicate a short-length version of a size) 4 (context baseball English) A shortstop. 5 (context finance English) A short seller. 6 (context finance English) A short sale. 7 A summary account. 8 (context phonetics English) A short sound, syllable, or vowel. 9 (label en programming) An (l/en: integer) (l/en: variable) shorter than normal integers; usually two bytes long. prep. 1 Deficient in. 2 (context finance English) Having a negative position in. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To cause a short circuit#Noun in (something). 2 (context intransitive English) Of an electrical circuit, to short circuit#Verb. 3 (context transitive English) To shortchange. 4 (context transitive English) To provide with a smaller than agreed or labeled amount. 5 (context transitive business English) To sell something, especially security, that one does not own at the moment for delivery at a later date in hopes of profiting from a decline in the price; to sell short. 6 (context obsolete English) To shorten.

WordNet
short
  1. n. the location on a baseball field where the shortstop is stationed

  2. accidental contact between two points in an electric circuit that have a potential difference [syn: short circuit]

  3. the fielding position of the player on a baseball team who is stationed between 2nd and 3rd base [syn: shortstop]

short
  1. adj. primarily temporal sense; indicating or being or seeming to be limited in duration; "a short life"; "a short flight"; "a short holiday"; "a short story"; "only a few short months" [ant: long]

  2. primarily spatial sense; having little length or lacking in length; "short skirts"; "short hair"; "the board was a foot short"; "a short toss" [ant: long]

  3. low in stature; not tall; "his was short and stocky"; "short in stature"; "a short smokestack" [ant: tall]

  4. not sufficient to meet a need; "an inadequate income"; "a poor salary"; "money is short"; "on short rations"; "food is in short supply"; "short on experience" [syn: inadequate, poor]

  5. not holding securities or commodities that one sells in expectation of a fall in prices; "a short sale"; "short in cotton" [ant: long]

  6. of speech sounds (especially vowels) of relatively short duration (as e.g. the English vowel sounds in `pat', `pet', `pit', `pot', putt') [ant: long]

  7. containing a large amount of shortening; therefore tender and easy to crumble or break into flakes; "shortbread is a short crumbly cookie"; "a short flaky pie crust"

  8. less than the correct or legal or full amount often deliberately so; "a light pound"; "a scant cup of sugar"; "regularly gives short weight" [syn: light, scant(p)]

  9. used of syllables that are unaccented or of relatively brief duration

  10. (of memory) deficient in retentiveness or range; "a short memory"

  11. lacking foresight or scope; "a short view of the problem"; "shortsighted policies"; "shortsighted critics derided the plan"; "myopic thinking" [syn: shortsighted, unforesightful, myopic]

  12. unwilling to endure; "she was short with the slower students" [syn: unforbearing]

  13. quickly aroused to anger; "a hotheaded commander" [syn: choleric, irascible, hotheaded, hot-tempered, quick-tempered, short-tempered]

  14. most direct; "took the shortest and most direct route to town" [syn: shortest]

  15. marked by rude or peremptory shortness; "try to cultivate a less brusque manner"; "a curt reply"; "the salesgirl was very short with him" [syn: brusque, brusk, curt, short(p)]

short
  1. v. cheat someone by not returning him enough money [syn: short-change]

  2. create a short-circuit in [syn: short-circuit]

short
  1. adv. quickly and without warning; "he stopped suddenly" [syn: abruptly, suddenly, dead]

  2. without possessing something at the time it is contractually sold; "he made his fortune by selling short just before the crash"

  3. clean across; "the car's axle snapped short"

  4. at some point or distance before a goal is reached; "he fell short of our expectations"

  5. so as to interrupt; "She took him up short before he could continue"

  6. at a disadvantage; "I was caught short" [syn: unawares]

  7. tightly; "she caught him up short on his lapel"

  8. in a curt, abrupt and discourteous manner; "he told me curtly to get on with it"; "he talked short with everyone"; "he said shortly that he didn't like it" [syn: curtly, shortly]

Gazetteer
Short, OK -- U.S. Census Designated Place in Oklahoma
Population (2000): 328
Housing Units (2000): 143
Land area (2000): 23.781084 sq. miles (61.592721 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.059329 sq. miles (0.153662 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 23.840413 sq. miles (61.746383 sq. km)
FIPS code: 67400
Located within: Oklahoma (OK), FIPS 40
Location: 35.573047 N, 94.506071 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Short, OK
Short
Wikipedia
Short

Short or shortness may refer to:

Short (1801 cricketer)

Short (first name and dates unknown) was an English first-class cricketer for Surrey who was active in the 1800s and is recorded in one match in 1801, scoring 0 runs in his only innings.

Short (finance)

In finance, short selling (also known as shorting or going short) is the practice of selling securities or other financial instruments that are not currently owned, and subsequently repurchasing them ("covering"). In the event of an interim price decline, the short seller will profit, since the cost of (re)purchase will be less than the proceeds which were received upon the initial (short) sale. Conversely, the short position will be closed out at a loss in the event that the price of a shorted instrument should rise prior to repurchase. The potential loss on a short sale is theoretically unlimited as there is no theoretical limit to a rise in the price of the instrument, however, in practice, the short seller will be required to post margin or collateral to cover losses, and any inability to do so on a timely basis would cause its broker or counterparty to liquidate the position. In the securities markets, the seller generally must borrow the securities in order to effect delivery in the short sale. In some cases, the short seller must pay a fee to borrow the securities and must additionally reimburse the lender for cash returns the lender would have received had the securities not been loaned out.

Short selling is most commonly done with instruments traded in public securities, futures or currency markets, due to the liquidity and real-time price dissemination characteristic of such markets and because the instruments defined within each class are fungible.

In practical terms, going short can be considered the opposite of the conventional practice of " going long", whereby an investor profits from an increase in the price of the asset. Mathematically, the return from a short position is equivalent to that of owning (being "long") a negative amount of the instrument. A short sale may be motivated by a variety of objectives. Speculators may sell short in the hope of realizing a profit on an instrument which appears to be overvalued, just as long investors or speculators hope to profit from a rise in the price of an instrument which appears undervalued. Traders or fund managers may hedge a long position or a portfolio through one or more short positions.

In contrast to a traditional merchant who starts out to "buy low, sell high", a short-seller starts out to "sell high, buy low", or even to "buy high, sell low" when this buy is in fact "on tick".

Although some feel that short selling is morally wrong, research indicates that banning short selling is ineffective and has negative effects on markets.

Short (crater)

Short is a lunar impact crater that is located in the southern regions of the Moon, on the near side. It lies just to the south of the larger, prominent crater Moretus, and northeast of Newton.

This crater lies across an older crater designated Short B. Only the eroded southeastern section of the rim of Short B still survives. There is a cluster of small craters attached to the outer rim within the attached Short B.

Short itself is an eroded formation with a somewhat uneven outer rim. The inner wall is more narrow to the southeast and wider elsewhere. Several tiny craterlets lie along the rim edge, as well as the inner wall and floor. At the midpoint of the interior floor of Short is a low central rise. A small crater lies along the northeast edge of this hill.

Short (surname)

Short is a surname of English and Gaelic origin.

Notable people with this surname include:

  • Alan Short (1920–2004), California legislator
  • Arthur Short (born 1947), South African cricketer
  • Arthur Short (politician) (1850–1933) South Australian MHA
  • Arthur Ernest William Short (c. 1890–1949), South Australian businessman and (briefly) Lord Mayor of Adelaide
  • Augustus Short (1802–1883), "Bishop Short", British-born Australian religious leader
  • Bob Short (1917–1982), American sports team owner
  • Bobby Short (1924–2005), American musician
  • Brandon Short (born 1977), American football player
  • Chris Short (1937–1991), American baseball player
  • Clare Short (born 1946), British politician
  • Columbus Short (born 1982), American dance choreographer and actor
  • Craig Short (born 1968), British football player
  • E L Short (born 1925), Texas politician
  • Edward Short (Canadian judge) (1806–1871), Canadian jurist and politician
  • Edward Watson Short, Baron Glenamara (1912-2014), British politician
  • Elizabeth Short (1924–1947), American murder victim known as the " Black Dahlia"
  • " Emily Short", pseudonymous writer of interactive fiction
  • Eustace Short (1875–1932), co-founder of Short Brothers
  • Gene Short (born 1953), American basketball player
  • Gertrude Short (1902-1968), American film actress
  • Gregory Short (1938–1999), American classical music composer
  • Horace Short (1872–1917), co-founder of Short Brothers
  • Hassard Short (1877–1956), Broadway musical director
  • Jack Short ( fl. 1300s), Scottish servant and betrayer of Sir William Wallace
  • Jake Short (born 1998), US Television Actor
  • James Short (mathematician) (1710–1768), British mathematician, optician, and telescope builder
  • Jason Short (born 1978), American football player
  • Jay Short (born 1939), American biochemist and biotech entrepreneur
  • Joseph Short (1904–1952), American journalist
  • Kayle Short (born 1973), Canadian hockey player
  • Keith Short (born 1941), British sculptor
  • Leonie Short (born 1956), Australian politician
  • Lester L. Short (born 1933), American ornithologist
  • Luke Short (1854–1893), American gunfighter
  • Luke Short (writer) (1908–1975), American writer
  • Martin Short (born 1950), Canadian actor and comedian
  • Nathaniel Short (born 1985), English footballer
  • Nigel Short (born 1965), British chess player
  • Oswald Short (1883–1969), co-founder of Short Brothers
  • Patrick Short ( fl. c. 1830), British-born religious leader
  • Peter Short (clergyman) (born 1948), Canadian minister, Moderator of the United Church of Canada
  • Peter Short (field hockey) (born 1976), Canadian field hockey player
  • Peter Short (printer) (died 1603), English printer
  • Peter Short (rugby union) (born 1979), English rugby union player
  • Phil Short (born 1947), U.S. Army officer and Louisiana politician
  • Rob Short (born 1972), British-born hockey player
  • Robert L. Short (1932–2009), American religious writer and minister
  • Roger Short (1944–2003), British diplomat
  • Tom Short (born 1957), American Christian traveling evangelist
  • Walter Short (1880–1949), American soldier
  • William Henry Short (1884–1916), British soldier
  • William J. Short ( fl. 1920s), Canadian politician from Manitoba
  • William Short (Alberta politician) (1866–1926), mayor of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  • William Short (American ambassador) (1759–1849), Thomas Jefferson's private secretary

Usage examples of "short".

The short drive ended with him being carried onto a hypersonic aircraft, just big enough to accommodate Tochee at the back where a dozen seats had been removed.

Tyrone accommodated her shorter height by bending his knees, and for a moment their eyes melded in warm communications.

On the morning Washington departed Philadelphia to assume command at Boston, he and others of the Massachusetts delegation had traveled a short way with the general and his entourage, to a rousing accompaniment of fifes and drums, Adams feeling extremely sorry for himself for having to stay behind to tend what had become the unglamorous labors of Congress.

While the stream of power now flowing was ample to operate the lookout plates, yet it would be many hours before the accumulator cells would be in condition to drive the craft even that short distance.

The secretion of acetylcholine alters the properties of the muscle cell membrane, brings about the influx of sodium ion, and, in short, initiates a wave of depolarization just like that which takes place in a nerve cell.

As soon as the beans had protruded radicles, some to a length of less than a tenth of an inch, and others to a length of several tenths, little squares or oblongs of card were affixed to the short sloping sides of their conical tips.

Beside all this, Roderic had had communicated to him, by a supernatural afflatus, that wondrous art, as yet unknown in the plains of Albion, of turning up the soil with a share of iron, and scattering it with a small quantity of those grains which are most useful to man, to expect to gather, after a short interval, a forty-fold increase.

For all wounds, bruises, sprains, bee-stings, insect and snake-bites, frost-bites, chilblains, caked breast, swollen glands, rheumatism, and, in short, for any and all ailments, whether afflicting man or beast, requiring a direct external application, either to allay inflammation or soothe pain, the Extract of Smart-weed cannot be excelled.

And this imprisonment continued six years, and when this was over, another short affliction, which was an imprisonment of half a year, fell to his share.

By the time the Culture came to know the Affront better - shortly after the long distraction of the Idiran war - the Affront were a rapidly developing and swiftly maturing species, and short of another war there was no practical way of quickly changing either their nature or behaviour.

One of the best things you can do to ensure that short science fiction remains alive and plentiful in the market is to subscribe to whatever magazine you like best.

The sobs which interrupted the short and simple allocution which the pastor made to his flock overcame him so much that he stopped and said no more, except to invite all present to fervent prayer.

But if we attentively reflect how much swifter is the progress of corruption than its cure, and if we remember that the years abandoned to public disorders exceeded the months allotted to the martial reign of Aurelian, we must confess that a few short intervals of peace were insufficient for the arduous work of reformation.

It is a curious and a mystical fact, that at the period to which I am alluding, and a very short time, only a little month, before he successfully solicited the hand of Miss Milbanke, being at Newstead, he fancied that he saw the ghost of the monk which is supposed to haunt the abbey, and to make its ominous appearance when misfortune or death impends over the master of the mansion.

His amiable manners and generous heart had endeared him to all, and in a short time his delicate feelings were respected, and the slightest allusion to ambiguity of birth cautiously avoided by all his associates, who, whatever might be their suspicions, thought his brilliant qualifications more than compensated for any want of ancestral distinction.