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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
medicine
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a food/medicine/clothes cupboardBritish English
▪ The medicine cupboard's in the bathroom.
a prescription drug/medicine
▪ Not everyone can afford the cost of prescription drugs.
alternative medicine/therapies (=medical treatment that is not based on the usual western methods)
▪ Acupuncture is widely used by practitioners of alternative medicine.
Ayurvedic medicine
Chinese medicine
clinical medicine/experience/training etc (=medicine etc that deals directly with people, rather than with research or ideas)
complementary medicine
▪ acupuncture and other types of complementary medicines
cough medicine/cough mixture/cough syrup (=liquid containing medicine for a cough)
▪ You should take some cough medicine.
forensic evidence/science/medicine etc
▪ Forensic experts found traces of blood in the car.
▪ a career in forensic science
▪ a forensic pathologist
herbal medicine
internal medicine
medicine man
patent medicine
preventive medicine
private medicine
socialized medicine
tropical diseases/medicine (=diseases that are common in hot countries or the study of these diseases)
western medicine
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
alternative
▪ Needle Works Acupuncture is widely used in human alternative medicine.
▪ Clinical ecology is one of the more controversial forms of alternative medicine.
▪ It must be stressed that there are important differences between stage hypnotism and the techniques used in alternative medicine.
▪ There are so many forms of alternative medicine and there's no doubt it's getting more popular.
▪ We can not dismiss claims about, say, alternative medicine or acupuncture a priori.
▪ Tony Smith claims that the purpose of our newsletter is to support alternative medicine.
▪ In Homoeopathy and many other types of alternative medicine the patient's illness is placed in a much larger context.
▪ Unorthodox or alternative medicine was not on trial.
clinical
▪ Differences between clinical medicine and public health in their views on quality assurance are also illustrated.
▪ Some of them are potent ganglion blocking agents and were introduced into clinical medicine, but they had grave disadvantages.
▪ The reports illustrate the tensions between clinical medicine and public health in the formulation of health policy.
▪ The objective is to provide the student with a basic knowledge of normal human biology with aspects relevant to clinical medicine.
complementary
▪ The rift between conventional and complementary medicine has had many harmful effects.
▪ The practices of complementary medicine fall roughly into the following categories: 1.
▪ So why is complementary medicine gaining popularity?
▪ In my view, scientists have a crucial role to play in the rapprochement of conventional and complementary medicine.
▪ Such developments are paving the way to rapprochement between conventional and complementary medicine.
▪ Most forms of complementary medicine are framed in terms of traditional medical systems from other cultures.
▪ Today many physicians admit that complementary medicine has some potential and deserves a fair trial.
conventional
▪ This tremendous progress of conventional medicine in the present century has confirmed belief in the treatment by opposites.
▪ Currently, the problems people go online with the most are the problems that conventional medicine helps the least.
▪ The rift between conventional and complementary medicine has had many harmful effects.
▪ In my view, scientists have a crucial role to play in the rapprochement of conventional and complementary medicine.
▪ Much of conventional medicine has its roots in traditional medicine.
▪ Many of them have been failed by conventional medicine or have rejected it.
▪ Large areas of conventional medicine thus represent particular aspects of traditional medicine systematically developed and extended.
▪ Such developments are paving the way to rapprochement between conventional and complementary medicine.
forensic
▪ When she'd first qualified in forensic medicine he'd been a young sergeant.
good
Good nursing is the essential complement to good medicine.
▪ But, because of better medicine and nutrition, people live longer and their money may run out before they do.
▪ Yes, crushed apple was a very good medicine when properly blended with glucose and sterile milk for small stomachs.
▪ Having Louella come and live with me will be the best medicine in the world.
▪ This year you're receiving a rare double dose of the best heavenly medicine.
▪ Uncle Billy Watson doeth good like a medicine, he thought, paraphrasing the scriptures.
▪ Recovery is the best medicine for the market, but it must be sustainable.
▪ A former teacher at Longlands College, Middlesbrough, Pat always believes in laughter as the best medicine for loneliness.
herbal
▪ Other herbal medicines should be regarded with greater caution.
▪ They studied herbal medicine as an alternative to the drugs of the medical profession.
▪ There's a large dramatically-styled amphitheatre and a small clinic with herbal medicines.
▪ Organic foods, herbal medicines, and handmade goods were preferred to their industrially produced counterparts.
▪ Some herbal medicines may be safe; others may interact with other medication you are taking.
▪ Bloodletting is popular among the doctors and apothecaries, but herbal medicine, witchcraft and spells are rampant in the general population.
▪ The widow, a Quaker, would seem to have been a devotee of herbal medicine and various other quack cures.
▪ The good doctor Guruji treats madness with herbal medicine in a village near Delhi.
holistic
▪ In the centre, we record part of my daily routine for self-help holistic medicine which includes pectoral muscle exercises.
▪ It is usually called holistic medicine or holistic health.
▪ Paracelsus's influence on homoeopathy and holistic medicine is genuine, but the paracelsian legacy is much wider.
▪ She sent him books on holistic medicine and nutrition.
▪ The second axiom of holistic medicine is that each person is unique and each program must be individualized.
▪ The concepts of self-defense and self-repair are central contributions of holistic medicine.
internal
▪ Smith has been practicing internal medicine in Mesa since 1976.
▪ Physicians trained in internal medicine are attached and function as consultants.
modern
▪ The concerns of older people about their future health care probably reflect beliefs about modern medicine and priorities within the medical profession.
▪ Underscoring this notion is the fact that other diseases continue to go unnoticed under the very nose of modern medicine.
▪ In a way, though, that limited him and made him out of touch with modern medicine.
▪ However, it was found in nearly all those cancer patients whom modern medicine could not help.
▪ The clinical application of devices or materials which contact blood is of major importance in modern medicine.
▪ That perspective later reappeared as he witnessed what he considered the rampant missteps of modern allopathic medicine.
▪ Are these rules unsuited to modern medicine?
▪ Similarly, the rise of modern medicine developed at the expense of midwives and village healers, most of whom were women.
new
▪ Based on the breakthrough, researchers were working to develop new medicines that would specifically target certain kinds of cancer.
▪ The meeting took place in Manhattan a few weeks ago to bring attention to new medicines that are helping schizophrenics avoid hospitalization.
▪ She had been diagnosed the previous summer with congestive heart failure, but for a year a new medicine worked well.
▪ This was the first new class of medicine to be introduced in 40 years for Type I diabetes.
▪ Skill and luck kept the new medicine men alive.
orthodox
▪ We therefore should aim at integration rather than separation from orthodox medicine.
▪ Many practitioners of orthodox medicine boggle over the accuracy of reflexology's diagnoses.
▪ It's complementary to orthodox medicine.
▪ In this respect orthodox medicine may have placed itself at some disadvantage to its complementary counterparts.
patent
▪ Taken on to sell insurance, patent medicines and beauty products, I sold my own animals and bought an old bicycle.
▪ We are exposed to chemicals everywhere, in oven cleaners, detergents, patent medicines, hair sprays-everywhere.
▪ For instance, he collects on his little card index all references in Wells to feeding, eating, and patent medicines.
▪ Now, when I stopped at the Emporium, I looked at the patent medicine display first.
▪ He had sorted the boxes of patent medicines and stacked them in one corner away from the cartons of collar studs and bootlaces.
▪ The new display focuses primarily on the role of patent medicines from 1870 to 1906.
preventive
▪ We have received clear evidence from opticians in our constituencies that the imposition of charges runs contrary to the concept of preventive medicine.
▪ There exists no preventive medicine for the pain of feeling excluded or underappreciated.
▪ The appointment of John Simon as first Medical Officer heralded the replacement of the grandiose principles of sanitary engineering by preventive medicine.
▪ It was hardly surprising that preventive medicine, and state medicine in particular, refused to give unconditional support to eugenics.
▪ He says physicians should be well-trained in standard medical care and also grounded in preventive medicine and healing alternatives.
▪ Such apathy is indicative of the generally low emphasis and under-investment in health education and preventive medicine in Britain.
▪ Laughter and fun should also be on your preventive medicine shelf.
private
▪ Under what circumstances would you use private medicine?
public
Public health medicine and purchasing health care Public health medicine is a goal driven medical specialty.
▪ Thus Whitty and Jones argued recently that public health medicine embraces the purchasing role at its peril.
traditional
▪ But for the present, crystal users recommend using their treatment to complement, rather than replace, traditional medicine.
▪ He is among a growing minority of physicians combining the standard care of traditional medicine with certain nontraditional treatments and preventive measures.
▪ Much of conventional medicine has its roots in traditional medicine.
▪ Large areas of conventional medicine thus represent particular aspects of traditional medicine systematically developed and extended.
▪ Also he knows a lot about traditional medicines, which, by the way, I believe in one hundred per cent.
▪ Prevention also plays a central role in traditional medicine with many different practices and prohibitions being part of people's daily life.
▪ Any genuinely popular and empowering health system could not, therefore, ignore or bypass traditional medicine.
tropical
▪ He then went into research in tropical medicine.
▪ The substance of her treatise on the Black Death had been carefully checked with a microbiologist and a specialist in tropical medicine.
▪ Leo would be coming back to New York now to work in a hospital where he could specialize in tropical medicine.
veterinary
▪ Harry Wilson, services to veterinary medicine.
▪ His doctorate is in veterinary medicine.
▪ It has been traditionally treated with indigenous veterinary medicine.
western
▪ And while there are fundamental differences between Eastern and Western medicine, this is no new age fad.
▪ Officially Mataji could cure anything but perhaps western medicine hurried her along?
▪ This is an insight that western medicine has only recently begun to acknowledge.
■ NOUN
cabinet
▪ There are the cleaning products kept under the sink and a well-stocked medicine cabinet to be explored.
▪ There was a stainless-steel sink, and a mirrored medicine cabinet.
▪ Barbara padded across the carpet to the en-suite bathroom and opened the medicine cabinet above the basin.
▪ By then, it was all over but the trip to the medicine cabinet to find the nearest aspirin bottle.
▪ These kits really are a must for any home medicine cabinet.
▪ Now it seems that Mom has her head in the medicine cabinet and divorce papers in her hand.
▪ A few days later I found some use-them-once plastic hypodermics in the medicine cabinet.
▪ A perusal of the medicine cabinet could have told them that much.
chest
▪ It was well fitted out, with a formidable medicine chest.
▪ Dana fights his way through the protocol surrounding the medicine chest, has a recipe drawn up, and delivers his balm.
▪ Only, there on its side on top of the medicine chest was an unstoppered bottle.
▪ Both statements agree: Get your vitamins and minerals from your plate, not your medicine chest.
▪ The home medicine chest Every Koi keeper should have one of these, stored in a cool, dark place.
▪ Under his bed he had a complete medicine chest, full of stuff given him by a veterinary friend in Palm Beach.
health
▪ Public health medicine and purchasing health care Public health medicine is a goal driven medical specialty.
▪ Thus Whitty and Jones argued recently that public health medicine embraces the purchasing role at its peril.
man
▪ On the Reservation, being a medicine man meant literally that these days.
▪ Sioux medicine men collected tiny, glistening pebbles from anthills and used them in medicine rattles.
▪ Hundreds of such carpet-patterns lie folded in the brains of a few medicine men, still ready for ceremonial recreation and use.
▪ Yet medicine during that period was completely different, handled by leech-wielding doctors and medicine men.
▪ Present-day medicine men use wicker baskets and reed arrows.
▪ Forbes is a one-bottle medicine man.
▪ He spoke Navajo and once sang with a Navajo medicine man at the bedside of a sick girl.
▪ Primitive myth comes to us through the kindness of shamans, village elders, witches, warlocks, and medicine men.
■ VERB
buy
▪ We had to take jobs with Del Monte, but they didn't pay us enough money to buy medicines as well as food.
▪ You could have come and politely asked me to buy you some medicine.
▪ He often can not afford to buy medicine for his eight children.
▪ I already knew what they would face, having gone to one to buy some medicine for Zali.
▪ But government's interest also lies in buying medicines for the health service at lowest cost.
▪ The health ministry says it is forced to buy more expensive medicines from the big drug manufacturers because of international patent agreements.
give
▪ He said he was not given any medicine, and no doctor saw him.
▪ Of course, he'd given up medicine to pursue comedy, but he was absolutely at his best when caring for others.
▪ You can partially relieve muscles sore from coughing by giving simple pain medicine such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen.
▪ Help her! Give her some medicine!
▪ Has this doctor given you any medicine?
▪ We certainly can not afford to give away vouchers for medicine, for No. 2 pencils, for diapers.
need
▪ Their ` growth promoters' include drugs that might be needed in medicine.
▪ This time she was told that she needed medicine, and fast.
▪ Why do disable people need medicine?
▪ A practice with more patients needing expensive medicines will be set a larger amount.
▪ Also, there's a great deal of sickness for which we need medicines.
▪ What I needed was medicine, real bad.
▪ For all his invasive tendencies, Boswell does not tell us why Johnson needed medicine.
practice
▪ The doctors were practicing medicine, which is what society expects that we do.
▪ Bachynsky went back to practicing medicine.
▪ Doctors are not required to practice flawless medicine.
▪ It changed the way they practice medicine somewhat.
▪ Smith has been practicing internal medicine in Mesa since 1976.
practise
▪ They're carrying placards supporting a doctor who practises environmental medicine.
▪ He was probably the Robert Pemel who obtained an archiepiscopal licence to practise medicine around 1632.
prescribe
▪ The legislation also bans the practice of paying incentives to doctors to prescribe expensive brand name medicines.
▪ This worker can prescribe and dispense medicine, assuming a major function of a psychiatrist, for less money.
▪ The person who prescribed the medicine may have had homoeopathic experience but was not using homoeopathy in this case.
▪ The amount is not fixed firmly and the doctor will in no circumstances be told to stop prescribing necessary medicines.
▪ Treatment was not merely a matter of prescribing herbal medicines, but a whole regimen which controlled the diet and the life-style.
provide
▪ Underresourced hospitals struggle to provide medicines and care.
▪ The Urgent Care Center provides industrial medicine and workers' compensation examinations for local companies.
▪ Keep yourself clean from head to foot and provide yourself with opening medicine in case of need.
▪ They harbour some of the world's most endangered wildlife and provide vital food and medicines.
sell
▪ Taken on to sell insurance, patent medicines and beauty products, I sold my own animals and bought an old bicycle.
▪ Drug companies also are borrowing techniques used in marketing human drugs to sell pet medicines.
▪ SmithKline could also benefit from Beecham's experience in selling over-the-counter medicines.
▪ They were shopkeepers who sold medicines or cures and established their right to treat the sick during the plague.
study
▪ Leaving school at the age of 14 to study medicine, he was apprenticed to a surgeon in Worcester.
▪ They studied herbal medicine as an alternative to the drugs of the medical profession.
▪ Some of them were mature students studying medicine, dentistry, law, engineering.
▪ Daantjie Siebert, told the prison warder that Biko had studied medicine and yoga and was probably faking his injuries.
▪ The prize for successful candidates, a chance to study medicine in the former Czechoslovakia.
▪ Schools in Sao Leopoldo, the parents felt, were sorely lacking, and Joviane wanted to study medicine.
▪ This left my father's parents badly off, but they managed to send him to Oxford, where he studied medicine.
▪ Realising how useful it would be to have a doctor in their band, Magdalena was put to studying medicine.
take
▪ He hadn't been changed or taken his medicine.
▪ They can take medicines and watch their diets and living habits.
▪ He sees no need to take medicine.
▪ They were far more likely to take medicine for the sheep which suffered from anthrax, toxaemia and fluke.
▪ Patients whose ability to take medicines is a critical issue could be encouraged to use the same community pharmacy on each occasion.
▪ But many patients taking these medicines continue to have problems controlling their blood-sugar levels.
▪ The Castleford star took medicine for a throat and chest infection before the second Test in Auckland.
▪ She stopped taking the antipsychotic medicine.
use
▪ Needle Works Acupuncture is widely used in human alternative medicine.
▪ Herbs have historically been used in medicine to the extent that many are reported to have magical properties.
▪ They are used in medicine for the treatment of cancer and to detect thyroid gland disorders.
▪ Sioux medicine men collected tiny, glistening pebbles from anthills and used them in medicine rattles.
▪ Thereupon the Chief gave me some white, blue, yellow, and shining herbs to use as medicines.
▪ This had evolved from the ancient single red R. gallica and had long been used in medicine.
▪ Many teen-agers mistakenly assume that if they feel well, they can stop using these medicines.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
conventional medicine
▪ Currently, the problems people go online with the most are the problems that conventional medicine helps the least.
▪ It works in a totally different way from conventional medicine, which is known to Homoeopathic practitioners as Allopathy.
▪ Large areas of conventional medicine thus represent particular aspects of traditional medicine systematically developed and extended.
▪ Many of them have been failed by conventional medicine or have rejected it.
▪ Much of conventional medicine has its roots in traditional medicine.
▪ This tremendous progress of conventional medicine in the present century has confirmed belief in the treatment by opposites.
folk medicine/remedy
▪ And as in folk medicine generally, if you believe it will help, it probably will.
▪ GUHgl-MUHgl n. A folk remedy for sore throats and colds.
holistic medicine/treatment/healing etc
▪ Finding a therapist to help you Many complementary therapies exist which are concerned with holistic healing.
▪ Herbalism: a holistic treatment involving the use of herbal remedies specifically chosen and blended for different conditions.
▪ In the centre, we record part of my daily routine for self-help holistic medicine which includes pectoral muscle exercises.
▪ It is usually called holistic medicine or holistic health.
▪ Paracelsus's influence on homoeopathy and holistic medicine is genuine, but the paracelsian legacy is much wider.
▪ She sent him books on holistic medicine and nutrition.
▪ The concepts of self-defense and self-repair are central contributions of holistic medicine.
▪ The second axiom of holistic medicine is that each person is unique and each program must be individualized.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Medicines should be kept out of children's reach.
▪ Chinese herbal medicine
▪ Jane is studying medicine.
▪ Many of these people have been failed by conventional medicine or have rejected it.
▪ So why is complementary medicine gaining popularity?
▪ The discovery of penicillin revolutionized Western medicine.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He was taken to the hospital by police, where he was given a great deal of medicine and became unconscious.
▪ How are you going to get your medicine?
▪ I found a medicine dropper and used that to feed it the milk they left me.
▪ In the centre, we record part of my daily routine for self-help holistic medicine which includes pectoral muscle exercises.
▪ In the United Kingdom it's driven by medicine and there aren't many posts for social scientists.
▪ It was well fitted out, with a formidable medicine chest.
▪ No medicine, no therapy, can bring her back.
▪ Preventative medicine and good health rather than repairs were his philosophy.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Medicine

Medicine \Med"i*cine\, n. [L. medicina (sc. ars), fr. medicinus medical, fr. medicus: cf. F. m['e]decine. See Medical.]

  1. The science which relates to the prevention, cure, or alleviation of disease.

  2. Any substance administered in the treatment of disease; a remedial agent; a medication; a medicament; a remedy; physic.

    By medicine, life may be prolonged.
    --Shak.

  3. A philter or love potion. [Obs.]
    --Shak.

  4. [F. m['e]decin.] A physician. [Obs.]
    --Shak.

    1. Among the North American Indians, any object supposed to give control over natural or magical forces, to act as a protective charm, or to cause healing; also, magical power itself; the potency which a charm, token, or rite is supposed to exert.

      The North American Indian boy usually took as his medicine the first animal of which he dreamed during the long and solitary fast that he observed at puberty.
      --F. H. Giddings.

    2. Hence, a similar object or agency among other savages.

  5. Short for Medicine man.

  6. Intoxicating liquor; drink. [Slang]

    Medicine bag, a charm; -- so called among the North American Indians, or in works relating to them.

    Medicine man (among the North American Indians), a person who professes to cure sickness, drive away evil spirits, and regulate the weather by the arts of magic; a shaman.

    Medicine seal, a small gem or paste engraved with reversed characters, to serve as a seal. Such seals were used by Roman physicians to stamp the names of their medicines.

Medicine

Medicine \Med"i*cine\, v. t. To give medicine to; to affect as a medicine does; to remedy; to cure. ``Medicine thee to that sweet sleep.''
--Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
medicine

c.1200, "medical treatment, cure, remedy," also used figuratively, of spiritual remedies, from Old French medecine (Modern French médicine) "medicine, art of healing, cure, treatment, potion," from Latin medicina "the healing art, medicine; a remedy," also used figuratively, perhaps originally ars medicina "the medical art," from fem. of medicinus (adj.) "of a doctor," from medicus "a physician" (see medical); though OED finds evidence for this is wanting. Meaning "a medicinal potion or plaster" in English is mid-14c.\n

\nTo take (one's) medicine "submit to something disagreeable" is first recorded 1865. North American Indian medicine-man "shaman" is first attested 1801, from American Indian adoption of the word medicine in sense of "magical influence." The U.S.-Canadian boundary they called Medicine Line (first attested 1910), because it conferred a kind of magic protection: punishment for crimes committed on one side of it could be avoided by crossing over to the other. Medicine show "traveling show meant to attract a crowd so patent medicine can be sold to them" is American English, 1938. Medicine ball "stuffed leather ball used for exercise" is from 1889.\n\nIt is called a "medicine ball" and it got that title from Prof. Roberts, now of Springfield, whose fame is widespread, and whose bright and peculiar dictionary of terms for his prescription department in physical culture is taught in every first-class conducted Y.M.C.A. gymnasium in America. Prof. Roberts calls it a "medicine ball" because playful exercise with it invigorates the body, promotes digestion, and restores and preserves one's health.

["Scientific American Supplement," March 16, 1889]

Wiktionary
medicine

n. 1 A substance which specifically promotes healing when ingested or consumed in some way. 2 A treatment or cure. 3 The study of the cause, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of disease or illness. 4 The profession of physicians, surgeons and related specialisms; those who practice medicine. 5 Ritual Native American magic used by a medicine man to promote a desired outcome in healing, hunting, warfare etc. 6 Among the Native Americans, any object supposed to give control over natural or magical forces, to act as a protective charm, or to cause healing. 7 (context obsolete English) black magic, superstition. 8 (context obsolete English) A philtre or love potion. 9 (context obsolete English) A physician. 10 (cx slang English) alcoholic drink vb. (context rare obsolete English) To treat with medicine.

WordNet
medicine
  1. n. the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques [syn: medical specialty]

  2. (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease [syn: medication, medicament, medicinal drug]

  3. the learned profession that is mastered by graduate training in a medical school and that is devoted to preventing or alleviating or curing diseases and injuries; "he studied medicine at Harvard" [syn: practice of medicine]

  4. punishment for one's actions; "you have to face the music"; "take your medicine" [syn: music]

  5. v. treat medicinally, treat with medicine [syn: medicate]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Medicine (band)

Medicine are an American alternative rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1990 by guitarist/keyboardist Brad Laner.

They are perhaps best known for their cameo appearance in the 1994 film The Crow, in which they performed "Time Baby II", although the soundtrack album includes a different version entitled "Time Baby 3", a track that features guest vocals from the Cocteau Twins' Elizabeth Fraser.

Medicine (Grace Potter and the Nocturnals song)

"Medicine" is a song by Grace Potter and the Nocturnals, released on their eponymous album (2010). It is the lead single, was originally intended as the name of the album, and was promoted as such in numerous interviews and early reviews, but the album title was changed shortly after the replacement of producer T-Bone Burnett in favor of Dave Matthews Band producer, Mark Batson.

Medicine (Elsevier journal)

Medicine is a continually updated, evidence-based medical review journal covering internal medicine and its specialties. It was established by Simon Campbell-Smith in 1972 and is published by Medicine Publishing. The editor-in-chief is Allister Vale ( City Hospital, Birmingham).

Medicine

Medicine (British English ; American English ) is the science and practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. The word medicine is derived from Latinmedicus, meaning "a physician". Medicine encompasses a variety of health care practices evolved to maintain and restore health by the prevention and treatment of illness. Contemporary medicine applies biomedical sciences, biomedical research, genetics, and medical technology to diagnose, treat, and prevent injury and disease, typically through pharmaceuticals or surgery, but also through therapies as diverse as psychotherapy, external splints and traction, medical devices, biologics, and ionizing radiation, amongst others.

Medicine has existed for thousands of years, during most of which it was an art (an area of skill and knowledge) frequently having connections to the religious and philosophical beliefs of local culture. For example, a medicine man would apply herbs and say prayers for healing, or an ancient philosopher and physician would apply bloodletting according to the theories of humorism. In recent centuries, since the advent of modern science, most medicine has become a combination of art and science (both basic and applied, under the umbrella of medical science). While stitching technique for sutures is an art learned through practice, the knowledge of what happens at the cellular and molecular level in the tissues being stitched arises through science.

Prescientific forms of medicine are now known as traditional medicine and folk medicine. They remain commonly used with or instead of scientific medicine and are thus called alternative medicine. For example, evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture is "variable and inconsistent" for any condition, but is generally safe when done by an appropriately trained practitioner. In contrast, treatments outside the bounds of safety and efficacy are termed quackery.

Medicine (disambiguation)

Medicine is the modern field of medical practice and health care.

Medicine may refer to:

  • Internal medicine, medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis, management and nonsurgical treatment of unusual or serious diseases
  • Other systems of medicine including:
    • Acupuncture
    • Anthroposophic medicine
    • Ayurveda
    • Chiropractic
    • Herbalism
    • Homeopathy
    • Native American medicine
    • Naturopathy
    • Osteopathy
    • Shamanism, practiced by Indigenous people of the Americas
    • Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)
    • Traditional Tibetan medicine
  • Medication, licensed pharmaceutical drugs (see pharmacology) or herbal medicines
Medicine (Plies song)

"Medicine" is the first promo single of American hip hop recording artist Plies' fourth studio album, Goon Affiliated. The track is absent from the retail versions for unknown reasons, but is on the Amazon deluxe version. The track features American singer-songwriter Keri Hilson. There are two versions, one with a more radio friendly, slow beat and one with a more club beat.

The original version of the song was by Three 6 Mafia ft. Gucci Mane & Keri Hilson under the same title. The tempo is somewhat slower in that version.

The song contains a sample of " Ex fan des sixties" by Jane Birkin and composed by French singer and songwriter Serge Gainsbourg.

Medicine (Shakira song)

"Medicine" is a song recorded by Colombian singer and songwriter Shakira from her tenth studio album Shakira (2014). Featuring guest vocals from American country music singer Blake Shelton, the song was performed on the 49th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards on April 6, 2014, and spent one week on the country charts at number 57 from unsolicited airplay. The song was written by Shakira alongside Mark Bright and Hillary Lindsey, while the production was handled by Shakira and busbee.

Medicine (The 1975 song)

"Medicine" is a song by English rock band The 1975, released on 31 October 2014 as a part of the 2014 Drive re-score. It was written, produced and performed by members Matthew Healy and George Daniel. Healy said that the song had become one of their "most personal and best loved pieces of music to date."

Medicine (Drew Holcomb and The Neighbors album)

Medicine is the seventh studio album by Drew Holcomb and The Neighbors. Magnolia Music released the project on January 27, 2015. Drew Holcomb and The Neighbors co-produced the album with Joe Pisapia. It is the successor to 2013's, Good Light. His wife and former band member, Ellie Holcomb, makes some appearances throughout the album.

Medicine (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins journal)

Medicine® is an open access peer-reviewed medical journal published by Wolters Kluwer. It was established in 1922. Of general medical journals still in publication since 1959, Medicine had the highest number of citations per paper between 1959 and 2009. The journal covers all aspects of clinical medicine and publishes in over 43 specialty subjects.

Medicine® is now a fully open access mega journal publication, providing authors with a distinctive new service offering continuous publication of original research across a broad spectrum of medical scientific disciplines and sub–specialties. Medicine® covers the latest research and clinical developments in medicine and health sciences.

Usage examples of "medicine".

The employment of other medicines frequently should be preceded by the administration of an agent of this class, to neutralize excessive acidity in the stomach and bowels.

When there is great acidity of the stomach, which may be known by heart burn, saleratus may be taken in water, to neutralize it, but should not be drunk within an hour of the time for taking other medicines.

Dissections of cadavers were restricted or outlawed, so those who practised medicine were prevented from acquiring first-hand knowledge of the human body.

As santonin is almost entirely tasteless, if not combined with other medicines which are unpalatable, no difficulty will be experienced in administering it to children.

It was so similar to agrimony that she thought of it as a variation of that herb -- but one of the other medicine women at the Clan Gathering had called it boneset, and used it for that purpose.

He took the medicines she carried for him, washed them down with a drink from her flask, and sat there ahorse while others stretched their legs.

All right, the autopsy will show the heart ailment and it will show his system having traces of the medicine, and nobody is going to be suspicious about that.

When the science of medicine reaches perfection, treatment will be given by foods, aliments, fragrant fruits, and vegetables, and by various waters, hot and cold in temperature.

In perfecting this alterative compound, and likewise other standard preparations of medicine, we have made an outlay of many thousand dollars for chemical apparatus, and special machinery by the aid of which these remedies have been brought to their present perfection.

He was put upon a tonic and alterative course of treatment, which also embraced the use of such medicines as have been found to exert a specific, tonic action upon the muscular tissues of the heart.

The treatment of this disease should consist in rest for the hip-joint, cleanliness of the person and plenty of fresh air and light, a nutritious diet and the use of tonics and sustaining alterative, or blood-cleansing medicines.

Whether the procedure pertain to medicine or surgery, so long as the amelioration of the patient is the one purpose kept in view, IT IS LEGITIMATE TREATMENT.

She led the way into the dining-room, where the Castilian Amoroso bottle and the medicine glass were standIng on the table all ready.

The circumstances and conditions of the system increase or diminish the effects of medicine, so that an aperient at one time may act as a cathartic at another, and a dose that will simply prove to be an anodyne when the patient is suffering great pain will act as a narcotic when he is not.

Lately a certain aperient medicine has become highly popular with both doctors and patients in this country, the same being known as Cascara Sagrada.