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Crossword clues for heat

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
heat
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a heat wave (=a period of unusually hot weather)
▪ California is in the middle of a heat wave.
a heated argument (=involving very strong feelings)
▪ Someone was having a heated argument with a police officer.
a heated exchange (=a very angry conversation)
▪ I overheard a heated exchange between John and his wife.
a heated/fierce debate (=in which people express strong opinions in an angry way)
▪ There has been a fierce debate over the way the war was fought.
a heating system (=in a building)
▪ We’re waiting for the heating system to be repaired.
bear the heat/cold
▪ Some people find it hard to bear the heat in the summer.
blinding rain/snow/heat etc
▪ I struggled back to the hut through blinding rain.
blood heat
central heating
▪ the central heating boiler
dead heat
gentle heat (=low heat)
▪ Melt the butter over a gentle heat.
heat exhaustion (=when you become tired and ill because you are too hot)
▪ Many runners were suffering from heat exhaustion .
heat exhaustion
heat pump
heat rash
heat rash (=a rash caused by heat)
▪ a heat rash
heat wave
intense heat
▪ He could feel the intense heat of the Egyptian sun.
medium heat
▪ Fry the onions over a medium heat until they are golden.
oppressive heat
▪ the oppressive heat of the afternoon
prickly heat
searing heat
▪ the searing heat of the desert
stifling heat
▪ the stifling heat of the tropics
the desert sun/heat
▪ Animals shelter from the desert sun during the day.
the summer heat
▪ Crowds of shoppers are sweltering in the summer heat.
underfloor heating
white heat
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
dead
▪ We play for about 40 minutes to a dead heat at game point.
▪ The trucks bound across the finish in almost a dead heat -- but it is a bad race for both.
▪ Phil Gramm finished in a dead heat with front-runner Bob Dole.
▪ If you look merely at voting margins, there is a dead heat.
▪ Last year the Florida race was, in effect, a dead heat.
▪ The horses would all be dead from the heat.
▪ Among non-religious-right voters, the race for governor was a dead heat.
gentle
▪ Boil for 5 minutes on gentle heat then add mushroom - and simmer in a covered saucepan for a further 7 minutes.
▪ Use the gentler heat if your dryer has variable adjustments.
▪ Samples can be left in the impregnation chamber overnight before curing under gentle heat.
▪ Let the butter melt over very gentle heat.
▪ Return to a gentle heat and stir until the sauce thickens.
▪ Cook over a gentle heat, stirring until the mixture turns thick. 3.
▪ Ian left the colour to develop for the maximum time of forty minutes under a gentle heat.
▪ Add the herring fillets and cook for 2 minutes on both sides over a gentle heat.
high
▪ Grill poussins under moderately high heat for 15-20 minutes on each side, basting with the marinade.
▪ Cook over high heat until liquid is reduced by one third.
▪ This is consistent with high heat flow across Western Cordillera and altiplano.
▪ In spring the land turns emerald, and in midsummer, in the high heat, the edges of the pasture brown.
▪ Add extra oil to pan, then onion and stir over high heat until caramelised and aromatic, 5-6 minutes.
▪ Place over high heat until reduced by half.
▪ Add chicken portions and cook over a high heat for a few mins on each side until brown.
▪ Combine the sugar and 2 cups water in the saucepan and set over medium high heat.
intense
▪ Three police officers who tried to save the children were beaten back by the intense heat and smoke.
▪ Only exceptionally cloudy, boggy areas might survive the intense heat radiation from the reentering debris.
▪ One of the friends, Manuel Cabrera, said he tried to grab Jamie but the intense heat drove him out.
▪ All the surrounding countryside, scorched by the intense heat, is now in flames.
▪ Conditions have been made worse by intense heat and the continuing drought.
▪ Every tree was scorched or charred by a brief exposure to extremely intense heat.
▪ Over the next four months, the weather veered from intense heat to snowstorms.
▪ All archaebacteria thrive in intense heat, and most derive their energy from breaking chemical bonds.
low
▪ Cook over low heat until mixture becomes hot and juices begin to come out of tomatoes.
▪ Cover and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, 10 minutes or until tender but not brown.
▪ Bring to the boil and cook hard for 10 minutes, then lower the heat and cover.
▪ Add flour and cook over low heat 2 minutes.
▪ Allow the mixture to cook for about 5 minutes over a low heat, then add the salt, sugar and stock.
▪ Add chili powder, cumin, and cayenne and black peppers, and stir over low heat for 3 minutes.
▪ Melt the margarine or butter in a small pan, add the flour and cook over a low heat for 1-2 minutes.
▪ Add oxtails, lower heat and cook gently 1 hour, covered.
medium
▪ Melt butter over medium heat in a large pan.
▪ In the same pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat.
▪ Heat the oil over medium heat.
▪ In a large frying pan, melt the butter or margarine over medium heat.
▪ Add the meat and brown over medium heat until meat is totally dry and there is no liquid in the frying pan.
▪ Heat a lightly greased skillet over medium heat.
▪ Cover tightly and gently steam over a medium heat for 20 minutes. 3.
▪ Combine the sugar and 2 cups water in the saucepan and set over medium high heat.
moderate
▪ Place the skewers under the grill and cook under a moderate heat turning frequently to avoid burning.
▪ Bring to a simmer over moderate heat.
▪ Cover, cook over a moderate heat for ten minutes.
▪ In a large skillet, melt clarified butter and saute rabbit over moderate heat until evenly browned.
▪ I stuck it on with silicone sealant glue and it is unaffected by salt spray or moderate heat.
▪ In a large ovenproof skillet, cook bacon over moderate heat until crisp, about 10 minutes.
▪ Heat the oil in a large pan, add the onion and cook covered for 4-5min over a moderate heat. 4.
▪ Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large saute pan over moderate heat.
oppressive
▪ My first impression was of oppressive heat, but then I have spent my life mainly on the cool side of temperate.
▪ The oppressive heat and humidity make that smell stronger.
▪ An opposite movement occurs with the elements of oppressive heat and smell on that same momentous fourth floor.
▪ They have worked in sleet, in downpours, in oppressive Washington heat.
▪ The road back towards the shops and bars melts into water, thanks to the oppressive dry heat.
▪ This shop is surely an outpost of hell, with its oppressive heat and dense clouds of smoke.
▪ The wine he had taken for lunch, together with the oppressive afternoon heat, had quite tired him out.
■ NOUN
body
▪ Environmental note Over 30% of body heat is lost from the head.
▪ It dried on body heat during the day at the office.
▪ The body heat from a bird would trigger them.
▪ The power could come either from induction, using body heat, or even from remote infrared powering.
▪ Bhopal ji was as thin and white-haired as a granny but his intelligence radiated like body heat.
▪ Most reptiles utilize the buffering aquatic environment to lower body heat.
▪ The down then insulates efficiently against loss of body heat, at the same time allowing body moisture to wick through.
exhaustion
▪ They didn't know that if you have ecstasy you should drink a lot of water because of the risk of heat exhaustion.
▪ In its early stages, the symptoms of fatigue and nausea mimic heat exhaustion and can confuse the rangers.
▪ Several elderly men were treated for heat exhaustion.
▪ You have to be able to handle real emergencies: sprained ankles, heat exhaustion, sudden snowstorms, canceled flights.
▪ She slumped down, near to heat exhaustion, and raked her jet hair from her temples.
▪ These tips also help prevent heat exhaustion, only several cases of which advance to potentially deadly heat stroke at the Canyon.
▪ I was feeling nauseous from heat exhaustion and had sort of passed out.
▪ Later in the day, another 1st Platoon Marine was felled by heat exhaustion.
loss
▪ The fabric U values and heat losses from the house are given in Table 6.2.
▪ As it was getting colder, my body was automatically adjusting to reduce its surface area for heat loss.
▪ Hypertension may be controlled by a nitroprusside infusion, which has the additional advantage of aiding heat loss by peripheral vasodilatation.
▪ The calculation of the heat loss from structures in contact with the ground is a complex procedure.
▪ It achieves this by forming an ice barrier to lessen heat loss from the ground it covers.
▪ While insulation will reduce heat loss, it will not necessarily prevent burst pipes.
▪ In these clean, dry conditions, the heat loss is minimised.
▪ It covers areas such as heat loss and therefore allows you to measure the effectiveness of various insulation methods.
pump
▪ Both the photovoltaic and wind power systems for domestic hot-water provision would be even more effective if linked to a heat pump.
▪ But the catch is that heat pumps work best when it is not real cold outside.
▪ Why haven't heat pumps caught on?
▪ In fact, areas where the outdoor temperature routinely falls to about 15 degrees are not good candidates for heat pumps.
▪ But it predicts massive sales and energy savings only if heat pumps penetrate the space-heating market.
▪ His heat pump is relatively new, but the air-handling system is two decades old.
▪ Energy systems analysis, heat pump control and applications.
▪ To make sure your heat pump is operating efficiently during the heating season, keep your eye on the outside coil.
shield
▪ Aluminised heat shield panels allow hot a engine and pipes to be covered immediately.
▪ But it also requires a heat shield to protect it during aerobraking.
▪ In turn the forward heat shield contained four slots into which the legs of the launch escape tower would fit.
▪ It is even possible that this residue could be used in its entirety to make heat shields.
▪ Also the improvised heat shield covering the main compartment can be seen over the top of the station.
▪ Thus, it appears feasible to manufacture practical heat shields in reusable molds on the Moon.
▪ Then the crew could enter the station and cover part of the main body with a Mylar heat shield.
▪ The use of a heat shield made from asteroidal materials is highly attractive because it reduces propulsion requirements.
source
▪ However, it is when the two heat sources are used together in combination that the true capabilities can be appreciated.
▪ Pumps and refrigeration equipment, powered by the heat source, turn on and start liquefying the atmosphere.
▪ Again a vertical stable salt concentration gradient is set up, and a heat source introduced.
▪ But potassium itself is one of the most important radioactive heat sources in the planets.
▪ In contrast with Fig. 23.7, the heat source is now a localized one.
▪ Thus the disintegration of the radioactive elements is a heat source that has persisted for billions of years.
▪ This detects any approaching heat source such as people or cars and automatically turns on, welcoming friends and deterring intruders.
▪ Broil about 5 inches away from heat source, just until zucchini is golden.
summer
▪ Insulated by thick walls, ceiling and door the ice would last throughout the summer heat.
▪ Children could find relief from the summer heat in her shop.
▪ The summer heat is coming on.
▪ Ideas flowed out of me like water out of a Brooklyn fire hydrant in the midst of a summer heat wave.
▪ Between takes he waited outside the main hall with a helper to wipe his glasses for him in the close summer heat.
▪ That would mean that the summer heat stories that Doug Kreutz writes for the Star were started a year ago last winter.
▪ To others it brings relief from the merciless summer heat.
▪ The air in here is stale and heavy, used up and burned out by the summer heat.
wave
▪ She shivered at the memory of the horrors that had accompanied that awful heat wave.
▪ People were saying that a cold spring meant an early heat wave in summer.
▪ Computers, faxes and photocopiers generate heat waves of their own.
▪ Killer heat waves fell hundreds in Calcutta and Chicago.
▪ I remember we arrived during a heat wave and had to go into this refrigerator where they kept the furs.
▪ Early in August a heat wave hit.
▪ A great heat wave descended; it was a beautiful day, the sun turned red at three.
▪ Ideas flowed out of me like water out of a Brooklyn fire hydrant in the midst of a summer heat wave.
■ VERB
conduct
▪ All metals conduct heat and electricity.
▪ Materials that do not conduct heat well are called insulators. 61.
▪ They contain less water and therefore cool more quickly and conduct heat less well.
▪ Some materials conduct heat well and some do not.
▪ The needle conducts the heat into the acupuncture point.
feel
▪ The sun was high in the sky now and he could feel the heat of it on his head and shoulders.
▪ He must have been feeling the heat with all that weight to carry about, but he looked quite cheerful and relaxed.
▪ Already I felt numbed by the heat and the smoke, queasy in the stomach.
▪ When he slides them in front of us you can feel the heat rising.
▪ Meanwhile, several small fire districts in San Diego County are feeling the heat from Proposition 218.
▪ He could feel the heat as he entered.
▪ He felt the heat beating in, midnight vibrations, the sirens down Canal, the growl of some solo drunk.
generate
▪ So if all the deuterium fused it could generate substantial heat in the Earth.
▪ Molten rock generated by the heat and pressure associated with the zone wells up through the Earth, erupting at the surface.
▪ Frankenstein's lights generated a lot of heat.
▪ It is important to use small bags, since a large number of acorns together will generate heat.
▪ Computers, faxes and photocopiers generate heat waves of their own.
▪ But those proposed amendments are merely the ones that generate the most political heat.
▪ That makes sense, but they can't be accurate because compost heaps generate heat which might accelerate decomposition.
▪ After the fire investigators tested a similar oxygen canister to determine whether it could generate enough heat to cause the fire.
lose
▪ But her thoughts seemed to get lost in the heat.
▪ The bulkhead door is steel and loses a lot of heat, and so does that hollow-core door.
▪ Insects can also lose heat by evaporation from their spiracles, but this may lead to desiccation.
▪ As it loses the heat that fuels its steady churning, the plate motions on the surface are slowly winding down.
▪ This impairs the circulation which then means that the body can not lose excess heat.
▪ They expected to lose their heat or hot water.
▪ Their small size means that they lose heat more rapidly than the adults.
reduce
▪ Bring to the boil, reduce the heat, cover and cook for 40 minutes. 3.
▪ Add wine and reduce over medium-high heat to 1 teaspoon.
▪ Add the cream and reduce the heat slightly.
▪ Immediately reduce heat to 140 F and allow meat to dry slowly for 8 hours or so.
▪ We hear they may be trying for 2.5 volts to reduce heat on the part.
▪ Add bourbon and port and reduce over medium-high heat by half.
▪ While insulation will reduce heat loss, it will not necessarily prevent burst pipes.
▪ When all cornmeal has been added, reduce heat to moderately low.
remove
▪ As soon as the thigh meat is ready, remove it from the heat and keep warm.
▪ Add brandy and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and add peppercorns and parsley.
▪ Season to taste. Remove from the heat, stir in the fromage frais and reheat gently without boiling.
▪ Stir in fish sauce, coconut milk, sugar, and lime juice and bring to a simmer. Remove from heat.
▪ Heat through gently while tossing all the ingredients together. Remove from heat. 4.
▪ Bring to simmer over medium heat. Remove from heat.
▪ Cook for two or three minutes and remove from the heat.
▪ Stir occasionally and continue cooking to 305 degrees. Remove from heat.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
beat the heat
▪ Strawberries in wine is a festive way to beat the heat.
▪ We were up and off early to beat the heat.
direct heat/sunlight
▪ However, far more use is made of geothermal energy for direct heat.
▪ In bright or open shade, there is no direct sunlight but plenty of indirect light.
▪ In full shade there is no direct sunlight, but there is some indirect light.
▪ It needs this cooling device because it is more exposed to the direct heat of the sun.
▪ Never fall asleep in direct sunlight.
▪ They need bright light, but should be watched for signs of scorching in strong direct sunlight during the summer.
▪ Unfortunately it get direct sunlight, and is afflicted with algae.
▪ Winter, summer, spring, or fall, the Vanyas' house received no direct sunlight.
feel the cold/heat
▪ But this sector was the first to feel the heat of intense competition and spiralling development costs.
▪ He could feel the heat as he entered.
▪ He got up and wobbled, wiping blindly at his wet face, not even feeling the cold.
▪ He must have been feeling the heat with all that weight to carry about, but he looked quite cheerful and relaxed.
▪ I felt the heat hit my face as I stared through the opening with narrowed eyes.
▪ Meanwhile, several small fire districts in San Diego County are feeling the heat from Proposition 218.
▪ You can feel the cold winds whipping across the barren island of Smuttynose as Maren relates her disturbing story.
heated argument/debate/discussion etc
▪ After a short heated argument, the inspector agreed to pay the costs in cash from his local station funds.
▪ After fifteen months of heated debate, Billingham was abandoned.
▪ It got off to a hairy start with several heated discussions about what a wild boar is.
▪ No presidential policy is so controversial that it provokes heated debate.
▪ Since 1980, a balanced-budget amendment has been the focus of heated debate in congressional committees and on the floor.
▪ There was heated argument at the meeting, with strongly differing views advanced.
▪ There was a heated argument between the two men which at length it fell to Branson to settle.
▪ Witnesses have already given descriptions of the pair who were seen having what appeared to be a heated argument.
if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen
merciless heat/cold/wind etc
▪ During the merciless heat of noon one of the frailer females collapsed, far from any possible shelter.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ At this heat, all the poisonous chemicals are changed into safe compounds.
▪ Black surfaces absorb heat from the sun.
▪ I'm just not used to this kind of heat.
▪ I'm worried the heat from the lamp will melt the cord.
▪ Once the coals are ready, close the lid of the barbecue to keep in the heat.
▪ She didn't pay her bills, so they turned off the heat.
▪ She turned down the heat on the electric fire.
▪ The heat in the desert was incredible.
▪ The heat of the water caused the glass to shatter.
▪ The chilies gave the sauce some heat.
▪ The classrooms lack heat and air conditioning.
▪ The reaction gives off tremendous heat.
▪ Turn the heat up, I'm cold.
▪ When the oven reaches the correct heat, the light goes off.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Add wine and reduce over medium-high heat to 1 teaspoon.
▪ But Katie confesses that she had to forget their friendship in the heat of the battle.
▪ In another medium skillet add the olive oil and heat over medium-high heat.
▪ It was part of a strategy to let Republicans lead on the budget and take the political heat for doing so.
▪ Mounted round this fairing were the eight radiators used to vent the excess heat produced by the fuel cells into space.
▪ Presumably when one went in, they all moved up a chair, into the heat of the previous sitter, intimately.
▪ Shake the pan gently to distribute the melted sugar evenly, then remove from the heat.
▪ The heat in the air moves to the cooler liquid.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
kitchen
▪ There is obvious merit in good insulation, using only the most efficient kitchen appliances, heating systems and such.
▪ Phoebe went back to the kitchen, heated up some tinned soup and made tuna fish sandwiches.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
direct heat/sunlight
▪ However, far more use is made of geothermal energy for direct heat.
▪ In bright or open shade, there is no direct sunlight but plenty of indirect light.
▪ In full shade there is no direct sunlight, but there is some indirect light.
▪ It needs this cooling device because it is more exposed to the direct heat of the sun.
▪ Never fall asleep in direct sunlight.
▪ They need bright light, but should be watched for signs of scorching in strong direct sunlight during the summer.
▪ Unfortunately it get direct sunlight, and is afflicted with algae.
▪ Winter, summer, spring, or fall, the Vanyas' house received no direct sunlight.
heated argument/debate/discussion etc
▪ After a short heated argument, the inspector agreed to pay the costs in cash from his local station funds.
▪ After fifteen months of heated debate, Billingham was abandoned.
▪ It got off to a hairy start with several heated discussions about what a wild boar is.
▪ No presidential policy is so controversial that it provokes heated debate.
▪ Since 1980, a balanced-budget amendment has been the focus of heated debate in congressional committees and on the floor.
▪ There was heated argument at the meeting, with strongly differing views advanced.
▪ There was a heated argument between the two men which at length it fell to Branson to settle.
▪ Witnesses have already given descriptions of the pair who were seen having what appeared to be a heated argument.
merciless heat/cold/wind etc
▪ During the merciless heat of noon one of the frailer females collapsed, far from any possible shelter.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ It costs a lot to heat these offices.
▪ She heated the water in a small pan.
▪ Wax melts quickly when it is heated.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Clearly the saltwater was heated in pans in order to drive off the water.
▪ Cut artichoke hearts in half and add to soup; heat through.
▪ I heated up some water on the gas stove and poured it into an oval enamel pan.
▪ Let it heat through so neither the cabbage nor the pineapple lose their bite.
▪ They had microwave ovens where he was able to heat up a portion of hot food to eat in the car.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Heat

Heat \Heat\ (h[e^]t), imp. & p. p. of Heat. Heated; as, the iron though heat red-hot. [Obs. or Archaic]
--Shak.

Heat

Heat \Heat\, v. i.

  1. To grow warm or hot by the action of fire or friction, etc., or the communication of heat; as, the iron or the water heats slowly.

  2. To grow warm or hot by fermentation, or the development of heat by chemical action; as, green hay heats in a mow, and manure in the dunghill.

Heat

Heat \Heat\ (h[=e]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heated; p. pr. & vb. n. Heating.] [OE. heten, AS. h[=ae]tan, fr. h[=a]t hot. See Hot.]

  1. To make hot; to communicate heat to, or cause to grow warm; as, to heat an oven or furnace, an iron, or the like.

    Heat me these irons hot.
    --Shak.

  2. To excite or make hot by action or emotion; to make feverish.

    Pray, walk softly; do not heat your blood.
    --Shak.

  3. To excite ardor in; to rouse to action; to excite to excess; to inflame, as the passions.

    A noble emulation heats your breast.
    --Dryden.

Heat

Heat \Heat\ (h[=e]t), n. [OE. hete, h[ae]te, AS. h[=ae]tu, h[=ae]to, fr. h[=a]t hot; akin to OHG. heizi heat, Dan. hede, Sw. hetta. See Hot.]

  1. A force in nature which is recognized in various effects, but especially in the phenomena of fusion and evaporation, and which, as manifested in fire, the sun's rays, mechanical action, chemical combination, etc., becomes directly known to us through the sense of feeling. In its nature heat is a mode of motion, being in general a form of molecular disturbance or vibration. It was formerly supposed to be a subtile, imponderable fluid, to which was given the name caloric.

    Note: As affecting the human body, heat produces different sensations, which are called by different names, as heat or sensible heat, warmth, cold, etc., according to its degree or amount relatively to the normal temperature of the body.

  2. The sensation caused by the force or influence of heat when excessive, or above that which is normal to the human body; the bodily feeling experienced on exposure to fire, the sun's rays, etc.; the reverse of cold.

  3. High temperature, as distinguished from low temperature, or cold; as, the heat of summer and the cold of winter; heat of the skin or body in fever, etc.

    Else how had the world . . . Avoided pinching cold and scorching heat!
    --Milton.

  4. Indication of high temperature; appearance, condition, or color of a body, as indicating its temperature; redness; high color; flush; degree of temperature to which something is heated, as indicated by appearance, condition, or otherwise.

    It has raised . . . heats in their faces.
    --Addison.

    The heats smiths take of their iron are a blood-red heat, a white-flame heat, and a sparkling or welding heat.
    --Moxon.

  5. A single complete operation of heating, as at a forge or in a furnace; as, to make a horseshoe in a certain number of heats.

  6. A violent action unintermitted; a single effort; a single course in a race that consists of two or more courses; as, he won two heats out of three.

    Many causes . . . for refreshment betwixt the heats.
    --Dryden.

    [He] struck off at one heat the matchless tale of ``Tam o' Shanter.''
    --J. C. Shairp.

  7. Utmost violence; rage; vehemence; as, the heat of battle or party. ``The heat of their division.''
    --Shak.

  8. Agitation of mind; inflammation or excitement; exasperation. ``The heat and hurry of his rage.''
    --South.

  9. Animation, as in discourse; ardor; fervency; as, in the heat of argument.

    With all the strength and heat of eloquence.
    --Addison.

  10. (Zo["o]l.) Sexual excitement in animals; readiness for sexual activity; estrus or rut.

  11. Fermentation.

  12. Strong psychological pressure, as in a police investigation; as, when they turned up the heat, he took it on the lam. [slang]

    Animal heat, Blood heat, Capacity for heat, etc. See under Animal, Blood, etc.

    Atomic heat (Chem.), the product obtained by multiplying the atomic weight of any element by its specific heat. The atomic heat of all solid elements is nearly a constant, the mean value being 6.4.

    Dynamical theory of heat, that theory of heat which assumes it to be, not a peculiar kind of matter, but a peculiar motion of the ultimate particles of matter.

    Heat engine, any apparatus by which a heated substance, as a heated fluid, is made to perform work by giving motion to mechanism, as a hot-air engine, or a steam engine.

    Heat producers. (Physiol.) See under Food.

    Heat rays, a term formerly applied to the rays near the red end of the spectrum, whether within or beyond the visible spectrum.

    Heat weight (Mech.), the product of any quantity of heat by the mechanical equivalent of heat divided by the absolute temperature; -- called also thermodynamic function, and entropy.

    Mechanical equivalent of heat. See under Equivalent.

    Specific heat of a substance (at any temperature), the number of units of heat required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of the substance at that temperature one degree.

    Unit of heat, the quantity of heat required to raise, by one degree, the temperature of a unit mass of water, initially at a certain standard temperature. The temperature usually employed is that of 0[deg] Centigrade, or 32[deg] Fahrenheit.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
heat

Old English hætan "to heat; to become hot," from Proto-Germanic *haita- (see heat (n.)). Related: Heated (with many variants in Middle English); heating. Compare Middle Dutch heeten, Dutch heten, German heizen "to heat."

heat

Old English hætu, hæto "heat, warmth; fervor ardor," from Proto-Germanic *haita- "heat" (cognates: Old Saxon hittia, Old Norse hiti, Old Frisian hete, German hitze "heat," Gothic heito "fever"), from PIE *kaid-, from root *kai- "heat." The same root is the source of Old English hat "hot" and hæða "hot weather" (see hot).\n

\nMeaning "a single course in a race," especially a horse race, is from 1660s, perhaps from earlier figurative sense of "violent action; a single intense effort" (late 14c.), or meaning "run given to a horse to prepare for a race" (1570s). This later expanded to "division of a race or contest when there are too many contestants to run at once," the winners of each heat then competing in a final race. Meaning "sexual excitement in animals" is from 1768. Meaning "trouble with the police" attested by 1920. Heat wave "period of excessive hot weather" first attested 1890; earlier in reference to solar cycles.

Wiktionary
heat

Etymology 1 n. (context uncountable English) thermal energy. Etymology 2

vb. 1 To cause an increase in temperature of an object or space; to cause something to become hot (qualifier: often with "up"). 2 To excite or make hot by action or emotion; to make feverish. 3 To excite ardour in; to rouse to action; to excite to excess; to inflame, as the passions. 4 To arouse, to excite (sexually).

WordNet
heat
  1. n. a form of energy that is transferred by a difference in temperature [syn: heat energy]

  2. the presence of heat [syn: hotness, high temperature] [ant: coldness]

  3. the sensation caused by heat energy [syn: warmth]

  4. intense passion or emotion [syn: warmth, passion]

  5. applies to nonhuman mammals: a state or period of heightened sexual arousal and activity [syn: estrus, oestrus, rut] [ant: anestrus]

  6. a preliminary race in which the winner advances to a more important race

  7. utility to warm a building; "the heating system wasn't working"; "they have radiant heating" [syn: heating system, heating plant, heating]

heat
  1. v. make hot or hotter; "heat the soup" [syn: heat up] [ant: cool]

  2. provide with heat; "heat the house"

  3. arouse or excite feelings and passions; "The ostentatious way of living of the rich ignites the hatred of the poor"; "The refugees' fate stirred up compassion around the world"; "Wake old feelings of hatred" [syn: inflame, stir up, wake, ignite, fire up]

  4. gain heat or get hot; "The room heated up quickly" [syn: hot up, heat up] [ant: cool]

Wikipedia
Heat (1995 film)

Heat is a 1995 American crime film written, produced and directed by Michael Mann, and starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and Val Kilmer. De Niro plays Neil McCauley, a professional thief, while Pacino plays Lt. Vincent Hanna, a veteran LAPD robbery-homicide detective tracking down McCauley's crew. The central conflict is based on the experiences of former Chicago police officer Chuck Adamson and his pursuit in the 1960s of a criminal named McCauley, after whom De Niro's character is named.

Heat was a commercial success, grossing $67 million in the United States and $187 million worldwide (about $ million in ) against a $60 million budget. It was well received by critics. The film-critic aggregator Rotten Tomatoes reports 86% positive reviews, calling the film "an engrossing crime drama that draws compelling performances from its stars – and confirms Michael Mann's mastery of the genre."

Heat (professional wrestling)

In professional wrestling, heat refers to both crowd reaction and real-life animosity between those involved in the professional wrestling business. In terms of crowd reaction, heat is usually either cheers for a babyface or boos for a heel. The amount of heat a wrestler generates is often an accurate gauge of his popularity.

Although the term can in some contexts refer to either positive or negative crowd reactions, "heat" can otherwise be used specifically to mean a negative crowd response (booing etc.); its opposite being a " pop" or positive reaction (cheering, clapping, etc.).

As heat typically refers to a negative reaction that a wrestling character gets from a crowd in a performance setting, it has also become slang for a negative reaction that a wrestler gets backstage from colleagues, management or both. Backstage heat can be garnered for both real and perceived slights and transgressions.

HEAT (magazine)

HEAT was an international Australian literary magazine published by Giramondo Publishing and the University of Western Sydney.

Heat (Buffy/Angel novel)

Heat is an original novel based on the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel. Tagline: "An original crossover novel based on the hit television series created by Joss Whedon & David Greenwalt"

Heat (1972 film)

Heat (1972) also known as Andy Warhol's Heat, is an American film written and directed by Paul Morrissey, produced by Andy Warhol, and starring Joe Dallesandro, Sylvia Miles, and Andrea Feldman.

The film was conceived by Warhol as a parody of Sunset Boulevard (1950).

Heat (soundtrack)

Heat is the soundtrack album to the 1995 film Heat. The score is compiled mostly with Elliot Goldenthal's orchestrations although there are a variety of other artists featured including U2/ Brian Eno project Passengers, Lisa Gerrard, Moby and Terje Rypdal.

Heat (Jimmy Barnes album)

Heat is the sixth album by Australian rock singer Jimmy Barnes. It reached number 2 on the ARIA album charts in 1993, and features the singles "Sweat It Out", "Stand Up", "Right By Your Side", and his biggest solo hit, " Stone Cold", a never-used Cold Chisel song written by Don Walker in the early 1980s.

Heat (Soul for Real album)

Heat is the third studio album by Soul for Real, released on May 18, 1999.

Heat (disambiguation)

Heat may refer to:

  • as a technical term in thermodynamics, a spontaneous transfer of thermal energy, see Heat
  • in non-technical parlance, thermal energy in general
  • a preliminary race or match in a sports tournament
  • in the biological estrous cycle, a period of increased sexual drive
  • heat (professional wrestling), applause or booing given by fans to a professional wrestler
  • in baseball, a colloquialism for a fastball
  • in slang, a firearm, usually a pistol
  • in slang, police surveillance or attention
  • pungency, the hotness or spiciness of foods such as pepper, garlic and chili peppers

As a proper name, Heat or HEAT may also refer to:

Heat (manga)

is a seinen manga written by Yoshiyuki Okamura and illustrated by Ryoichi Ikegami. It was serialized in Big Comic Superior from 1999 to 2004. In 2002, it received the Shogakukan Manga Award for general manga. It was adapted into a live-action movie in 2004 featuring Yoshihiko Hakamada, Takeshi Yoshioka, and Hakuryu as main actors.

Heat is a crime story featuring a young man named Tatsumi Karasawa who suddenly rises in the criminal world of Shinjuku, Tokyo, and becomes the leader of a group of amateurs who show no reluctance to face police and gangs alike. His successes in the Tokyo underground make a chief and a yakuza boss plot a conspiracy to eliminate him.

Heat (1986 film)

Heat is a 1986 action- thriller film about an ex- mercenary working as a bodyguard in Las Vegas. The film was written by William Goldman, based on his 1985 novel of the same name. It was directed by Dick Richards and Jerry Jameson, and stars Burt Reynolds, Karen Young and Peter MacNicol.

Heat (software)

Heat may refer to:

  • OpenStack Heat, the orchestration component of the OpenStack infrastructure-as-a-service software platform
  • HEAT (software), a help desk software package by FrontRange Solutions
Heat (Colder album)

Heat is the second album from French musician Colder, released on Output Recordings on July 4, 2005. The album was produced in Paris, France and was released on CD, limited edition CD (housed in a digipak), and limited edition red-colored 12" vinyl. The album was also released on CD in Mexico with two bonus tracks. All versions of the album are out of print.

Heat (Lupica novel)

Heat is a young adult novel written by Mike Lupica that was published in 2006.

Heat (video game)

Heat was a proposed video game, based on the 1995 crime film with the same name. It was under development by Gearbox Software for PlayStation 3, Xbox 360. During the E3 2009, Gearbox did not have the license of the film to make the game as it is being opened to be sold.

Michael Mann, director of the film, is reported to be involved.

In a recent interview Randy Pitchford President, CEO, and co-founder of Gearbox Software said that development of the game has been halted and the IP could potentially be available to pass onto another developer saying:

"In a nutshell, we're nowhere. We have passionate game makers that would love to do it. We've got filmmakers that think it's a great idea that would love to see it done. We have publishing partners that would love to publish it. But we have no time. That's the limiting factor. Because of the situation, we're not keeping the IP locked down anymore. So if somebody else were in a spot where they could do it, and everybody was comfortable with that, then conceivably that could happen."

Although not based on the movie Heat, during the 2013 release of Grand Theft Auto V, the games series was said to "tread the same turf as films such as Scarface and, in this case, Heat".

Heat (2006 film)

Heat (, stylized as "ЖАRА") is a 2006 Russian teen romantic comedy loosely based on the Walking the Streets of Moscow, directed by and produced by Fyodor Bondarchuk. Heat along with Wolfhound became one of the most expensive Russian films in 2006. Besides, its budget was three times less as compared to the advertising campaign.

Heat (Goldman novel)

Heat is a 1985 novel by William Goldman about a soldier of fortune in Las Vegas.

Heat (Kim Hyun-joong song)

HEAT is Kim Hyun-joong's second Japanese single. There are five available versions of this single, three of which include the song "Let's Party" in addition to the CD's title track "Heat".

For "Heat" Kim Hyun-joong collaborated with Japanese rock duo B'z.

Although there are music videos for both, "Heat" and "Let's Party", the latter song was not promoted on TV programs.

The songs will be featured on Kim Hyun-joong's upcoming Japanese album Unlimited.

Heat reached #31 on Oricon's Yearly Single Chart, having sold 202,672 copies.

Heat (1996 film)

Heat is a 1996 Australian TV movie about a solicitor who heads to the bush.

Heat (American Me album)

Heat is the debut album by American hardcore punk band American Me. It was released on February 19, 2008 through Rise Records. It's the only album to feature Doug Funny on bass, Phillip Ralston on guitars and Scott Walker on drums.

Heat (Scarlet Pleasure song)

"Heat" is a song recorded by the Danish band Scarlet Pleasure. This song is the most selling of Scarlet Pleasure and is produced by David Mørup and mixed by Jean-Marie Horvat, who also mixed for stars like Michael Jackson, Rihanna, Chris Brown and Jessie J.

Heat

In physics, heat is energy that spontaneously passes between a system and its surroundings in some way other than through work or the transfer of matter. When a suitable physical pathway exists, heat flows spontaneously from a hotter to a colder body. The transfer can be by contact between the source and the destination body, as in conduction; or by radiation between remote bodies; or by conduction and radiation through a thick solid wall; or by way of an intermediate fluid body, as in convective circulation; or by a combination of these.

Because heat refers to a quantity of energy transferred between two bodies, it is not a state function of either of the bodies, in contrast to temperature and internal energy. Instead, according to the first law of thermodynamics heat exchanged during some process contributes to the change in the internal energy, and the amount of heat can be quantified by the equivalent amount of work that would bring about the same change.

While heat flows spontaneously from hot to cold, it is possible to construct a heat pump or refrigeration system that does work to increase the difference in temperature between two systems. Conversely, a heat engine reduces an existing temperature difference to do work on another system.

Historically, many energy units for measurement of heat have been used. The standards-based unit in the International System of Units (SI) is the joule (J). Heat is measured by its effect on the states of interacting bodies, for example, by the amount of ice melted or a change in temperature. The quantification of heat via the temperature change of a body is called calorimetry, and is widely used in practice. In calorimetry, sensible heat is defined with respect to a specific chosen state variable of the system, such as pressure or volume. Sensible heat causes a change of the temperature of the system while leaving the chosen state variable unchanged. Heat transfer that occurs at a constant system temperature but changes the state variable is called latent heat with respect to the variable. For infinitesimal changes, the total incremental heat transfer is then the sum of the latent and sensible heat.

Heat (TV series)

Heat is an Irish prime time reality television series broadcast on RTÉ One. The programme sees two professional chefs, Kevin Dundon and Kevin Thornton, attempt to train amateur participants to each compose a restaurant menu. Each chef has won one series each. Each series, of which there have so far been two, runs for six weeks. The first series began broadcasting weekly in July 2008, with Team Dundon winning. A second series followed in February 2009, airing on Tuesday nights at 20:30, with Team Thornton winning. Dundon has described the series as being akin to "a fly-on-the wall documentary inside the kitchen of a very high-end kitchen".

Heat (perfume)

Heat is a perfume endorsed by Beyoncé. It was created by her alongside Claude Dir and Olivier Gillotin of the company Givaudan. The product, which was released on February 3, 2010, uses the tagline "catch the fever". The release was promoted with a cover version of " Fever" recorded by Beyoncé and a limited edition extended play (EP) also titled Heat. She also appeared at Macy's Herald Square to launch the perfume and on The Today Show where she discussed about Heat.

The fragrance's commercial, directed by director Jake Nava and released in December 2009, spawned controversy for its sexually explicit imagery, and was only allowed nighttime broadcast in the United Kingdom. Macy's sold US$3 million worth of Heat between early February and early March 2010. It received mixed reviews from critics, and it was nominated at several fragrance award ceremonies.

Heat was followed by five additional releases: Heat Ultimate Elixir meant to capture a more private side of the entertainer, Heat Rush intended as a daytime fragrance, Midnight Heat, a night fragrance, Heat The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour, a limited product dedicated to the tour of that name and Heat Wild Orchid, a floral update of the original. Each scent was followed with its own Eau De Parfum release and multiple gift sets. In 2013, in addition to becoming the best-selling celebrity-branded fragrance line, the perfumes went on to become the third best-selling fragrance worldwide with $400 million earned at retail globally.

Usage examples of "heat".

A flush of heat engulfed Abie as she watched the slow, seductive movements of the dancers on the stage.

She was breathing too fast, and her underarms and her face were abloom with heat.

Charlotte Simmons gave off waves and waves of shiftlessness, incompetence, irresponsibility, sloth, flabby character, and the noxious funk of flesh abloom with heat, sweat, fear, and adrenaline.

Of that great, tempering, benign shadow over the continent, tempering its heat, giving shelter from its cold, restraining the waters, there is left about 65 per cent in acreage and not more than one-half the merchantable timber--five hundred million acres gone in a century and a half.

Its tuberous root has been found to contain a particular volatile acrid principle which exercises distinct medicinal effects, though these are altogether dissipated if the roots are subjected to heat by boiling or baking.

The root and leaves contain an acrid juice, dispersed by heat, which is of service for irritability of the bladder.

After the actinic glow of the drive, the white heat of the drive components seemed dim by comparison.

Looking at it rising across the valley, the straight high walls and towers adazzle in the blinding light, it seemed less a city than an enormous jewel: a monstrous ornament carved of whitest ivory and nestled against the black surrounding mountains, or a colossal milk-coloured moonstone set upon the dusty green of the valley to shimmer gently in the heat haze of a blistering summer day.

The teams are all looking at variants on a simple, cheap technique that involves putting antigen genes into harmless bacteria that will double as delivery vehicles and adjuvants, then freeze-drying them into spores that can survive tropical heat without refrigeration.

The heat was very much stronger than he had expected, and he had to duck his Plexiglas mask away when the near end of the admin building bulged out and then collapsed in a wall of flame.

I cannot contravene the order of knights errant, about whom I know it is true, not having read anything to the contrary, that they never paid for their lodging or anything else in any inn where they stayed, because whatever welcome they receive is owed to them as their right and privi-lege in return for the unbearable hardships they suffer as they seek adventures by night and by day, in winter and in summer, on foot and on horseback, suffering thirst and hunger, heat and cold, and exposed to all the inclemencies of heaven and all the discomforts on earth.

A blast of heat swept up the stairs, so fierce that for a moment I thought it must have set my hair afire as I staggered backward into the kitchen.

A goodly number were aflight, but those that had gone between planet and star were suicides, sending only bare glimpses before heat and radiation killed their electronics.

There was no light save the light shed abroad by the flashes of the blade, and in these they beheld the air suffocated with Afrites and Genii in a red and brown and white heat, followers of Karaz.

The steam in the headers filled the space with roaring heat and the sound of the turbines whining at thirty-six hundred RPM aft of maneuvering was the sweetest sound Vaughn could remember hearing.