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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
wheat
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a corn/wheat/rice etc field
▪ In summer the rice fields were lush and green.
a field of corn/wheat/rice etc
▪ The road was surrounded by fields of corn.
the corn/cotton/wheat belt (=where corn/cotton etc is grown)
▪ Western Australia's wheat belt
the wheat/cereal/rice etc crop
▪ In January farmers prepare the ground for the potato crop.
white/wholemeal/rice/wheat etc flour
whole wheat
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
hard
▪ There are about six types of high-gluten flour, some made with hard spring wheat and some with hard winter wheat.
▪ Generally, the harder the wheat the better it is for bread; the softer wheats are better for pastries.
▪ Try your natural foods market and, if it does not have unbleached high-gluten flour, ask for hard spring wheat flour.
▪ This is hard red number-one wheat.
red
▪ This is hard red number-one wheat.
whole
▪ Add whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour and stir.
▪ And we know all the toast was white -- hey, we ran out of whole wheat and rye and muffins.
▪ No, not the whole wheat.
▪ More whole wheat usually means a slightly heavier bread that has a tighter gluten network but is perfectly satisfy-ing.
▪ There are also recipes that use only whole wheat flour yet yield a fairly light loaf.
▪ Mastering Macintosh would be as simple as dropping a couple of pieces of whole wheat into the Sunbeam.
▪ Maybe the Dakota appeals to you -- a whole wheat bread with millet, sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds added.
■ NOUN
beer
▪ This is a style of wheat beer that I especially enjoy, with its teasing counterpoint of tartness and chocolate-malt sweetness.
▪ Some of the wilder wheat beers might taste odd to the uninitiated, but not to people who grew up with them.
▪ The company was acquired last year by the regional brewer Riva, best known for its Dentergens wheat beer.
bread
▪ Whether it is white bread or wheat bread, it is, to be kind, mediocre bread.
▪ Making good wheat bread is a satisfying experience for a number of reasons.
▪ Maybe the Dakota appeals to you -- a whole wheat bread with millet, sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds added.
crop
▪ Further away in commercialisation terms, work on lentils at Reading University suggests that following wheat crops would have lower N requirements.
▪ Winter wheat crop reported to be in fair-to-good condition.
▪ Straw from the previous wheat crop was chopped and spread before the heavy soil was deep cultivated.
▪ The Agriculture Department said Monday the wheat crop in 19 states is in poor or very poor condition.
▪ The problems of a poor wheat crop were overcome and record volumes were produced at both mills in the fourth quarter.
▪ In some sections of Sonora, the disease affects more than half of the wheat crop, Bowden said.
▪ The former manor spread over several parishes, with a particular emphasis on sheep farming backed up by a large wheat crop.
▪ Already, 40 percent of Texas' wheat crop has been lost.
farmer
▪ He may however increase the annual payment to wheat farmers under the five-year phase out plan of the old farming policy.
▪ So in Britain in the 1870s many wheat farmers went over to meat production.
field
▪ Suggestions that he could avoid the damage by protecting the wheat fields with electric fencing do not impress Mr Berry.
▪ But the scientists also will consider whether additional wheat fields should be quarantined and destroyed to contain the spores.
▪ Then it flies off, with characteristic bounding flight, across a wheat field and into a wood.
▪ In Arizona, less than 10 percent of wheat fields are quarantined.
▪ Walking alongside a wheat field, admiring the vibrancy of poppies scattered in sparse splashes of scarlet, I spot something remarkable.
▪ They had new weeding tractors and their wheat fields were still being run over by weeds.
flour
▪ Many people react adversely to gluten, present in wheat flour.
▪ Try your natural foods market and, if it does not have unbleached high-gluten flour, ask for hard spring wheat flour.
▪ Add whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour and stir.
▪ There are also recipes that use only whole wheat flour yet yield a fairly light loaf.
▪ As this is not always available, I've used wheat flour.
▪ Mina is carrying the wheat flour in a bronze plate and the oil in a smaller bronze bowl bedded inside it.
harvest
▪ This led to a famine and a delay in the wheat harvest of 2 months.
▪ By the 1880s half the wheat harvest was being exported.
▪ At last the green straw, which had plagued wheat harvest from the start, had disappeared.
price
▪ This dilemma has become more acute now that wheat prices tend to behave unpredictably.
▪ On other markets, coffee and wheat prices also rose.
production
▪ Their combined wheat production fell from 80 million tons in 1968 to 60 million in 1970.
▪ Total national wheat production is expected to rise by 2 % year on year to 2.56 billion bushels.
winter
▪ The fields he could see from the window of Kirsham primary school rustled with winter wheat.
▪ Holiday sales were slightly above 1994 levels. Winter wheat crop reported to be in fair-to-good condition.
▪ But, under winter wheat, the income would be £9600.
▪ There are about six types of high-gluten flour, some made with hard spring wheat and some with hard winter wheat.
▪ Another herbicide, Isoproturon, is in much wider use as a means of controlling the blackgrass weed which affects winter wheat.
▪ In addition, a 7 percent increase in the winter wheat crop acres raised hope stockpiles would rise later this year.
▪ The ground used was where herbicide in the previous winter wheat had failed to provide any real control of blackgrass.
▪ Already the young farmer has lost more than half his winter wheat crop to a crippling drought.
■ VERB
cut
▪ I left the trip until late July, of the local farmers cut their wheat and barley at the beginning of August.
▪ Mountains cut into terraces with wheat, maize and rice.
grow
▪ Tests have shown that desert soil treated with the gel can grow rice and wheat.
▪ Our earlier illustration indicated that Nebraska grows wheat to which its resources are suited and similarly Florida grows oranges.
▪ Out came Dakota farmers who despaired at the meager profits they made growing wheat.
▪ We grew wheat and made flour.
▪ How does the climate seem to affect the choice of farmers in deciding where in Britain to grow wheat?
▪ William helps the farmer next to us and he is disappointed because he grows really good wheat and spuds and cabbages.
▪ Most holdings grew their own wheat and every village boasted a mill.
produce
▪ Bullock power to produce wheat is very inefficient.
▪ Boise may produce wheat, while Boston produces computers.
▪ Which team can produce the best wheat gross margin without spending the earth?
▪ If column 2 exceeds column 3, a producer will continue to produce wheat.
sell
▪ Having an option doesn't have to affect how you physically sell wheat, or your relationship with local merchants.
separate
▪ This gives the courts a useful power to separate the wheat from the chaff among the pending cases.
▪ But Pavelic said experienced detectives can quickly separate the wheat from the chaff.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ For example, one year Marvin Lugar allowed the children to buy one acre of wheat with their savings.
▪ He may however increase the annual payment to wheat farmers under the five-year phase out plan of the old farming policy.
▪ I am absolutely not going to drill any second wheat land before October, unless flooding is forecast.
▪ In addition, a 7 percent increase in the winter wheat crop acres raised hope stockpiles would rise later this year.
▪ In Arizona, less than 10 percent of wheat fields are quarantined.
▪ In mid-March, at the Chicago Board of Trade, a bubble in the wheat pit sent prices flying.
▪ Straw from the previous wheat crop was chopped and spread before the heavy soil was deep cultivated.
▪ This land was dry-farmed, and those weeds were using precious rainfall that was needed by the wheat.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
wheat

Widgeon \Widg"eon\, n. [Probably from an old French form of F. vigeon, vingeon, gingeon; of uncertain origin; cf. L. vipio, -onis, a kind of small crane.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of fresh-water ducks, especially those belonging to the subgenus Mareca, of the genus Anas. The common European widgeon ( Anas penelope) and the American widgeon ( Anas Americana) are the most important species. The latter is called also baldhead, baldpate, baldface, baldcrown, smoking duck, wheat, duck, and whitebelly. Bald-faced widgeon, or Green-headed widgeon, the American widgeon. Black widgeon, the European tufted duck. Gray widgeon.

  1. The gadwall.

  2. The pintail duck. Great headed widgeon, the poachard. Pied widgeon.

    1. The poachard.

    2. The goosander.

      Saw-billed widgeon, the merganser.

      Sea widgeon. See in the Vocabulary.

      Spear widgeon, the goosander. [Prov. Eng.]

      Spoonbilled widgeon, the shoveler.

      White widgeon, the smew.

      Wood widgeon, the wood duck.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
wheat

Old English hwæte "wheat," from Proto-Germanic *hwaitjaz (cognates: Old Saxon hweti, Old Norse hveiti, Norwegian kveite, Old Frisian hwete, Middle Dutch, Dutch weit, Old High German weizzi, German Weizen, Gothic hvaiteis "wheat"), literally "that which is white" (in reference to the grain or the meal), from PIE *kwoid-yo-, suffixed variant form of root *kweid-, *kweit- "to shine" (see white; and compare Welsh gwenith "wheat," related to gwenn "white"). The Old World grain was introduced into New Spain in 1528. Wheaties, the cereal brand name, was patented 1925.

Wiktionary
wheat

a. wheaten, of a light brown colour, like that of wheat. n. 1 (context countable English) any of several cereal grains, of the genus ''Triticum'', that yields flour as used in bakery. 2 (context uncountable English) a light brown colour, like that of wheat.

WordNet
wheat
  1. n. annual or biennial grass having erect flower spikes and light brown grains [syn: corn]

  2. grains of common wheat; sometimes cooked whole or cracked as cereal; usually ground into flour [syn: wheat berry]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Wheat

Wheat (Triticum spp.) is a cereal grain, (botanically, a type of fruit called a caryopsis) originally from the Levant region of the Near East but now cultivated worldwide. In 2013, world production of wheat was 713 million tons, making it the third most-produced cereal after maize (1,016 million tons) and rice (745 million tons). Wheat was the second most-produced cereal in 2009; world production in that year was 682 million tons, after maize (817 million tons), and with rice as a close third (679 million tons).

This grain is grown on more land area than any other commercial food. World trade in wheat is greater than for all other crops combined. Globally, wheat is the leading source of vegetable protein in human food, having a higher protein content than the other major cereals maize (corn) and rice. In terms of total production tonnages used for food, it is currently second to rice as the main human food crop and ahead of maize, after allowing for maize's more extensive use in animal feeds. The archaeological record suggests that this first occurred in the regions known as the Fertile Crescent.

Wheat (color)

Wheat is a color that resembles wheat.

The first recorded use of wheat as a color name in English was in 1711.

Wheat is one of the X11 web colors.

Wheat (band)

Wheat is an American indie-rock band formed by Scott Levesque (vocals, guitar), Brendan Harney (drums, vocals), Ricky Brennan Jr. (guitar, vocals), and Kenny Madaras (bass) in Taunton, Massachusetts, in 1996.

Wheat (film)

Wheat is a 2009 Chinese historical drama film directed by He Ping, starring Fan Bingbing, Wang Jue, Du Jiayi, Wang Xueqi and Wang Zhiwen. The film tells the story of women left behind when their husbands went to war.

The film was produced for US$6 million and was funded by He Ping's own Beijing Classic Culture, along with Polybona Films, and the state-backed Xi'an Film Studio.

Wheat (disambiguation)

Wheat may refer to:

  • Wheat, a type of cultivated grass used in agriculture
  • Wheat (surname)
  • Wheat (band), indie rock band
  • Wheat (color), a color that resembles wheat
  • Wheat, Tennessee, a former community, United States
  • Wheat, West Virginia, an unincorporated community, United States
  • WEAT, a radio station licensed to the West Palm Beach, Florida market.

See also:

  • Thinopyrum intermedium, an intermediate wheatgrass
Wheat (surname)

Wheat is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Alan Wheat (born 1951), American politician
  • Brian Wheat (born 1963), American musician
  • DeJuan Wheat (born 1973), American basketball player
  • Ken Wheat (born 1950), American screenwriter, film producer and director
  • Lloyd F. Wheat (born 1923), American politician and lawyer
  • Mark Wheat, English-born American DJ
  • Mike Wheat, American judge
  • Natasha Wheat (born 1981), American artist
  • Sara Wheat (born 1984), American figure skater
  • Sheila D. Wheat, American singer

Usage examples of "wheat".

Volgnarius has seen a grain of wheat make its exit from the axilla, and Polisius mentions an abscess of the back from which was extracted a grain of wheat three months after ingestion.

Ye say, it shall soon pass over and we shall fare afield And reap the wheat with the war-sword and winnow in the shield.

Rice and wheat were feeble and undependable crops here, but the amaranth is so hardy that we have to use herbicides around the fields to keep it from spreading.

The cafe still serves breakfast all day, but the quiche on the menu is as likely to contain porta bello mushrooms as cheddar cheese, the bread is homemade, thick, and filled with goodies like wheat germ and nuts, and the lunch sandwiches are served on baguettes with avocado slices and bean sprouts.

With cotton, wool, wheat and mountains rich in minerals, Shensi should have been prosperous but was not, owing to opium-smoking and banditry, but fundamentally to lack of good communications.

Before the rain commenced, Bowie had heard sounds of the town, but now there was only the smacking of the wind-driven rain against the shocks of old wheat around him and its clatter on the stubbled earth.

Rainfall at Centennial is only thirteen inches a year, when any farmer knows that to produce even miserly corn or wheat requires twenty-one.

She thought about all the different types of bread that might be in those sandwiches -- quinoa, winter wheat, sprouted rye -- and the fillings -- potted cuy, chlorella paste, maybe even real chicken, or freeze-dried ham imported from Earth.

She fingered the especially well-cut wheat stem cicatrice of the heresy.

Chemically the Potato contains citric acid, like that of the lemon, which is admirable against scurvy: also potash, which is equally antiscorbutic, and phosphoric acid, yielding phosphorus in a quantity less only than that afforded by the apple, and by wheat.

Hamilton was Acting Prime Minister on May 2, when the devaluation was announced, and personally telephoned most of the editors of Prairie newspapers, hinting that the main purpose of the move had been to raise the external price of Canadian wheat.

Oatmeal comes the nearest to wheat in the amount of nitrogen or protein, but the digestible part of this is much smaller than in wheat, and the indigestible portion is decidedly irritating to the bowels, so that if used in excess of about one-fifth of our total starch-food required, it is likely to upset the digestion.

Dona Luz, and the Flowering Wheat Health Food Store in Chamisa-ville, and she raked in the dinero hand over fist.

Once as they were sauntering homeward by the brink of the turbid Eger, they came to a man lying on the grass with a pipe in his mouth, and lazily watching from under his fallen lids the cows grazing by the river-side, while in a field of scraggy wheat a file of women were reaping a belated harvest with sickles, bending wearily over to clutch the stems together and cut them with their hooked blades.

She dragged the poles to the field and left them while she gathered seed heads of einkorn wheat and rye for the rest of the afternoon, then dragged them back to the cave.