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Crossword clues for heel

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
heel
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Achilles' heel
▪ I think Frank’s vanity is his Achilles' heel.
click your heels (=hit the heels of your shoes together, as a soldier does)
▪ He clicked his heels and saluted.
come/follow close on the heels of sth
▪ Yet another scandal followed close on the heels of the senator’s resignation.
head over heels in love (=very much in love)
▪ The two of them fell head over heels in love.
high heels
kitten heels
▪ kitten-heel ankle boots
the heel of your foot (=the curved back part of your foot )
▪ He kicked his opponent with the heel of his foot.
turned on her heel (=turned away suddenly because of anger)
▪ Brigitte glared at him, turned on her heel, and stomped out of the room.
wedge heels
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
clean
▪ In a separate incident, Ferguson also showed Irvine a clean pair of heels.
close
▪ With another couple of laps he might have finished close on the heels of the two Dunlops.
hard
▪ But the law was hard on their heels.
▪ His partner meanwhile, burst into the room, pistol in hand, the stammerer hard on his heels.
▪ He was jailed for four and a half years in December, hard on the heels of another shyster, Jack Bennett.
▪ Then the click of its stopping, the hard heels on bare boards.
▪ Thank goodness you've rescued me, she thought, yet hard on the heels of her relief came dismay.
head
▪ I gripped the banister and swung myself head over heels, then came out on the roof of a tower.
▪ Or else she's head over heels in debt.
high
▪ Invariably our toes are unnaturally cramped into odd-shaped shoes and the feet raised because we choose to teeter around in high heels!
▪ Have yourself dropped off in your high heels in front of the restaurant.
▪ She wore impossibly high heels, yet she was still only eye to eye with Virginia in her bare feet.
▪ She wore brown leather shoes with pointed toes and high heels.
▪ With high heels she stood at least an inch over me.
▪ Masha, in a comfortable chair, kicked off her high heels and drew her legs under her flower-patterned skirt.
▪ Try drag-you know, high heels and makeup...
hot
▪ Young Laura is hot on the heels of her brothers.
▪ Critique followed hot on the heels of this pioneering work.
▪ It comes hot on the heels of the C5 saloon we showed you last week.
▪ Merchants followed hot on their heels selling fabrics and other manufactured goods in exchange for copra oil.
▪ Conversely, victory for Bath leaves them very much in the title hunt, hot on the heels of Leicester.
left
▪ And there are still traces of mud at the sides as well as under the left heel.
▪ He walked with a lilting gait, his left Achilles tendon apparently shortened, pulling his left heel up.
▪ My left heel was being rubbed by a piece of leather.
low
▪ Stand with the feet together and slowly raise up on tiptoes, then lower the heels down again.
▪ Among the tips: Wear a conservative, navy blue suit, a white blouse, low heels and no flashy jewelry.
▪ Shoes with thick soles and low heels are to be recommended for walking round the centre of Funchal.
▪ The fashion for the gentler Nineties is generally for lower heels.
▪ That's fine, because there are lots of shoes in the shops with low heels to choose from.
▪ Black tights, black low heels.
right
▪ I had to fold my leg sideways so I could use my right heel to rest my left foot against.
▪ Cornerback Larry Brown did not suit up because of lingering pain in his right heel.
▪ Brown has been bothered by torn tissue in his right heel since early in training camp.
■ NOUN
spike
▪ Marie said and hung up quickly as Astrid teetered back into the office on her gold spike heels.
stiletto
▪ Popular songs and stiletto heels are examples.
▪ In the interests of conservation, stiletto heels are not permitted in the house.
■ VERB
click
▪ He clicked his heels and bowed briefly towards a beautiful Eurasian girl.
▪ The Daughter clicked her heels, and made a pass, lunging forwards.
▪ A couple strolled past on clicking heels which echoed from one side of the road to the other.
▪ I want to click my heels, I want to clench my fist: Yes.
▪ A sergeant hurried forward and clicked his heels.
cool
▪ He was ushered forward after cooling his heels for four minutes.
▪ Basically, if you believe the law of averages, 1996 should be a year for mutual funds to cool their heels.
▪ Our sources, who are cooling their heels waiting for chips, continue to think Intel is having problems making the parts.
▪ As things turned out, I had a week to cool my heels in New York.
▪ If a man was workshy and mutinous I would put him in a cell to cool his heels for a while.
▪ His office says he has kept at least 20 top-flight journalists and analysts cooling their heels waiting to interview him since October.
dig
▪ Firstly, there are clearly some issues where member states are beginning to dig in their heels.
▪ After he organized a dozen files, Manion dug in his heels and started his workday.
▪ Whether it can persuade the Government to dig in its heels over this issue looks very uncertain.
▪ I dig my heels into the sandy soil of the path.
▪ The others in the case became upset and dug in their heels about changing their minds.
▪ He argued with me but never dug in his heels.
▪ I had to dig my heels in to stay steady.
▪ Gail dug in her heels under attack.
digging
▪ Liz yanked at her arm, and she stumbled a few steps, digging in her heels.
drag
▪ The council was informed about the anniversary two years ago but has dragged its heels over putting it on any agenda.
▪ Too easy to fall off and be dragged around by the heel.
▪ On this occasion, their leaders have dragged their heels at every stage, without giving any of the ideas a chance.
▪ Coming back I was exhausted, dragging my heels through a four-inch snow.
▪ The truth could be that they are dragging their heels in processing these requests which makes it appear that way.
▪ Presidential spokesman Park Joon-young denied that the government was dragging its heels.
▪ They went up the track with Piper dragging his heels like a recalcitrant child.
▪ No doubt we can drag our heels pretty effectively if we really try.
follow
▪ The overhaul follows hard on the heels of increased charges earlier this year.
▪ For this young woman, one tragedy followed on the heels of another.
▪ This 17-track album follows on the heels of the latest Levi's ad, but it's a pretty lazy compilation.
▪ There will be some serious disillusion to follow on the heels of the euphoria of freedom.
▪ Then it seemed that the consummation would follow soon on the heels of its inauguration.
kick
▪ Masha, in a comfortable chair, kicked off her high heels and drew her legs under her flower-patterned skirt.
▪ She deserves to kick up her heels.
▪ That has set Crosby into conflict with Murray and left Armstrong kicking his heels instead of a football.
▪ Women in white boots, short shorts and frilly cowgirl outfits kicked up their heels on it.
▪ My son, I began to fear, was still kicking his heels on a fog-bound airport in Birmingham.
▪ For a guy like me to hang around kicking his heels ain't natural.
▪ But perhaps you too are kicking up your heels elsewhere by now.
▪ BThey kicked up their heels, spun, twirled and got down till dawn.
rock
▪ Burun had rocked back on to his heels.
▪ He was rocking on his heels, watching Kathy sleep.
sit
▪ The students then stoop to sit on their heels and issue another formal bow before standing and beginning the lesson.
▪ He sat back on his heels, sorrowfully examining the ruined glove.
▪ She ventured at last to sit back on her heels, let her hands lie in her lap, and listen.
▪ He can move forwards, rolling the ball forwards, and then come back almost to sit on his heels.
▪ Hari mended the fire and sat back on her heels, looking at her blackened fingers.
▪ Lowell sat back on his heels and watched the flames.
▪ He sat back on his heels and swore.
▪ Luke, a 4-year-old boy, would sit on his heels in order not to pass a motion.
snap
▪ It's touted as the cheaper alternative to Photoshop, and is snapping at the heels of the industry benchmark.
▪ I've the problems of the world on my shoulders and the Captain snapping at my heels.
▪ As night fell the Empire army was in full retreat with wolf riders snapping at their heels.
spin
▪ Then he spun on his heel and stalked off round the side of the cart.
▪ John spun on his heel and ran back to the banister, his fist closing on empty air behind the moving figure.
▪ Duvall was jerked away from Jimmy, spinning on his heels so that he was facing the office door again.
turn
▪ Suddenly, the boar had been faced with a cliff too steep to climb and had turned on its heel.
▪ The throng turned on their heels and stampeded into town.
▪ He turned smartly on his heel and trotted into the foyer, greeting the stewards with indiscriminate effusion.
▪ Whenever Einar got extremely mad, he turned on his heel and walked away.
▪ She turned on her heel and vanished into the murk.
▪ Then, without a word, he turned on his heel and left the room.
▪ Then she turned on her heel and we marched back down the hall.
▪ He turned on his heel and went into the dining room.
wear
▪ She wore impossibly high heels, yet she was still only eye to eye with Virginia in her bare feet.
▪ He must wear leather heels, maybe with taps.
▪ As she tried to pick her way over frozen puddles, she regretted her decision to wear high heels instead of boots.
▪ This mournfully bright menial Val wore high heels and a black beret.
▪ She wears white spiky heels and has a tiny white beret balanced asymmetrically on the side of her head.
▪ She would just about do, although she wished she had been able to wear high heels.
▪ She ought to have worn high heels.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be/fall head over heels in love
▪ It wasn't just the usual liaison: the two of them fell head over heels in love.
close on the heels of sth
▪ With another couple of laps he might have finished close on the heels of the two Dunlops.
come/follow hot on the heels of sth
▪ It comes hot on the heels of the C5 saloon we showed you last week.
cool your heels
▪ I had to cool my heels in a long line at the checkout.
▪ As things turned out, I had a week to cool my heels in New York.
▪ Basically, if you believe the law of averages, 1996 should be a year for mutual funds to cool their heels.
▪ He was ushered forward after cooling his heels for four minutes.
▪ His office says he has kept at least 20 top-flight journalists and analysts cooling their heels waiting to interview him since October.
▪ If a man was workshy and mutinous I would put him in a cell to cool his heels for a while.
▪ Our sources, who are cooling their heels waiting for chips, continue to think Intel is having problems making the parts.
dig your heels in
▪ I had to dig my heels in to stay steady.
▪ The situation to be avoided is where the buyer digs his heels in on principle, because of the attitude of the salesperson.
drag your feet/heels
▪ And don't drag your feet.
▪ Elsewhere they dragged their feet until it became clear that the laws were unenforceable.
▪ Mr de Klerk's people say the Congress is dragging its feet because it is too disorganised to talk.
▪ On the other hand, the agency has been dragging its feet all the way in making the endangered determination.
▪ On this occasion, their leaders have dragged their heels at every stage, without giving any of the ideas a chance.
▪ The council was informed about the anniversary two years ago but has dragged its heels over putting it on any agenda.
▪ They thus exhibit a strong tendency to drag their feet as doomsday draws nearer.
▪ Was it because he feared the Republicans were going to hammer him in the 1996 election for dragging his feet on enlargement?
hot on sb's heels
▪ Conversely, victory for Bath leaves them very much in the title hunt, hot on the heels of Leicester.
▪ Critique followed hot on the heels of this pioneering work.
▪ It comes hot on the heels of the C5 saloon we showed you last week.
▪ Merchants followed hot on their heels selling fabrics and other manufactured goods in exchange for copra oil.
▪ Young Laura is hot on the heels of her brothers.
kick up your heels
▪ Women in cowgirl outfits kicked up their heels before an audience of 24,000.
▪ BThey kicked up their heels, spun, twirled and got down till dawn.
▪ But perhaps you too are kicking up your heels elsewhere by now.
▪ She deserves to kick up her heels.
▪ This is your chance to kick up your heels and support this group of anonymous women artists.
▪ Women in white boots, short shorts and frilly cowgirl outfits kicked up their heels on it.
kick your heels
▪ For a guy like me to hang around kicking his heels ain't natural.
▪ I kicked my heels and ran my eye along the ruff of mountains surrounding Cuzco, like a tongue over broken teeth.
▪ I sat in the pie shop kicking my heels and pondering the problem.
▪ My son, I began to fear, was still kicking his heels on a fog-bound airport in Birmingham.
▪ That has set Crosby into conflict with Murray and left Armstrong kicking his heels instead of a football.
▪ The clash of steel jarred up his arm, then he kicked his heels back to force the stallion towards the road.
scuff your feet/heels
show (sb) a clean pair of heels
spike heels
▪ And then Doreen entered the dining-room, walking carefully on her high spike heels.
▪ If I were you I'd change those spike heels for walking shoes and explore the place.
▪ Marie said and hung up quickly as Astrid teetered back into the office on her gold spike heels.
▪ Set off the look with a pair of high spiked heels.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Mary found a pair of black pumps with three-inch heels and silver buckles.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Hard, through the heel of my thumb.
▪ He gets the goods, but he feels like a heel.
▪ He then handed her the turtle, turned on his heels and walked off.
▪ It is projected to hit $ 1. 17 billion in 1996 sales, nipping at the heels of Sega and Nintendo.
▪ Suddenly, the boar had been faced with a cliff too steep to climb and had turned on its heel.
▪ The woollen choirboy under my heel!
▪ This season Gwynn often has been hindered by an inflamed heel, intensifying speculation that his weight is an issue.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be/fall head over heels in love
▪ It wasn't just the usual liaison: the two of them fell head over heels in love.
close on the heels of sth
▪ With another couple of laps he might have finished close on the heels of the two Dunlops.
come/follow hot on the heels of sth
▪ It comes hot on the heels of the C5 saloon we showed you last week.
hot on sb's heels
▪ Conversely, victory for Bath leaves them very much in the title hunt, hot on the heels of Leicester.
▪ Critique followed hot on the heels of this pioneering work.
▪ It comes hot on the heels of the C5 saloon we showed you last week.
▪ Merchants followed hot on their heels selling fabrics and other manufactured goods in exchange for copra oil.
▪ Young Laura is hot on the heels of her brothers.
spike heels
▪ And then Doreen entered the dining-room, walking carefully on her high spike heels.
▪ If I were you I'd change those spike heels for walking shoes and explore the place.
▪ Marie said and hung up quickly as Astrid teetered back into the office on her gold spike heels.
▪ Set off the look with a pair of high spiked heels.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ With just the mainsail out, the boat heeled hard off the wind on to a port reach.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Heel

Heel \Heel\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heeled; p. pr. & vb. n. Heeling.]

  1. To perform by the use of the heels, as in dancing, running, and the like. [R.]

    I cannot sing, Nor heel the high lavolt.
    --Shak.

  2. To add a heel to; as, to heel a shoe.

  3. To arm with a gaff, as a cock for fighting.

  4. (Golf) To hit (the ball) with the heel of the club.

  5. (Football) To make (a fair catch) standing with one foot advanced, the heel on the ground and the toe up.

Heel

Heel \Heel\, n. [OE. hele, heele, AS. h[=e]la, perh. for h[=o]hila, fr. AS. h[=o]h heel (cf. Hough); but cf. D. hiel, OFries. heila, h[=e]la, Icel. h[ae]ll, Dan. h[ae]l, Sw. h["a]l, and L. calx. [root]12. Cf. Inculcate.]

  1. The hinder part of the foot; sometimes, the whole foot; -- in man or quadrupeds.

    He [the stag] calls to mind his strength and then his speed, His winged heels and then his armed head.
    --Denham.

  2. The hinder part of any covering for the foot, as of a shoe, sock, etc.; specif., a solid part projecting downward from the hinder part of the sole of a boot or shoe.

  3. The latter or remaining part of anything; the closing or concluding part. ``The heel of a hunt.''
    --A. Trollope. ``The heel of the white loaf.''
    --Sir W. Scott.

  4. Anything regarded as like a human heel in shape; a protuberance; a knob.

  5. The part of a thing corresponding in position to the human heel; the lower part, or part on which a thing rests; especially:

    1. (Naut.) The after end of a ship's keel.

    2. (Naut.) The lower end of a mast, a boom, the bowsprit, the sternpost, etc.

    3. (Mil.) In a small arm, the corner of the but which is upwards in the firing position.

    4. (Mil.) The uppermost part of the blade of a sword, next to the hilt.

    5. The part of any tool next the tang or handle; as, the heel of a scythe.

  6. (Man.) Management by the heel, especially the spurred heel; as, the horse understands the heel well.

  7. (Arch.)

    1. The lower end of a timber in a frame, as a post or rafter. In the United States, specif., the obtuse angle of the lower end of a rafter set sloping.

    2. A cyma reversa; -- so called by workmen.
      --Gwilt.

  8. (Golf) The part of the face of the club head nearest the shaft.

  9. In a carding machine, the part of a flat nearest the cylinder.

    Heel chain (Naut.), a chain passing from the bowsprit cap around the heel of the jib boom.

    Heel plate, the butt plate of a gun.

    Heel of a rafter. (Arch.) See Heel, n., 7.

    Heel ring, a ring for fastening a scythe blade to the snath.

    Neck and heels, the whole body. (Colloq.)

    To be at the heels of, to pursue closely; to follow hard; as, hungry want is at my heels.
    --Otway.

    To be down at the heel, to be slovenly or in a poor plight.

    To be out at the heels, to have on stockings that are worn out; hence, to be shabby, or in a poor plight.
    --Shak.

    To cool the heels. See under Cool.

    To go heels over head, to turn over so as to bring the heels uppermost; hence, to move in a inconsiderate, or rash, manner.

    To have the heels of, to outrun.

    To lay by the heels, to fetter; to shackle; to imprison.
    --Shak.
    --Addison.

    To show the heels, to flee; to run from.

    To take to the heels, to flee; to betake to flight.

    To throw up another's heels, to trip him.
    --Bunyan.

    To tread upon one's heels, to follow closely.
    --Shak.

Heel

Heel \Heel\ (h[=e]l), v. i. [OE. helden to lean, incline, AS. heldan, hyldan; akin to Icel. halla, Dan. helde, Sw. h["a]lla to tilt, pour, and perh. to E. hill.] (Naut.) To lean or tip to one side, as a ship; as, the ship heels aport; the boat heeled over when the squall struck it.

Heeling error (Naut.), a deviation of the compass caused by the heeling of an iron vessel to one side or the other.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
heel

"back of the foot," Old English hela, from Proto-Germanic *hanhilon (cognates: Old Norse hæll, Old Frisian hel, Dutch hiel), from PIE *kenk- (3) "heel, bend of the knee" (source also of Old English hoh "hock").\n

\nMeaning "back of a shoe or boot" is c.1400. Down at heels (1732) refers to heels of boots or shoes worn down and the owner too poor to replace them. For Achilles' heel "only vulnerable spot" see Achilles. To "fight with (one's) heels" (fighten with heles) in Middle English meant "to run away."

heel

"to lean to one side," in reference to a ship, Old English hieldan "incline, lean, slope," from Proto-Germanic *helthijan (cognates: Middle Dutch helden "to lean," Dutch hellen, Old Norse hallr "inclined," Old High German halda, German halde "slope, declivity"). Re-spelled 16c. from Middle English hield, probably by misinterpretation of -d as a past tense suffix.

heel

"contemptible person," 1914 in U.S. underworld slang, originally "incompetent or worthless criminal," perhaps from a sense of "person in the lowest position" and thus from heel (n.1).

heel

of a dog, "to follow or stop at a person's heels," 1810, from heel (n.1). Also see heeled.

Wiktionary
heel

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context anatomy English) The rear part of the foot, where it joins the leg. 2 The part of a shoe's sole which supports the foot's heel. 3 The rear part of a sock or similar covering for the foot. 4 (context firearms English) The back upper part of the stock. 5 The last or lowest part of anything; as, ''the heel of a mast'' or ''the heel of a vessel''. 6 (context US Ireland English) A crust end-piece of a loaf of bread. 7 (context US English) The base of a bun sliced in half lengthwise. 8 A contemptible, inconsiderate or thoughtless person. 9 (context slang professional wrestling English) A wrestler whose on-ring persona embodies villainous or reprehensible traits. Contrast with babyface. 10 (context card games English) The cards set aside for later use in a patience or solitaire game. 11 Anything regarded as like a human heel in shape; a protuberance; a knob. 12 (context architecture English) The lower end of a timber in a frame, as a post or rafter. Specifically, (context US English), the obtuse angle of the lower end of a rafter set sloping. 13 (context architecture English) A cyma reversa; so called by workmen. 14 (context carpentry English) the short side of an angled cut 15 (cx golf English) The part of the face of the club head nearest the shaft. 16 In a carding machine, the part of a flat nearest the cylinder. vb. 1 To follow at somebody's heels; to chase closely. 2 To add a heel to, or increase the size of the heel of (a shoe or boot). 3 To kick with the heel. 4 (context transitive English) To perform by the use of the heels, as in dancing, running, etc. 5 (context transitive English) To arm with a gaff, as a cock for fighting. 6 (cx golf transitive English) To hit (the ball) with the heel of the club. 7 (cx football transitive English) To make (a fair catch) standing with one foot forward, the heel on the ground and the toe up. Etymology 2

n. The act of inclining or canting from a vertical position; a cant. vb. (context intransitive English) To incline to one side, to tilt (especially of ships).

WordNet
heel
  1. v. tilt to one side; "The balloon heeled over"; "the wind made the vessel heel"; "The ship listed to starboard" [syn: list]

  2. follow at the heels of a person

  3. perform with the heels; "heel that dance"

  4. strike with the heel of the club; "heel a golf ball"

  5. put a new heel on; "heel shoes" [syn: reheel]

heel
  1. n. the bottom of a shoe or boot; the back part of a shoe or boot that touches the ground

  2. the back part of the human foot

  3. someone who is morally reprehensible; "you dirty dog" [syn: cad, bounder, blackguard, dog, hound]

  4. one of the crusty ends of a loaf of bread

  5. the lower end of a ship's mast

  6. (golf) the part of the clubhead where it joins the shaft

  7. the piece of leather that fits the heel [syn: counter]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Heel

The heel is the prominence at the posterior end of the foot. It is based on the projection of one bone, the calcaneus or heel bone, behind the articulation of the bones of the lower leg.

Heel (professional wrestling)

In professional wrestling, a heel (also known as a rudo in lucha libre) is a wrestler who is villainous or a "bad guy", who is booked (scripted) by the promotion to be in the position of being an antagonist. They are typically opposed by their polar opposites, faces, who are the heroic protagonist or "good guy" characters. In American wrestling, it was common for the faces to be American and the heels to be portrayed as foreign (e.g. The Iron Sheik, Eddie Guerrero, Alexander Rusev).

In order to gain heat (with boos and jeers from the audience), heels are often portrayed as behaving in an immoral manner by breaking rules or otherwise taking advantage of their opponents outside the bounds of the standards of the match. Others do not (or rarely) break rules, but instead exhibit unlikeable, appalling and deliberately offensive and demoralizing personality traits such as arrogance, cowardice or contempt for the audience. Many heels do both, cheating as well as behaving nastily. No matter the type of heel, the most important job is that of the antagonist role. Heels exist to provide a foil to the face wrestlers. If a given heel is cheered over the face, a promoter may opt to turn that heel to face or vice versa, or to make the wrestler do something even more despicable to encourage heel heat.

In the world of lucha libre wrestling, heels are generally known for being brawlers and for using physical moves that emphasize brute strength or size, often having outfits akin to demons, devils, or other tricksters. This is contrasted with the heroic técnicos that are generally known for using moves requiring technical skill, particularly aerial maneuvers.

Heel (disambiguation)

The heel is the prominence at the posterior end of the foot.

Heel also may refer to:

  • Heel (shoe)
  • Heel of the hand
  • Heel (professional wrestling)
  • Heel (corporation), a homeopathy company
  • Heel, Netherlands
  • The neck joint of a guitar
  • The end of a loaf of bread
  • A dog obedience training command
  • North Carolina Tar Heels, often known as the "Heels"
Heel (shoe)

A heel is the projection at the back of a shoe which rests below the heel bone. The shoe heel is used to improve the balance of the shoe, increase the height of the wearer, alter posture or other decorative purposes. Sometimes raised, the high heel is common to a form of shoe often worn by women, but sometimes by men too. See also stiletto heel.

Heel (corporation)

Heel is a developer, producer and distributor of homeopathic preparations. It was founded in 1936 by Hans-Heinrich Reckeweg. Heel has offices in 40 countries worldwide including the United States where it is located in Albuquerque, NM.

Heel (album)

Heel is the second studio album from Dogs of Peace. Suite 28 Records released the album on April 22, 2016.

Usage examples of "heel".

I just sat back on my heels and let her tongue lash over me, until at last it dawned on me that the old abo must have gone running to her and she thought we were responsible for scaring him out of what wits he had.

Round the corner of the narrow street there came rushing a brace of whining dogs with tails tucked under their legs, and after them a white-faced burgher, with outstretched hands and wide-spread fingers, his hair all abristle and his eyes glinting back from one shoulder to the other, as though some great terror were at his very heels.

From their bases first at Turin, and then at Coblenz, they were accused of planning invasions of France on the heels of absolutist armies that would put good patriots and their women and children to the sword and raze their cities.

With the heel of his palm on the underside, he flicked a callused thumb back and forth across the pebbled tip until her breast felt heavy and ached for some fulfillment she could not understand.

And hard on the heels of that thought, she had to wonder if she could have possibly allowed her agoraphobia to become a convenient excuse to justify her career choices and a lifestyle some would consider eccentric.

So I sat, scuffing my heels against the floor and trying to take an interest in what Alake was doing.

She was more noted for her skill at archery and the constant shadows of three or more of the Alaunt hounds at her heels.

To his considerable dissurprise, Alec stared at him for a moment, then turned on his heel and stalked abruptly away to stare out over the central pool, his back rigid as a blade.

Gorloic, and laying a hand to his hilt he rushed forward through the antechamber and into the gatehouse, his friends coming hard on his heels.

A slight young woman, Mary developed strong muscles in the forearms as she grasped the areolar tissue, sometimes making Daisy squeal, rolled the large muscles of the calf and thigh firmly both ways and kneaded the belly with the heel of her hand.

He dropped down the staircase and raced towards the doors of the armoury with Big Daniel and the others on his heels.

She knelt stiffly before Ashake and spread it out, sitting back then on her heels as the girl, making slow work of it, rolled the talisman into a tight bundle.

Ze hebben allemaal heel hard aan dit boek gewerkt en de bezorgdheid van een beginnend auteur vriendelijk getolereerd.

He rose to his feet and put into Avis where she lay at precisely the correct elevation, her heels still over his shoulders.

Axis bowed slightly to Jayme and Moryson, his right fist clenched over the golden axes on his breast, then he strode from the room, his boot heels clicking sharply on the stone floor.