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Crossword clues for glove

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
glove
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
fit...like a glove (=fit you very well)
▪ I know this dress is going to fit you like a glove.
gardening gloves/tools/equipment etc
glove compartment
glove puppet
glove/hand/finger puppet
odd socks/gloves etc (=not a matching pair of socks etc)
▪ He was wearing odd socks.
treat/handle sb with kid gloves
▪ I want you to treat Hayley with kid gloves today. She’s still upset about her father.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
black
▪ She wears black gloves to cover her hands and I imagine them veined and stiff under the fabric.
▪ He wears a pair of black gloves.
▪ She was dressed in black fingerless gloves and a disintegrating taffeta cape and looked as if she'd been recently exhumed.
▪ Mandylor, also a writer, wears black fingerless gloves and broods magnificently while recounting stories of orgiastic dances in St-Tropez.
▪ He wiped a hand across his mouth, and stared at the scarlet smear on the back of his black glove.
▪ She wore a cream linen suit, a black straw boater, and black gloves.
bloody
▪ While Nicole runs around waving bloody gloves, Mia worries that Guy is coming back to get them.
kid
▪ Rutelli is handling the far-left Refounded Communists with kid gloves.
▪ I really didn't understand the kid gloves, but it was still a slap up-side their right-wing heads.
▪ No big deal To be sure, O. J. Simpson was treated with kid gloves.
long
▪ The white dresses, the long white gloves, the limos, the whole nine yards.
rubber
▪ They say it's normal procedure at other Universities to wash contaminated materials like rubber gloves and glass containers.
▪ Wear rubber gloves and protect the floor.
▪ A simple cleaning kit for instance can include rubber gloves, disposable masks and goggles if necessary.
▪ Brush clean using an old paintbrush 4 Wearing rubber gloves, pour a little Ronseal Wood Hardener into the lid.
▪ He'd had time to wash his hands and take off his rubber gloves and apron.
▪ It was soon ablaze, with the empty tin and rubber gloves buried deep in its midst.
▪ Again wear rubber gloves and repeat the treatment until the wood can absorb no more.
▪ He picked up a rubber glove whose open end was sucking in brown greasy water.
surgical
▪ Allied businesses such as specialist surgical gloves also offer strong growth potential worldwide.
▪ They came into the hallway before opening it and taking out rubber surgical gloves.
white
▪ The white bear in white gloves?
▪ Think of a tall, gray rabbit who wears white gloves and walks around on his hind legs.
▪ And white gloves with a tunic of silvery mail, lying there in a tent that was empty but for himself and Klakkr.
▪ The white dresses, the long white gloves, the limos, the whole nine yards.
▪ Then he stood and gathered his hat, cigar and white gloves together in one hand.
▪ I am wearing white gloves and carrying a little pocketbook.
▪ The wooden black boy in the corner was identifiable by his white gloves in the gloom.
▪ They were all wearing white gloves and their hands were inside a big glass box.
woollen
▪ The stems were wet and she felt the dampness seeping through her woollen gloves.
▪ The sickening feel of woollen gloves being pulled on to your hands and hitting and blunting your fingertips so touch was lost.
▪ The real answer is to cover hands and feet warmly, using woollen stockings and gloves.
▪ I was wearing a heavy overcoat and woollen gloves but the bust whipped its way right into my bones.
■ NOUN
box
▪ He was staring at the glove box now, he was too low to see out of the window.
▪ The glove box is fair, but the tested model came with front-door bins and a large bin between the seats.
▪ I slowed down as I approached Colcutt village, searching in the glove box for something more soothing than Tina Turner.
▪ The glove box is fair, and there is additional interior storage.
▪ I wanted to buy a special begging pack for him, and keep it in the glove box.
compartment
▪ In the glove compartment of his car was another love letter, this time written by her husband.
▪ Miguel leaned across and opened the glove compartment, pulling out his fat plastic bag of weed.
▪ She got the revolver off the back seat and put it into the glove compartment with the cartridges.
▪ I tallied our money, sorted it, found a sickly rubber band in the glove compartment to wrap around it.
▪ As Harry Chiltern had said, there was always a gun in the glove compartment.
▪ One inspector was startled to see a woman's face peering back at him from a glove compartment box.
▪ I took a fresh notebook from the glove compartment and started back to talk to them.
▪ Before she even left the compound, Yolanda put the list away in the glove compartment.
leather
▪ Blanche glanced up and down the empty pavement, slid on her leather gloves and loped off into the night.
▪ Eric Dodd set down his wire cutters and leather gloves.
▪ She picked up a heavy leather glove and hit him in the face with it.
▪ Picking up their chamois leather gloves, they joined the boys in the hall.
▪ We used the old sash windows from the house, held them flat with leather gloves, steadied them down the path.
puppet
▪ The second uses glove puppets and is performed from a small booth to animate smaller crowds.
▪ Charles collapsed like a glove puppet with the hand withdrawn, and stood for a long moment, sagging.
■ VERB
fit
▪ But now she suddenly realised it fitted him like a glove.
▪ Legendary San Francisco private eye Hal Lipset and five fellow gumshoes have an offer that may fit snug as a glove.
▪ Praise Six years on, the job almost seems to fit him like a glove.
▪ Temperamentally and ideologically, the two men fit hand in glove.
▪ In performing calculations we know exactly what to do and the answers fit nature like a glove.
▪ This statement fits hand in glove with the Corinthian assertions in 6: 12-13.
▪ After a while, it fit like a glove, and I became comfortable with it.
garden
▪ I like gardening without gloves, feeling the warm moist earth in my hands.
pull
▪ She had been standing alone, hatted, pulling on her gloves, ready to go out.
▪ Then she pulled on gloves, so Simon wouldn't see that the ring was missing.
put
▪ She got the revolver off the back seat and put it into the glove compartment with the cartridges.
▪ Then put on your rubber gloves and give the meat a good squeeze with both hands.
▪ I put my glove back on.
▪ I set down my grocery bags and put on my disposable gloves.
▪ I put the small glove on.
▪ They put on gloves and masks to remove strips of insulation in the loft.
remove
▪ This can often be balanced by temporary exposure of skin, e.g. lowering an anorak hood or removing one or both gloves.
▪ Exhausted, you remove your green glove and sit on the sidelines.
▪ Fiennes developed severe frostbite after removing a glove while attempting to retrieve a sledge from freezing water.
take
▪ She kept fidgeting with her bonnet, dropping her hat-pin, taking off her gloves and putting them on again.
▪ By doing nothing, Daley permitted the police to take off both gloves.
▪ He'd had time to wash his hands and take off his rubber gloves and apron.
▪ Wait a minute, girl! Take those stupid gloves off.
▪ He took off his glove, signed it and gave it to the boy.
▪ Then he takes the gloves off.
▪ I take my glove off and try again, the metal cold and edges sharp against my skin.
▪ Then she took off her gloves.
treat
▪ No big deal To be sure, O. J. Simpson was treated with kid gloves.
use
▪ Sampson used to tie his gloves with straps and whilst batting in this particular game they came loose.
▪ The real answer is to cover hands and feet warmly, using woollen stockings and gloves.
▪ Protect your eyes and use the plastic gloves supplied 2 Inject foam and allow it to expand proud of the surface.
wear
▪ By the time he'd finished shifting the chairs, he was wearing grey gloves and a wig.
▪ They cite newspaper reports of police officers wearing gloves even during AIDS-related political demonstrations.
▪ Also I suggest you wear gloves.
▪ As proof, the officer points to a car surrounded by investigators wearing blood-stained rubber gloves.
▪ The man hit him, left hand, backhanded; he was wearing a weighted glove.
▪ Mandylor, also a writer, wears black fingerless gloves and broods magnificently while recounting stories of orgiastic dances in St-Tropez.
▪ She wears black gloves to cover her hands and I imagine them veined and stiff under the fabric.
▪ You may have wondered why your dentist wears gloves and perhaps a mask when treating you.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
hand in glove
▪ Temperamentally and ideologically, the two men fit hand in glove.
▪ All night long the thought of his being hand in glove with Harry Martin had lingered at the back of her mind.
▪ Far from being independent and wary of one another, big government and mainstream media work hand in glove with each other.
▪ She did the bending and the kneeling, and they worked together hand in glove.
▪ Temperamentally and ideologically, the two men fit hand in glove.
▪ The flaw apparently involves the Orion chipset that works hand in glove with the new Pentium Pro or P6 microprocessor.
▪ This statement fits hand in glove with the Corinthian assertions in 6: 12-13.
▪ Was he worried that she'd finally found her proof that he was hand in glove with Harry Martin?
kid gloves
▪ Diana was treated with kid gloves when all she needed was some sensible advice, a cuddle and a consoling word.
▪ Elegant kid gloves like the ones Mrs Carson wore would have improved her image, but she possessed none.
▪ I really didn't understand the kid gloves, but it was still a slap up-side their right-wing heads.
▪ No big deal To be sure, O. J. Simpson was treated with kid gloves.
▪ Religion you handled with kid gloves.
▪ Rutelli is handling the far-left Refounded Communists with kid gloves.
▪ There was no point in kid gloves; she had to know sooner or later.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He also testified to a cut or damage in another area of the glove.
▪ They came into the hallway before opening it and taking out rubber surgical gloves.
▪ You may have wondered why your dentist wears gloves and perhaps a mask when treating you.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Glove

Glove \Glove\ (gl[u^]v), n. [OE. glove, glofe, AS. gl[=o]f; akin to Icel. gl[=o]fi, cf. Goth. l[=o]fa palm of the hand, Icel. l[=o]fi.]

  1. A cover for the hand, or for the hand and wrist, with a separate sheath for each finger. The latter characteristic distinguishes the glove from the mitten.

  2. A boxing glove. Boxing glove. See under Boxing. Glove fight, a pugilistic contest in which the fighters wear boxing gloves. Glove money or Glove silver.

    1. A tip or gratuity to servants, professedly to buy gloves with.

    2. (Eng. Law.) A reward given to officers of courts; also, a fee given by the sheriff of a county to the clerk of assize and judge's officers, when there are no offenders to be executed.

      Glove sponge (Zo["o]l.), a fine and soft variety of commercial sponges ( Spongia officinalis).

      To be hand and glove with, to be intimately associated or on good terms with. ``Hand and glove with traitors.''
      --J. H. Newman.

      To handle without gloves, to treat without reserve or tenderness; to deal roughly with. [Colloq.]

      To take up the glove, to accept a challenge or adopt a quarrel.

      To throw down the glove, to challenge to combat.

Glove

Glove \Glove\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gloved; p. pr. & vb. n. Gloving.] To cover with, or as with, a glove.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
glove

Old English glof "glove, covering for the hand," also "palm of the hand," from Proto-Germanic *galofo (cognates: Old Norse glofi), probably from *ga- collective prefix + *lofi "hand" (cognates: Old Norse lofi, Middle English love, Gothic lofa "flat of the hand"), from PIE *lep- "be flat; palm, sole, shoulder blade" (cognates: Russian lopata "shovel;" Lithuanian lopa "claw," lopeta "shovel, spade").\n

\nGerman Handschuh, the usual word for "glove," literally "hand-shoe" (Old High German hantscuoh; also Danish and Swedish hantsche) is represented by Old English Handscio (the name of one of Beowulf's companions, eaten by Grendel), but this is attested only as a proper name. To fit like a glove is first recorded 1771.

glove

"to cover or fit with a glove," c.1400, from glove (n.). Related: Gloved; gloving. Glover as a surname is from mid-13c.

Wiktionary
glove

n. 1 An item of clothing other than a mitten, covering all or part of the hand and fingers, but allowing independent movement of the fingers. 2 A baseball mitt. 3 (context baseball figuratively English) The ability to catch a hit ball. 4 (context slang English) A condom. vb. 1 (context baseball transitive English) To catch the ball in a baseball mitt. 2 (context transitive English) To put on a glove. 3 (context cricket English) To touch a delivery with one's glove while the gloved hand is on the bat. Under the rules of cricket, the batsman is deemed to have hit the ball.

WordNet
glove
  1. n. gloves worn by fielders in baseball [syn: baseball glove, baseball mitt, mitt]

  2. handwear: covers the hand and wrist [syn: gloves]

  3. gloves that are big and padded; worn for boxing [syn: boxing glove]

Wikipedia
Glove (ice hockey)

There are three styles of gloves worn by ice hockey players. Skaters wear similar gloves on each hand, while goaltenders wear gloves of different types on each hand.

Glove (disambiguation)

A glove is a type of garment or utility which is designed to cover the human hand. There are gloves for:

  • commercial and industrial purposes as well as for
  • sports and recreation

Glove may also refer to:

  • Gauntlet (gloves), a form of glove used for purposes including military, science, industry and drumming
Glove (film)

Glove is a 2011 South Korean sports drama film directed by Kang Woo-suk based on a true story. After another drunken fiasco, fading baseball star Sang-nam is forced to coach kids at a school for the hearing impaired, but the publicity stunt eventually becomes an opportunity of a lifetime. The film was released to South Korean cinemas on January 20 and went on to receive 1,890,406 admissions nationwide during its run in theaters.

GloVe (machine learning)

GloVe is an unsupervised learning algorithm for obtaining vector representations for words. Training is performed on aggregated global word-word co-occurrence statistics from a corpus, and the resulting representations showcase interesting linear substructures of the word vector space. It is developed as an open-source project at Stanford.

Glove

A glove ( Middle English from Old Englishglof) is a garment covering the whole hand. Gloves have separate sheaths or openings for each finger and the thumb; if there is an opening but no (or a short) covering sheath for each finger they are called fingerless gloves. Fingerless gloves having one large opening rather than individual openings for each finger are sometimes called gauntlets, though gauntlets are not necessarily fingerless. Gloves which cover the entire hand or fist but do not have separate finger openings or sheaths are called mittens. Mittens are warmer than gloves made of the same material because fingers maintain their warmth better when they are in contact with each other. Reduced surface area reduces heat loss.

A hybrid of glove and mitten contains open-ended sheaths for the four fingers (as in a fingerless glove, but not the thumb) and an additional compartment encapsulating the four fingers. This compartment can be lifted off the fingers and folded back to allow the individual fingers ease of movement and access while the hand remains covered. The usual design is for the mitten cavity to be stitched onto the back of the fingerless glove only, allowing it to be flipped over (normally held back by Velcro or a button) to transform the garment from a mitten to a glove. These hybrids are called convertible mittens or glittens, a combination of "glove" and "mittens".

Gloves protect and comfort hands against cold or heat, damage by friction, abrasion or chemicals, and disease; or in turn to provide a guard for what a bare hand should not touch. Latex, nitrile rubber or vinyl disposable gloves are often worn by health care professionals as hygiene and contamination protection measures. Police officers often wear them to work in crime scenes to prevent destroying evidence in the scene. Many criminals wear gloves to avoid leaving fingerprints, which makes the crime investigation more difficult. However, the gloves themselves can leave prints that are just as unique as human fingerprints. After collecting glove prints, law enforcement can then match them to gloves that they have collected as evidence. In many jurisdictions the act of wearing gloves itself while committing a crime can be prosecuted as an inchoate offense.

Fingerless gloves are useful where dexterity is required that gloves would restrict. Cigarette smokers and church organists use fingerless gloves. Some gloves include a gauntlet that extends partway up the arm. Cycling gloves for road racing or touring are usually fingerless. Guitar players often use fingerless gloves in circumstances when weather is much too cold to play with an un-covered hand.

Gloves are made of materials including cloth, knitted or felted wool, leather, rubber, latex, neoprene, and metal (as in mail). Gloves of kevlar protect the wearer from cuts. Gloves and gauntlets are integral components of pressure suits and spacesuits such as the Apollo/Skylab A7L which went to the moon. Spacesuit gloves combine toughness and environmental protection with a degree of sensitivity and flexibility.

Usage examples of "glove".

So were the cameras and the items needed to accessorize my ensemble: paper apron and mask, plastic goggles, latex gloves.

It is also suggested that the fingerprint examiner wear rubber gloves when using acetone, benzine, xylene, formaldehyde, potassium hydroxide, or sodium hydroxide.

As promised, Seregil had found Alec a pair of gloves, and he suspected the boy was grateful now for their warmth.

Catching a questioning glance from Alec, Seregil raised a gloved hand to his chest.

She uses the glove box for the last time, breaking open a vial of sodium fluoride solution and injecting an aliquot into every one of the cell cultures.

Hembroke saw a stoopish man wearing an alpaca coat and kid gloves, whose eyes were owlish in round glasses that magnified their size.

But half an hour later when Ida went into the library she found him absorbed in his books as usual, and he only glanced up at her with absent, unseeing eyes, as she stood beside him putting on her gloves, her habit skirt caught up under her elbow, the old felt hat just a little askew on the soft, silky hair.

The figure of darkness dipped into an atramentous pocket with a nigrescently gloved hand and drew out a five-pound note.

I shall put on about twenty kilos - I have a suit and shirt designed to cope with the excess avoirdupois -fatten my cheeks, tint hair and moustache, wear a sinister scar and a black leather glove.

Bobby could smell sweat and hear the heavy biff and baff of gloves on flesh.

The bather had no soap, but used rough fibre gloves with which he rubbed the surface of his skin until it glowed.

Chancellor announced that each inceptor would be required to pay the ordinary fee of thirty shillings and a pair of buckskin gloves for each bedel, or, in lieu of gloves, five shillings to be divided among the bedels.

Grateful for that mark of propriety, I took out of my pocket the twelve pairs of gloves which I had bought in the morning, and after I had begged her acceptance of half a dozen pairs I gave the other six to my young friend.

He started the car, leaned over, opened the glove box in front of Bender and grabbed a blue bubble light.

Her beplumed hat floated in a pool of disfiguring water, her long suede gloves lay in a ditch and her white satin wedding slippers, alas, hung by their tiny heels at the top of a tree in a neighboring township, the only tree in the entire surrounding county, put there, in all probability, to catch and hold them for her.