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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
cheese
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
as different as chalk and cheese
▪ The two brothers are as different as chalk and cheese.
big cheese
blue cheese
cheese making/cider making etc
▪ a region famous for its cheese making
cheese/chocolate etc spread
cottage cheese
cream cheese
feta cheese
ham/cheese etc rollBritish English (= one that is filled with ham, cheese etc)
like chalk and cheese
▪ They’re like chalk and cheese, those two.
macaroni cheeseBritish English/macaroni and cheese American English (= macaroni cooked with a cheese sauce)
processed cheese/meat/fish etc
tomato/cheese/wine etc sauce
▪ vanilla ice cream with chocolate sauce
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ This I corrected in a grocery store, piled with butter and big cheeses and shelves of pickles and bread.
▪ Evidently he was considered a big cheese here, and was greeted by everyone.
blue
Blues is a delicious full fat soft blue cheese with a creamy texture and good bite.
▪ A sprinkling of blue cheese or Gorgonzola makes it extra special.
▪ Add Cheddar cheese, blue cheese and 2 cups flour.
▪ And the horseradish potato puree, braised greens, Maytag blue cheese and port wine sauce are also praiseworthy.
▪ Nearly all blue cheeses are scalded and lightly pressed and tend to crumble.
▪ The mold variety used in the making of blue cheeses has been in use for centuries and is apparently safe.
▪ If you fancy a blue cheese, chose Roquefort over Stilton - the difference is 40 calories an ounce!
cheddar
▪ Add Cheddar cheese, blue cheese and 2 cups flour.
▪ Mix all ingredients together, except crab meat and Cheddar cheese, until smooth.
▪ The period of ripening may be just days, as for Camembert cheese, or several months, as for cheddar cheese.
▪ If desired, sprinkle with cheddar cheese.
▪ Most of the cheddar cheese made in the United States is made from pasteurized milk.
▪ Prepare corn-bread according to package directions and fold in the Cheddar cheese cubes.
cream
▪ Beat the cream cheese until smooth, then add the ground almonds and beat well. 3.
▪ Mercedes and Luisa begin bringing in dinner: plates of rice, beans and crema, a smoky cream cheese.
▪ Mix to a smooth paste, then add to the cream cheese and beat well.
▪ If you think of cheese steaks or cream cheese when you think of Philadelphia, think again.
▪ Mix cream cheese, icing sugar, vanilla essence and pistachio nuts.
▪ Beat together cream cheese, 1 / 3 cup sugar, 1 egg, 2 tablespoons flour and cinnamon until blended.
▪ Taramasalata may also be used, and any of the cream cheese fillings suggested above for Savoury Petits Choux.
▪ A sesame seed bagel with cream cheese.
fat
▪ Blues is a delicious full fat soft blue cheese with a creamy texture and good bite.
▪ Grease, oil, animal fat and cheeses do not biodegrade readily.
▪ Curd cheese is a low or medium fat cheese, very similar to cream cheese but having a more lactic flavour.
▪ Try lower fat cheeses, such as Edam, Camembert and Brie.
feta
▪ Then there is the heirloom tomato salad with baby spinach, a little white balsamic vinegar and feta cheese.
▪ An evening meal began promisingly with a bruschetta topped with chopped spinach, sun-dried tomatoes, pesto and feta cheese.
▪ Mix the remaining dressing with the feta cheese.
▪ Add chickpeas, green beans, olives, cucumber, feta cheese and basil.
fresh
▪ To make a fresh milk cheese at home is the simplest of processes.
▪ The fresh cheese with cream was all we, or at any rate I, wanted.
▪ Mascarpone is the fresh cheese that really rebels against being low fat - it is virtually solidified cream.
▪ Cottage, cream and curd cheeses are probably the best known of the fresh cheeses of Britain.
▪ Many continental fresh cheeses have now found their way to the supermarket shelves and to the specialist delicatessen.
grated
▪ Serve with grated Parmesan cheese and a green salad.
▪ Cut the remaining butter into slivers and stir into the rice with the grated Parmesan cheese.
▪ Put grated cheese into a 7-inch fondue dish or enamelled iron casserole and melt gently, stirring continuously.
▪ Cover with grated cheese and single cream and bake for 20 minutes until golden brown.
▪ Serve with freshly grated Parmesan cheese.
▪ Pile the meat into the pastry case and top with the sliced tomatoes and then the grated cheese.
▪ She made herself a cup of tea, cut bread for toast, beat up eggs with grated cheese in a pan.
▪ Sprinkle the grated cheese at this point if desired.
grilled
▪ He makes the best grilled cheese sandwiches and scrambled eggs because of his fearless use of butter.
▪ A grilled cheese sandwich is not exactly a late-breaking recipe.
▪ At twelve-thirty I leave the office and go to the deli for a grilled cheese and a soda.
▪ When it comes to grilled cheese sandwiches, everybody has an opinion.
▪ Of all the grilled cheese sandwiches we made, this was our favorite.
▪ As for Lowe, she cooks her grilled cheese sandwiches in the oven, too.
hard
▪ Low fat hard and soft cheeses account for 8 percent of sales.
▪ Some hard cheeses are permitted to age.
Hard Cheeses Of all the hard cheeses produced throughout the world, Parmesan must surely be the most famous.
▪ Later, at the club, he will get tight on good brandy and as for the estate it is simply hard cheese.
▪ Although the bacteria can multiply in soft cheeses, they also can occur in hard cheese without posing such a danger.
▪ It was about as strong as stale hard cheese.
▪ Then he remembered. Hard cheese on Pocock.
low
▪ Try lower fat cheeses, such as Edam, Camembert and Brie.
parmesan
▪ Serve with grated Parmesan cheese and a green salad.
▪ Pass a bowl of grated Parmesan cheese at the table.
▪ When evenly blended, stir in the parmesan cheese, pepper, mustard and lean bacon.
▪ Stir in parsley and Parmesan cheese.
▪ Cut the remaining butter into slivers and stir into the rice with the grated Parmesan cheese.
▪ When we were in Parma, it was Parmesan cheese.
▪ Simply boil for about eight minutes and serve with parmesan cheese.
▪ The Parmesan cheese really pulls the strong flavors together, he thinks.
soft
▪ Epoisses is a very popular washed rind soft cheese from Burgundy.
▪ The idea of crackers packaged with a soft dipping cheese has taken a sweet turn.
▪ Blues is a delicious full fat soft blue cheese with a creamy texture and good bite.
▪ Because soft cheeses are perishable, they are kept small and / or thin; they are quickly ripened from the surface.
▪ They inject soft cheeses, as I said, to stop them ripening too quickly.
▪ Low fat hard and soft cheeses account for 8 percent of sales.
▪ We've had Salmonella in chickens and eggs, and Listeria in chilled foods and soft cheeses.
▪ Mix the soft cheese with the sugar, fold in the orange rind. 5 Fold cream into mixture.
■ NOUN
cottage
▪ Waistliner - combine cottage cheese, diced red pepper and sweetcorn. 7.
▪ There are several curd styles of cottage cheese.
▪ Combine the fromage frais and cottage cheese.
▪ In 1980, the per capita consumption in the United States was 18 pounds of cheese of which one-third was cottage cheese.
▪ Top with the cottage cheese, and sprinkle the mixed herbs on top.
▪ Meanwhile, in a blender, liquefy the cottage cheese and milk.
▪ This will make dining out much easier and of course extends the variety of protein foods beyond fish, chicken and cottage cheese!
▪ Turn heat on low, and slowly stir in cottage cheese mixture.
goat
▪ Crumble the goat cheese and let come to room temperature.
▪ Reduce heat and boil and mirrors the tart goat cheese. gently, stirring occasionally until thick, 30 to 35 minutes.
▪ And they ate Papparadelle Ripiene stuffed with goat cheese and Parmesan and covered with a grated lemon peel and cream sauce.
▪ Redwood Hill Crottin: A small goat cheese made in Sebastopol. 2.
▪ Between the two, there's a warm goat cheese croquette with beet tartare, oysters Rockefeller, and other seductive offerings.
▪ Remove cabbage from pan, place alongside pheasant, and top with goat cheese and bacon.
▪ In a mixing bowl, crush the goat cheese with a fork until smooth.
milk
▪ To make a fresh milk cheese at home is the simplest of processes.
▪ Pecorino, Feta and Manchego are the best known of the remaining ewes' milk cheeses.
▪ Pyrenees may also refer to small ewes' milk cheeses that are produced in the same area.
▪ Spenwood is a delightful sheep's milk cheese from the same dairy as the Wellington.
▪ Fresh goats' milk cheese is available in many supermarkets and has a slightly sharper flavour than fromagefrais.
▪ I keep one pressed goats' milk cheese, Burndell, which has a creamy texture and a mild flavour.
▪ Many goats' milk cheeses are produced organically by small-scale farmers and smallholders.
▪ Where did all our own home-made cream and milk cheeses go?
process
▪ Some products on supermarket shelves are simply described as pasteurized process cheese product.
roll
▪ Sarah carried her cup of coffee and cheese roll back to her chosen table and settled to work.
▪ She bit into her cheese roll.
▪ And double trouble from a Double Gloucester.The cheese roll that caused chaos.
sandwich
▪ Just a wet walker in a woollen hat, eating a cheese sandwich in the rain.
▪ He makes the best grilled cheese sandwiches and scrambled eggs because of his fearless use of butter.
▪ Cereal and toast start the day followed by an apple mid-morning and a cheese sandwich at lunch.
▪ Not surprisingly, the result tasted more like a toasted cheese sandwich.
▪ She wanted a pint of recaff and a toasted cheese sandwich.
▪ A grilled cheese sandwich is not exactly a late-breaking recipe.
▪ My little boy has just rammed a cheese sandwich up my nose!
▪ When it comes to grilled cheese sandwiches, everybody has an opinion.
sauce
▪ Simmer chunks in milk until tender, then use the milk for a cheese sauce.
▪ Tea: Poached fish in cheese sauce, peas, baked potato, piece of fresh fruit.
▪ Dinner Cauliflower in low-fat cheese sauce.
■ VERB
add
▪ Rub in the butter with the hands, then add the low-fat cheese spread and work in with the hands.
▪ Let stand about 3 minutes for yeast to activate. Add Cheddar cheese, blue cheese and 2 cups flour.
▪ Mix to a smooth paste, then add to the cream cheese and beat well.
▪ As the sauce thickens add the seasoning, cheese and mustard to taste.
▪ Simmer for 25 mins, add grated cheese and parsley.
▪ Blend for a few seconds to crush. Add cheese and seasoning.
buy
▪ I do believe people carne from far away to buy her cheeses.
▪ I just saw one the other day, buying cheese.
▪ When buying, avoid cheese that is discoloured under the rind.
▪ So these days I have to buy my cheese like everyone else.
▪ Brie and Camembert are best bought from a cheese shop.
eat
▪ Just a wet walker in a woollen hat, eating a cheese sandwich in the rain.
▪ Try a different approach. Eat 1 ounce less cheese per day.
▪ Pregnant ladies and elderly people should be careful when eating soft cheese, as they should be when exercising.
▪ They felt hungry and sat down to eat the bread and cheese from Allen's wallet.
▪ However, it is not a problem of calcium deficiency; eating extra milk or cheese doesn't help the condition.
▪ I find it rather rich for eating as a table cheese, but a few spoonfuls stirred into hot pasta is delicious.
▪ They ate their bread and cheese.
grate
▪ Pour on tomato sauce and sprinkle 1 teaspoon grated Parmesan cheese over top of each.
▪ When I refused his offer of grated cheese for the pasta, Fabio only shook his head.
▪ She started to grate the cheese.
▪ Serve with grated cheese, if desired.
▪ Place in a heatproof dish and sprinkle the grated cheese over the top.
▪ Pass a bowl of grated Parmesan cheese at the table.
▪ And in our sandwich, the grated cheese, when melted, got lost in the shuffle of the other ingredients.
make
▪ To make a fresh milk cheese at home is the simplest of processes.
▪ He makes the best grilled cheese sandwiches and scrambled eggs because of his fearless use of butter.
▪ The earth is flat, the moon is made of green cheese, and get this one.
▪ He learnt to make excellent cheeses - they fetched good prices in Athens.
▪ The mold variety used in the making of blue cheeses has been in use for centuries and is apparently safe.
▪ It's generally accepted that the herbage of this area produces the milk necessary to make a fine cheese.
▪ Because the molds used in making these cheeses have been long used, it is surmised that they are safe.
melt
▪ The chicken version is filled with corn, black beans, peppers, onions, melted cheese and of course, chicken.
▪ Dramatic look with tiny jalapeno pepper slices embedded in melted cheese topping.
▪ A General Electric toaster oven, distinguished by four years of melted cheese dripped from countless tuna melts and toasted-cheese sandwiches.
▪ Matt was laughing so hard he dropped his Frito chips and melted cheese on the floor beneath the stands.
produce
▪ What cheeses must such land have produced!
▪ Rindless cheeses are produced by wrapping cheeses in plastic.
serve
▪ Choose a dessert from over the page or serve cheese.
▪ Stir fry together for another 5 to 8 minutes until raviolis are lightly browned. Serve with grated cheese, if desired.
▪ Simply boil for about eight minutes and serve with parmesan cheese.
▪ He hadn't been back, Mrs Chalk assured her, as she prepared to serve a light cheese and fruit supper.
spread
▪ The luncheon table in the little cottage was spread with cheese, olives, sardines and bread.
▪ Lightly toast the bread and spread the cheese over the warm slices.
▪ Roll out the bread lightly with a rolling pin after cutting off the crusts and spread thickly with the cheese filling.
sprinkle
▪ Place a spoonful of beans in the bottom of each tin. Sprinkle the cheese over the beans. 4.
▪ Pour over the courgettes and onions. Sprinkle the cheese on top.
▪ A sprinkling of blue cheese or Gorgonzola makes it extra special.
▪ Remove from dish. Sprinkle remaining cheese and parsley into dish and place apples on top, core side up.
▪ Top each half with a poached egg and half the tomato mixture; sprinkle each half with cheese.
▪ Place in a heatproof dish and sprinkle the grated cheese over the top.
▪ Drizzle oil over polenta and brush to distribute evenly. Sprinkle with cheese.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
chalk and cheese
▪ Middlesbrough and East Cleveland are like chalk and cheese.
▪ The two men are as different as chalk and cheese.
▪ They are psychologically, spiritually and in personality as different as chalk and cheese.
▪ They know that to compare that game to next Sunday's contest is to compare chalk and cheese.
▪ This twin thing ... you are separate people, different as chalk and cheese.
▪ We are chalk and cheese; our personalities are radically different and likely to abrade each other.
cheese/jam/cream etc puff
▪ Add a little cream puff goodie for dessert and no one will be late for dinner.
▪ He was courteous, but he did not feed him cream puffs.
▪ Makes about 19 cream puffs.&.
say cheese
▪ Come on everybody, say cheese!
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a tray of cheeses and cold meats
▪ bagels and cream cheese
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Damp casein is very like damp cheese and its elastic behaviour is anything but Hookean.
▪ It won't be long before cheeses such as these become rarities.
▪ Results the second time around: The bread started to burn before the cheese was melted.
▪ Swaledale is a traditional cheese of the same era as Wensleydale, which has been revived and is now selling well.
▪ The cheese will disappear in the dough, becoming part of the elastic texture.
▪ The chives and parsley will provide a bright perk and a complementary flavor to the cheese.
▪ To make a fresh milk cheese at home is the simplest of processes.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Cheese

Cheese \Cheese\ (ch[=e]z), n. [OE. chese, AS. c[=e]se, fr. L. caseus, LL. casius. Cf. Casein.]

  1. The curd of milk, coagulated usually with rennet, separated from the whey, and pressed into a solid mass in a hoop or mold.

  2. A mass of pomace, or ground apples, pressed together in the form of a cheese.

  3. The flat, circular, mucilaginous fruit of the dwarf mallow ( Malva rotundifolia). [Colloq.]

  4. A low courtesy; -- so called on account of the cheese form assumed by a woman's dress when she stoops after extending the skirts by a rapid gyration.
    --De Quincey.
    --Thackeray.

    Cheese cake, a cake made of or filled with, a composition of soft curds, sugar, and butter.
    --Prior.

    Cheese fly (Zo["o]l.), a black dipterous insect ( Piophila casei) of which the larv[ae] or maggots, called skippers or hoppers, live in cheese.

    Cheese mite (Zo["o]l.), a minute mite ( Tryoglyhus siro) in cheese and other articles of food.

    Cheese press, a press used in making cheese, to separate the whey from the curd, and to press the curd into a mold.

    Cheese rennet (Bot.), a plant of the Madder family ( Golium verum, or yellow bedstraw), sometimes used to coagulate milk. The roots are used as a substitute for madder.

    Cheese vat, a vat or tub in which the curd is formed and cut or broken, in cheese making.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
cheese

Old English cyse (West Saxon), cese (Anglian) "cheese," from West Germanic *kasjus (cognates: Old Saxon kasi, Old High German chasi, German Käse, Middle Dutch case, Dutch kaas), from Latin caseus "cheese" (source of Italian cacio, Spanish queso, Irish caise, Welsh caws).\n

\nOf unknown origin; perhaps from a PIE root *kwat- "to ferment, become sour" (cognates: Prakrit chasi "buttermilk;" Old Church Slavonic kvasu "leaven; fermented drink," kyselu "sour," -kyseti "to turn sour;" Czech kysati "to turn sour, rot;" Sanskrit kvathati "boils, seethes;" Gothic hwaþjan "foam"). Also compare fromage. Old Norse ostr, Danish ost, Swedish ost are related to Latin ius "broth, sauce, juice."\n

\nEarliest references would be to compressed curds of milk used as food; pressed or molded cheeses with rinds are 14c. Transferred to other cheese-like substances by 1530s. As a photographer's word to make subjects hold a smile, it is attested from 1930, but in a reminiscence of schoolboy days, which suggests an earlier use. Probably for the forced smile involved in making the -ee- sound. Green cheese is that newly made; the notion that the moon is made of green cheese as a type of a ridiculous assertion is from 1520s. To make cheeses was a schoolgirls' amusement (1835) of wheeling rapidly so one's petticoats blew out in a circle then dropping down so they came to rest inflated and resembling a wheel of cheese; hence, used figuratively for "a deep curtsey."

cheese

"stop (what one is doing), run off," 1812, thieves' slang, of uncertain origin. Meaning "to smile" is from 1930 (see cheese (n.1)). For meaning "to annoy," see cheesed.\n\nCHEESE IT. Be silent, be quiet, don't do it. Cheese it, the coves are fly; be silent, the people understand our discourse.

["Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence," London, 1811]

cheese

"the proper thing," from Urdu chiz "a thing," from Persian chiz, from Old Persian *ciš-ciy "something," from PIE pronomial stem *kwo- (see who). Picked up by British in India by 1818 and used in the sense of "a big thing" (especially in the phrase the real chiz).\n

\nThis perhaps is behind the expression big cheese "important person" (1914), but that is American English in origin and likely rather belongs to cheese (n.1). To cut a big cheese as a figurative expression for "look important" is recorded from 1915, and overlarge wheels of cheese, especially from Wisconsin, were commonly displayed 19c. as publicity stunts by retailers, etc.\n\nThe cheese will be on exhibition at the National Dairy Show at Chicago next week. President Taft will visit the show the morning of Monday, October thirtieth, and after his address he will be invited to cut the big cheese, which will then be distributed in small lots to visitors at the show.

["The Country Gentleman," Oct. 28, 1911]

Wiktionary
cheese

Etymology 1 interj. (context photography English) (non-gloss definition: Said while being photographed, to give the impression of smiling.) n. 1 (context uncountable English) A dairy product made from curdled or cultured milk. 2 (context countable English) Any particular variety of cheese. 3 (context countable English) A piece of cheese, especially one moulded into a large round shape during manufacture. 4 (context uncountable colloquial English) That which is melodramatic, overly emotional, or cliché, i.e. cheesy. 5 (context uncountable slang English) money. 6 (context countable UK English) In skittles, the roughly ovoid object that is thrown to knock down the skittles. 7 (context uncountable slang baseball English) A fastball. 8 (context uncountable slang English) A dangerous mixture of black tar heroin and crushed Tylenol tablets. The resulting powder resembles grated cheese and is snorted. 9 (context vulgar slang English) smegm

  1. 10 (context technology English) hole pattern of circuitry to decrease pattern density. 11 A mass of pomace, or ground apples, pressed together in the shape of a cheese. 12 The flat, circular, mucilaginous fruit of the dwarf mallow (''Malva rotundifolia''). 13 A low curtsey; so called on account of the cheese shape assumed by a woman's dress when she stoops after extending the skirts by a rapid gyration. v

  2. 1 To prepare curds for making cheese. 2 (context technology English) To make holes in a pattern of circuitry to decrease pattern density. 3 (context slang English) To smile excessively, as for a camer

    1. Etymology 2

      n. (context slang English) Wealth, fame, excellence, importance. Etymology 3

      v

    2. 1 (context slang English) To stop; to refrain from. 2 (context slang English) To anger or irritate someone, usually in combination with "off". Etymology 4

      vb. 1 (context gaming slang English) To use an unsporting tactic; to repeatedly use an attack which is overpowered or difficult to counter 2 (context gaming English) To use an unconventional, all-in strategy to take one's opponent by surprise early in the game (especially for real-time strategy games)

WordNet
cheese
  1. n. a solid food prepared from the pressed curd of milk

  2. erect or decumbent Old World perennial with axillary clusters of rosy-purple flowers; introduced in United States [syn: tall mallow, high mallow, cheeseflower, Malva sylvestris]

cheese
  1. v. used in the imperative (get away, or stop it); "Cheese it!"

  2. wind onto a cheese; "cheese the yarn"

Wikipedia
Cheese (software)

Cheese is a GNOME webcam application. It was developed as a Google Summer of Code 2007 project by Daniel G. Siegel. It uses GStreamer to apply effects to photos and videos. It can export to Flickr and is integrated into GNOME.

It was officially added to GNOME in version 2.22. Guvcview does not use GStreamer.

Cheese (album)

Cheese is the debut album by Belgian musician Stromae, released on 14 June 2010. The songs "Bienvenue chez moi", " House'llelujah", "Rail de Musique", " Peace Or Violence", " Te Quiero" and " Silence" were released as album-promo-singles, only "Rail de Musique" and "Bienvenue Chez Moi" did not chart. It features three official singles including the hit " Alors on danse", " Te Quiero" and " House'llelujah".

Cheese (recreational drug)

"Cheese" is a heroin-based recreational drug that came to the attention of the media inside and outside the United States after a string of deaths among adolescents in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, between 2005 and 2007. As of 2012 the drug use is now among older people who were teenagers around the period the drug was first discovered.

Cheese is a combination of drugs, made by combining heroin with crushed tablets of certain over-the-counter cold medication, such as Tylenol PM. Such cold medications contain acetaminophen (paracetemol), the active ingredient in Tylenol, and the antihistamine diphenhydramine, the active ingredient in Benadryl. Cheese samples obtained in north Dallas contained between 2% and 8% heroin, in contrast to the 30% commonly found in black tar heroin. Users commonly take the powder by insufflation ("snorting") rather than by intravenous injection. This mixture is also known as "Tylenol With Smack", by analogy to the Tylenol With Codeine series.

Due to the high concentrations of non-opiate substances relative to the diamorphine content of the drug, abuse and overdose of cheese are more dangerous than pure-form opiate overdoses. Emergency personnel must address the overdose effects of each component of the drug, since the contents and concentrations of each component vary widely among batches they must wait for either the completion of the toxicology report to begin treatment or wait for the effects of each drugs overdose to manifest. The acetaminophen content of the drug induces severe, irreversible damage to the liver when taken in high doses for long periods of time. Very high doses of acetaminophen are capable of producing acute liver failure and death within hours, patients who survive this acute phase of the toxicity generally require dialysis and eventually a liver transplant. Due to the many methods of preparation a user can not know how much acetaminophen is in any given batch and therefore can not reliably determine a safe dose. A dose of the last batch which produced no toxic effects may produce lethal effects in the next batch.

Cheese (disambiguation)

Cheese is a food made from milk.

Cheese may also refer to:

  • Cheese!, a monthly Japanese manga magazine
  • Cheese, a novel by Willem Elsschot
  • Cheese, an object used in the game of skittles
  • Cheese (album), an album by Stromae
  • Cheese (recreational drug)
  • Cheese (software), a webcam application
  • Cheese head (screw), a description of the shape of the head of some screws
  • The Cheese, a New Zealand LPFM radio station
  • "The Cheese", nickname of Jaunt (sculpture) at Calvin College, Michigan
Cheese

Cheese is a food derived from milk that is produced in a wide range of flavors, textures, and forms by coagulation of the milk protein casein. It comprises proteins and fat from milk, usually the milk of cows, buffalo, goats, or sheep. During production, the milk is usually acidified, and adding the enzyme rennet causes coagulation. The solids are separated and pressed into final form. Some cheeses have molds on the rind or throughout. Most cheeses melt at cooking temperature.

Hundreds of types of cheese from various countries are produced. Their styles, textures and flavors depend on the origin of the milk (including the animal's diet), whether they have been pasteurized, the butterfat content, the bacteria and mold, the processing, and aging. Herbs, spices, or wood smoke may be used as flavoring agents. The yellow to red color of many cheeses, such as Red Leicester, is produced by adding annatto. Other ingredients may be added to some cheeses, such as black pepper, garlic, chives or cranberries.

For a few cheeses, the milk is curdled by adding acids such as vinegar or lemon juice. Most cheeses are acidified to a lesser degree by bacteria, which turn milk sugars into lactic acid, then the addition of rennet completes the curdling. Vegetarian alternatives to rennet are available; most are produced by fermentation of the fungus Mucor miehei, but others have been extracted from various species of the Cynara thistle family. Cheesemakers near a dairy region may benefit from fresher, lower-priced milk, and lower shipping costs.

Cheese is valued for its portability, long life, and high content of fat, protein, calcium, and phosphorus. Cheese is more compact and has a longer shelf life than milk, although how long a cheese will keep depends on the type of cheese; labels on packets of cheese often claim that a cheese should be consumed within three to five days of opening. Generally speaking, hard cheeses, such as parmesan last longer than soft cheeses, such as Brie or goat's milk cheese. The long storage life of some cheeses, especially when encased in a protective rind, allows selling when markets are favorable.

There is some debate as to the best way to store cheese, but some experts say that wrapping it in cheese paper provides optimal results. Cheese paper is coated in a porous plastic on the inside, and the outside has a layer of wax. This specific combination of plastic on the inside and wax on the outside protects the cheese by allowing condensation on the cheese to be wicked away while preventing moisture from within the cheese escaping.

A specialist seller of cheese is sometimes known as a cheesemonger. Becoming an expert in this field requires some formal education and years of tasting and hands-on experience, much like becoming an expert in wine or cuisine. The cheesemonger is responsible for all aspects of the cheese inventory: selecting the cheese menu, purchasing, receiving, storage, and ripening.

Usage examples of "cheese".

Then the courage came into his body, and with a great might he abraid upon his feet, and smote the black and yellow knight upon the helm by an overstroke so fierce that the sword sheared away the third part of his head, as it had been a rotten cheese.

We may, however, infer from the time during which the tentacles remained inflected,from the changed colour of some of the glands,and from the injury done to others, that matter had been absorbed from the cheese.

There were anchovies and olives and tasteless Mediterranean fish with brown bread and a lobster and hard cheese, all washed down with Aleatico from Elba.

The Almoner greeted him in a kindly manner and gave him a beautiful round cheese and a warm blanket and asked what had happened to make his face so long and sad.

It was the same mixture of cheese, bread and bacon they had eaten on their first morning in Amicus, and it was even less appetizing this time around.

After the cheese and fruit dessert, Natalie wanted to visit the aqueduct and take their coffee with them so Saul filled the steel Thermos while she went to her room and got a thick sweater from her suitcase.

Top with artichoke hearts, tomatoes, onions, garbanzo beans, feta cheese, and tofu.

Top with artichoke hearts, tomatoes, onion, chickpeas, feta cheese, and tofu.

The large platter also contained smoked salmon, pickled herring, liver pate, melba toast, bagels and cream cheese, artichoke hearts and slices of Kiwi fruit and papaya.

I have artichokes with Parmesan cheese, just a little bite of the excellent bread, a few sips of red wine, a plate of eggplant and peppers, and gigantic portions of rib steak, chicken, and lamb.

The cheese - cloth gag got a hole bitten through it as Asey went at the remaining knots with everything he had.

Since all but me were vegetarians I had made a dinner of cream of spinach soup with steamed turnip tops, broccoli quiche, asparagus risotto, cauliflower cheese and a mixed salad.

Fifteen pounds of cold tortellini salad, two hundred miniature asparagus tarts, three platters of herbed goat cheese, and a hundred and fifty spring rolls had no doubt been loaded back into the Right Touch Catering van.

Then: only shields were the soft copper breastplates and the many copper bracelets upon their arms from shoulder to wrist, fit protection perhaps against atlatl dart and stone knife, but our good edges cut through them like cheese.

A chicken leg, a meat pasty, half of a baguette, a large chunk of ripe cheese, and a strawberry tart nestled in the checkered napkin beside a bottle of lemonade.