Find the word definition

Crossword clues for boot

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
boot
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a computer starts up/boots up
▪ My computer takes ages to start up in the morning.
as tough as nails/as tough as old boots (=very tough)
▪ He’s as tough as nails – a good man to have on the team.
be shaking in your shoes/boots (=be very nervous)
▪ The President must be shaking in his shoes about Tuesday’s vote.
boot camp
boot sale
booted/sandalled feet (=wearing boots or sandals)
▪ He put down his rucksack and stretched out his booted feet.
car boot sale
combat boots
▪ The troops were issued with steel helmets and combat boots.
comfortable clothes/shoes/boots etc
▪ You’ll need comfortable shoes for walking around the city.
football boots
▪ He got some new football boots for his birthday.
moon boot
rubber boot
ski boot
start up/boot up a computer (=make it start working)
walking boots/shoes
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ Too big for his boots, as she'd always said.
▪ I walk real slow, feeling my body all heavy, like I got big boots on.
▪ For the grand narrative of History was always too big for its boots.
▪ A mouthful of chocolate passed for breakfast before we forsook big boots for sticky rubber.
▪ But it was the launch of the Plus 8 in September 1968 that shoved Morgan into the big boots league.
▪ The big boots, the gaudy anorak, the heavy rucsac.
▪ A mad headteacher in a huge blue suit and big leather boots.
▪ Several humans with official-looking trousers and big boots were standing at the bottom of the ramp.
heavy
▪ The man calmly walked all over the child's body with his heavy boots, and left her screaming on the ground.
▪ Two heavy farm boots were then heaved off.
▪ You are dressed in a heavy snowsuit and boots like two club feet.
▪ His feet are usually cocooned in two pairs of thick socks and heavy walking boots - even during hot weather!
▪ The scuff of heavy boots drew closer.
▪ More Nassauer infantry were running down the road, their heavy boots stirring a thick dust.
▪ The area had heated up considerably, without heavy boots the floor would burn.
high
▪ As she tried to pick her way over frozen puddles, she regretted her decision to wear high heels instead of boots.
▪ To work Ranieri wore black Johnny Unitas-style ankle-#high boots and six-inch-wide neckties.
▪ Her lurex leggings, high suede boots and yellow sweatshirt are folded and tucked away with equal care.
▪ Guards in dark uniforms and high black boots hurried us along.
▪ These new short fashions make us all look like showgirls in the miniskirt and the high boots.
▪ I came upon a very old woman dressed from hat to woollen stockings and high boots in black.
▪ Instead of metal serving-dishes there was an officer's uniform laid out there, complete with peaked cap and well-shined high boots.
▪ I have seen her in hats, in high boots, in fishnets, in stilettos.
old
▪ But though Zen looks a wet little wimp he's as tough as old boots.
▪ The old boots were designed for the Army in 1951, and the sailors started wearing them in 1960.
▪ He wears old boots, sort of miniature Doc Martens, and he doesn't half kick with them too.
▪ Now old buckets, boots, broken chairs and even prams are a source of information.
▪ You're tough as an old boot.
▪ And she has shown already, beneath her frail exterior, Kylie is as tough as old boots.
▪ He's as tough as old boots, but playing with drugs is still a mug's game.
riding
▪ Look out for cheap seconds of new leather riding boots.
▪ He met us in the hacienda courtyard dressed in white shirt, white jodhpurs and black riding boots.
▪ He was in riding boots and a pair of immaculate white jodhpurs.
▪ The riding breeches £30 and the new pair of riding boots £225.
▪ She wore a well-used wax jacket over tight breeches and riding top boots.
▪ He wore riding boots and a monocle and his face was made shapeless by duelling scars.
▪ Mandeville and Southgate slouched on their horses, both dressed in leather quilted jackets, their feet encased in long riding boots.
▪ You may have noticed, a riding boot greatly eases my infirmity.
rubber
▪ They seemed surprised and told him that they had been burning their rubber boots.
▪ She dressed quickly, put on rubber boots and a waterproof, and set off along the footpath leading to Benbury Woods.
▪ These included a green wax jacket, walking and rubber boots, tapes and a rug.
▪ The rubber boot is to stop ingress of dirt, etc. into the splines, causing premature failure.
▪ At the time we were rushing from job to job repairing storm damage, and fortunately were both wearing rubber soled boots.
▪ Then a stomping noise came from behind the kids and I saw some massive black rubber boots coming slowly down the stairs.
tough
▪ Luckily, she was wearing tough boots, so the trap had not torn her leg.
▪ He has already taken over 12 million paces and worn out six pairs of tough walking boots.
▪ But though Zen looks a wet little wimp he's as tough as old boots.
▪ And she has shown already, beneath her frail exterior, Kylie is as tough as old boots.
▪ He's as tough as old boots, but playing with drugs is still a mug's game.
■ NOUN
ankle
▪ She was dressed casually in a pair of faded Levi jeans, brown ankle boots and a baggy white T-shirt.
▪ Snaffle loafers reduced from £61 to £49. Ankle boots £71 to £59.
camp
▪ In those days it was run like a boot camp-the army used to come and teach the girls formation marching.
▪ The men I worked with called it academic boot camp.
▪ Corps officials say initiation into their ranks is difficult enough without mixing men and women in boot camp.
▪ Beetle Bailey will go through boot camp again and again, never to be promoted above private.
▪ However, about 25 percent of those who finished boot camp have had problems while on parole.
▪ For Dunbar, 19, who cried during the ceremony, finishing boot camp was the high school graduation he missed.
▪ Navy doctors say the new shoes have cut blister problems in half since the boot camp started issuing them last July.
car
▪ Trading standards officer say the recent growth in car boot sales has provided a perfect outlet for the computer pirates.
▪ The remarks followed a court case in which a couple admitted selling counterfeit software at car boot sales.
▪ Market stalls, car boot sales and one-day sales are popular selling grounds.
▪ Voice over Anyone considering selling counterfeit goods at car boot sales could face two years in prison or unlimited fines.
▪ A car boot sale at Boxted Airfield has also been called off.
▪ Then he drove to tell police the murdered woman was in his car boot.
▪ In addition to car boot sales, officers had visited shops selling tobacco and drink.
▪ Bungee jumping, a fun fair, car boot, craft and charity stalls will be the order of the day.
combat
▪ Army surplus stores report a stream of buyers for gas masks, water-purification tablets, survival knives - even combat boots.
▪ Then I drove my combat boot on to his temple as Marius hit him again in the mouth.
▪ My fatigue pants were so baggy they almost concealed my combat boots.
▪ A barrage of ghosts wearing combat boots and carrying clubs surface from your subconscious.
▪ He heard her stomp across the floor as if she were wearing combat boots.
▪ May, who had denied any wrongdoing, hanged himself a week ago with the laces from his combat boots.
cowboy
▪ He took off his wellingtons and put on his cowboy boots.
▪ I remember a lot of tan parkas, a lot of cowboy boots.
▪ Barry is a modern parent in jeans and cowboy boots.
▪ A polyester pantsuit hung on her bones, and on her feet some one had stuck a pair of too-large cowboy boots.
▪ He wore a white ten-gallon hat and black cowboy boots decorated with swastikas and stars.
▪ Why is George Bush going about in one cowboy boot and one walking cast?
football
▪ But he'd still much rather have a new pair of football boots at Christmas.
▪ He took some football boots I'd never worn.
leather
▪ Skintight jeans tucked into a pair of brown leather boots and a terrific figure.
▪ I warned him, looking down at my brown leather boots.
▪ A head-on collision with a pair of black salt-stained leather boots.
▪ I wore it on cold days with soft leather boots, a mouton coat, and a large brimmed black felt hat.
▪ Tight denims clung to her legs and she wore knee-length leather boots.
▪ He paused at the intersection, fearful that a hard leather boot was waiting for him no matter which way he ran.
▪ Missing were expensive black leather boots, the white shoe polish, a jumbo jar of Nivea.
▪ The coarse cloth of his trousers, tucked into polished leather boots, is too thick.
sale
▪ The remarks followed a court case in which a couple admitted selling counterfeit software at car boot sales.
▪ Market stalls, car boot sales and one-day sales are popular selling grounds.
▪ Voice over Anyone considering selling counterfeit goods at car boot sales could face two years in prison or unlimited fines.
▪ But that law can't be used to stop people selling heaters at car boot sales.
▪ Overall complaints about car boot sales have risen from virtually nil to around ten a week in just two years.
▪ A car boot sale at Boxted Airfield has also been called off.
▪ Trading standards officer say the recent growth in car boot sales has provided a perfect outlet for the computer pirates.
ski
▪ Salomon's radically different Adventure 7 boots, using even more ski boot technology, are still eagerly awaited for test.
▪ This year, however, Lowa have produced a remarkable ski boot range.
▪ The concept of assessing foot volume instead of width to achieve a good fit is another idea borrowed from ski boot technology.
walking
▪ His feet are usually cocooned in two pairs of thick socks and heavy walking boots - even during hot weather!
▪ He has already taken over 12 million paces and worn out six pairs of tough walking boots.
▪ Notes Outdoor clothing is recommended, including walking boots or wellingtons.
▪ Various grades are available, and the best is generally used for top-quality mountain and walking boots.
▪ He wore an anorak over a wool sweater with a polo neck and he wore tough cord jeans and walking boots.
▪ Mars leather wax A wax treatment for waterproofing modern lightweight and waterproof leather walking boots.
▪ The man is dressed in walking boots, brown cords and a shirt and green hiking jacket.
▪ Stephen always kept an anorak and a pair of walking boots in the car.
wellington
▪ Rows of wellington boots and raincoats lined the inside porch.
▪ One of his feet found its way into an enormous wellington boot.
▪ Two men were discussing a brand-new opera in which the ladies of the chorus all wore wellington boots.
▪ Home and dry: use a hairdryer to dry the inside of wellington boots.
▪ After that he still chased me, firing away with wellington boots, sugar bowls and other unlikely weapons.
▪ Diana cut a nondescript figure in her checked shirt, her sister's anorak, cords and wellington boots.
▪ Andy has a pair of wellington boots.
▪ They could feel the chill of the water through the rubber of their Wellington boots.
■ VERB
clean
▪ I could not order you to clean your boots, for example; though I might recommend it.
▪ Hana looked at her husband with pride but wished he had cleaned his boots better.
▪ S: Jones. Clean your boots.
▪ S: Jones, I order you to clean your boots.
lace
▪ He sits on the grass lacing stiff boots into a wreath of effort and breath.
▪ With my eyes still shut, I laced the boots automatically, and minutes later I launched myself outside.
▪ When fate marks you down for immortality you'd just better bite the bullet and lace your boots up tight.
pull
▪ He pulled the boot down and slammed it.
▪ He pulled on his boots in silence.
▪ I got dressed, pulled on my boots and put on my coat and got ready to leave.
▪ I pulled off my boots, put the stick between my teeth and gently went down the rope into the water.
put
▪ He took off his wellingtons and put on his cowboy boots.
▪ When Moran eventually appeared he did not speak but fussed excessively as he put on socks and boots.
▪ I wouldn't like to be stuck down a dark alley at night with whoever put the boot in here.
▪ Glancing round Nutty saw some skinhead joker put out an enormous boot and trip Hoomey as he came by.
▪ Rog just kept on putting the boot into him.
▪ Léonie and Thérèse were down the other end, putting on their boots.
▪ I think they just sucked up to David, and began to put the boot in really, quite unnecessarily and unfairly.
wear
▪ Who, in passing, it might be noted, wore not boots nor shoes but canvas sneakers.
▪ They wore black boots, green military fatigues, had their faces covered with black ski masks and carried automatic weapons.
▪ As she tried to pick her way over frozen puddles, she regretted her decision to wear high heels instead of boots.
▪ Tight denims clung to her legs and she wore knee-length leather boots.
▪ You wore the same boots, the same fatigues.
▪ In places the path can be wet and slippery, so obviously wear your boots.
▪ He heard her stomp across the floor as if she were wearing combat boots.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
ankle socks/boots
▪ Her ankle boots she had picked up in an army surplus store, and were the most comfortable she had ever possessed.
▪ Scottie is mainly black, with a white chest and white ankle socks on black legs.
▪ She was dressed casually in a pair of faded Levi jeans, brown ankle boots and a baggy white T-shirt.
▪ She was wearing Ray-Bans, a pale blue sunsuit, and white ankle socks under ivory-colored high-heeled espadrilles.
▪ Snakeskin zip-up ankle boots with open toe and heel, $ 134. 95.
▪ The boys, meanwhile, were yanking on elastic-sided ankle boots; very hip, very Beatles.
be/get too big for your boots
hang up your hat/football boots/briefcase etc
lick sb's boots
quake in your boots
the tramp of feet/boots
▪ She glanced through the open gateway, her attention caught by the tramp of boots.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a pair of hiking boots
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Amelia, in boots, breeks, and leather jacket is smiling into the distance.
▪ Boxes of shoes and boots filled the corners of the room.
▪ But the re-organisation means the boot is now on the other foot as far as money is concerned.
▪ I swung my boots up on to the bed and stretched out full length.
▪ Skintight jeans tucked into a pair of brown leather boots and a terrific figure.
▪ The unit badge a pigeon wearing flying boots!
▪ Wes followed me and watched as I opened the boot and laid Duke gently on top of my black working coat.
▪ When they first made their appearance in this country, crag rats sported nailed boots and tweed plus-fours.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
out
▪ Lord Halifax and the other grand residents got us booted out at last.
▪ If booted out, he could portray himself as a martyr.
▪ Thornton exploded, and successfully demanded that Curran be booted out.
▪ But going home can be difficult when a member has been booted out of office.
▪ In recent years the defiantly right-on stance of the comedy circuit had been booted out by a brand of no-holds barred humour.
▪ Puck was one of only two Real World-ites to be booted out of the house, and we can see why.
▪ This arrangement lasted only a few weeks before Barrett was booted out of the band he had named and created.
▪ It was one of the great hongs, trading houses, that had been booted out by Mao after Liberation.
up
▪ Most distributions do this as standard when you boot up.
▪ When you try to boot up the game, it balks: The mouse driver is missing again.
▪ The A2 automatically boots up in individual mode.
▪ But complex swarm systems with rich hierarchies take time to boot up.
▪ I had an Amstrad 1640 machine which booted up every morning without a complaint.
▪ Most agents at headquarters still believed he would be fully operable once his parallel systems booted up and stopped the repetition.
▪ Loren Carpenter boots up the ancient video game of Pong on to the immense screen.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
ankle socks/boots
▪ Her ankle boots she had picked up in an army surplus store, and were the most comfortable she had ever possessed.
▪ Scottie is mainly black, with a white chest and white ankle socks on black legs.
▪ She was dressed casually in a pair of faded Levi jeans, brown ankle boots and a baggy white T-shirt.
▪ She was wearing Ray-Bans, a pale blue sunsuit, and white ankle socks under ivory-colored high-heeled espadrilles.
▪ Snakeskin zip-up ankle boots with open toe and heel, $ 134. 95.
▪ The boys, meanwhile, were yanking on elastic-sided ankle boots; very hip, very Beatles.
be/get too big for your boots
the tramp of feet/boots
▪ She glanced through the open gateway, her attention caught by the tramp of boots.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ He booted the ball up to the other end of the playing field.
▪ If the usher caught you throwing popcorn, you were booted out of the theater.
▪ Jaeger booted a 37-yard field goal for the winning points.
▪ Suddenly this big heavy guy came up and booted me in the stomach.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Lord Halifax and the other grand residents got us booted out at last.
▪ Loren Carpenter boots up the ancient video game of Pong on to the immense screen.
▪ The lifters were tested three weeks ago and were booted out of the Olympics for taking Clenbuterol.
▪ This can be accessed even if the machine won't boot.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Boot

Boot \Boot\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Booted; p. pr. & vb. n. Booting.]

  1. To profit; to advantage; to avail; -- generally followed by it; as, what boots it?

    What booteth it to others that we wish them well, and do nothing for them?
    --Hooker.

    What subdued To change like this a mind so far imbued With scorn of man, it little boots to know.
    --Byron.

    What boots to us your victories?
    --Southey.

  2. To enrich; to benefit; to give in addition. [Obs.]

    And I will boot thee with what gift beside Thy modesty can beg.
    --Shak.

Boot

Boot \Boot\ (b[=oo]t), n. [OE. bot, bote, advantage, amends, cure, AS. b[=o]t; akin to Icel. b[=o]t, Sw. bot, Dan. bod, Goth. b[=o]ta, D. boete, G. busse; prop., a making good or better, from the root of E. better, adj. [root]255.]

  1. Remedy; relief; amends; reparation; hence, one who brings relief.

    He gaf the sike man his boote.
    --Chaucer.

    Thou art boot for many a bruise And healest many a wound.
    --Sir W. Scott.

    Next her Son, our soul's best boot.
    --Wordsworth.

  2. That which is given to make an exchange equal, or to make up for the deficiency of value in one of the things exchanged.

    I'll give you boot, I'll give you three for one.
    --Shak.

  3. Profit; gain; advantage; use. [Obs.]

    Then talk no more of flight, it is no boot.
    --Shak.

    To boot, in addition; over and above; besides; as a compensation for the difference of value between things bartered.

    Helen, to change, would give an eye to boot.
    --Shak.

    A man's heaviness is refreshed long before he comes to drunkenness, for when he arrives thither he hath but changed his heaviness, and taken a crime to boot.
    --Jer. Taylor.

Boot

Boot \Boot\, n. [OE. bote, OF. bote, F. botte, LL. botta; of uncertain origin.]

  1. A covering for the foot and lower part of the leg, ordinarily made of leather.

  2. An instrument of torture for the leg, formerly used to extort confessions, particularly in Scotland.

    So he was put to the torture, which in Scotland they call the boots; for they put a pair of iron boots close on the leg, and drive wedges between them and the leg.
    --Bp. Burnet.

  3. A place at the side of a coach, where attendants rode; also, a low outside place before and behind the body of the coach. [Obs.]

  4. A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach.

  5. An apron or cover (of leather or rubber cloth) for the driving seat of a vehicle, to protect from rain and mud.

  6. (Plumbing) The metal casing and flange fitted about a pipe where it passes through a roof.

    Boot catcher, the person at an inn whose business it was to pull off boots and clean them. [Obs.]
    --Swift.

    Boot closer, one who, or that which, sews the uppers of boots.

    Boot crimp, a frame or device used by bootmakers for drawing and shaping the body of a boot.

    Boot hook, a hook with a handle, used for pulling on boots.

    Boots and saddles (Cavalry Tactics), the trumpet call which is the first signal for mounted drill.

    Sly boots. See Slyboots, in the Vocabulary.

Boot

Boot \Boot\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Booted; p. pr. & vb. n. Booting.]

  1. To put boots on, esp. for riding.

    Coated and booted for it.
    --B. Jonson.

  2. To punish by kicking with a booted foot. [U. S.]

Boot

Boot \Boot\, v. i. To boot one's self; to put on one's boots.

Boot

Boot \Boot\, n. Booty; spoil. [Obs. or R.]
--Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
boot

footwear, early 14c., from Old French bote "boot" (12c.), with corresponding words in Provençal and Spanish, of unknown origin, perhaps from a Germanic source. Originally for riding boots only. An old Dorsetshire word for "half-boots" was skilty-boots [Halliwell, Wright].

boot

"profit, use," Old English bot "help, relief, advantage; atonement," literally "a making better," from Proto-Germanic *boto (see better (adj.)). Compare German Buße "penance, atonement," Gothic botha "advantage." Now mostly in phrase to boot (Old English to bote).

boot

"start up a computer," 1975, from bootstrap (v.), a 1958 derived verb from bootstrap (n.) in the computer sense.

boot

"to kick," 1877, American English, from boot (n.1). Generalized sense of "eject, kick out" is from 1880. Related: Booted; booting.

Wiktionary
boot

Etymology 1 n. 1 A heavy shoe that covers part of the leg. 2 A blow with the foot; a kick. 3 (context construction English) A flexible cover of rubber or plastic, which may be preformed to a particular shape and used to protect a shaft, lever, switch, or opening from dust, dirt, moisture, etc. 4 A torture device used on the feet or legs, such as a Spanish boot. 5 (context US English) A parking enforcement device used to immobilize a car until it can be towed or a fine is paid; a wheel clamp. 6 A rubber bladder on the leading edge of an aircraft’s wing, which is inflated periodically to remove ice buildup. A deicing boot. 7 (context obsolete English) A place at the side of a coach, where attendants rode; also, a low outside place before and behind the body of the coach. 8 (context archaic English) A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach. 9 (context Australia British NZ automotive English) The luggage storage compartment of a sedan or saloon car. 10 (context computing informal English) The act or process of removing somebody from a chat room. 11 (context British slang English) unattractive person, ugly woman 12 (context firearms English) A hard plastic case for a long firearm, typically moulded to the shape of the gun and intended for use in a vehicle. vb. 1 To kick. 2 To put boots on, especially for riding. 3 To apply corporal punishment (compare slippering). 4 (context informal English) To forcibly eject. 5 (context computing informal English) To disconnect forcibly; to eject from an online service, conversation, etc. 6 (context slang English) To vomit. Etymology 2

alt. 1 (context dated English) remedy, amends 2 (context uncountable English) profit, plunder 3 (context obsolete English) That which is given to make an exchange equal, or to make up for the deficiency of value in one of the things exchanged; compensation; recompense 4 (context obsolete English) Profit; gain; advantage; use. n. 1 (context dated English) remedy, amends 2 (context uncountable English) profit, plunder 3 (context obsolete English) That which is given to make an exchange equal, or to make up for the deficiency of value in one of the things exchanged; compensation; recompense 4 (context obsolete English) Profit; gain; advantage; use. vb. 1 (context transitive English) to profit, avail, benefit 2 To enrich; to benefit; to give in addition. Etymology 3

n. (context computing English) The act or process of bootstrapping; the starting or re-starting of a computing device. vb. (context computing English) To bootstrap; to start a system, e.g. a computer, by invoking its boot process or bootstrap. Etymology 4

n. A bootleg recording.

WordNet
boot
  1. v. kick; give a boot to

  2. cause to load (an operating system) and start the initial processes; "boot your computer" [syn: reboot, bring up]

boot
  1. n. footwear that covers the whole foot and lower leg

  2. British term for the luggage compartment in a car

  3. the swift release of a store of affective force; "they got a great bang out of it"; "what a boot!"; "he got a quick rush from injecting heroin"; "he does it for kicks" [syn: bang, charge, rush, flush, thrill, kick]

  4. protective casing for something that resembles a leg

  5. an instrument of torture that is used to crush the foot and leg [syn: iron boot, iron heel]

  6. the act of delivering a blow with the foot; "he gave the ball a powerful kick"; "the team's kicking was excellent" [syn: kick, kicking]

Wikipedia
Boot

A boot is a type of footwear and a specific type of shoe. Most boots mainly cover the foot and the ankle, while some also cover some part of the lower calf. Some boots extend up the leg, sometimes as far as the knee or even the hip. Most boots have a heel that is clearly distinguishable from the rest of the sole, even if the two are made of one piece. Traditionally made of leather or rubber, modern boots are made from a variety of materials. Boots are worn both for their functionality – protecting the foot and leg from water, extreme cold, mud or hazards (e.g., work boots may protect wearers from chemicals or use a steel toe) or providing additional ankle support for strenuous activities with added traction requirements (e.g., hiking) – and for reasons of style and fashion.

In some cases, the wearing of boots may be required by laws or regulations, such as the regulations in some jurisdictions requiring workers on construction sites to wear steel-toed safety boots. Some uniforms include boots as the regulated footwear. Boots are recommended as well for motorcycle riders. High-top athletic shoes are generally not considered boots, even though they do cover the ankle, primarily due to the absence of a distinct heel. In Britain, the term may be used to refer to football (soccer) cleats.

Boot (torture)

The term boot refers to a family of instruments of torture and interrogation variously designed to cause crushing injuries to the foot and/or leg. The boot has taken many forms in various places and times. Common varieties include the Spanish boot (sometimes referred to as "scarpines") and the Malay boot. One type was made of four pieces of narrow wooden board nailed together. The boards were measured to fit the victim's leg. Once the leg was enclosed, wedges would be hammered between the boards, creating pressure. The pressure would be increased until the victim confessed or lost consciousness. Newer variants have included iron vises—sometimes armed with spikes—that squeezed feet and metal frames employed red-hot.

Boot (disambiguation)

A boot is a type of footwear.

Boot or boots may also refer to:

Boot (medical)

A boot is a medical device worn during treatment and recovery of a variety of foot injuries. Along with orthopedic casts, leg braces, splints and orthotics, it is a form of immobilizing and weight bearing for injuries to the foot area.

Boot (surname)

Boot is both a Dutch and English metonymic occupational surname. In Dutch, boot sounds like and means boat and the name refers to a "boatman". In English the name refers to the maker or seller of boots.1

Boot:

  • Arnold Boot later Boate (1606-1653), Dutch physician, writer and Hebraist in Ireland
  • Charles Boot (1874-1945), English businessman
  • Cornelis Hendrik Boudewijn Boot (1813–1892), Dutch politician
  • Eddie Boot (1915-1999), English footballer
  • Elise Boot (born 1932), Dutch jurist and former politician
  • Fred Boot (born 1965), Dutch theatre producer
  • Geoffrey Boot, Manx air racer
  • Gerard Boot later Boate (1604-1650), Dutch writer and physician in Ireland
  • Harry Boot (1917-1983), English physicist
  • Henri Frédéric Boot (1877–1963), Dutch painter and printmaker
  • Henry Boot (1851–1931), English businessman and founder of Henry Boot PLC, father of Charles Boot
  • Jaap Boot (1903-1986), Dutch track and field athlete
  • Jesse Boot, 1st Baron Trent (1850–1931), English businessman
  • Joe Boot (probably an alias), one of the last stagecoach robbers in the United States - see Pearl Hart
  • John Boot, 2nd Baron Trent (1889-1956), English businessman and philanthropist, son of Jesse Boot
  • Leonard Boot (1899-1937), English footballer
  • Max Boot (born 1969), American author, consultant, editorialist, lecturer, and military historian
  • Micky Boot (born c.1945), English footballer
  • Oliver Boot, English stage and television actor
  • Pat Boot (1914-1947), New Zealand athlete
  • Ton Boot (born 1940), Dutch basketball coach and player
  • Vitali Boot, German amateur boxer
  • William Henry James Boot (1848–1918), English oil and watercolour artist, illustrator and author

Boots:

  • Dave Boots (born 1955), American college basketball coach
  • George Boots (1874–1928), Welsh international rugby union forward
  • Phil Boots, American politician

Category:Dutch-language surnames

Boot (software)

Boot is a build automation and dependency management tool written primarily in the Clojure programming language.

Boot was originally written by Micha Niskin and Alan Dipert as part of the Hoplon web framework. As of May 2015, Boot is developed and released independently of Hoplon. Boot is implemented as an executable entry point and a set of Clojure libraries that can be used to develop build processes programmatically. The spirit of Boot's design is captured by its tag line, "Builds are programs. Let's start treating them that way."

Build tasks supported natively by Boot include compiling Java, creating .jar files, and creating servlets. As a Clojure program, Boot can be extended on a per-project basis using the Clojure language. Boot's primary means of extension are tasks, or functions that take and return Filesets. A Fileset is a managed, immutable representation of the filesystem and classpath that can be synchronized to disk at any point during the build. Like Leiningen, Boot supports resolving and publishing Maven dependencies using the Aether library.

Boot also supports:

  • In-process classloader isolation with pods
  • Shebang scripts

Boot is featured in Appendix B of the book "Clojure for the Brave and True"

Usage examples of "boot".

I will now go and skin that troll who went so nigh to slay thee, and break up the carcase, if thou wilt promise to abide about the door of the house, and have thy sword and the spear ready to hand, and to don thine helm and hauberk to boot.

There were his irrigation boots and a spade for cutting water out of the Acequia del Monte into his back field, or into his apple and plum trees, or into his garden.

He also took off a cloak of fine material, in which he had dressed himself that day, and dressed the king in it, and sent for some colored boots, which he put on his feet, and he put a large silver ring on his finger, because he had heard that he had admired greatly a silver ornament worn by one of the sailors.

Boots, the whole thing should have fallen apart, because Boots is a poster child for gene-pool dilution, but Holovka had made an alliance with an Afghani warlord.

Pewt dident bring those close back in about 5 minits he wood go up and boot him down to our house and back agen and jest then Mister Purington came into the yard holding Pewt by the ear.

A group of officers had appeared there, their aiguillettes and epaulettes a dark gold in the wintry light, and in their midst were the chasseur in his red pelisse, and the civilian in his black coat and white boots.

But despite his acquittal the Latvian remained a dead Latvian and weighed on his mind like a ton of bricks, although he was said to have been a frail little man, afflicted with a stomach ailment to boot.

By right, as an old friend who had found the airman in the forest, Seryonka was walking solemnly in front of the stretcher, laboriously pulling his feet, encased in the huge felt boots left him by his father, out of the snow and sternly scolding the other white-toothed, grimy-faced, fantastically ragged boys.

First God Ait be-neath his boots, and he glared at the still-drugged trio of nurses.

And inside the trunk are mail leggings, cowl, mittens, boots, and a leather aketon for protection underneath.

Lucky for me I met up with someone my own size, Alec thought, inspecting the boots more closely.

Shaking his head, Alec slid the dagger into the pocket of his boot and grinned.

I had just finished wiggling into my boots and securing my vest when Alem handed me the flechette pistol.

When she was attired in a grey alpaca dress with a cape to match, a blue straw bonnet resting on her brown hair, and a pair of black buttoned boots on her feet, she went to the top drawer of the chest and took out the long envelope and looked at it.

Strand and Cockspur Street, Cabrillo pulled up next to the Ural and kicked at Amad with his boot.