Find the word definition

Crossword clues for wind

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
wind
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bullet wound
▪ He died from a bullet wound to his chest.
a chest injury/wound
▪ He suffered serious chest injuries in the accident.
a cold wind
▪ A cold wind was blowing from the north.
a knife wound
▪ She died from a single knife wound.
a path winds
▪ A narrow path wound down towards the beach.
a river winds (=it turns and curves, rather than going in a straight line)
▪ He could see the river winding across the plain.
a road winds (=it turns and curves, rather than going in a straight line)
▪ A long road wound through the park.
a war wound
▪ He still suffered pain from an old war wound.
a wind/woodwind instrument
▪ Violas blend very well with most of the wind instruments.
chilly wind/breeze/air etc
flesh wound
freak wind/wave/storm etc
▪ The men drowned when a freak wave sank their boat.
got...second wind
▪ He got his second wind and ran on.
offend/wound sb’s sensibilities
▪ Avoid using words that might offend someone’s racial or moral sensibilities.
puff of smoke/wind/air/steam etc
▪ The dragon disappeared in a puff of smoke.
rocket/wind/nuclear/jet propulsion
rush of air/wind/water
▪ She felt a cold rush of air as she wound down her window.
trade wind
water/wind erosion (=caused by water or wind)
▪ Hedgerows and trees help to reduce the effect of wind erosion.
wind breaker
wind chill factor
▪ It must have been minus 5 with the wind chill factor.
wind chill
▪ It must have been minus 5 with the wind chill factor.
wind chimes
wind farm
wind instrument
wind power (=energy produced by the wind)
▪ Is wind power the answer to the energy crisis?
wind speed (=the speed of the wind)
▪ The average wind speed will be about 14 knots.
wind tunnel
wind turbine
wind (up) a clock (=turn a key to keep it working)
▪ It was one of those old clocks that you have to wind up.
wind whistling
▪ They listened to the wind whistling through the trees.
winding sheet
winding streets (=streets that turn in many directions)
▪ We spent hours exploring the town’s winding streets.
winding
▪ He climbed the winding path up the hill.
wind/wave energy
▪ The windmill uses wind energy to crush grain and pump water.
wound up
▪ I was too wound up to sleep.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
chill
▪ A chill wind came through the open doors to the balcony.
▪ Over the valley, a full moon was rising, and a chill wind was blowing down from the distant mountains.
▪ Even as he looked the first drops of rain began to fall, whipped into a flurry by a chill little wind.
▪ By now the skies were black, a chill wind was blustering down the street and the rain was slashing sideways.
▪ But at least he was high above the city, where chill winds swept the air clean and freshened the skin.
▪ There were ominous dark clouds gathering overhead now and a chill wind.
▪ He didn't even seem to be aware that a chill north wind was blowing.
▪ For some, the chill wind of competition is again blowing through their offices.
cold
▪ A light wind ruffled the leaves of the trees, but it was warm, not cold like the winds of winter.
▪ The first cold winds rattled the windowpane, and I had made it just in time.
▪ The bright October day belied the cold wind.
▪ He stared at the ice-covered ground and half listened to the cold wind moaning gently amongst the trees.
▪ He hid in doorways when the cold wind blew.
▪ There was a cold wind outside the car.
▪ You can feel the cold winds whipping across the barren island of Smuttynose as Maren relates her disturbing story.
high
▪ The more experienced may try Villa-Flotilla in Yalikavak, where high wind courses give the confidence needed to cope with choppy seas.
▪ First, in high winds the building could twist and turn and pull sections of the walls or windows apart.
▪ Earlier in the day it had been raining, now there was a high wind blowing.
▪ Lightning or high winds can knock branches or whole trees on to power lines, cutting the electricity to an entire neighborhood.
▪ The main problem is, of course, high wind.
▪ Downpours, lightning and thunder, high winds, a tornado that barely missed carrying away the house.
▪ There was a high wind and clouds scudded across the blue sky and when the sun was obscured the wind seemed cold.
▪ The high winds did not cease.
icy
▪ An icy wind howled and a great wall of snow bore down upon them.
▪ She felt an icy wind howl over her, a graveyard stench enter her throat, a chill finger touch her cheek.
▪ It is often their only protection against the icy winds of winter.
▪ Through her fingers Tallis could hear the horses protesting against the growing, icy wind.
▪ It snowed again in the night, on an icy wind.
▪ Cold icy winds swept under the gaps of cottage doors rattling them fiercely.
▪ It was cold, too, an icy wind sneaking in through the thatch and through gaps in the mud wall.
ill
▪ It is, as the saying goes, an ill wind.
▪ It's an ill wind, thought Charles.
▪ It's the worst wind you can get: the nor-easter, the east and the south-east.
light
▪ The wet grass glittered and near-by a nut-tree sparkled iridescent, winking and gleaming as its branches moved in the light wind.
▪ Clear skies and light winds helped cleanup crews Sunday.
▪ This is generally okay in light to medium winds where the bait is moving very slowly through the water.
▪ We are dead in the water, heading into a light wind and surface current.
▪ We don't provide formal instruction, but novices pick up a lot by sailing out and back in light winds.
▪ In the night with a light fair wind we had again lost out to the Black Stream.
▪ Evening, and warmer air now with lighter winds.
▪ A light wind sprang up, and the smoke of their guns drifted over the valley towards the cemetery.
offshore
▪ You should never sail in an offshore wind, particularly not alone.
▪ Steady offshore winds keep blowing the water westward where it becomes heated.
▪ The government has responded by planning offshore wind farms on the Ijsselmeer.
▪ At the moment, only inshore wind farms have been erected but there is great potential in offshore wind.
▪ Large swell waves may be present with an absolutely calm sea or even with light offshore winds in the opposite direction.
▪ Avoid strong tides, offshore winds, poor visibility or sailing in the dark.
▪ This is an essential skill in gusty offshore winds.
prevailing
▪ Protection from the prevailing wind can often be provided by rock outcrops or carefully planted shrubs in the background.
▪ He also organized the compilation and publication of charts showing the prevailing winds and currents for each quarter of the year.
▪ You must be reasonably fit and be sure you can handle the prevailing wind, weather and tidal conditions.
▪ It was an entire nation of pragmatists, each individual swaying with the prevailing wind to ensure his or her own future.
▪ They will adjust, bending like bamboos before the prevailing wind from the north.
strong
▪ Disadvantages: Lack of volume, thus difficult to sail in all but strong winds.
▪ Driven thirty miles north last night by continuing strong southerly winds.
▪ They walked for miles on the hilltops in the strong clean wind, alone with the birds and the sheep.
▪ On one particular day I lay there watching a strong, high wind move the clouds.
▪ Porto Heli and Cannigione additionally offer catamaran coaching. Strong winds and some racing provide further challenges.
▪ A hurricane is a storm of strong circular wind flow which rotates in a counter-clockwise direction.
▪ Sinker A very small board which is used in stronger winds.
▪ Flying is often safer than towing into a really strong and gusty wind.
■ NOUN
direction
▪ Do check on wind direction when siting your barbecue.
▪ Bill would simply have to steer 106 degrees and adjust for wind direction and drift.
▪ Four repeaters costing £140 are available for wind and boat speed, wind direction and depth and a multifunction repeater costs £160.
▪ Fighting my feeling of dread, I went through the automatic routine of checking the smoke drift for wind direction.
▪ Odour emissions are affected by wind direction, temperature inversion, ambient temperatures and humidity.
▪ This would certainly be hazard in a cross wind and, to an inexperienced pilot, in any wind direction.
▪ When sailing upwind, a change in the wind direction will make either the board point higher or lower than previously.
▪ This was fine until the wind direction changed slightly and came across the fixed line.
east
▪ Kind skies and balmy breezes instead of the cutting east wind off the marshes.
▪ Or was it the east wind blowing in through the open bell tower with renewed force?
▪ It was cold, with an east wind blowing from the sea, and it was getting dark.
▪ It was December and a bitterly cold east wind was blowing.
▪ I adjusted the sail at forty-five degrees to the east wind, and walked south.
▪ And with an east wind behind them they could not abruptly halt.
farm
▪ The Countryside Commission has called for planning guidelines on wind farms to be issued to local authorities.
▪ The government has responded by planning offshore wind farms on the Ijsselmeer.
▪ At the moment, only inshore wind farms have been erected but there is great potential in offshore wind.
▪ Offshore wind farms would be more expensive to establish but far less of an eyesore.
force
▪ As the Sea King hovered in gale force winds, alarms warned of engine trouble.
▪ The superstar's Coral Gables mansion was battered by gale force winds which left windows smashed and wrecked her garden.
▪ Gale force winds could not blow away the players' enthusiasm but they did make it very hard work.
▪ The whole service has taken some five and a half hours in gale force winds and heavy seas.
▪ Near hurricane force winds and free-roaming sheep put paid to early attempts at planting flowers and shrubs.
▪ The tanker, the Braer, crashed into the rocky coast in heavy seas and gale force winds.
▪ Read in studio Hurricane force winds are hampering efforts to save seals caught in the Shetland oil slick.
instrument
▪ The same held true for mouthpieces for wind instruments and replacement roots for teeth, Sakai explained.
▪ Many of the stringed instruments imitate the sounds of horses; wind instruments imitate the sounds of birds and other wild animals.
▪ Mac had said something about his fondness for wind instruments without actually saying what he played.
▪ Both were playing a traditional wind instrument known as the didgeridoo.
▪ Its high register gives brilliance and point when doubling at the octave phrases allotted to other wind instruments or to the violins.
▪ The pre-Columbian Amerindian civilizations in particular produced a variety of vessel flutes, compound pipes and wind instruments.
▪ Native wind instruments fashioned from tiny straws are sold at a fraction of the cost of matchbox-size ghetto-blasters.
▪ They provided six of the centre's elephants, aged seven to 18, with a variety of percussion and wind instruments.
north
▪ Hot winds, and the sugary savor of the air! ... The squalling north wind beats against my windows.
▪ A moaning north wind that ebbed and flowed like the sound of surf and ocean waves.
▪ The morning was cold, in the wake of the north wind that had frozen the fields since mid-March.
▪ Winter is coming on the north wind, and winter in the Maine woods comes to stay for six months.
▪ Pine trees, swayed by the north wind, whisper; the bracken sighs.
▪ He didn't even seem to be aware that a chill north wind was blowing.
▪ Ships docking at Amnisos could well have found themselves trapped there by a north wind, just as Odysseus claimed he was.
power
▪ Not surprisingly wind power is regarded as having considerable potential.
▪ A big unknown is the fate of federal support for wind power.
▪ Biofuels and wind power are regarded as the most promising technologies, along with small scale hydro and tidal power.
▪ The market could grow much bigger if countries further subsidize wind power to curb greenhouse gas emissions.
▪ Many congressmen are keen to revive research into renewable energy sources like solar and wind power.
▪ It's hoped that wind power will eventually provide up to 20 percent of the country's energy needs.
▪ The government hopes that wind power will meet around a tenth of total electricity demand by the year 2000.
▪ Of course, wind power isn't new.
speed
▪ There is less difference between the two hemispheres with respect to wind speeds than with respect to the pattern of the bands.
▪ As the wind speed varied, so did the strength of the rain.
▪ The reported wind speeds gave everyone a false sense of security.
▪ Wind drift indicators were used to figure out wind speed and direction, but they worked only if they could be seen.
▪ This is important because the balloon and payload could be damaged if the wind speed is above 10 knots.
▪ Hsu Fu would advance at her own pace, depending on the wind speed and direction.
▪ Another interesting option is the use of wind turbines as windbreaks to reduce wind speed and erosion.
▪ The wind speed and direction, and the cloud height and type were major hurdles to be overcome each hour.
trade
▪ To grasp the whole picture, envisage first the trade wind, blowing from east to west.
▪ Sometimes a trade wind takes me toward land.
▪ So in winter the trade winds are strengthened and diverted, and are almost reversed in summer.
▪ Its economy, as a world trader, is sensitive to every trade wind that blows.
tunnel
▪ Work includes full-scale experiments, wind tunnel studies and computational fluid dynamics.
▪ Fall through the platform, and unless you're either amazingly brave or stupid head down the wind tunnel to the left.
▪ The reverse acoustic ceilings amplify the din to a decibel range appropriate for a wind tunnel.
▪ It was the wind tunnel which gave birth to the characteristic shape of the Boeing 747.
▪ But the wind tunnel specifications called for this wall to be able to withstand seventy-five pounds a square foot.
▪ During wind tunnel tests on the car, at the development stage, water was added.
▪ By ensuring that only the most promising designs enter the wind tunnel, it has made physical evaluation more cost effective.
turbine
▪ The seasonal performance might be improved to some extent by using a wind turbine as the energy source.
▪ Gipe gives values based on rotor diameter for the outputs of a range of wind turbines currently available.
▪ The toilets are lit with electricity from a wind turbine.
▪ The organisation hopes to power the village via a wind turbine.
▪ Another interesting option is the use of wind turbines as windbreaks to reduce wind speed and erosion.
▪ These, the largest offshore wind turbines in the world, have been tested for three months.
▪ Britain's 2,000 kilometres of motorway could accomodate 130,000 wind turbines safely and efficiently at a cost of £10,000 for each device.
■ VERB
break
▪ Lifting up one of his legs he broke wind loudly, causing Sarah to purse her lips.
▪ When the ice jam broke and the wind dropped, the Falls returned to their former glory.
▪ The boy might break wind or say a naughty word and forfeit the protection of that great white spirit.
▪ Why not plant millions of them on the high plains to break the wind and conserve the soil?
drop
▪ Cold gusts dropped the wind chill into the low 40s and played havoc with final-round scores in the highest-scoring Nissan since 1984.
throw
▪ If you can't avoid trouble, then throw valour to the winds and run.
▪ Anything less truly would be throwing caution to the winds.
▪ My friends and their little daughter went splashing blithely in so I threw caution to the winds and followed.
▪ It continued poorly, as Gatti threw to the winds any notion of coherent tempo relationships.
▪ You may even throw caution to the wind and try one of our Mystery Trips.
▪ Fair trial rights were thrown to the wind.
▪ The two of us threw caution to the winds and raced to the rescue.
▪ The players furnished all those elements in an alternately rapturous and probing performance that sporadically threw decorum to the winds.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a breath of air/wind
▪ Scarcely a breath of air disturbed the stillness of the day.
▪ It had been a very cold but bright morning, without a breath of wind.
▪ Not a breath of air disturbs the tranquil spectacle.
▪ Ramsey presumably leant out for a breath of air.
▪ The moon was hidden under a veil of clouds, and there was not a breath of wind.
▪ There was complete silence and not even a breath of wind disturbed the peace.
▪ There was not a breath of wind blowing, and not a leaf or blade of grass stirred.
▪ There was scarcely a breath of wind.
a following wind
break wind
▪ Lifting up one of his legs he broke wind loudly, causing Sarah to purse her lips.
▪ The boy might break wind or say a naughty word and forfeit the protection of that great white spirit.
gale/hurricane force wind
▪ As the Sea King hovered in gale force winds, alarms warned of engine trouble.
▪ Near hurricane force winds and free-roaming sheep put paid to early attempts at planting flowers and shrubs.
▪ Read in studio Hurricane force winds are hampering efforts to save seals caught in the Shetland oil slick.
▪ The superstar's Coral Gables mansion was battered by gale force winds which left windows smashed and wrecked her garden.
▪ The tanker, the Braer, crashed into the rocky coast in heavy seas and gale force winds.
▪ The whole service has taken some five and a half hours in gale force winds and heavy seas.
high wind
▪ At present, they can only develop profitably in locations with high wind speed.
▪ First high winds blow Stu Miller off the mound, forcing a balk, at Candlestick Park.
▪ Four guylines are attached half way up the pole sleeve to storm-lash the tent - great for very high winds.
▪ It was a shed that wobbled in high winds.
▪ More than 1, 100 plows struggled to keep up with the high winds and drifts of four to six feet.
▪ Nevertheless, there was a degree of innovation in one aspect of this design: its ability to resist high wind.
▪ On one particular day I lay there watching a strong, high wind move the clouds.
▪ This allows good use of space, but high winds compress the sides.
it's an ill wind (that blows nobody any good)
merciless heat/cold/wind etc
▪ During the merciless heat of noon one of the frailer females collapsed, far from any possible shelter.
mortal blow/danger/wound etc
▪ As she reads or hears the news reports of battles, she can ascertain whether he is in mortal danger.
▪ Hellenism no longer represented a mortal danger.
▪ His dragon had taken a mortal wound as he and Caledor clashed on the battlefield.
▪ Railroad traffic is a mortal danger.
▪ This rust-blood pouring from mortal wounds in the planet's skin is a terrible indictment of the tyranny we climbers inflict.
▪ Yesterday, the joint shop stewards committee of Corporate Jets said a loss of production would be a mortal blow.
offshore wind/current etc
▪ At the moment, only inshore wind farms have been erected but there is great potential in offshore wind.
▪ Avoid strong tides, offshore winds, poor visibility or sailing in the dark.
▪ Large swell waves may be present with an absolutely calm sea or even with light offshore winds in the opposite direction.
▪ Steady offshore winds keep blowing the water westward where it becomes heated.
▪ The government has responded by planning offshore wind farms on the Ijsselmeer.
▪ This is an essential skill in gusty offshore winds.
▪ When sailing in offshore winds, however, this rule is more often than not proved right, particularly in coastal bays.
▪ You should never sail in an offshore wind, particularly not alone.
piss in the wind
prevailing wind
▪ He also organized the compilation and publication of charts showing the prevailing winds and currents for each quarter of the year.
▪ He faces the open end to the east, away from the sun and prevailing wind.
▪ It was an entire nation of pragmatists, each individual swaying with the prevailing wind to ensure his or her own future.
▪ Protection from the prevailing wind can often be provided by rock outcrops or carefully planted shrubs in the background.
▪ They will adjust, bending like bamboos before the prevailing wind from the north.
▪ You must be reasonably fit and be sure you can handle the prevailing wind, weather and tidal conditions.
rub salt into the wound
▪ Boro rubbed salt into the wound by scoring with their first genuine scoring attempt.
▪ To rub salt into the wound, they had Michael Mols sent off.
sail close to the wind
▪ They had quite a reputation for sailing close to the wind.
▪ With his own property, it was perhaps easier too for a baron to take risks or sail close to the wind.
second wind
▪ By the 1980s Borge had got his second wind and looked like going on for ever as an international touring artist.
▪ Cruising along on a second wind.
▪ I was drunk, okay, but I was getting my second wind by now.
▪ I won my race into a 1.5 metres per second wind.
▪ She had got her second wind.
▪ She seems to have acquired a second wind.
▪ So one perennial idea getting a second wind is the campaign to raise the pitifully low current minimum wage.
sharp wind/frost
▪ The ground was hardened by a sharp frost making the going firm on a fine, sunny day.
▪ There had been a sharp frost overnight and the ground was frozen hard.
stiff wind/breeze
▪ A stiff breeze riffles the brush.
▪ A stiff breeze shoves broken clouds across the moon.
▪ Daylight broke, a stiff breeze struck up and the sky clouded over.
▪ Put in on a shoe and it will wipe off in a stiff breeze.
▪ The mastheads of beached yachts tinkled in a stiff breeze.
▪ The next day was bright and cold, with a stiff breeze blowing straight down the field.
▪ The skill is running down the beach with all your equipment often in a stiff breeze.
▪ Within minutes a stiff wind was blowing over the harbor.
straw in the wind
▪ A final straw in the wind may be Tolkien's increasing desire to pull strands together.
▪ But even before 1947 there were straws in the wind.
▪ There were other straws in the wind.
▪ These various statements amounted to straws in the wind rather than a fully defined policy for ending the war.
strong wind/current/tide
▪ A strong wind was now blowing and there was a loud crack of thunder.
▪ Disadvantages: Lack of volume, thus difficult to sail in all but strong winds.
▪ Firefighters must contend with steep canyons and the strong winds, not to mention hot and dry conditions.
▪ In very strong winds the critical place for ground handling is at the tail.
▪ Rip A strong current, commonly experienced on surf beaches.
▪ The same materials, thrown into the Martian atmosphere by strong winds, give the Martian sky a pinkish color.
▪ There was a strong wind blowing from the north.
▪ Toward late afternoon, a strong wind came up and the sky clouded over.
the wind drops
throw caution to the wind(s)
▪ Anything less truly would be throwing caution to the winds.
▪ My friends and their little daughter went splashing blithely in so I threw caution to the winds and followed.
▪ The two of us threw caution to the winds and raced to the rescue.
▪ You may even throw caution to the wind and try one of our Mystery Trips.
throw/cast caution to the winds
▪ Anything less truly would be throwing caution to the winds.
▪ My friends and their little daughter went splashing blithely in so I threw caution to the winds and followed.
▪ The two of us threw caution to the winds and raced to the rescue.
twist/turn the knife (in the wound)
▪ Saints twisted the knife with a glorious try from Tony Sullivan, set up by Gary Connolly.
▪ The tragedy is that you have to twist the knife in your own gray matter to make this defense work.
wind/air/water resistance
▪ A 3-phase 15° step-angle variable-reluctance motor has a rated phase current 01 2.0A and a phase winding resistance of 5.0 ohms.
▪ A car that squats low meets less wind resistance.
▪ If you want to lower the wind resistance on a car body how low do you want to get it?
▪ Naturally the water resistance was less, but modern tanning processes have improved leathers considerably.
▪ The actual path taken by the orbiter is complex and designed to minimize the effect of air resistance on the craft.
▪ This holds precisely because all objects fall at the same speed under gravity. Air resistance is being ignored here.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a 30-mile-an-hour wind
▪ A bitter wind was blowing from the East
▪ A sudden gust of wind blew the paper out of his hand.
▪ Strong winds caused damage to many buildings.
▪ The flags fluttered gently in the wind.
▪ We walked home through the wind and the rain.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But everyone erupted into giggles and bolted down the street as free of deference as the wind.
▪ Gregson felt the wind whipping around him, felt the chill grow more intense.
▪ She could not believe that the typhoon winds of change could alter our family.
▪ Some kind of wind had risen outside and was whistling through the rotten window casement and the ill-fitted panes.
▪ There was a biting wind from the right which made all the dead winter stems rattle and rustle feverishly.
▪ We tie up the boats and wade up the creek towards it, enveloped in a wind of fine mist.
▪ With the rain came a southerly wind, moderate at first but then steadily increasing until it built to gale force.
▪ You can even feel the deck shift beneath your feet or shiver in the ice cold arctic wind.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
around
▪ The body of the creature began to wind around him.
▪ However, he was reluctantly persuaded to buy a secondhand gold band with a worn heart pattern winding around it.
down
▪ The Volvo, whose windows wind down to reveal plush red curtains, is surrounded by stepladders.
▪ As we have pointed out elsewhere, t6day the economy automatically deploys fiscal stimuli when the business cycle winds down.
▪ But Mr Clarke showed no signs of winding down.
▪ Moments later, we saw the Fast on the screen change to West and the numbers began to wind down backwards.
▪ The government was essentially faced with the option of winding down MDC's operations or extending its boundaries.
▪ I stopped pushing and let the swing wind down to a stop.
▪ They will wind down the pain.
▪ Dumenil Leble has been gradually winding down its banking operations since 1993.
up
▪ Looking past Adam, she saw Fand had stopped by another set of steps winding up into the rock.
▪ Moreover, battered women often wind up dropping the charges as reconciliation with the abuser.
▪ Perhaps my right hon. Friend the Minister will tell the House when he winds up.
▪ And should you wind up in court, a call to your friend the governor will set things straight.
▪ That section enables the court to wind up a company if its membership falls below two.
▪ If he fails he's likely to become expendable and could even wind up back at Barnsley, a forgotten man.
■ NOUN
clock
▪ So like an old-fashioned clock, Trevor simply winds the handle.
path
▪ Follow the path as it winds its way through the forest.
▪ These paths go winding into physical, psychological, and historical realms, all three.
▪ The path to employment often winds back home.
▪ It widened but nothing could be seen in the gap, save for the path ahead, winding on down to the valley.
▪ The path winds its way around the Newtown river and Clamerkin Lake providing some fine estuary walking and taking you inland a little.
▪ Walk along the path, as it winds its way up into the mountain.
phase
▪ A 3-phase 15° step-angle variable-reluctance motor has a rated phase current 01 2.0A and a phase winding resistance of 5.0 ohms.
▪ Another consequence of the finite phase winding inductance is that the phase current can not be switched off instantaneously.
▪ The complete model must also take account of the voltages induced in the phase winding by rotor motion.
road
▪ The road was hilly and winding.
▪ The road winds crazily through the farms, between their buildings from one farmhouse to another.
▪ The road begins to wind downward; they are now passing along the main street.
▪ In my imagination I saw a country road winding through granite hills or threading the sides of dunes.
▪ Sheridan Road, which winds so prettily through the North Shore, used to be a military road for moving troops.
▪ Her reverie is interrupted by the sound of hooves on the long white road winding towards the house.
street
▪ Then we wind through interminable streets of Edwardian terraced houses converted to flats and rooms.
▪ I find a tiny winding street in the Marais that takes me to a shack in the courtyard of a run-down mansion.
▪ The only access was through the narrow, winding streets of Sandwich.
▪ Motorcycles whiz through winding streets, adding to a cacophony of rumbling truck motors and screaming vendors.
▪ It is a town of simple charms and colourful history, where winding narrow streets and alleyways present surprises at every turn.
▪ It is a quiet resort of winding narrow streets lined with cafés and shops.
▪ There are winding streets, museums, half-timbered houses and lush gardens of figs, mulberries, sweet chestnuts and vines.
▪ Everywhere the narrow, winding streets were lined with little golden terraced houses.
way
▪ Follow the path as it winds its way through the forest.
▪ Despite my inability to follow my own advice, we wind our way into the heart of the Cerro Colorado Mountains.
▪ Two freeform swimming pools wind their way through the hotel complex.
▪ These waterways wind their way through countryside often inaccessible by road and unchanged over the years.
▪ Burgon winded his way through the Bangor defence and passed the ball to Minnis whose shot was well saved by Brown.
▪ The path winds its way around the Newtown river and Clamerkin Lake providing some fine estuary walking and taking you inland a little.
▪ Dozens of the cars will wind their way around the scenic coastline on Friday.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a breath of air/wind
▪ Scarcely a breath of air disturbed the stillness of the day.
▪ It had been a very cold but bright morning, without a breath of wind.
▪ Not a breath of air disturbs the tranquil spectacle.
▪ Ramsey presumably leant out for a breath of air.
▪ The moon was hidden under a veil of clouds, and there was not a breath of wind.
▪ There was complete silence and not even a breath of wind disturbed the peace.
▪ There was not a breath of wind blowing, and not a leaf or blade of grass stirred.
▪ There was scarcely a breath of wind.
a following wind
gale/hurricane force wind
▪ As the Sea King hovered in gale force winds, alarms warned of engine trouble.
▪ Near hurricane force winds and free-roaming sheep put paid to early attempts at planting flowers and shrubs.
▪ Read in studio Hurricane force winds are hampering efforts to save seals caught in the Shetland oil slick.
▪ The superstar's Coral Gables mansion was battered by gale force winds which left windows smashed and wrecked her garden.
▪ The tanker, the Braer, crashed into the rocky coast in heavy seas and gale force winds.
▪ The whole service has taken some five and a half hours in gale force winds and heavy seas.
high wind
▪ At present, they can only develop profitably in locations with high wind speed.
▪ First high winds blow Stu Miller off the mound, forcing a balk, at Candlestick Park.
▪ Four guylines are attached half way up the pole sleeve to storm-lash the tent - great for very high winds.
▪ It was a shed that wobbled in high winds.
▪ More than 1, 100 plows struggled to keep up with the high winds and drifts of four to six feet.
▪ Nevertheless, there was a degree of innovation in one aspect of this design: its ability to resist high wind.
▪ On one particular day I lay there watching a strong, high wind move the clouds.
▪ This allows good use of space, but high winds compress the sides.
it's an ill wind (that blows nobody any good)
merciless heat/cold/wind etc
▪ During the merciless heat of noon one of the frailer females collapsed, far from any possible shelter.
mortal blow/danger/wound etc
▪ As she reads or hears the news reports of battles, she can ascertain whether he is in mortal danger.
▪ Hellenism no longer represented a mortal danger.
▪ His dragon had taken a mortal wound as he and Caledor clashed on the battlefield.
▪ Railroad traffic is a mortal danger.
▪ This rust-blood pouring from mortal wounds in the planet's skin is a terrible indictment of the tyranny we climbers inflict.
▪ Yesterday, the joint shop stewards committee of Corporate Jets said a loss of production would be a mortal blow.
offshore wind/current etc
▪ At the moment, only inshore wind farms have been erected but there is great potential in offshore wind.
▪ Avoid strong tides, offshore winds, poor visibility or sailing in the dark.
▪ Large swell waves may be present with an absolutely calm sea or even with light offshore winds in the opposite direction.
▪ Steady offshore winds keep blowing the water westward where it becomes heated.
▪ The government has responded by planning offshore wind farms on the Ijsselmeer.
▪ This is an essential skill in gusty offshore winds.
▪ When sailing in offshore winds, however, this rule is more often than not proved right, particularly in coastal bays.
▪ You should never sail in an offshore wind, particularly not alone.
prevailing wind
▪ He also organized the compilation and publication of charts showing the prevailing winds and currents for each quarter of the year.
▪ He faces the open end to the east, away from the sun and prevailing wind.
▪ It was an entire nation of pragmatists, each individual swaying with the prevailing wind to ensure his or her own future.
▪ Protection from the prevailing wind can often be provided by rock outcrops or carefully planted shrubs in the background.
▪ They will adjust, bending like bamboos before the prevailing wind from the north.
▪ You must be reasonably fit and be sure you can handle the prevailing wind, weather and tidal conditions.
second wind
▪ By the 1980s Borge had got his second wind and looked like going on for ever as an international touring artist.
▪ Cruising along on a second wind.
▪ I was drunk, okay, but I was getting my second wind by now.
▪ I won my race into a 1.5 metres per second wind.
▪ She had got her second wind.
▪ She seems to have acquired a second wind.
▪ So one perennial idea getting a second wind is the campaign to raise the pitifully low current minimum wage.
sharp wind/frost
▪ The ground was hardened by a sharp frost making the going firm on a fine, sunny day.
▪ There had been a sharp frost overnight and the ground was frozen hard.
stiff wind/breeze
▪ A stiff breeze riffles the brush.
▪ A stiff breeze shoves broken clouds across the moon.
▪ Daylight broke, a stiff breeze struck up and the sky clouded over.
▪ Put in on a shoe and it will wipe off in a stiff breeze.
▪ The mastheads of beached yachts tinkled in a stiff breeze.
▪ The next day was bright and cold, with a stiff breeze blowing straight down the field.
▪ The skill is running down the beach with all your equipment often in a stiff breeze.
▪ Within minutes a stiff wind was blowing over the harbor.
straw in the wind
▪ A final straw in the wind may be Tolkien's increasing desire to pull strands together.
▪ But even before 1947 there were straws in the wind.
▪ There were other straws in the wind.
▪ These various statements amounted to straws in the wind rather than a fully defined policy for ending the war.
strong wind/current/tide
▪ A strong wind was now blowing and there was a loud crack of thunder.
▪ Disadvantages: Lack of volume, thus difficult to sail in all but strong winds.
▪ Firefighters must contend with steep canyons and the strong winds, not to mention hot and dry conditions.
▪ In very strong winds the critical place for ground handling is at the tail.
▪ Rip A strong current, commonly experienced on surf beaches.
▪ The same materials, thrown into the Martian atmosphere by strong winds, give the Martian sky a pinkish color.
▪ There was a strong wind blowing from the north.
▪ Toward late afternoon, a strong wind came up and the sky clouded over.
throw/cast caution to the winds
▪ Anything less truly would be throwing caution to the winds.
▪ My friends and their little daughter went splashing blithely in so I threw caution to the winds and followed.
▪ The two of us threw caution to the winds and raced to the rescue.
twist/turn the knife (in the wound)
▪ Saints twisted the knife with a glorious try from Tony Sullivan, set up by Gary Connolly.
▪ The tragedy is that you have to twist the knife in your own gray matter to make this defense work.
twist/wrap/wind sb around your little finger
wind/air/water resistance
▪ A 3-phase 15° step-angle variable-reluctance motor has a rated phase current 01 2.0A and a phase winding resistance of 5.0 ohms.
▪ A car that squats low meets less wind resistance.
▪ If you want to lower the wind resistance on a car body how low do you want to get it?
▪ Naturally the water resistance was less, but modern tanning processes have improved leathers considerably.
▪ The actual path taken by the orbiter is complex and designed to minimize the effect of air resistance on the craft.
▪ This holds precisely because all objects fall at the same speed under gravity. Air resistance is being ignored here.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I hate watches that you have to wind.
▪ My watch has stopped - I must have forgotten to wind it.
▪ Route 101 winds along the coastline for several hundred miles.
▪ She wound the car window down to speak to the police officer.
▪ The staircase appears almost to be floating on air, as it winds its way up three stories.
▪ The trail winds through the hills and then down towards Ironhorse Falls.
▪ We decided to take the Blueridge Parkway, which winds its way through the Smoky Mountains.
▪ You wind the handle on the side to make the music play.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As the day winds on, he collects a few possums, a couple of skunks.
▪ He could maybe wind her up a bit if he had the chance.
▪ Herb could wind up on the Ginza in Tokyo.
▪ Once they were driving to meet friends for dinner when they spotted a pair winding across the highway.
▪ Try winding four or five large curlers into the crown to add height.
III.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
phase
▪ A 3-phase 15° step-angle variable-reluctance motor has a rated phase current 01 2.0A and a phase winding resistance of 5.0 ohms.
▪ Another consequence of the finite phase winding inductance is that the phase current can not be switched off instantaneously.
▪ The complete model must also take account of the voltages induced in the phase winding by rotor motion.
■ VERB
begin
▪ The Saigon River now begins to wind like a serpent.
▪ Moments later, we saw the Fast on the screen change to West and the numbers began to wind down backwards.
▪ The body of the creature began to wind around him.
▪ The road begins to wind downward; they are now passing along the main street.
▪ Business began to wind down as men tacitly awaited the new regime.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Once they were driving to meet friends for dinner when they spotted a pair winding across the highway.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Wind

Wind \Wind\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wound (wound) (rarely Winded); p. pr. & vb. n. Winding.] [OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windan (in comp.). Cf. Wander, Wend.]

  1. To turn completely, or with repeated turns; especially, to turn about something fixed; to cause to form convolutions about anything; to coil; to twine; to twist; to wreathe; as, to wind thread on a spool or into a ball.

    Whether to wind The woodbine round this arbor.
    --Milton.

  2. To entwist; to infold; to encircle.

    Sleep, and I will wind thee in arms.
    --Shak.

  3. To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern. ``To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus.''
    --Shak.

    In his terms so he would him wind.
    --Chaucer.

    Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do please And wind all other witnesses.
    --Herrick.

    Were our legislature vested in the prince, he might wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure.
    --Addison.

  4. To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate.

    You have contrived . . . to wind Yourself into a power tyrannical.
    --Shak.

    Little arts and dexterities they have to wind in such things into discourse.
    --Gov. of Tongue.

  5. To cover or surround with something coiled about; as, to wind a rope with twine. To wind off, to unwind; to uncoil. To wind out, to extricate. [Obs.] --Clarendon. To wind up.

    1. To coil into a ball or small compass, as a skein of thread; to coil completely.

    2. To bring to a conclusion or settlement; as, to wind up one's affairs; to wind up an argument.

    3. To put in a state of renewed or continued motion, as a clock, a watch, etc., by winding the spring, or that which carries the weight; hence, to prepare for continued movement or action; to put in order anew. ``Fate seemed to wind him up for fourscore years.''
      --Dryden. ``Thus they wound up his temper to a pitch.''
      --Atterbury.

    4. To tighten (the strings) of a musical instrument, so as to tune it. ``Wind up the slackened strings of thy lute.''
      --Waller.

Wind

Wind \Wind\, n. The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist; a winding.

Wind

Wind \Wind\, v. i.

  1. To turn completely or repeatedly; to become coiled about anything; to assume a convolved or spiral form; as, vines wind round a pole.

    So swift your judgments turn and wind.
    --Dryden.

  2. To have a circular course or direction; to crook; to bend; to meander; as, to wind in and out among trees.

    And where the valley winded out below, The murmuring main was heard, and scarcely heard, to flow.
    --Thomson.

    He therefore turned him to the steep and rocky path which . . . winded through the thickets of wild boxwood and other low aromatic shrubs.
    --Sir W. Scott.

  3. To go to the one side or the other; to move this way and that; to double on one's course; as, a hare pursued turns and winds.

    The lowing herd wind ?lowly o'er the lea.
    --Gray.

    To wind out, to extricate one's self; to escape. Long struggling underneath are they could wind Out of such prison.
    --Milton.

Wind

Wind \Wind\ (w[i^]nd, in poetry and singing often w[imac]nd; 277), n. [AS. wind; akin to OS., OFries., D., & G. wind, OHG. wint, Dan. & Sw. vind, Icel. vindr, Goth winds, W. gwynt, L. ventus, Skr. v[=a]ta (cf. Gr. 'ah`ths a blast, gale, 'ah^nai to breathe hard, to blow, as the wind); originally a p. pr. from the verb seen in Skr. v[=a] to blow, akin to AS. w[=a]wan, D. waaijen, G. wehen, OHG. w[=a]en, w[=a]jen, Goth. waian. [root]13

  1. Cf. Air, Ventail, Ventilate, Window, Winnow.] 1. Air naturally in motion with any degree of velocity; a current of air.

    Except wind stands as never it stood, It is an ill wind that turns none to good.
    --Tusser.

    Winds were soft, and woods were green.
    --Longfellow.

  2. Air artificially put in motion by any force or action; as, the wind of a cannon ball; the wind of a bellows.

  3. Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument.

    Their instruments were various in their kind, Some for the bow, and some for breathing wind.
    --Dryden.

  4. Power of respiration; breath.

    If my wind were but long enough to say my prayers, I would repent.
    --Shak.

  5. Air or gas generated in the stomach or bowels; flatulence; as, to be troubled with wind.

  6. Air impregnated with an odor or scent.

    A pack of dogfish had him in the wind.
    --Swift.

  7. A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the four winds.

    Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain.
    --Ezek. xxxvii. 9.

    Note: This sense seems to have had its origin in the East. The Hebrews gave to each of the four cardinal points the name of wind.

  8. (Far.) A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.

  9. Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words.

    Nor think thou with wind Of airy threats to awe.
    --Milton.

  10. (Zo["o]l.) The dotterel. [Prov. Eng.]

  11. (Boxing) The region of the pit of the stomach, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury; the mark. [Slang or Cant] Note: Wind is often used adjectively, or as the first part of compound words. All in the wind. (Naut.) See under All, n. Before the wind. (Naut.) See under Before. Between wind and water (Naut.), in that part of a ship's side or bottom which is frequently brought above water by the rolling of the ship, or fluctuation of the water's surface. Hence, colloquially, (as an injury to that part of a vessel, in an engagement, is particularly dangerous) the vulnerable part or point of anything. Cardinal winds. See under Cardinal, a. Down the wind.

    1. In the direction of, and moving with, the wind; as, birds fly swiftly down the wind.

    2. Decaying; declining; in a state of decay. [Obs.] ``He went down the wind still.'' --L'Estrange. In the wind's eye (Naut.), directly toward the point from which the wind blows. Three sheets in the wind, unsteady from drink. [Sailors' Slang] To be in the wind, to be suggested or expected; to be a matter of suspicion or surmise. [Colloq.] To carry the wind (Man.), to toss the nose as high as the ears, as a horse. To raise the wind, to procure money. [Colloq.] To take the wind or To have the wind, to gain or have the advantage. --Bacon. To take the wind out of one's sails, to cause one to stop, or lose way, as when a vessel intercepts the wind of another; to cause one to lose enthusiasm, or momentum in an activity. [Colloq.] To take wind, or To get wind, to be divulged; to become public; as, the story got wind, or took wind. Wind band (Mus.), a band of wind instruments; a military band; the wind instruments of an orchestra. Wind chest (Mus.), a chest or reservoir of wind in an organ. Wind dropsy. (Med.)

      1. Tympanites.

      2. Emphysema of the subcutaneous areolar tissue. Wind egg, an imperfect, unimpregnated, or addled egg. Wind furnace. See the Note under Furnace. Wind gauge. See under Gauge. Wind gun. Same as Air gun. Wind hatch (Mining), the opening or place where the ore is taken out of the earth. Wind instrument (Mus.), an instrument of music sounded by means of wind, especially by means of the breath, as a flute, a clarinet, etc. Wind pump, a pump moved by a windmill. Wind rose, a table of the points of the compass, giving the states of the barometer, etc., connected with winds from the different directions. Wind sail.

        1. (Naut.) A wide tube or funnel of canvas, used to convey a stream of air for ventilation into the lower compartments of a vessel.

        2. The sail or vane of a windmill.

          Wind shake, a crack or incoherence in timber produced by violent winds while the timber was growing.

          Wind shock, a wind shake.

          Wind side, the side next the wind; the windward side. [R.]
          --Mrs. Browning.

          Wind rush (Zo["o]l.), the redwing. [Prov. Eng.]

          Wind wheel, a motor consisting of a wheel moved by wind.

          Wood wind (Mus.), the flutes and reed instruments of an orchestra, collectively.

Wind

Wind \Wind\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Winded; p. pr. & vb. n. Winding.]

  1. To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate.

  2. To perceive or follow by the scent; to scent; to nose; as, the hounds winded the game.

    1. To drive hard, or force to violent exertion, as a horse, so as to render scant of wind; to put out of breath.

    2. To rest, as a horse, in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe.

      To wind a ship (Naut.), to turn it end for end, so that the wind strikes it on the opposite side.

Wind

Wind \Wind\, v. t. [From Wind, moving air, but confused in sense and in conjugation with wind to turn.] [imp. & p. p. Wound (wound), R. Winded; p. pr. & vb. n. Winding.] To blow; to sound by blowing; esp., to sound with prolonged and mutually involved notes. ``Hunters who wound their horns.''
--Pennant.

Ye vigorous swains, while youth ferments your blood, . . . Wind the shrill horn.
--Pope.

That blast was winded by the king.
--Sir W. Scott.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
wind

"to perceive by scent, get wind of," c.1400, from wind (n.1). Of horns, etc., "make sound by blowing through," from 1580s. Meaning "tire, put out of breath; render temporarily breathless" is from 1802, originally in pugilism, in reference to the effect of a punch in the stomach. Related: Winded; winding.

wind

"an act of winding round," 1825, from wind (v.1) . Earlier, "an apparatus for winding," late 14c., in which use perhaps from a North Sea Germanic word, such as Middle Dutch, Middle Low German winde "windlass."

wind

"air in motion," Old English wind "wind," from Proto-Germanic *windaz (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Middle Dutch, Dutch wind, Old Norse vindr, Old High German wind, German Wind, Gothic winds), from PIE *we-nt-o- "blowing," from root *we- "to blow" (cognates: Sanskrit va-, Greek aemi-, Gothic waian, Old English wawan, Old High German wajan, German wehen, Old Church Slavonic vejati "to blow;" Sanskrit vatah, Avestan vata-, Hittite huwantis, Latin ventus, Old Church Slavonic vetru, Lithuanian vejas "wind;" Lithuanian vetra "tempest, storm;" Old Irish feth "air;" Welsh gwynt, Breton gwent "wind").\n

\nNormal pronunciation evolution made this word rhyme with kind and rind (Donne rhymes it with mind), but it shifted to a short vowel 18c., probably from influence of windy, where the short vowel is natural. A sad loss for poets, who now must rhyme it only with sinned and a handful of weak words. Symbolic of emptiness and vanity since late 13c.\n\nI have forgot much, Cynara! gone with the wind.

[Ernest Dowson, 1896]

\nMeaning "breath" is attested from late Old English; especially "breath in speaking" (early 14c.), so long-winded, also "easy or regular breathing" (early 14c.), hence second wind in the figurative sense (by 1830), an image from the sport of hunting.\n

\nWinds "wind instruments of an orchestra" is from 1876. Figurative phrase which way the wind blows for "the current state of affairs" is suggested from c.1400. To get wind of "receive information about" is by 1809, perhaps inspired by French avoir le vent de. To take the wind out of (one's) sails in the figurative sense (by 1883) is an image from sailing, where a ship without wind can make no progress. Wind-chill index is recorded from 1939. Wind energy from 1976. Wind vane from 1725.
wind

"move by turning and twisting," Old English windan "to turn, twist, plait, curl, brandish, swing" (class III strong verb; past tense wand, past participle wunden), from Proto-Germanic *windan "to wind" (cognates: Old Saxon windan, Old Norse vinda, Old Frisian winda, Dutch winden, Old High German wintan, German winden, Gothic windan "to wind"), from PIE *wendh- "to turn, wind, weave" (cognates: Latin viere "twist, plait, weave," vincire "bind;" Lithuanian vyti "twist, wind").\n

\nRelated to wend, which is its causative form, and to wander. The past tense and past participle merged in Middle English. Meaning "to twine, entwine oneself around" is from 1590s; transitive sense of "turn or twist round and round (on something) is from c.1300. Meaning "set a watch, clockwork, etc. in operating mode by tightening its spring" is from c.1600. Wind down "come to a conclusion" is recorded from 1952; wind up "come to a conclusion" is from 1825; earlier in transitive sense "put (affairs) in order in advance of a final settlement" (1780). Winding sheet "shroud of a corpse" is attested from early 15c.

Wiktionary
wind

Etymology 1 n. (context countable uncountable English) Real or perceived movement of atmospheric air usually caused by convection or differences in air pressure. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To blow air through a wind instrument or horn to make a sound. 2 (context transitive English) To cause (someone) to become breathless, often by a blow to the abdomen. 3 (context reflexive English) To exhaust oneself to the point of being short of breath. 4 (context British English) To turn a boat or ship around, so that the wind strikes it on the opposite side. 5 (context transitive English) To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate. 6 (context transitive English) To perceive or follow by scent. 7 (context transitive English) To rest (a horse, etc.) in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe. 8 (context transitive English) To turn a windmill so that its sails face into the wind.(cite book title=The English Windmill author=Rex Wailes year=1954 page=104 text=...if a windmill is to work as effectively as possible its sails must always face the wind squarely; to effect this some means of turning them into the wind, or winding the mill, must be used.) Etymology 2

n. The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist. vb. 1 (lb en transitive) To turn coils of (a cord or something similar) around something. 2 (lb en transitive) To tighten the spring of a clockwork mechanism such as that of a clock. 3 To entwist; to enfold; to encircle. 4 (lb en ergative) To travel, or to cause something to travel, in a way that is not straight.

WordNet
wind
  1. n. air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure; "trees bent under the fierce winds"; "when there is no wind, row"; "the radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air current and out into the atmosphere" [syn: air current, current of air]

  2. a tendency or force that influences events; "the winds of change"

  3. breath; "the collision knocked the wind out of him"

  4. empty rhetoric or insincere or exaggerated talk; "that's a lot of wind"; "don't give me any of that jazz" [syn: idle words, jazz, nothingness]

  5. an indication of potential opportunity; "he got a tip on the stock market"; "a good lead for a job" [syn: tip, lead, steer, confidential information, hint]

  6. a musical instrument in which the sound is produced by an enclosed column of air that is moved by the breath [syn: wind instrument]

  7. a reflex that expels intestinal gas through the anus [syn: fart, farting, flatus, breaking wind]

  8. the act of winding or twisting; "he put the key in the old clock and gave it a good wind" [syn: winding, twist]

  9. [also: wound]

wind
  1. v. to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course; "the river winds through the hills"; "the path meanders through the vineyards"; "sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body" [syn: weave, thread, meander, wander]

  2. extend in curves and turns; "The road winds around the lake" [syn: curve]

  3. wrap or coil around; "roll your hair around your finger"; "Twine the thread around the spool" [syn: wrap, roll, twine] [ant: unwind]

  4. catch the scent of; get wind of; "The dog nosed out the drugs" [syn: scent, nose]

  5. coil the spring of (some mechanical device) by turning a stem; "wind your watch" [syn: wind up]

  6. form into a wreath [syn: wreathe]

  7. raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help; "hoist the bicycle onto the roof of the car" [syn: hoist, lift]

  8. [also: wound]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
WIND (AM)

WIND " AM 560" is a radio station based in Chicago, Illinois, broadcasting its talk radio format on 560 kHz. Its 5,000 Watt signal is heard throughout the Chicago metropolitan area, as well as parts of Southeast Wisconsin and Northwest Indiana, and transmits from a location near I-294 and Dempster Road in Des Plaines, with studios located in Elk Grove Village. WIND is owned by Salem Media, a company specializing primarily in Christian radio.

Wind (band)

Wind is a German musical group that mostly plays " schlager" music. The band is still active, more than 20 years after its foundation.

Wind (film)

Wind is a 1992 film. The movie was directed by Carroll Ballard and starred Matthew Modine, Jennifer Grey and Cliff Robertson.

Wind (song)

Wind (stylized as WIND) is a J-pop song by Japanese singer Koda Kumi and is the eleventh single in her 12 Singles Collection. Much like the other singles in the collection, this single is also limited to 50,000 copies. The single managed to chart at #3 on Oricon and charted for six weeks. The song was used as the theme song to Fuji TV's TORINO 2006 Chuukei (トリノ2006 中継 / TORINO 2006 Relay).

WIND was also used as Koda Kumi's final performance song in a-nation, which was changed from Shake It Up.

WIND

WIND may refer to:

  • WIND (spacecraft), a satellite and NASA science spacecraft launched in 1994
  • WIND (AM), an American radio station based in Chicago. Illinois
  • WIND Hellas, a Greek telecommunications provider
  • WIND Telecomunicazioni SpA, an Italian telecommunications provider
  • WIND Mobile, a Canadian wireless telecommunications provider
WIND (spacecraft)

The Global Geospace Science (GGS) Wind satellite is a NASA science spacecraft launched at 04:31:00 EST on November 1, 1994 from launch pad 17B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Merritt Island, Florida aboard a McDonnell Douglas Delta II 7925-10 rocket. Wind was designed and manufactured by Martin Marietta Astro Space Division in East Windsor, New Jersey. The satellite is a spin stabilized cylindrical satellite with a diameter of 2.4 m and a height of 1.8 m.

It was deployed to study radio and plasma that occur in the solar wind and in the Earth's magnetosphere before the solar wind reaches the Earth. The spacecraft's original mission was to orbit the Sun at the Lagrangian point, but this was delayed when the SOHO and ACE spacecraft were sent to the same location. Wind has been at continuously since 2004, and is still operating as of March 22, 2016. Wind currently has enough fuel to last roughly 53 years at L1. Wind continues to produce relevant research, with its data having contributed to over 1600 publications since 2009 and over 2200 publications prior to 2009. As of March 22, 2016 (not including 2016 publications), the total number of publications either directly or indirectly using Wind data is ~3903. Note that many of these publications utilized Wind data indirectly by citing the OMNI dataset at CDAWeb, which relies heavily upon Wind measurements.

Mission operations are conducted from the Multi-Mission Operations Center (MMOC) in Building 14 at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Wind data can be accessed using the SPEDAS software.

Wind is the sister ship to GGS Polar.

Wind (disambiguation)

Wind is the movement of air.

Wind may also refer to:

  • Wind god or the winds, deities representing wind
  • Solar wind, a stream of charged particles ejected from the sun
  • Planetary wind, the outgassing of light chemical elements from a planet's atmosphere into space
  • Wind instrument
    • Woodwind instrument
  • Flatulence

In music

  • Wind (band), a German musical group created in 1985
  • Winds (band), a Norwegian progressive metal band formed in 1998
  • The Wind (band), a California band formed in 2006
  • "Wind" (Akeboshi song)
  • w-inds., a J-Pop vocal group, formed in 2001

In computing and the Internet:

  • MSI Wind Netbook
  • MSI Wind PC

In telecom:

  • WIND (Italy), a mobile telephone carrier in Italy
  • WIND Hellas, a mobile telephone carrier in Greece
  • WIND Mobile, a mobile telephone carrier in Canada

In visual media:

  • Wind (film), a 1992 film about the America's Cup series of yachting races
  • Wind: A Breath of Heart, a 2002 visual novel

Other uses:

  • WIND (AM), a radio station in Chicago
  • Wind (Miami), a skyscraper in Miami
  • WIND (spacecraft), a NASA spacecraft launched in 1994 to study solar wind
  • Wind, a roadster by French automobile manufacturer Renault
WIND (Italy)

'''Wind Telecomunicazioni SpA ''' (also known as Wind Italy) is an Italian telecom operator which offers integrated mobile, fixed and Internet services (under Wind brand for mobile and business services and under Infostrada brand for home). Wind Italy has 21.6 million mobile customers with a market share of 22.9% (placing itself behind TIM and Vodafone Italy) and 2.8 million customers on fixed lines with a market share of 13.2% (that makes it the second largest fixed line operator, behind TIM). The company serves through a network of 159 owned stores and around 498 exclusive franchised outlets under the WIND brand, as well as 396 electronic chain stores.

Wind (Miami)

Wind Tower is a skyscraper in Downtown Miami, Florida, United States. It was completed in early 2008. It is located adjacent to the River Front East complex, on the north bank of the Miami River in Downtown. The building is located on Southwest 3rd Street and Miami Avenue. It is 501 ft (153 m) tall and has 41 floors. Floors 1-8 are used for parking, while floor 10 houses the building's recreation center, consisting of a pool area, racquetball court and fitness facility. The residential lobby is on the first floor. Floors 11-41 are used for residential units. The architect is Revuelta Vega Leon, who also designed the River Front East complex.

Usage examples of "wind".

Two of the towers were ablaze, black smoke pouring from their arrow loops and twisting in the light wind as it rose into the sky.

Give me the Saltings of Essex with the east winds blowing over them, and the primroses abloom upon the bank, and the lanes fetlock deep in mud, and for your share you may take all the scented gardens of Sinan and the cups and jewels of his ladies, with the fightings and adventures of the golden East thrown in.

It bore both the rich aroma of leaves being burnt in the fall and the faint perfume of wildflowers ablow in the spring, but it also held a third attar which seemed to be the breath of the Wind itself which none could ever set name to.

The wind gusted: canvas shook to a wind so hard and sand-edged it abraded his exposed hands.

Memphis had pursued its winding course through an alluvial country, made when abreast of Vicksburg a sharp turn to the northeast, as though determined to reach the bluffs but four miles distant.

The wound was still abscessed, its dressing changed twice a day, but now Harper and Isabella had to wipe the sweat that poured from Sharpe and listen to the ravings that he muttered day and night.

The reason given for this change of form was that it more conveniently allowed the lower road to pass between the springings and ensured the transmission of the wind stresses to the abutments without interrupting the cross-bracing.

Arums and acanthus and ivy filled every hollow, roses nodded from over every gate, while a carpet of violets and cyclamen and primroses stretched over the fields and freighted every wandering wind with fragrance.

The tornado of wind whistled loudly around us and up into the heavens, almost knocking Adeem off his feet.

He was in the cedar parlour, that adjoined the great hall, laid upon a couch, and suffering a degree of anguish from his wound, which few persons could have disguised, as he did.

Some hours after midnight, the Typhoon abated so much, that through the strenuous exertions of Starbuck and Stubb-- one engaged forward and the other aft--the shivered remnants of the jib and fore and main-top-sails were cut adrift from the spars, and went eddying away to leeward, like the feathers of an albatross, which sometimes are cast to the winds when that storm-tossed bird is on the wing.

It did not cost me much to get wind of the adventurer, but I felt angry that he had had the impudence to try and dupe me.

One of my few authenticated pieces of aeronautical information said that a plane must land into the wind.

But the storm came up sharper than ever that evening, and even had he wished to, Roy would have found it impossible to handle the aeroplane alone in the heavy wind that came now in puffs and now in a steady gale.

She shrieked to the ravens that croaked from afar, And she sighed to the gusts of the wild sweeping wind.