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Crossword clues for sock

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
sock
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a sock/underwear/cutlery etc drawer (=containing socks, underwear etc)
▪ He hid the gun in his sock drawer.
bobby socks
odd socks/gloves etc (=not a matching pair of socks etc)
▪ He was wearing odd socks.
tube sock
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
black
▪ Tommy, following instructions from the uniform department, had shiny new black ones, with black socks.
▪ The first snowstorm blew in from the north, and crows crossed the sky before it like thrown black socks.
▪ There were two more feet - black shoes, black socks.
▪ With or without turn-ups - but short nevertheless - worn with black shoes, black socks, patterned polo shirts.
▪ She was still wearing muddy breeches, black socks and Merlin s polo shirt.
green
▪ Robert struggled into his green socks.
▪ Then he buttoned the top over his undershirt, and pulled on a pair of green socks.
▪ He was wearing green socks, with the big toes sticking out.
odd
▪ For dumped along with several worn and odd socks was £500 he had hidden in the foot of one pair!
▪ On his feet were a pair of odd socks that were holed at the toes.
▪ Today, also odd sock day, students and lecturers will be selling themselves to carry out jobs for the week.
old
▪ Has Peter been smoking his old gym socks?
red
▪ Don't you dare tell Steven that you found this pair of red socks under my bed!
▪ It wasn't until 1970 that modern textile colouring made the now familiar red and white sock possible.
thick
▪ His feet are usually cocooned in two pairs of thick socks and heavy walking boots - even during hot weather!
▪ Through the gap at the end her thick grey sock protruded.
▪ Then she reached into her sack and took out a thick pair of socks.
white
▪ Nice white socks and a proper little coat.
▪ Jockey shorts on sale in outdoor bins on Broadway entrance him. White tube socks with different bands of color delight him.
▪ He was wearing blue trousers and little white socks.
White shirt, open at the neck; white pants, white shoes, white socks.
▪ Her white socks and sandals pristine on her little feet.
▪ Most fellows wore heavy white athletic socks.
▪ Chester, a chestnut gelding with three white socks, was a particular family pet.
▪ Forget the white socks and team shirts splashed with the logo of your favorite gas-jockeys.
woollen
▪ Willie stared in amazement at the fields, his thin woollen socks heaped around his ankles.
▪ He handed him a thick pair of woollen socks.
▪ One deaf centre contributed over 700 knitted pairs of woollen socks.
■ NOUN
ankle
▪ She was wearing Ray-Bans, a pale blue sunsuit, and white ankle socks under ivory-colored high-heeled espadrilles.
drawer
▪ He made piles of quarters in his sock drawer when he emptied his pockets at night.
■ VERB
blow
▪ So, he popped down to my office, stuck this demo on the turntable and it just blew my socks off.
knock
▪ The current crop of non-Windows databases can knock the socks off their predecessors.
▪ This in-your-face marketing could be forgiven if the food absolutely knocked your socks off.
▪ And yet the correlations just knock my socks off...
pull
▪ Maybe we needed to pull our socks up and we are trying to do just that.
▪ With 16 games to go Oxford have still got time to pull their socks up.
▪ You're not exactly a young lad any more so you've got to pull your socks up.
▪ I pulled on some socks and shoes and ran to the iron door.
put
▪ When Moran eventually appeared he did not speak but fussed excessively as he put on socks and boots.
▪ When we get up in the morning, we put on our socks, then our shoes.
▪ After a while he put on his socks and good shoes and the flannel suit coat.
▪ She put her socks and shoes at attention at the foot of the chair.
▪ The foot was too big to get a boot on so I put on two woolly socks and a plastic bag.
▪ The 170-pound Veras put some sock where his mouth is an inning later.
wash
▪ Earl Varney was squatting over the creek, dipping a stockinged foot into the water to wash his socks.
wear
▪ On holiday you might like to give your feet a rest and not wear socks.
▪ They wore high socks and had the largest pairs of shoes and, by implication, feet, Fong had ever seen.
▪ If you didn't wear socks, you should have done.
▪ Most fellows wore heavy white athletic socks.
▪ On his third raid Fielding wore a sock over his head.
▪ Keep feet dry and wear socks to cushion feet.
▪ He was wearing green socks, with the big toes sticking out.
▪ And you seem to get very mad and sometimes have a tantrum when some one even suggests that you wear these socks.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
ankle socks/boots
▪ Her ankle boots she had picked up in an army surplus store, and were the most comfortable she had ever possessed.
▪ Scottie is mainly black, with a white chest and white ankle socks on black legs.
▪ She was dressed casually in a pair of faded Levi jeans, brown ankle boots and a baggy white T-shirt.
▪ She was wearing Ray-Bans, a pale blue sunsuit, and white ankle socks under ivory-colored high-heeled espadrilles.
▪ Snakeskin zip-up ankle boots with open toe and heel, $ 134. 95.
▪ The boys, meanwhile, were yanking on elastic-sided ankle boots; very hip, very Beatles.
knock sb's socks off
▪ Cierra's performance knocked my socks off!
▪ And yet the correlations just knock my socks off...
▪ The current crop of non-Windows databases can knock the socks off their predecessors.
▪ This in-your-face marketing could be forgiven if the food absolutely knocked your socks off.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I just need to put my socks and shoes on.
▪ Larry gave him a sock in the arm.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A small boy in pajamas and socks wanders blearily behind his father, hands clapped over his ears.
▪ For dumped along with several worn and odd socks was £500 he had hidden in the foot of one pair!
▪ He had taken off his shoes and socks.
▪ He sat on the edge of the gazebo, wrung out the sock and dried himself as best he could.
▪ This arrangement suited Fogarty down to his socks.
▪ Willie stared in amazement at the fields, his thin woollen socks heaped around his ankles.
▪ You would carry this in your sock and give it back to the man, reclaiming your clothes on your way out.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
ankle socks/boots
▪ Her ankle boots she had picked up in an army surplus store, and were the most comfortable she had ever possessed.
▪ Scottie is mainly black, with a white chest and white ankle socks on black legs.
▪ She was dressed casually in a pair of faded Levi jeans, brown ankle boots and a baggy white T-shirt.
▪ She was wearing Ray-Bans, a pale blue sunsuit, and white ankle socks under ivory-colored high-heeled espadrilles.
▪ Snakeskin zip-up ankle boots with open toe and heel, $ 134. 95.
▪ The boys, meanwhile, were yanking on elastic-sided ankle boots; very hip, very Beatles.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Airline passengers are being socked with fuel surcharges.
▪ Bill socked her so hard that the bruise lasted a week.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ I began crying and swearing and socking myself on the head for being such a damn fool.
▪ We have to be ready to sock them in the mouth, to kick back when they kick us.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
sock

Soc \Soc\ (s[o^]k), n. [AS. s[=o]c the power of holding court, sway, domain, properly, the right of investigating or seeking; akin to E. sake, seek. Sake, Seek, and cf. Sac, and Soke.] [Written also sock, and soke.]

  1. (O. Eng. Law)

    1. The lord's power or privilege of holding a court in a district, as in manor or lordship; jurisdiction of causes, and the limits of that jurisdiction.

    2. Liberty or privilege of tenants excused from customary burdens.

  2. An exclusive privilege formerly claimed by millers of grinding all the corn used within the manor or township which the mill stands. [Eng.]

    Soc and sac (O. Eng. Law), the full right of administering justice in a manor or lordship.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
sock

"knitted or woven covering for the foot, short stocking," early 14c., from Old English socc "slipper, light shoe," from Latin soccus "slipper, light low-heeled shoe," probably a variant of Greek sykchos, word for a kind of shoe, perhaps from Phrygian or another Asiatic language. The Latin word was borrowed generally in West Germanic (Middle Dutch socke, Dutch sok, Old High German soc, German Socke). To knock the socks off (someone) "beat thoroughly" is recorded from 1845, American English colloquial. Teen slang sock hop is c.1950, from notion of dancing without shoes.

sock

"to stash (money) away as savings," 1942, American English, from the notion of hiding one's money in a sock (see sock (n.1)).

sock

1700, "to beat, hit hard, pitch into," of uncertain origin. To sock it to (someone) first recorded 1877.

sock

"a blow, a hit with the fist," 1700, from or related to sock (v.1).

Wiktionary
sock

Etymology 1 n. 1 A knitted or woven covering for the foot 2 A shoe worn by Greco-Roman comedy actors 3 A violent blow, punch 4 (context Internet slang English) sock puppet 5 (context firearms informal English) a gun sock Etymology 2

vb. (context transitive English) To hit or strike violently; to deliver a blow to. Etymology 3

n. A ploughshare.

WordNet
sock
  1. n. hosiery consisting of a cloth covering for the foot; worn inside the shoe; reaches to between the ankle and the knee

  2. a truncated cloth cone mounted on a mast; used (e.g., at airports) to show the direction of the wind [syn: windsock, air sock, wind sleeve, wind cone, drogue]

  3. v. hit hard [syn: bop, whop, whap, bonk, bash]

Wikipedia
Sock

A sock is an item of clothing worn on the feet and often covering the ankle and some part of the calf. Some type of shoe or boot is typically worn over socks. In ancient times, socks were made from leather or matted animal hair. In the late 16th century, machine-knit socks were first produced. Until 1800 both hand knitting and machine knitting were used to produce socks, but after 1800, machine knitting became the predominant method.

One of the roles of socks is absorbing perspiration. The foot is among the heaviest producers of sweat in the body, as it can produce over of perspiration per day. Socks help to absorb this sweat and draw it to areas where air can evaporate the perspiration. In cold environments, socks made from wool insulate the foot and decrease the risk of frostbite. Socks are worn with sport shoes (typically white-coloured socks) and dress shoes (typically dark-coloured socks). In addition to the numerous practical roles played by socks, they are also a fashion item, and they are available in myriad colours and patterns.

Usage examples of "sock".

Keeping pants tucked into socks, taking Atabrine tablets at mealtime, and spraying the island with DDT were all measures taken to help prevent the troops from getting infected.

We must be far below the ground level of the citadel, thought Borel, stumbling along in his socks and feeling most clammy and uncomfortable.

A protesting Prof Coypu was ripped from his midnight bed and found himself in deep space before be had put his socks on.

And between the top of the shoes and the cuffless bottom of the trouser legs there was at least an inch of space, occupied by canary yellow socks.

But, by way of recreation, after the supper dishes had been washed up, Gertie darned socks, mended shirts, patched trousers for the men folk or sewed on some garment for herself.

A bunch of socks and Jockey underwear, jeans, shaving and tooth stuff, some black T-shirts, running gear, and a dripless candlestick in a small brass holder.

I pictured her socks in the air, her little tennis socks with the balls at the heels, those ensanguined balls, bouncing.

Graham Airport, a small, blue-lit compound some twelve miles outside of Enwood, consisting of a short airstrip, a cinderblock building, an air sock, and little else.

I toyed with the idea of writing her a prescription for an artificial foot and a padded shoe with fillable socks, but then I remembered the Fat Man and TURFED her to Podiatry.

Here there was no need for warmth-inducing layers, for socks, for fingerless gloves which she had found in a shop in St Austell.

With his moist bright red mouth and fluffy white whiskers he had begun to look, if not respectable, at least harmless, and his shrunken body had assumed such a gossamery aspect that the matrons of his dingy neighbourhood, as they watched him shuffle along in the fluorescent halo of his dotage, felt almost like crooning over him and would buy him cherries and hot raisin cakes and the loud socks he affected.

Greg Grom was highly educated superstitious rabble, and he was scared out of his socks.

Approaching a huge hymenium tree, he saw hundreds of bird nests hanging like stuffed socks off the branches.

She took her Keds off and got under the covers with him, still in her jeans, socks, and sweatshirt.

I looked down into the hole for a moment, not at the dirt and rocks, but at his shoes, an old pair of Keds, and then at his gray socks and at the cuffs of his jeans.