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sick
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
sick
I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cruel/sick joke (=very unkind)
▪ When I heard he had cancer, at first I thought it was some kind of sick joke.
a sick infant
▪ Sick infants are treated in the intensive care nursery.
be sick at heart (=to feel very unhappy)
▪ He was too sick at heart to know what to say.
be sick/frantic with worry
▪ The girl's mother was sick with worry over her missing daughter.
heartily sick of
▪ Madge had become heartily sick of the city.
phoned in sick (=telephoned to say that she was ill and could not come to work)
▪ She phoned in sick.
physically ill/sick
▪ The thought made her feel physically ill.
rang in sick (=telephoned to say he was ill)
▪ He rang in sick every morning for a week.
sick building syndrome
▪ A common household fungus can contribute to sick building syndrome.
sick leave (also medical leave American English) (= time that you are allowed away from work because you are ill)
▪ The form must be filled in as soon as you return from sick leave.
sick leave
▪ He has been on sick leave for more than three months.
sick note
sick pay (=pay when you are ill)
▪ As a self-employed person, you get no sick pay or benefits.
sick pay
signed off sick
▪ For the last month, she has been signed off sick from work.
violently sick/ill
▪ He rushed to the bathroom, where he was violently sick.
worried sick/stiff (=extremely worried)
▪ Where have you been? We’ve been worried sick!
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
as
▪ In fact, the dividing lines were often difficult to draw between those formally described as sick and those described as early-retired.
▪ You look as sick as I feel.
▪ He is not as sick as he thinks he is.
▪ Homosexuality aroused revulsion in about a quarter of the respondents, another quarter seeing it as sick, odd or ridiculous.
▪ But not as sick as Vicky, who every morning now staggered up to retch helplessly into the slop bucket.
▪ Other voters are as sick of the situation as Dmitri is.
▪ Peter Beardsley International Football As sick as a parrot.
chronically
▪ It was criticised as apparently unequal to all the needs of chronically sick children and helpless geriatrics.
▪ Private insurance schemes clearly do not wish to become involved with either the mentally ill or the chronically sick.
▪ For a widow or for a chronically sick parent with three children, the total loss is almost £20 or £1,030 perannum.
▪ Two members lived in local authority homes and 15 in households characterised by unemployment and chronically sick and/or lone parents.
▪ Elderly people and chronically sick people in residential and nursing homes will not be the only ones to benefit.
▪ It has been converted to provide accommodation for up to 60 chronically sick or severely disabled residents.
▪ The unemployed, the poor, the chronically sick and disabled and of course children would need to be covered by public money.
▪ The chronically sick sought him out endlessly for healing from their never-ending weakness.
so
▪ It makes you so sick that you lose the baby.
▪ They were young and so sick with the absence of women they had taken to calves.
▪ I have never seen her looking so sick and skinny.
▪ I am so sick of judges writing psalms to arbitration.
▪ She felt so sick that it was lunchtime before she could drag herself out of bed and come downstairs.
▪ After the Stone Roses experience I wasn't going to do anything again, I was so sick of it all.
▪ Is our society really so sick that we call this scientific advance?
too
▪ The lifts were for transporting patients too sick to protest to departments on higher floors.
▪ Maybe he thought I was too sick to run.
▪ February Henrietta feeling too sick to remember anything about February.
▪ If some one had a wound, or looked too weak or too sick, they were selected for the gas chamber.
▪ I knew she was unhappy about his going away for a whole weekend when she was too sick to accompany him.
▪ I already called, said you were too sick.
▪ It will not leave me too sick, it will not punish me too much.
▪ I try to ask her, but I feel too sick.
very
▪ And soon he had the good news that this tiny refugee was fit enough to continue - though still very sick.
▪ I had the luxury of not being very sick.
▪ Do whatever is necessary to get a very sick young infant seen.
▪ He was always in the cheerful rooms upstairs, where the Sisters kept a constant vigil on premature and very sick children.
▪ The scene in Basic Instinct with Michael was a very weird and very sick sort of love.
▪ Now she is very sick again.
▪ Some children had last-minute treats of ice cream and sweets which made them very sick.
▪ Please, sir, my donkey Violetta is very sick.
violently
▪ When they leave, Ann is violently sick.
▪ A moment later he turned to his right and was violently sick.
▪ Feeling her stomach churn with the painful memories, she leaned sideways and was violently sick.
▪ I managed to drive out of the hospital but I had to stop the car and was violently sick.
▪ I can cheerfully admit that it made no impact on me apart from an overwhelming urge to be violently sick.
▪ The stench is so powerful that you feel - and sometimes are - violently sick.
▪ In mid-sentence he broke off, turned ghastly pale and rushed to the bathroom, where he was violently sick.
▪ Rex turned away and was violently sick. 11 25.
■ NOUN
bay
▪ He padded them out with a torn sheet from sick bay to stop them making any noise.
▪ His weight dropped from 145 to 97 pounds, and he had to be placed in the camp sick bay.
▪ He took one from the cupboard in the sick bay.
▪ Go back to the sick bay and tell him to take it out again at once.
building
▪ It believes that the economic evidence on the significance of sick building syndrome is of the greatest importance.
child
▪ It is a terrible thing to be clung to by a sick child if you are not used to it.
▪ Families told researchers that they had found greater solidarity and amity in their family life now that they had a sick child.
▪ Parents have been promised the right to stay in hospital with their sick children at all times.
▪ His tomb is believed to be a place for healing sick children.
▪ She was turned down on the grounds of lack of experience with sick children.
▪ He was always in the cheerful rooms upstairs, where the Sisters kept a constant vigil on premature and very sick children.
▪ Most of it will be spent providing hospital accommodation for parents who want to stay with their sick children.
▪ A sick child was the first step toward utter family ruin.
feeling
▪ A sick feeling was beginning in the base of her stomach, growing, filling her with blind misery.
▪ Finally, a sick feeling in his belly, as though something there was twisted, pulsing pain. he left the room.
▪ Meryl followed the young detective constable to the library door with a sick feeling in her stomach.
▪ Nina remained on the fringe of the crowd, a sick feeling in the pit of her stomach.
▪ Bernice felt a sick feeling begin to develop in her stomach.
joke
▪ In 1981, you couldn't pass off wearing a swastika as a sick joke.
▪ I thought it was a sick joke, but it wasn't.
▪ Oh, and plantation workers sometimes earn as little as 25 cents a day ... These are sick jokes.
▪ Either way, it was an occasion for black humour, or at least sick jokes.
▪ It sounds like a sick joke but they are deadly serious.
leave
▪ The woman suffered bruising to the head and body in the impact and went on sick leave from work.
▪ Then they learn that Lincoln employees receive no company-paid dental insurance benefits, no paid holidays, and have no sick leave.
▪ If the technology is not firm-wide train an extra secretary to cover for others who are on holiday or sick leave.
▪ Accumulating days for sick leave proved to be a trap.
▪ Generally a trend of sick leave or requests for transfers by other women who have worked for this person will emerge.
▪ I could take the afternoon off from work as sick leave.
▪ J Nyberg had now returned from sick leave.
▪ It meant giving up the security of my salary, together with sick leave, fringe benefits, and long vacation time.
pay
▪ A key element of the package was a reduction in guaranteed sick pay.
▪ The terms of any company sick pay scheme also need to be considered.
▪ Kohl wanted to reduce sick pay to 80 percent of wages.
▪ Thus, one could consider such factors as hours, sick pay, pension schemes and holiday entitlements.
▪ Of course, employers' sick pay does not go on indefinitely.
▪ I remember when sick pay and conditions were added and when, under the wages councils, wage rates were raised.
▪ One feature of the absence screens is that sick pay and absence entitlements are displayed.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be sick of/can't stand/hate the sight of sb/sth
be taken ill/sick
▪ At two years and a half, he was taken ill with pneumonia.
▪ During the siege of Bristol he was taken ill with the plague and again feared for his life.
▪ His sister ate one, and was taken ill.
▪ Several of the team were taken ill.
▪ Taylor, 47, was taken ill last week while working on his third album in a Florida recording studio.
▪ Then Mum had cancer and Dad was taken ill at work.
▪ We were just about to go abroad when our usual nanny was taken ill and was advised not to travel.
▪ Whilst in Fort William she was taken ill with stomach pains.
maternity/sick/compassionate leave
▪ Accumulating days for sick leave proved to be a trap.
▪ Generally a trend of sick leave or requests for transfers by other women who have worked for this person will emerge.
▪ I could take the afternoon off from work as sick leave.
▪ If the technology is not firm-wide train an extra secretary to cover for others who are on holiday or sick leave.
▪ Joe and Eileen were given short compassionate leave and Stephen came home for the funeral.
▪ She was then shown a picture taken at the farewell party at Champion Spark Plugs just before Paula went on maternity leave.
▪ These work-force-centered benefits helped businesses retain their most valuable employees. Sick leave policies changed.
▪ When they go on sick leave, their aggregate take-home pay is actually higher than when they are on the job.
report sick
▪ Spurs clearly felt the loss of their big centre-back Guy Butters, who had reported sick on the coach journey to Essex.
▪ Time allowed 00:20 Read in studio Trade unions at Rover Cars have attacked plans to penalise staff who continually report sick.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Gary phoned to say that he's off sick today.
▪ Grant Hill played despite being sick with the flu for the past ten days.
▪ I'm sorry I didn't reply to your e-mail. I was in bed sick for a couple of days.
▪ Is this somebody's idea of a sick joke?
▪ One of the suspect's neighbors described him as "a very sick man."
▪ Sheila spent months looking after her sick mother.
▪ We were dirty, hungry, cold and sick with exhaustion.
▪ Where's Mary today? I hope she's not sick again.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But they also can't develop if people are sick and illiterate.
▪ I get travel sick, anyway.
▪ I was very sick for twenty-four hours, and Michael was coping with everything.
▪ Miguel was sick of being part of a machine that was eating up the city and spitting out the bones.
▪ Nall should have kept bringing the time down herself, but she got sick.
▪ So the family rule about illness, as Carrie Semple experienced it, was that the best child was a sick child.
II.noun
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ On average, companies lose twelve days per employee per year as a result of sickness.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ They provided hospitality to travellers, and people with property endowed foundations for the care of the old and the sick.
▪ Under such circumstances it is frequently the sick who are the first to leave.
III.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be sick of/can't stand/hate the sight of sb/sth
maternity/sick/compassionate leave
▪ Accumulating days for sick leave proved to be a trap.
▪ Generally a trend of sick leave or requests for transfers by other women who have worked for this person will emerge.
▪ I could take the afternoon off from work as sick leave.
▪ If the technology is not firm-wide train an extra secretary to cover for others who are on holiday or sick leave.
▪ Joe and Eileen were given short compassionate leave and Stephen came home for the funeral.
▪ She was then shown a picture taken at the farewell party at Champion Spark Plugs just before Paula went on maternity leave.
▪ These work-force-centered benefits helped businesses retain their most valuable employees. Sick leave policies changed.
▪ When they go on sick leave, their aggregate take-home pay is actually higher than when they are on the job.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Sick

Sick \Sick\, a. [Compar. Sicker; superl. Sickest.] [OE. sek, sik, ill, AS. se['o]c; akin to OS. siok, seoc, OFries. siak, D. ziek, G. siech, OHG. sioh, Icel. sj?kr, Sw. sjuk, Dan. syg, Goth. siuks ill, siukan to be ill.]

  1. Affected with disease of any kind; ill; indisposed; not in health. See the Synonym under Illness.

    Simon's wife's mother lay sick of a fever.
    --Mark i. 30.

    Behold them that are sick with famine.
    --Jer. xiv. 18.

  2. Affected with, or attended by, nausea; inclined to vomit; as, sick at the stomach; a sick headache.

  3. Having a strong dislike; disgusted; surfeited; -- with of; as, to be sick of flattery.

    He was not so sick of his master as of his work.
    --L'Estrange.

  4. Corrupted; imperfect; impaired; weakned.

    So great is his antipathy against episcopacy, that, if a seraphim himself should be a bishop, he would either find or make some sick feathers in his wings.
    --Fuller.

    Sick bay (Naut.), an apartment in a vessel, used as the ship's hospital.

    Sick bed, the bed upon which a person lies sick.

    Sick berth, an apartment for the sick in a ship of war.

    Sick headache (Med.), a variety of headache attended with disorder of the stomach and nausea.

    Sick list, a list containing the names of the sick.

    Sick room, a room in which a person lies sick, or to which he is confined by sickness.

    Note: [These terms, sick bed, sick berth, etc., are also written both hyphened and solid.]

    Syn: Diseased; ill; disordered; distempered; indisposed; weak; ailing; feeble; morbid.

Sick

Sick \Sick\, n. Sickness. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Sick

Sick \Sick\, v. i. To fall sick; to sicken. [Obs.]
--Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
sick

"to chase, set upon" (as in command sick him!), 1845, dialectal variant of seek. Used as an imperative to incite a dog to attack a person or animal; hence "cause to pursue." Related: Sicked; sicking.

sick

"unwell," Old English seoc "ill, diseased, feeble, weak; corrupt; sad, troubled, deeply affected," from Proto-Germanic *seukaz, of uncertain origin. The general Germanic word (Old Norse sjukr, Danish syg, Old Saxon siok, Old Frisian siak, Middle Dutch siec, Dutch ziek, Old High German sioh, Gothic siuks "sick, ill"), but in German and Dutch displaced by krank "weak, slim," probably originally with a sense of "twisted, bent" (see crank (n.)).\n

\nRestricted meaning "having an inclination to vomit, affected with nausea" is from 1610s; sense of "tired or weary (of something), disgusted from satiety" is from 1590s; phrase sick and tired of is attested from 1783. Meaning "mentally twisted" in modern colloquial use is from 1955, a revival of the word in this sense from 1550s (sense of "spiritually or morally corrupt" was in Old English, which also had seocmod "infirm of mind"); sick joke is from 1958.

sick

"those who are sick," Old English seoce, from sick (adj).

Wiktionary
sick

Etymology 1

  1. 1 Having an urge to vomit. 2 (context chiefly American English) In poor health. n. 1 Sick people in general as a group. 2 (context colloquial English) vomit. v

  2. 1 To vomit. 2 (context obsolete intransitive English) To fall sick; to sicken. Etymology 2

    vb. (context rare English) (alternative spelling of sic English)

WordNet
sick
  1. adj. not in good physical or mental health; "ill from the monotony of his suffering" [syn: ill] [ant: well]

  2. feeling nausea; feeling about to vomit [syn: nauseated, queasy, sickish]

  3. affected with madness or insanity; "a man who had gone mad" [syn: brainsick, crazy, demented, distracted, disturbed, mad, unbalanced, unhinged]

  4. having a strong distaste from surfeit; "grew more and more disgusted"; "fed up with their complaints"; "sick of it all"; "sick to death of flattery"; "gossip that makes one sick"; "tired of the noise and smoke" [syn: disgusted, fed up(p), sick(p), sick of(p), tired of(p)]

sick

v. eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth; "After drinking too much, the students vomited"; "He purged continuously"; "The patient regurgitated the food we gave him last night" [syn: vomit, vomit up, purge, cast, cat, be sick, disgorge, regorge, retch, puke, barf, spew, spue, chuck, upchuck, honk, regurgitate, throw up] [ant: keep down]

sick

n. people who are sick; "they devote their lives to caring for the sick"

Wikipedia
Sick (The Young Ones)

"Sick" was the eleventh episode of British sitcom The Young Ones. It was written by Ben Elton, Rik Mayall and Lise Mayer, and directed by Paul Jackson. It was first aired on BBC2 on 12 June 1984. The episode features the song " Our House", performed by Madness, the only band to appear on the show twice.

Sick

Sick may refer to:

  • Having a disease (physical or mental)
  • Vomiting (literal or metaphorical)
Sick (Sow album)

Sick is the second studio album by Sow released in 1998. This album spawned no singles. At this time Sow comprises Anna Wildsmith with "Boys", where the Boys are Raymond Watts, Euphonic, Sascha Konietzko, Hoppy Kamiyama & Optical 8, Martin King, and Günter Schulz.

Sick (Massacra album)

Sick is the fourth album by French metal band Massacra. It introduces a notable change in the musical direction, including mid-paced thrash and groove elements. It was released in 1994.

Sick (magazine)

Sick was a satirical-humor magazine published from 1960 to 1980, lasting 134 issues. It was created by comic-book writer-artist Joe Simon, who also edited the title until the late 1960s. Sick was published by Crestwood Publications until issue #62 (1968), when it was taken over by Hewfred Publications. Charlton Comics took over publishing the magazine in 1976 with issue #109.

Sick 's original mascot was a blank-faced little physician. He was later replaced by a mascot named Huckleberry Fink, whose design was similar to that of Mad 's Alfred E. Neuman, and whose motto, instead of Neuman's "What, me worry?", was "Why Try Harder?"

Its contributors included Mad regulars Angelo Torres and Jack Davis, as well as Howard Cruse, Arnold Drake, Ernie Schroeder, Washington correspondent Jim Atkins and B.K. Taylor. Its art director from 1961 until his death in 1967 was the noted comic-book artist Bob Powell.

In his book, American Comic Book Chronicles 1960–1964, comic book historian John Wells comments:

"Where Cracked was content as a mimic, Sick took its title as a mission statement. Published by Crestwood Publications (whose color comics imprint was Prize Comics), issue #1 (September 1960) declared itself “a grim collection of revolting humor.” Financed by Teddy Epstein and packaged by industry legend Joe Simon, the magazine was built on the more tasteless, politically incorrect humor dispensed by stand-up comics like the controversial Lenny Bruce. The comedian is said to have bought 100 copies of any issue of ‘’Sick’’ featuring excerpts on his routines that he then mailed to prospective clients. Discussing Sick #1, Simon wrote:

   'I have found a humor writer named Dee Caruso who had been writing comedy routines and one-liners for some of the leading theatrical comic personalities. Dee got some of his collaborators together and they wrote the entire book as if it were a routine for a stand-up comedian such as Don Adams or Joey Bishop, both of whom had bought Dee’s material. Transforming these ‘wordy’ routines to eye-catching graphics was a problem but our artists got into the spirit and did well.'”

Sick (song)

"Sick" is the first single from Adelitas Way's second studio album, Home School Valedictorian, released on March 11, 2011.It is the band's third single in overall. This the band's first single to hit the ''Billboard Alternative Rock Song chart reaching No. 29 and staying on the chart for 14 weeks. The song reached No. 2 on the U.S Mainstream Rock chart.

Sick (The Walking Dead)

"Sick" is the second episode of the third season of the post-apocalyptic horror television series The Walking Dead, which aired on AMC in the United States on October 21, 2012.

Sick (EP)

Sick EP is the debut extended play by American metalcore band Beartooth and is produced by Caleb Shomo formerly of the band Attack Attack! who sang and recorded all the instruments used on the album. It was released on July 26, 2013 through Red Bull Records for free download.

Sick (CeCe Peniston song)

"Sick" is a 2014 song by the singer CeCe Peniston, released as a digital single through Spectra Music Group on November 4, 2014. The gospel-soaked R&B work features contributions by Paris Toon along with his musical body self-titled as Mother's Favorite Child.

Usage examples of "sick".

Right now the only one of us tars actually working was Halle, who was chasing down a pool of vomit sicked up by Pael, the Academician, the only non-Navy personnel on the bridge.

I felt sick to my stomach, and grateful that Achates was such a beautiful and healthy child.

Sirius could now travel far afield and doctor sick sheep without Pugh having to accompany him.

If you got the power, or know somebody that does, you can be ageless, nearly immortal, just about never get sick, grow back lost limbs, even, under certain circumstances, be brought back from the dead.

Plo Koon and Ki-Adi-Mundi winked out, as Obi-Wan and Agen Kolar rose and spoke together in tones softly grave, as Yoda and Mace Windu walked from the room, Anakin could only sit, sick at heart, stunned with helplessness.

A bomb aimer was sick in the bar after drinking whisky mixed with rum.

He felt sick at the sight of the dry bloodstains on the floor, but there was a certain poetic justice to be found: also on the floor were the same bungi cords that Marks and Akers had used to tie him up.

Then I felt dizzy, trying to hold myself on all fours, and sick to my stomach.

That she was feeling all right and getting sick of me looking worried.

Mohammedan travelers speak of ambergris swallowed by whales, who are made sick and regorge it.

Simone Amiot had not yet had a chance to speak to many of the German volunteers--the numbers of sick and dying exceeded a thousand now, and all her time was spent in the medical tent.

Six months ago, sick with food poisoning in some nameless hospital, he had seen this same look of blind struggle in the eyes of amnesiacs or men dying of cancer.

It made him sick to be playing the part here in Amour Magique, but he always did what he had to do.

By nine-fifty I had decided to tell him that Amrita or the baby was sick.

With the ageing mistress sick at Anet some said dyingthat tension must increase.