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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
shit
I.interjection
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be hot shitAmerican Englishinformal not polite (= used about someone or something that people think is very good)
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a crock (of shit)
▪ That's a crock. She'd never even met him before.
be a piece of shit/crap
be full of crap/shit/it
▪ Black cats are full of it, while pale animals have less.
▪ His head was full of it.
▪ I thought she was full of shit, but what the hell?
▪ Television is full of it about election time.
▪ The very donkey boys were full of it.
▪ Usually her hands are full of it.
be in deep shit
jack (shit)
▪ It doesn't look like they did jack shit.
▪ And there was a further twenty second time penalty for leaving a jack out of place.
▪ Henry turned to her and held up the jack.
▪ Money for plaintiffs' lawyers and court costs will jack the total up to some $ 550m.
▪ On the final end he moved the jack again to add another and finish 20-17 ahead.
kick the shit out of sb
not give a damn/shit etc
▪ As David said, the union simply does not give a shit.
▪ For opening doors and not giving a damn about what anybody else has to say to it.
▪ I think their nonchalance about not caring or not giving a damn about record sales is just not true.
▪ It was nature that had turned her grey, she said, and she did not give a damn.
▪ My ideal would be to not give a damn as much as possible.
▪ This time she yelled his name, not giving a damn if she looked a fool, and dived after him.
tough shit!
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
deep
▪ We know we're in deep shit.
▪ We knew we were in some deep shit at that time.
full
▪ And, by the way-Clive's full of shit.
▪ They're so full of shit.
▪ I thought she was full of shit, but what the hell?
▪ You have a head full of bad shit.
little
▪ Bit me, the little shit.
▪ And of course, that little shit has no right to try and ambush me or get me with a booby trap!
▪ One night I got stoned and saw exactly what I'd become - a spoiled, heartless little shit.
▪ This is his umpteenth bust on similar charges, the little shit.
▪ Can't stand the little shit, personally.
▪ Young players slow down as their bodies put on weight ... especially thin little shits like Sharpe.
tough
▪ People must believe that you're such a tough shit you would snap them in half if they sneezed.
▪ Wednesday was good, Thursday is bad. Tough shit, but with the Dead them's the breaks.
■ VERB
beat
▪ That fish wasn't scheduled to beat the shit out of Doug.
▪ He caught her and dragged her back home and beat the shit out of her.
feel
▪ It's a terrible thing to be told that and then to do what the director says and it feels like shit.
▪ The school made you feel like shit.
▪ Everytime I am about to go to a cup match I imagine myself travelling back home feeling like shit.
▪ And it used to make me feel like shit to hear that.
get
▪ Considering we ve got such shit players and shit management that s not bad is it.
▪ It may be so, but we have to get off that shit.
▪ People take time to get into all that shit What's the state of the funk today?
▪ You got the shit kicked outta you.
▪ She definitely couldn't stay with us: Dad would get in shit with Anwar.
▪ He had to get out of this shit.
▪ We get treated like shit in this job.
▪ I know you better get your shit together with her.
give
▪ I guess if they are reasonable there is no reason to give them any shit.
▪ You think they give a shit about the producers?
▪ I skate down the road a bit before I shout at cops - or anyone that was giving me some shit.
▪ They could give a shit if you like this stuff.
▪ Some of them didn't work out too well ... Who really gives a shit?
▪ And no one gave a shit about the pressure of it all.
▪ But what Gunshot have got over those they're criticising is that they don't give a shit who they upset.
▪ Then again, Metheny has never seemed to give a shit, which is the way it should be in jazz experimentation.
kick
▪ They retailed around £38-£45, depending on the model, and for sound kicked the shit out of my Levin.
look
▪ Here goes ... I expected to look like shit but this was ridiculous.
▪ You looked like shit the other night.
▪ We really do look like shit.
▪ I try to think of nice ways to comment on his appearance without saying he looks like shit.
▪ Come in to work next morning looking shit.
▪ The cities all looked like shit alley to me.
▪ You can stay home and look like shit.
treat
▪ We get treated like shit in this job.
▪ There are people I treat like shit.
▪ Everybody always treats me like shit.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Just put your shit on the chair over there.
▪ She put up with a lot of shit from her ex-husband.
▪ There's a pile of dog shit on the sidewalk.
▪ What are you looking at, you little shit?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But the shit proliferates, he wrote, and there is still much to be done.
▪ I mean, shit, I got to know what he's thinking, right?
▪ So you heard this shit from Amelia?
▪ The room began to smell of feathers and shit.
▪ There are people I treat like shit.
▪ We really do look like shit.
▪ Why are you into this kind of shit?
III.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a crock (of shit)
▪ That's a crock. She'd never even met him before.
be a piece of shit/crap
be full of crap/shit/it
▪ Black cats are full of it, while pale animals have less.
▪ His head was full of it.
▪ I thought she was full of shit, but what the hell?
▪ Television is full of it about election time.
▪ The very donkey boys were full of it.
▪ Usually her hands are full of it.
be in deep shit
jack (shit)
▪ It doesn't look like they did jack shit.
▪ And there was a further twenty second time penalty for leaving a jack out of place.
▪ Henry turned to her and held up the jack.
▪ Money for plaintiffs' lawyers and court costs will jack the total up to some $ 550m.
▪ On the final end he moved the jack again to add another and finish 20-17 ahead.
tough shit!
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ The bread holds it below till you're ready to shit.
IV.adjective
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a crock (of shit)
▪ That's a crock. She'd never even met him before.
be a piece of shit/crap
jack (shit)
▪ It doesn't look like they did jack shit.
▪ And there was a further twenty second time penalty for leaving a jack out of place.
▪ Henry turned to her and held up the jack.
▪ Money for plaintiffs' lawyers and court costs will jack the total up to some $ 550m.
▪ On the final end he moved the jack again to add another and finish 20-17 ahead.
kick the shit out of sb
not give a damn/shit etc
▪ As David said, the union simply does not give a shit.
▪ For opening doors and not giving a damn about what anybody else has to say to it.
▪ I think their nonchalance about not caring or not giving a damn about record sales is just not true.
▪ It was nature that had turned her grey, she said, and she did not give a damn.
▪ My ideal would be to not give a damn as much as possible.
▪ This time she yelled his name, not giving a damn if she looked a fool, and dived after him.
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
shit

Old English scitan, from Proto-Germanic *skit- (cognates: North Frisian skitj, Dutch schijten, German scheissen), from PIE *skei- "to cut, split, divide, separate" (see shed (v.)). The notion is of "separation" from the body (compare Latin excrementum, from excernere "to separate," Old English scearn "dung, muck," from scieran "to cut, shear;" see sharn). It is thus a cousin to science and conscience.\n

\n"Shit" is not an acronym. The notion that it is a recent word might be partly because it was taboo from c.1600 and rarely appeared in print (neither Shakespeare nor the KJV has it), and even in "vulgar" publications of the late 18c. it is disguised by dashes. It drew the wrath of censors as late as 1922 ("Ulysses" and "The Enormous Room"), scandalized magazine subscribers in 1957 (a Hemingway story in "Atlantic Monthly") and was omitted from some dictionaries as recently as 1970 ("Webster's New World").\n

\nExtensive slang usage; meaning "to lie, to tease" is from 1934; that of "to disrespect" is from 1903. Shite, now a jocular or slightly euphemistic and chiefly British variant of the noun, formerly a dialectal variant, reflects the vowel in the Old English verb (compare German scheissen); the modern verb has been influenced by the noun. Shat is a humorous past tense form, not etymological, first recorded 18c. To shit bricks "be very frightened" attested by 1961. The connection between fear and involuntary defecation has generated expressions in English since 14c. (the image also is in Latin), and probably also is behind scared shitless (1936).\nAlle þe filþ of his magh ['maw'] salle breste out atte his fondament for drede. ["Cursor Mundi," early 14c.]

shit

Old English scitte "purging, diarrhea," from source of shit (v.). Sense of "excrement" dates from 1580s (Old English had scytel, Middle English shitel for "dung, excrement;" the usual 14c. noun seems to have been turd). Use for "obnoxious person" is since at least 1508; meaning "misfortune, trouble" is attested from 1937. Shit-faced "drunk" is 1960s student slang; shit list is from 1942. Up shit creek "in trouble" is from 1937 (compare salt river). To not give a shit "not care" is from 1922. Pessimistic expression Same shit different day attested by 1989. Shitticism is Robert Frost's word for scatological writing.\n\nThe expression [the shit hits the fan] is related to, and may well derive from, an old joke. A man in a crowded bar needed to defecate but couldn't find a bathroom, so he went upstairs and used a hole in the floor. Returning, he found everyone had gone except the bartender, who was cowering behind the bar. When the man asked what had happened, the bartender replied, 'Where were you when the shit hit the fan?'

[Hugh Rawson, "Wicked Words," 1989]

Wiktionary
shit

Etymology 1

  1. 1 (context vulgar colloquial English) Of poor quality; worthless. 2 (context vulgar colloquial English) nasty; despicable. n. 1 (context countable uncountable colloquial vulgar English) Solid excretory product evacuated from the bowels; feces. 2 (context countable colloquial vulgar in the plural definite English) ('''the shits''') diarrhea. 3 (context countable colloquial vulgar English) An instance of defecation. 4 (context uncountable vulgar colloquial English) rubbish; worthless matter. 5 (context uncountable vulgar colloquial English) stuff, things. 6 (context uncountable colloquial vulgar definite English) ('''the shit''') The best of its kind. 7 (context uncountable vulgar colloquial English) nonsense; bullshit. 8 (context countable vulgar colloquial English) A nasty, despicable person, used particularly of men. 9 (context uncountable vulgar colloquial English) (''in negations'') anything. 10 (context uncountable vulgar colloquial English) A problem or difficult situation. 11 (context uncountable vulgar colloquial English) A strong rebuke. 12 (context uncountable vulgar colloquial English) any recreational drug, usually cannabis. Etymology 2

    interj. 1 (context vulgar English) Expression of worry, failure, shock, etc., often at something seen for the first time or remembered immediately before using this term. 2 (context vulgar English) To show displeasure or surprise. v

  2. 1 (context intransitive vulgar colloquial English) To defecate. 2 (context transitive vulgar colloquial English) To excrete (something) through the anus. 3 (context transitive vulgar colloquial English) To fool or try to fool someone; to be deceitful. 4 (context transitive vulgar colloquial Australia English) To annoy.

WordNet
shit
  1. v. give away information about somebody; "He told on his classmate who had cheated on the exam" [syn: denounce, tell on, betray, give away, rat, grass, shop, snitch, stag]

  2. have a bowel movement; "The dog had made in the flower beds" [syn: stool, defecate, take a shit, take a crap, ca-ca, crap, make]

  3. [also: shitting, shitted, shat]

shit
  1. n. obscene terms for feces [syn: crap, dirt, shite, poop, turd]

  2. obscene words for unacceptable behavior; "I put up with a lot of bullshit from that jerk"; "what he said was mostly bull" [syn: bullshit, bull, Irish bull, horseshit, crap, dogshit]

  3. a small worthless amount; "you don't know jack" [syn: jack, diddly-squat, diddlysquat, diddly-shit, diddlyshit, diddly, diddley, squat]

  4. a coarse term for defecation; "he took a shit" [syn: dump]

  5. insulting terms of address for people who are stupid or irritating or ridiculous [syn: asshole, bastard, cocksucker, dickhead, mother fucker, motherfucker, prick, whoreson, son of a bitch, SOB]

  6. something of little value; "his promise is not worth a damn"; "not worth one red cent"; "not worth shucks" [syn: damn, darn, hoot, red cent, shucks, tinker's damn, tinker's dam]

  7. [also: shitting, shitted, shat]

Wikipedia
Shit (disambiguation)

Shit is an English-language vulgarism, literally referring to feces, but having many metaphoric uses.

Shit or The shit may also refer to:

Shit (song)

"Shit" (stylized as "Sh!t", edited for radio as "Shhh...") is a song by American hip hop recording artist Future. It was released on September 24, 2013, as the third single from his second studio album, Honest (2014). The song has since peaked at number 45 on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs.

Shit

Shit is a word that is usually considered vulgar and profane in Modern English. As a noun it refers to fecal matter, and as a verb it means to defecate; in the plural ("the shits") it means diarrhea. Shite is a common variant in British and Irish English. As a slang term, it has many meanings, including: nonsense, foolishness, something of little value or quality, trivial and usually boastful or inaccurate talk, or a contemptible person. It may also be used as an expression of annoyance, surprise, or anger.

Usage examples of "shit".

And so, trapped in this ambivalent double bind, God tortures Schreber by producing in him the imperious urge to shit, while simultaneously denying him the ability to do so.

Get you high on some mean shit they call basuco, made from coke but takes hold of you worse.

Shit, he was backing her into a corner and there was nothing Breezy hated more.

My family role had always been the burier of dead animals, the shoveler of shit, the cleaner of vomit.

By order of Gaius Justus Gallicus, under-commander of the Sixth Legion, commander of the Third and Fourth Centuries, under authority of Emperor Tiberius and the Roman Empire, you are all commanded to go home and perpetrate no weird shit until I have gotten well drunk and had several days to sleep it off.

The waste management system had been thoroughly modernised in recent years, and organic microfilters worked hard to reprocess all the daily shit the city could produce.

And here we see the effects of malnutrition and the effects of overcrowded, unsanitary shantytowns and overfilled garbage dumps and we see thin, ribby, curly-tailed dogs digging on heaps of decomposing rubbish on which children play and pick and shit.

There are lots of neurotransmitter precursors in this shit, phenylalanine and glutamate.

Any space was rentable, not only bedrooms to girls for turning tricks, kitchen to dealers cutting up their shit, but closets for stashing quantities in transit, corridors and couches for slumping against.

With all that shit breaking loose, a lot of buildings were retooling to cope.

Great for sniffing threats both animated and fixed, great for hearing subtle whines and rustles that even AI sensors would neglect, and absolutely wonderful for scaring the shit out of people.

Wes petted him distractedly, then schlumped into the kitchen, turning on the light, checking for dog shit.

Those screwing contractors been trying to fix and patch up shit and I had to earn five weeks of overtime in two weeks.

Shit, even two might not be enough, but it was all he figured he could get from Doc Sherve and his crowd.

A thousand children are shuffling out these doors tonight, but only rare nights will even one come in, home to your sprung, spermy bed, the wind over the gasworks, closer smells of mold on wet coffee grounds, cat shit, pale sweaters with the pits heaped in a corner, in some accidental gesture, slink or embrace.