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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
ship
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cruise ship/liner
▪ a luxury cruise ship
a luxury ship/yacht
▪ He'd booked a holiday on a luxury cruise ship.
a manufacturing/shipping/publishing etc company
▪ I’m working for a printing company at the moment.
a passenger ship
▪ It is the biggest passenger ship afloat.
a rescue helicopter/boat/ship
▪ A rescue helicopter is on its way.
a shipping forecast (=a forecast about weather conditions at sea)
▪ According to the shipping forecast, strong winds can be expected later today.
cruise ship
mother ship
run/keep a tight ship (=manage a company, organization etc strictly and effectively)
sailing ship
ship's chandler
shipping forecast
shipping lane
shipping lanes
▪ busy shipping lanes
steel/oil/shipping etc magnate
▪ a powerful media magnate
tall ship
transport ship
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
cargo
▪ Q: I have heard that you can reach many places in the world as passengers on cargo ships.
▪ During a routine docking maneuver to resupply, we collided with a cargo ship.
▪ And Weider Travel, of Felixstowe, has offered them a place on the cargo ship Sexton.
▪ Lying in the anchorage were two light cruisers, a number of destroyers, and about ten cargo ships.
▪ The only retail travel agency in Britain specialising in passenger journeys on board cargo ships.
▪ Tankers and cargo ships make easy targets.
▪ A river passenger boat crashed into a cargo ship and sank on the Amazon on March 7 after leaving Iquitos.
cruise
▪ One man's job was to select films for airlines and cruise ships.
▪ Developers have been trying for years to finish building a cruise ship pier that will bring more jobs and tourism to Cozumel.
▪ The cruise ship dilemma is a classic example.
▪ Unlike previous generations of cruise ships, the ever-larger vessels delivered in recent years have virtually no single cabins.
▪ Beds on cruise ships may either be free standing or bunk beds. g. Will there be self service at mealtimes?
▪ Best cruise ships overall: 1.
▪ As a cruise ship is primarily a hotel and leisure complex over half the staff are employed in these areas of specialisation.
▪ Instead, his cheerleading coach said, he chose to spend his spring break on a cruise ship.
supply
▪ This time Dennis claimed hits on a destroyer while Osborne inflicted damage on a supply ship.
■ VERB
abandon
▪ I don't understand why Andropulos and the others didn't abandon ship earlier.
▪ They enrolled here expecting much and are reluctant to abandon ship, though I have argued with them.
▪ The crew now wanted to abandon ship, and a few minutes later red flares were seen dead ahead.
▪ Ribault soon had to abandon the other two ships, the last reminders of a planned Huguenot empire.
▪ Paul Reichmann was not yet ready to abandon the ship.
▪ He was discouraged, ready to abandon ship.
▪ Of course I don't want to abandon ship.
▪ We make ready to abandon ship!
board
▪ Pirates in fast boats have tried to board ships off Bab el-Mandeb in the Red Sea's southern tip.
▪ Ishmael recalls boarding an Enderby ship with pleasure because of its fine provisions.
▪ Around 300 people managed to board a ship which set sail, but this was intercepted in the harbour by coastguards.
▪ The pier will bring more tourists, who will browse the boutiques and souvenir stores before boarding their ship at night.
▪ As they draw near Elijah detains them and asks if they intend to board the ship.
▪ Chapter Eight On 14 July 1892, Maisie's son boarded a merchant ship and sailed away from his homeland.
build
▪ In 1785 it cost £63,174 to build the 100-gun ship Victory.
▪ When built, the arsenal ships will have the smallest crews of any Navy ship except small coastal patrol craft.
▪ It would make more sense to build the ships in this country and use those millions to subsidise the industry.
▪ Developers have been trying for years to finish building a cruise ship pier that will bring more jobs and tourism to Cozumel.
▪ They were major subcontractors competing to design and build the arsenal ship.
jump
▪ Harley would have them jump ship just as it's pulling into the dock.
▪ Half the grunts jumped on to the sixteen ships, leaving the rest to wait for the last flight.
▪ When the Blefuscans saw me, they were so frightened that they jumped out of their ships and swam to the beach.
▪ The survivors had to jump from their sinking ship or walk on wobbling planks in order to be taken aboard.
▪ My first commitment is to Aprilia and I don't intend to jump ship.
▪ Before that happened, Ventura himself jumped ship.
▪ Fox jumped ship after Modesty Blaise in 1966.
▪ Eight grunts jumped on each ship.
leave
▪ Probably the FedPol contingent visiting Vadinamia had left a backup ship in orbit, as they often do.
▪ I a most sorry, and so is Captain Binneford, but no one can leave the ship.
▪ After another short chat they joined the exodus of dockers leaving the ship.
▪ She left the ship in Mazatlan the night after the performance.
▪ At midday, he would retire to the galley and leave the ship to Hal while he prepared his lunch.
▪ She had stopped giving me murderous looks and seemed quite bright-eyed as we got ourselves ready to leave the ship.
▪ The experience will continue to influence those who have served long after they leave the ship.
sail
▪ The question of sailing the ship against winds or currents I submit the Khan ought to leave to sailors.
▪ Patrick builds an entire world filled with bubble machines, sailing ships and friendly dinosaurs.
▪ It's time to take the wheel, in each case a slender Bakelite rim of sailing ship proportions.
▪ Just as the sailing ship belonged to a world before jobs, the space ship belongs to a world after jobs.
▪ They decided to keep the sailors to help sail the ship, but they did not need me.
▪ The prejob world used sailing ships.
▪ None of you knows how to sail the ship home.
▪ At the four corners of the block were bronzed steer skulls, and the front of the block showed a sailing ship.
sink
▪ Like the people who made the bomb, the Clinton team understood that loose lips sink more than ships.
▪ They didn't make him redundant this time, they just sank the ships he was on.
▪ The survivors had to jump from their sinking ship or walk on wobbling planks in order to be taken aboard.
▪ Like Mrs Patrick Campbell, marsupials seem to be sinking ships, firing on their rescuers.
▪ On 8 August, 1813, a sudden and violent squall sank both ships within minutes of each other.
▪ Jean was pushed out of this sinking ship, but he actually should have jumped.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(like) rats leaving the sinking ship
abandon ship
▪ He was discouraged, ready to abandon ship.
▪ I don't understand why Andropulos and the others didn't abandon ship earlier.
▪ Of course I don't want to abandon ship.
▪ The crew now wanted to abandon ship, and a few minutes later red flares were seen dead ahead.
▪ They enrolled here expecting much and are reluctant to abandon ship, though I have argued with them.
▪ We make ready to abandon ship!
jump ship
▪ Many workers will jump ship if their employers try to limit their bonus.
▪ Before that happened, Ventura himself jumped ship.
▪ Does this mean Accord and Camry owners will be jumping ship for Chevrolet?
▪ Fox jumped ship after Modesty Blaise in 1966.
▪ Harley would have them jump ship just as it's pulling into the dock.
▪ My first commitment is to Aprilia and I don't intend to jump ship.
▪ Precious few traders were invited to return to Salomon after they had jumped ship, but Dipasquale was made an exception.
▪ Recruits in the big firms frequently jump ship.
▪ Sam seriously injured the fellow, and was then compelled to jump ship.
shape up or ship out
supply ship/convoy/route etc
▪ An Axis supply convoy was now spotted by a Maryland, and on 7 May an attack was laid on.
▪ At other times, they waged an incessant guerrilla war, attacking isolated Roman garrisons, ambushing caravans, cutting supply routes.
▪ From the summit there is a view of the Roman supply route, Dere Street.
▪ Mr Mobutu had cut the supply route after a dispute with Mr Savimbi.
▪ None of the supply routes go close to the point where Sunderby's aircraft ditched.
▪ The bases and the well-traveled supply routes that kept them run-ning were as obvious as Nui Ba Den.
▪ This time Dennis claimed hits on a destroyer while Osborne inflicted damage on a supply ship.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a cargo ship
▪ a cruise ship
▪ a reduction in oil shipments
▪ Hundreds of cars are lined up outside the factory, awaiting shipment to France and Holland.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Another ship called in that a pilot was killed, and it turned back.
▪ Half-stunned, he struggled back aboard, to defend his ship like a fortress.
▪ I heard what had caught his attention the heavy thump of a big ship engine.
▪ I moved the aim away from the ship, an automatic precaution.
▪ Then they will take their place on the ship at Tilbury among the food, plants and livestock cargo.
▪ They brush off Elijah and board the ship, but they see no sign of the mysterious figures they saw boarding earlier.
▪ They identified your ten ships right away and cheered back.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
in
▪ Sand had been shipped in to form a deeper and wider beach, to accommodate up to two hundred people.
▪ Meat shipped in from abroad has been pinpointed as the most likely source.
▪ National stores have had ball gowns shipped in from all over the country.
▪ Seven-eighths of the water the town of Aegina consumes is shipped in from the mainland.
▪ It was casual and served freshly caught lobster shipped in from St Vincent.
now
▪ Models 5 and 25 are shipping now in volume.
off
▪ A quantity of ore is here shipped off to distant smelting-houses.
▪ How you hate being shipped off to Long Island for weeks on end during the summer.
▪ The pockets of hops were stored here until they were shipped off to market or to a brewery.
out
▪ Was this driven by the need to ship out the occupants of the decaying and unviable institutions?
▪ Braden and Ellsworth shipped out together and took Watling Street with them.
▪ They recalled kidneys being removed from chimpanzees in these places, and then shipped out.
▪ My whole flight-school class was suddenly redesignated as glider-pilot candidates and shipped out.
▪ His unit was shipping out for the latest hot spot, Formosa, in a couple of weeks.
over
▪ Stone and marble fixtures weighing 400 tonnes from a garden in Boston have been shipped over for this sale.
■ NOUN
company
▪ Both companies have already shipped versions of the software, but both see the need to improve performance.
▪ The company none the less began regular shipping over the spur that year, which continued until 1965.
▪ The company now intends shipping production code for the first time this week, saying it has hundreds of orders.
▪ Acer is one of the few companies shipping a monitor of this size aimed at the home market.
copy
▪ Random House says it is shipping 150, 000 copies, and has paper ready to print another 100, 000.
country
▪ But it's possible the antiques and art may have already been shipped out of the country.
▪ More than three million tonnes of waste were shipped from the industrialised countries of the South between 1986 and 1988.
product
▪ The company also has its Smartstream decision support products ready to ship under Unix at the end of the month.
▪ Assembled products can be quickly shipped to wherever they are needed with just-in-time air freight delivery systems.
▪ Both products are due to ship at the beginning of June.
▪ The product is expected to ship in September, he said in an interview at his Woodside estate.
system
▪ Some systems are still shipped with 16 megabytes, but Windows 95 runs much faster and more reliably with increased memory.
▪ The system is expected to ship by the third quarter of 1996.
unit
▪ Worldwide, since its launch some fifteen months ago, PageMaker has shipped in excess of 30,000 units for the Macintosh.
▪ However, Sony only began shipping units in quantity in mid-1994, spokeswoman Gemma Richardson pointed out.
▪ The catalogue has been distributed to current customers and resellers and will ship with all units.
▪ We shipped the first units in the first and second weeks of May 1993.
▪ PageMaker shipped 30,000 units in its first year and has now become regarded as the benchmark for today's competitors.
version
▪ Pre-final spec T9000-based versions will ship in June/July followed by final spec versions in the fourth quarter.
▪ The read-only version of Image/SQL will ship before year-end, with the full version following in mid-1993.
▪ OpenVMS versions will start shipping in July.
▪ Both the X and character versions will be shipped together so users can upgrade for free.
world
▪ If computers are now to be shipped to the third world, what are they going instead of?
▪ The story was picked up by the Associated Press and shipped around the world.
▪ Both governments fear censure if the fuel is shipped around the world again.
▪ Here the usual export formalities occur before the guitars are shipped all over the world.
▪ All works of art have the inalienable right to remain in their original abode rather than being shipped around the world for display.
▪ The fleet will be shipped around the world to venues where the sailing will be just part of a larger event.
■ VERB
begin
▪ Alcatel PABXs running Chorus began shipping earlier this year, with volumes expected soon.
▪ However, Sony only began shipping units in quantity in mid-1994, spokeswoman Gemma Richardson pointed out.
▪ After three years and approximately £2m of research and development, SeaChange 4 began shipping on March 31.
▪ The company none the less began regular shipping over the spur that year, which continued until 1965.
▪ In 1958, Ryan Potato Co. was formed and began shipping table potatoes.
▪ A new San Jose-based subsidiary of the huge company has begun shipping its first products: notebook computers aimed at business users.
▪ We began shipping our Archistrat 4s server only in December.
expect
▪ The company is currently designing a new chassis to provide full mechanical functionality, expecting it to ship in June.
▪ Quantum expects to ship 1. 5 million units by the end of June.
▪ Pioneer and Sony also expect to ship players in the second half of the year.
▪ The product is expected to ship in September, he said in an interview at his Woodside estate.
▪ Oracle expects to ship the product in September.
▪ The system is expected to ship by the third quarter of 1996.
plan
▪ Novell says it is planning to ship version 4.0 of NetWare for Unix by year's end.
▪ Philips plans to ship players, under both its Philips and subsidiary Magnavox labels, late this year.
start
▪ OpenVMS versions will start shipping in July.
▪ MicroHenry is a simpler and cheaper off-line version of Henry, which should start shipping in the summer.
▪ Pentium-based products will also be released, when Intel starts shipping the chip.
▪ This was developed in conjunction with Stratus Computer Inc, and should start shipping in November.
▪ UIM/X Professional 2.0 will start to ship in August.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(like) rats leaving the sinking ship
supply ship/convoy/route etc
▪ An Axis supply convoy was now spotted by a Maryland, and on 7 May an attack was laid on.
▪ At other times, they waged an incessant guerrilla war, attacking isolated Roman garrisons, ambushing caravans, cutting supply routes.
▪ From the summit there is a view of the Roman supply route, Dere Street.
▪ Mr Mobutu had cut the supply route after a dispute with Mr Savimbi.
▪ None of the supply routes go close to the point where Sunderby's aircraft ditched.
▪ The bases and the well-traveled supply routes that kept them run-ning were as obvious as Nui Ba Den.
▪ This time Dennis claimed hits on a destroyer while Osborne inflicted damage on a supply ship.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ About half of the whisky produced in Scotland is shipped to Japan and the US.
▪ I'm a manufacturer, and I ship electronic goods across the Mexican border, so the new levies will definitely affect my business.
▪ The updated version is scheduled to ship on July 1.
▪ We can ship a replacement to you within 24 hours.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Arizona seed growers suspect the infestation may widen because the state ships its seed to many other states and countries.
▪ It should ship in September or October.
▪ More oil is being shipped in less seaworthy vessels.
▪ The animals were shipped out on Friday, but maybe they didn't know that.
▪ The merchants would under-invoice what was shipped and over-invoice expenses.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Ship

Ship \Ship\, n. [AS. scipe.] Pay; reward. [Obs.]

In withholding or abridging of the ship or the hire or the wages of servants.
--Chaucer.

Ship

Ship \Ship\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shipped; p. pr. & vb. n. Shipping.]

  1. To put on board of a ship, or vessel of any kind, for transportation; to send by water.

    The timber was . . . shipped in the bay of Attalia, from whence it was by sea transported to Pelusium.
    --Knolles.

  2. By extension, in commercial usage, to commit to any conveyance for transportation to a distance; as, to ship freight by railroad.

  3. Hence, to send away; to get rid of. [Colloq.]

  4. To engage or secure for service on board of a ship; as, to ship seamen.

  5. To receive on board ship; as, to ship a sea.

  6. To put in its place; as, to ship the tiller or rudder.

Ship

Ship \Ship\, n. [OE. ship, schip, AS. scip; akin to OFries. skip, OS. scip, D. schip, G. schiff, OHG. scif, Dan. skib, Sw. skeep, Icel. & Goth. skip; of unknown origin. Cf. Equip, Skiff, Skipper.]

  1. Any large seagoing vessel.

    Like a stately ship . . . With all her bravery on, and tackle trim, Sails filled, and streamers waving.
    --Milton.

    Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State!
    --Longfellow.

  2. Specifically, a vessel furnished with a bowsprit and three masts (a mainmast, a foremast, and a mizzenmast), each of which is composed of a lower mast, a topmast, and a topgallant mast, and square-rigged on all masts. See Illustation in Appendix. [1913 Webster] l Port or Larboard Side; s Starboard Side; 1 Roundhouse or Deck House; 2 Tiller; 3 Grating; 4 Wheel; 5 Wheel Chains; 6 Binnacle; 7 Mizzenmast; 8 Skylight; 9 Capstan; 10 Mainmast; 11 Pumps; 12 Galley or Caboose; 13 Main Hatchway; 14 Windlass; 15 Foremast; 16 Fore Hatchway; 17 Bitts; 18 Bowsprit; 19 Head Rail; 20 Boomkins; 21 Catheads on Port Bow and Starboard Bow; 22 Fore Chains; 23 Main Chains; 24 Mizzen Chains; 25 Stern. [1913 Webster] 1 Fore Royal Stay; 2 Flying Jib Stay; 3 Fore Topgallant Stay;4 Jib Stay; 5 Fore Topmast Stays; 6 Fore Tacks; 8 Flying Martingale; 9 Martingale Stay, shackled to Dolphin Striker; 10 Jib Guys; 11 Jumper Guys; 12 Back Ropes; 13 Robstays; 14 Flying Jib Boom; 15 Flying Jib Footropes; 16 Jib Boom; 17 Jib Foottropes; 18 Bowsprit; 19 Fore Truck; 20 Fore Royal Mast; 21 Fore Royal Lift; 22 Fore Royal Yard; 23 Fore Royal Backstays; 24 Fore Royal Braces; 25 Fore Topgallant Mast and Rigging; 26 Fore Topgallant Lift; 27 Fore Topgallant Yard; 28 Fore Topgallant Backstays; 29 Fore Topgallant Braces; 30 Fore Topmast and Rigging; 31 Fore Topsail Lift; 32 Fore Topsail Yard; 33 Fore Topsail Footropes; 34 Fore Topsail Braces; 35 Fore Yard; 36 Fore Brace; 37 Fore Lift; 38 Fore Gaff; 39 Fore Trysail Vangs; 40 Fore Topmast Studding-sail Boom; 41 Foremast and Rigging; 42 Fore Topmast Backstays; 43 Fore Sheets; 44 Main Truck and Pennant; 45 Main Royal Mast and Backstay; 46 Main Royal Stay; 47 Main Royal Lift; 48 Main Royal Yard; 49 Main Royal Braces; 50 Main Topgallant Mast and Rigging; 51 Main Topgallant Lift; 52 Main Topgallant Backstays; 53 Main Topgallant Yard; 54 Main Topgallant Stay; 55 Main Topgallant Braces; 56 Main Topmast and Rigging; 57 Topsail Lift; 58 Topsail Yard; 59 Topsail Footropes; 60 Topsail Braces; 61 Topmast Stays; 62 Main Topgallant Studding-sail Boom; 63 Main Topmast Backstay; 64 Main Yard; 65 Main Footropes; 66 Mainmast and Rigging; 67 Main Lift; 68 Main Braces; 69 Main Tacks; 70 Main Sheets; 71 Main Trysail Gaff; 72 Main Trysail Vangs; 73 Main Stays; 74 Mizzen Truck; 75 Mizzen Royal Mast and Rigging; 76 Mizzen Royal Stay; 77 Mizzen Royal Lift; 78 Mizzen Royal Yard; 79 Mizzen Royal Braces; 80 Mizzen Topgallant Mast and Rigging; 81 Mizzen Topgallant Lift; 82 Mizzen Topgallant Backstays; 83 Mizzen Topgallant Braces; 84 Mizzen Topgallant Yard; 85 Mizzen Topgallant Stay; 86 Mizzen Topmast and Rigging; 87 Mizzen Topmast Stay; 88 Mizzen Topsail Lift; 89 Mizzen Topmast Backstays; 90 Mizzen Topsail Braces; 91 Mizzen Topsail Yard; 92 Mizzen Topsail Footropes; 93 Crossjack Yard; 94 Crossjack Footropes; 95 Crossjack Lift; 96 Crossjack Braces; 97 Mizzenmast and Rigging; 98 Mizzen Stay; 99 Spanker Gaff; 100 Peak Halyards; 101 Spanker Vangs; 102 Spanker Boom; 103 Spanker Boom Topping Lift; 104 Jacob's Ladder, or Stern Ladder; 105 Spanker Sheet; 106 Cutwater; 107 Starboard Bow; 108 Starboard Beam; 109 Water Line; 110 Starboard Quarter; 111 Rudder.

  3. A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense. [Obs.] --Tyndale. Armed ship, a private ship taken into the service of the government in time of war, and armed and equipped like a ship of war. [Eng.] --Brande & C. General ship. See under General. Ship biscuit, hard biscuit prepared for use on shipboard; -- called also ship bread. See Hardtack. Ship boy, a boy who serves in a ship. ``Seal up the ship boy's eyes.'' --Shak. Ship breaker, one who breaks up vessels when unfit for further use. Ship broker, a mercantile agent employed in buying and selling ships, procuring cargoes, etc., and generally in transacting the business of a ship or ships when in port. Ship canal, a canal suitable for the passage of seagoing vessels. Ship carpenter, a carpenter who works at shipbuilding; a shipwright. Ship chandler, one who deals in cordage, canvas, and other, furniture of vessels. Ship chandlery, the commodities in which a ship chandler deals; also, the business of a ship chandler. Ship fever (Med.), a form of typhus fever; -- called also putrid fever, jail fever, or hospital fever. Ship joiner, a joiner who works upon ships. Ship letter, a letter conveyed by a ship not a mail packet. Ship money (Eng. Hist.), an imposition formerly charged on the ports, towns, cities, boroughs, and counties, of England, for providing and furnishing certain ships for the king's service. The attempt made by Charles I. to revive and enforce this tax was resisted by John Hampden, and was one of the causes which led to the death of Charles. It was finally abolished. Ship of the line. See under Line. Ship pendulum, a pendulum hung amidships to show the extent of the rolling and pitching of a vessel. Ship railway.

    1. An inclined railway with a cradelike car, by means of which a ship may be drawn out of water, as for repairs.

    2. A railway arranged for the transportation of vessels overland between two water courses or harbors.

      Ship's company, the crew of a ship or other vessel.

      Ship's days, the days allowed a vessel for loading or unloading.

      Ship's husband. See under Husband.

      Ship's papers (Mar. Law), papers with which a vessel is required by law to be provided, and the production of which may be required on certain occasions. Among these papers are the register, passport or sea letter, charter party, bills of lading, invoice, log book, muster roll, bill of health, etc.
      --Bouvier.
      --Kent.

      To make ship, to embark in a ship or other vessel.

Ship

Ship \Ship\, v. i.

  1. To engage to serve on board of a vessel; as, to ship on a man-of-war.

  2. To embark on a ship.
    --Wyclif (Acts xxviii. 11)

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
ship

Old English scip "ship, boat," from Proto-Germanic *skipam (cognates: Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Gothic skip, Danish skib, Swedish skepp, Middle Dutch scip, Dutch schip, Old High German skif, German Schiff), "Germanic noun of obscure origin" [Watkins]. Others suggest perhaps originally "tree cut out or hollowed out," and derive it from PIE root *skei- "to cut, split."\n

\nNow a vessel of considerable size, adapted to navigation; the Old English word was used for small craft as well, and definitions changed over time; in 19c., distinct from a boat in having a bowsprit and three masts, each with a lower, top, and topgallant mast. French esquif, Italian schifo are Germanic loan-words.\n

\nPhrase ships that pass in the night is from Longfellow's poem "Elizabeth" in "Tales of a Wayside Inn" (1863). Figurative use of nautical runs a tight ship (i.e., one that does not leak) is attested from 1965.

ship

c.1300, "to send or transport (merchandise, people) by ship; to board a ship; to travel by ship, sail, set sail," also figurative, from ship (n.). Old English scipian is attested only in the senses "take ship, embark; be furnished with a ship." Transferred to other means of conveyance (railroad, etc.) from 1857, originally American English. Related: Shipped; shipping.

Wiktionary
ship

Etymology 1 alt. 1 A water-borne vessel generally larger than a boat. 2 (context chiefly in combination English) A vessel which travels through any medium other than across land, such as an airship or spaceship. 3 (context archaic nautical formal English) A sailing vessel with three or more square-rigged masts. 4 A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense. n. 1 A water-borne vessel generally larger than a boat. 2 (context chiefly in combination English) A vessel which travels through any medium other than across land, such as an airship or spaceship. 3 (context archaic nautical formal English) A sailing vessel with three or more square-rigged masts. 4 A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense. vb. (label en transitive) To send by water-borne transport. Etymology 2

n. (context fandom English) A fictional romantic relationship between two persons, either real or themselves fictional. vb. (context fandom English) To write fiction that includes fictional romantic relationships between two persons, either real or themselves fictional.

WordNet
ship
  1. n. a vessel that carries passengers or freight

  2. [also: shipping, shipped]

ship
  1. v. transport commercially [syn: transport, send]

  2. hire for work on a ship

  3. go on board [syn: embark] [ant: disembark]

  4. travel by ship

  5. place on board a ship; "ship the cargo in the hold of the vessel"

  6. [also: shipping, shipped]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Ship

A ship is a large buoyant watercraft. Ships are generally distinguished from boats based on size, shape and cargo or passenger capacity. Ships are used on lakes, seas, rivers, and oceans for a variety of activities, such as the transport of people or goods, fishing, entertainment, public safety, and warfare. Historically, a "ship" was a sailing vessel with at least three square-rigged masts and a full bowsprit.

In armed conflict and in daily life, ships have become an integral part of modern commercial and military systems. Fishing boats are used by millions of fishermen throughout the world. Military forces operate vessels for naval warfare and to transport and support forces ashore. Commercial vessels, nearly 35,000 in number, carried 7.4 billion tons of cargo in 2007. As of 2011, there are about 104,304 ships with IMO numbers in the world.

Ships were always a key in history's great explorations and scientific and technological development. Navigators such as Zheng He spread such inventions as the compass and gunpowder. Ships have been used for such purposes as colonization and the slave trade, and have served scientific, cultural, and humanitarian needs. After the 16th century, new crops that had come from and to the Americas via the European seafarers significantly contributed to the world population growth. Ship transport has shaped the world's economy into today's energy-intensive pattern.

Ship (comics)

The fictional A.I. entity originally known as Ship has appeared in several incarnations in the Marvel Universe. At times controlled by both the X-Men and their enemies, the sentient A.I. has been installed in the core of a Celestial starship, two space stations, and a techno-organic being.

Ship (disambiguation)

A ship is a large vessel that floats on water, specifically the ocean and the sea.

Ship or ships may also refer to: __NOTOC__

Usage examples of "ship".

The dock areas were extensive, with long wharves that could accommodate ten large ships.

Sri magician into the bargain, I was fed and accommodated at no expense, and promised a ship to wherever I wished to journey.

Her ship immediately looped out of formation and streaked down toward the accretion disc.

It is proposed to instruct the coast-guard by means of ship platform batteries of one gun each, constructed exactly similar to the ports of a man-of-war, placed in a position in each district convenient for the drill of fifty men, and in a situation in which it may be rendered available for defence, as well as affording a range to sea for practice.

In all his life he had never been anywhere as unequivocally alien as here, inside a giant torus of cold, compressed gas orbiting a black hole - itself in orbit around a brown dwarf body light years from the nearest star - its exterior studded with ships - most of them the jaggedly bulbous shapes of Affront craft - and full, in the main, of happy, space-faring Affronters and their collection of associated victim-species.

The circular-sectioned living space was like a highly pressurised tyre bulging from the inner rim, and where its tread would have been hung the gantries and docks where the ships of the Affront and a dozen other species came and went.

Robert Penfold warned me the ship was to be destroyed, and I disbelieved and affronted him in return, and he never reproached me, not even by a look.

About half the docks were occupied, some with Affronter ships, some with craft from a handful of other species.

It shook off the remaining loose nanomissiles and fired thirty of them straight at the Affronter ship.

In the same instant, it fired its laser straight at the Affronter ship.

The Culture - the real Culture, the wily ones, not these semi-mystical Elenchers with their miserable hankering to be somebody else - had been known to give whole Affronter fleets the run-around for several months with not dissimilar enticements and subterfuges, keeping them occupied, seemingly on the track of some wildly promising prey which turned out to be nothing at all, or a Culture ship with some ridiculous but earnestly argued excuse, while the Culture or one of its snivelling client species got on - or away - with something else somewhere else, spoiling rightful Affronter fun.

I was angry with myself for going aground - we could not haul the ship round to bring all the guns to bear where we wan ted them.

Admiral Bossu, seeing that further resistance was useless, and that his ship was aground on a hostile shore, his fleet dispersed and three-quarters of his soldiers and crew dead or disabled, struck his flag and surrendered with 300 prisoners.

The tide ebbed and left his ship aground, while the other vessels were beaten back.

As for the ship, she might run hard aground again even closer to shore than last time, plowing shoreward as fast as she was coming now.