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Crossword clues for push

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
push
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
fuel inflation/push up inflation (=make inflation worse)
▪ The increase in food prices is fuelling inflation.
▪ There are now fears that price rises will push up inflation.
increase/push up the cost
▪ The new tax will increase the cost of owning a car.
pull/push yourself upright
▪ He pulled himself upright on the sofa.
push back the frontiers (=discover new things)
push back your chair (=in order to get up)
▪ He pushed back his chair and stood up.
push through reforms (=make them happen)
▪ He has so far failed to push through much-needed economic reforms.
pushed...aside
▪ He pushed his half-eaten salad aside and left.
pushing and shoving
▪ Everyone was pushing and shoving to see the prince.
pushing...pram
▪ a young woman pushing a pram
push/wheel a bicycle (=walk beside it pushing it)
▪ She was wheeling her bicycle and talking to some friends.
put/push sth to the back of your mind
▪ He tried to push these uncomfortable thoughts to the back of his mind.
throw/knock/push etc sb off-balance
▪ The sudden movement of the ship knocked them both off balance.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
ahead
▪ You need to push ahead with private plans. you're in a position to do so.
▪ Leaders seize opportunities and push ahead.
▪ But there are strong reasons to push ahead now to resolve all remaining final-status questions.
▪ But for black dancers and choreographers, this was a time to push ahead.
▪ To achieve this, Quinlan is pushing ahead with a salad of deals, alliances and joint ventures.
▪ Carter, however, insisted on pushing ahead.
▪ And with cold weather helping sentiment oil leaders pushed ahead.
▪ Anyone who tried to push ahead was berated by others.
along
▪ Dad was pushed along the passage, into the kitchen.
▪ And it was pushed along by the success of non-traditional Democrat Gary Hart in 1984.
▪ A shopping trolley pushed along and then released will roll across the floor, gradually slowing down until it comes to rest.
▪ Nevertheless, telecommuting is destined to increase, he said, pushed along by snowstorms, traffic jams and technological progress.
▪ Michael had a sense that he pushed along behind a much cleverer creature and could not keep up.
around
▪ She was no longer a nervous little nineteen-year-old that he could push around as he pleased.
▪ You get tired of being pushed around.
▪ I didn't want to be pushed around or to be made dependent on others.
▪ They won't be pushed around.
▪ In the Mirabeau Precinct she'd only get pushed around and ignored.
▪ This cart was pushed around by Nora Fauchon, well remembered by many.
▪ I suppose if the truth was known, I was narked at being pushed around.
▪ It's time we Berliners stopped allowing ourselves to be pushed around.
aside
▪ He then pushed aside all notes and summed up the case from beginning to end.
▪ He pushed aside the civilian Junta using it only to give decent sanction to new promotions.
▪ Maremont pushed aside his business and civic work and spent most of the early summer barnstorming through Illinois.
▪ He pushed aside, untasted, the food Pesaro's servant had given him.
▪ But with the piles of snow that are pushed aside, the streets are only 60 % passable.
▪ And now the cabinet was pushed aside.
away
▪ Bend the arms at the elbows. Push away the arms, forcing the hands out.
▪ I try to fold her into the comfort of my body, but she pushes away from me, startled into wakefulness.
▪ John Hendrie burst through in the closing minutes, but his strong shot was pushed away for a corner by Bob Bolder.
▪ Magnets can push away from each other.
▪ These would be pushed away by the radiation from the Sun, taking with them any payload attached to them.
▪ Cajole, shame, bully, push away?
▪ Head down, shoulders stooped, he counted his steps and tried to push away the evil.
back
▪ It has, by pushing back the boundaries of human knowledge, given us much that has enriched our lives.
▪ I think Dole really is for pushing back the barriers for all.
▪ The topsoil could then be pushed back across the site and to all appearances undisturbed agricultural land was left.
▪ Some know when to take off their napkins and push back from the table.
▪ They reeled under the blows, but the heavy steel saved them and they recovered to push back unarmoured householders.
▪ The trial was scheduled for last November, then pushed back a month.
▪ A brilliant word-processor proving shareware can push back the boundaries of software value for money.
▪ He pushed back his plate now.
down
▪ So, with this result, I decided to try the opposite by pushing down on the boom through the turn.
▪ The air in the room, which had higher pressure, pushed down on the water in the glass.
▪ When genuine feelings are denied and pushed down, depression may follow.
▪ The driver pushes down on the brakes and initially nothing happens.
▪ He pushed down some one with blond hair.
▪ The rafts and the wharves were lined with standing bodies, and people were pushing down through the woods on either side.
▪ He's a floating penguin that literally toots with joy when he is pushed down under the water.
▪ Not waiting for the completion of this effort, a strong Union army had pushed down through western Tennessee.
forward
▪ Claire pushed forward. family made of themselves in public.
▪ More important, its results gave the Minnesota change leaders the confidence to push forward.
▪ These programmes need to question and push forward the agenda of the news programmes.
▪ But we kept pushing forward and we fought fair and we tried not to be petty.
▪ He saw scientists and thinkers as exploring the unknown, pushing forward their place in the universe.
▪ These people endure decades of horror, and they set their shoulders and push forward.
▪ In figure A the pelvis is pushed forward so that the man is leaning backwards.
▪ Undaunted he would retreat, threading the twine between his fingers and thumb, before blindly pushing forward in a new direction.
hard
▪ They responded by pushing hard into corporate finance, seeking to use shareholdings as a door-opener.
▪ However, Thompson questioned whether the administration will push hard if resistance stiffens.
▪ Brian was pushed hard against the side of a car parked in the far corner of the bar's car park.
▪ I fell back, like a person pushed hard.
▪ Missing are neighborhood and business associations: two groups that pushed hard during the former administration for a crackdown on nuisance crimes.
▪ Big agricultural businesses, primarily in California, pushed hard for the temporary workers.
▪ Each pushed hard against the other.
off
▪ They touch down, and he pushes off again, taking her arm so that she glides up with him in spite of herself.
▪ Mellanby, pushed off balance by Stumpel, attempted to sweep the puck toward the net.
▪ It looks to me more as if he wanted them to push off and abandon him.
▪ He pushed off from one wall, ran two steps, did a belly-flop and sloshed across the floor.
▪ We pushed off with a flourish, leaving the boy and Marina's driver at the edge.
▪ As the bag inflates, the book will be pushed off and slide away. 4.
▪ Just as he was about to push off again, I asked if he was finished.
on
▪ He was taking himself to the limit and then pushing on from there.
▪ He pushed on in swamp and wilderness through Gulf Coast and lower Mississippi territories.
▪ There are times when I've pushed on when all the signals were saying turn back.
▪ The story does not seem easy for this woman to tell, but she pushes on.
▪ All the runners are adrift out here, sorting through their thoughts, weighing the reasons to push on.
▪ We push on to another standard tourist site, the almost grotesquely ornate Opera.
▪ Once he is distracted, I push on hard and he gives up the game.
▪ The pencil they pushed on is called the arm.
open
▪ He pushed open the driver's side door and clambered out, unsure whether to approach the Montego or wait.
▪ She pushed open the front door, which he had left unlocked.
▪ She pushed open the glass door, muttered good morning, and took her place in the queue.
▪ But when I pushed open the gate into the yard on my return, I always saw Jean-Claude at the window.
▪ She watched his hands as he pushed open the packet and pulled out a cigarette.
▪ Lisa pushed open the driver's door and stepped out to face him.
▪ She pushed open the sitting room door and walked in.
▪ I glimpsed Mathilda's white face then ran into the gallery, pushing open the door to the solar.
out
▪ Then a doctor appeared and more bustle followed, until a wheeled stretcher was pushed out and Robbie was wheeled away.
▪ In the schools we are visiting the walls are pushed out to encompass the world around them in multiple ways.
▪ Clouds of steam struck by sunlight pushed out of the power station in the Ironbridge gorge.
▪ Varney said, pushing out a single airy belch of laughter.
▪ We took it over for a Sunday night, hiring it, promoting the gig ourselves, pushing out a lot of handbills.
▪ Primo notices his dark swollen belly, pushing out between the flaps of a green flak jacket.
▪ Almost every work that is premiered seems to push out the boundaries of the form a little farther.
▪ Sometimes she had to be pushed out the door.
through
▪ Students should also be pushed through more quickly.
▪ They pushed through the doors, they hung from the porcelain straps.
▪ Cardiff pushed through into the offices.
▪ Tax cuts pushed through by a Republican-controlled Board of Supervisors from 1993 through 1996 were folly, Huckelberry says.
▪ Privatisation is to be pushed through without even the safeguard of a consultative body.
▪ The city pushed through the state Legislature a temporary law which made annexing the area much easier.
▪ Rohmer pushed through, followed by Duvall.
▪ But unfortunately, the old questions insist on pushing through.
up
▪ Both have pushed up against a lower limit which is, I believe, economic in character.
▪ I pushed up his eyelid and exposed an inert brown pupil.
▪ It is this extra spending which, given full employment and consequent constant number of transactions, pushes up the price level.
▪ As capital moves to low-wage areas, the employment rate tends to rise, and wages are pushed up.
▪ The increase in demand for borrowing will push up rates.
▪ Banking shares are also a key sector of the market, and any rally among them would push up the Nikkei significantly.
▪ Background: The New York area was hit hard by the recession, but pent-up demand is pushing up prices.
■ NOUN
boundary
▪ It has, by pushing back the boundaries of human knowledge, given us much that has enriched our lives.
▪ But that willingness to push beyond the usual boundaries of electronic is precisely why Prodigy seems so, well, prodigious.
▪ A brilliant word-processor proving shareware can push back the boundaries of software value for money.
▪ Bush's speech pushed the political boundaries of the missile defence issue much further than he has done before.
▪ Female speaker I like them because they push back the boundaries.
▪ There is no need to push boundaries here.
▪ Almost every work that is premiered seems to push out the boundaries of the form a little farther.
▪ Such men push the boundaries as far as they can to try to get their women to love them, dirt and all.
button
▪ After reaching the desired revs by using the foot throttle, the driver then pushes the centre button.
▪ The destabilizing effect will push buttons and force changes.
▪ But like most of his colleagues in Hampden Babylon he had an uncanny knack of pushing the self-destruct button.
▪ She pushed a button, cranking the bed to a more upright position.
▪ Subtle it ain t, but for big-band fans, it pushes all the buttons.
▪ Then when ready, they push a button to signal the start of their 40 shots that make up the first round.
▪ When your words are likely to push his buttons, use anticipation.
chair
▪ Honey shoots into shot, pushing Bella's chair.
▪ At that I push the chair all the way under the table and we give each other these glowing smiles.
▪ He pushed his chair back from the table as if trying to escape.
▪ His father pushed back his chair and stood and leaned back against the sink, looking into the middle distance.
▪ He pushed his chair back and wandered around the room.
▪ Frank said, pushing his chair back fast.
▪ He pushed back his chair, kissed his wife, and went back to his duties.
door
▪ She pushed against the garage door and it slid upwards.
▪ Then the Jesuit volunteers pushed open the shelter doors and the worshipers followed the cross into a misty rain.
▪ Rachaela pushed open the door and went in.
▪ She pushed open the door on silence.
▪ They pushed through the doors, they hung from the porcelain straps.
▪ She pushed open the glass door, muttered good morning, and took her place in the queue.
▪ Sometimes she had to be pushed out the door.
envelope
▪ It needs some one who understands its basic talent, some one who will help it to push the envelope of its artificial intelligence.
▪ In one entrapment incident when he was in the Assembly, some one pushed an envelope under his door.
▪ Both were known to push the envelope of life.
frontier
▪ Back then entrepreneurs were pushing out the frontiers of trade.
▪ As for the second one your use of rhyme pushes back the frontiers of english literature.
▪ Their achievement was in pushing back the frontiers of distance running with world records.
hand
▪ He pushes a hand through his hair, and pauses once more.
▪ Jolted, I pushed his hand away.
▪ He pushed both hands through his sleep-tousled hair.
▪ He'd push his hand right up, and feel me.
▪ Needless to say Kyle would push his hand away or quickly grab the train back and put it back where it belonged.
▪ He held his breath and pushed his hand down the bed to touch his night-gown.
▪ When she saw where I was sitting she pushed her hands in her coat pockets and ambled over on her shaky heels.
limit
▪ Vintage Steve Douglas pushing the limits of the fake ollie at the Whiplash comp. 1985.
▪ I feel that I have pushed the limits of his patience.
▪ Acorn, Hawkbit and Speedwell, decent enough rank-and-filers as long as they were not pushed beyond their limits.
▪ There are full-time writers who can't push things to their limits -- poets who stop when a thing is good enough.
▪ All who went through that regime of training remember the extremes of fatigue and of being pushed to their limits.
▪ The guards are pushed to the limit all the time.
▪ Some one somewhere is going to push them to the limit.
▪ If a mentor is pushing you beyond your limits, if you are feeling more and more exhausted, beware!
luck
▪ If the story did turn out to be true, though, I think he might be pushing his luck.
▪ Just make sure that you don't push your luck too far.
▪ However we pushed our luck and took Molly in, with no protests whatsoever.
▪ Mallachy, indeed, was inclined to push his luck with Rory.
▪ Now above all times, she felt, was not the time to push her luck.
▪ Twelve months later the Captain of Sea Rover pushed his luck once too often.
▪ Sunday 6 November I knew I shouldn't have pushed my culinary luck.
plate
▪ He pushed the empty plate away from him and leaned his arms on the table.
▪ As he pushed away the empty plates she waited for him to make some comment about the meal.
▪ Norm muttered, pushing his plate away.
▪ I pushed my plate away and settled back with the wine.
▪ I pushed back my plate angrily.
▪ Detective Sergeant Joseph Bragg pushed away his plate, and wiped his ragged moustache.
▪ He pushed back his plate now.
pram
▪ She approached the slope pushing a doll's pram full of dolls and blankets.
▪ An old woman in tattered clothes walked down the street pushing a dilapidated pram.
price
▪ It is this extra spending which, given full employment and consequent constant number of transactions, pushes up the price level.
▪ Big Oil will just push the price up another 4. 3 cents anyway.
▪ Top target is likely to be cigarettes and extra tax could push the price up by between 12 and 15p a packet.
▪ Background: The New York area was hit hard by the recession, but pent-up demand is pushing up prices.
▪ But lower mortgage rates for everyone else just push up the price of homes.
▪ Competitive bidding by buyers will push the price up toward the equilibrium level.
▪ Labour politicians fear estate agents carrying out the valuations will push prices up to benefit themselves.
▪ Trading was sluggish as aerospace, defense and oil stocks pushed prices yesterday.
rate
▪ Increased deposits would push deposit rates down.
▪ A complete breakdown of budget talks could push rates back up, at least temporarily, analysts concede.
▪ By then, car crime had pushed insurance rates up beyond the ozone and way past the stratosphere.
▪ Fourth, by pushing up interest rates, fiscal policy can push up the exchange rate of the currency.
▪ The increase in demand for borrowing will push up rates.
▪ Peso bears could therefore push against the exchange rate only by liquidating their long positions.
▪ A huge demands for apartments pushed vacancy rates down to the 1 to 2 percent level.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
at/with the push/touch of a button
be (hard) pushed to do sth
be driven/pushed from pillar to post
be hard put/pressed/pushed to do sth
▪ Aunt Edie was in such a rage about it that she was hard put to contain herself.
▪ Governments will then be hard put to get it on to their national statute books by mid-1993.
▪ I can assure you that any busybody would be hard put to it to prove maltreatment!
▪ Leinster will be hard pushed to keep the score within the respectable margins of defeat set by their predecessors.
▪ Once an apology is given, the defendant will be hard put to contest liability later.
▪ The slave's side ... and even Miss Phoebe would be hard put to understand.
▪ With his height and features, he was hard put to pass as a native.
▪ You will be hard pressed to choose a single main course because so many are mouth-watering.
be pushed for time/money etc
be pushing 40/60 etc
be pushing up (the) daisies
▪ It's lucky I was sent here, to Hepzibah, or I'd be pushing up daisies.
press/push (all) the right buttons
▪ He pushed all the right buttons.
▪ These are words which are all designed to press the right buttons among women voters.
press/push sb's buttons
press/push the panic button
▪ And why have governments in the region not pressed the panic button?
▪ Derby County chairman Brian Fearn has refused to push the panic button after Tranmere's 2-1 win.
push the envelope
▪ Each time Walters asked his employees to push the envelope, he said, "If you can dream it, you can do it."
▪ Both were known to push the envelope of life.
▪ It needs some one who understands its basic talent, some one who will help it to push the envelope of its artificial intelligence.
push/grope/inch etc your way somewhere
push/tip sb over the brink
put/press/push the pedal to the metal
▪ By the second half of the game, the Tigers had really started to put the pedal to the metal.
▪ Later, Brooks' brother alleged that racism helped put the pedal to the metal.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Who was at the door?" "It was some guy pushing magazine subscriptions."
Pushing his plate to one side he called for the waiter.
▪ Animal-rights groups are pushing to ban the capture of dolphins.
▪ Anyone caught pushing heroin or cocaine is given a long prison sentence.
▪ Are you sure you want to marry me? I don't want to push you into anything.
▪ Can you tell the people at the back of the queue to stop pushing!
▪ Coach Koepple pushes his players pretty hard.
▪ Don't let them push you into a making a decision before you're ready.
▪ He pushed his way through the crowd.
▪ I got tired of Robin pushing her environmental agenda at the office.
▪ It's still stuck - you'll have to push harder.
▪ Mum, William pushed me!
▪ My parents keep pushing me to get a good job.
▪ Paul held the door open for a woman pushing a trolley of heavy books.
▪ Revlon is really pushing its new range of beauty creams.
▪ She pushed past me to the front of the line.
▪ She pushed the table into a corner of the classroom.
▪ Shoppers were pushing their carts around the supermarket.
▪ The car had run out of gas so they pushed it into a side-street.
▪ There's no need to push. There are enough tickets for everyone.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Cursing, he began cutting it up, pushing the shorter strands on to his spoon.
▪ His back was pushed against the wall as a youth set about him.
▪ Mallachy, indeed, was inclined to push his luck with Rory.
▪ She pushed open the door to the sitting-room.
▪ She raised her eyes heavenwards and pushed by him.
▪ She was part of the first generation that really pushed the whole idea of reconciliation.
▪ The Woman pushed at the door, behind Doyle's chair, and when he moved sideways she stepped in.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ Which is why we expect Diamond to make a big push for city annexation.
▪ Releases from major acts have a bigger push and the marketing budget is much larger.
▪ Players will begin trickling into the marketplace by spring, with the biggest push at the Christmas season.
▪ Ironically, one of the big pushes for telecommuting is coming from that traditional bastion of bureaucracy, the federal government.
▪ He's made a good start, now comes the big push.
▪ Gardener, for the big push up the middle on defense?
final
▪ Lawrence could strengthen his squad for a final promotion push.
▪ The final push is a huff-and-a-puff all the way.
▪ It was steep and exposed but solid, and the final push for the summit involved some exhilarating scrambling.
▪ While the oven and the dough are warming up, the yeast may revive and give forth one final push.
▪ Middlesbrough manager Lennie Lawrence has to prepare his players for a final push after a gruelling season.
▪ In theatre, forceps hold the baby in position, one final push - and here he is! 8.20 p.m.
▪ Just as I gave the final push, my hand found a rope over the end of the ship.
hard
▪ Just as he reached the top step I gave him a push - not a hard push, just defensive.
▪ The pushing started first gently but slowly progressing to hard pushes.
little
▪ She's exaggerating; it was only a little push.
▪ They also need a little push from us, their public, their reason for being.
▪ One little push and the whole world's one, no woman's better than the next!
major
▪ A MAJOR push to make Darlington a centre for tourism was discussed by the council's development committee yesterday.
▪ In a major public relations push, Pillsbury boosted the prize this year to $ 1 million.
▪ Despite the possible loss, General Magic said it will press on and make a major new push on to the Internet.
▪ It was in many ways the perfect time for another major feminist push in Florida.
new
▪ The new push is reflected in the doubling of budget requests-to $ 254m-to combat Aids overseas.
▪ Despite the possible loss, General Magic said it will press on and make a major new push on to the Internet.
■ VERB
give
▪ Instead of jerking on the lead, he gave a mighty push to the bear's head and the man-animal rolled over backwards.
▪ The boy jerked them in over the gunwale, his father giving an unnecessary push from underneath.
▪ He's given Beattie Johnson the push, which is a shame.
▪ I give this book a push and it moves.
▪ Bigger capacity engines produce more torque as more fuel is burnt per firing stroke, giving a bigger push to the piston.
▪ I gave the button a push.
▪ One of the guys at the gate helped me give the Fiasco a push.
▪ While the oven and the dough are warming up, the yeast may revive and give forth one final push.
need
▪ Walking uphill and into the wind, with the forty-pound bag on your back, you felt like you needed a push.
▪ Does your business operation in fact need a push in the right direction?
▪ They also need a little push from us, their public, their reason for being.
▪ We need a big push on our environmental record.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
at/with the push/touch of a button
be (hard) pushed to do sth
be hard put/pressed/pushed to do sth
▪ Aunt Edie was in such a rage about it that she was hard put to contain herself.
▪ Governments will then be hard put to get it on to their national statute books by mid-1993.
▪ I can assure you that any busybody would be hard put to it to prove maltreatment!
▪ Leinster will be hard pushed to keep the score within the respectable margins of defeat set by their predecessors.
▪ Once an apology is given, the defendant will be hard put to contest liability later.
▪ The slave's side ... and even Miss Phoebe would be hard put to understand.
▪ With his height and features, he was hard put to pass as a native.
▪ You will be hard pressed to choose a single main course because so many are mouth-watering.
be pushed for time/money etc
be pushing 40/60 etc
press/push (all) the right buttons
▪ He pushed all the right buttons.
▪ These are words which are all designed to press the right buttons among women voters.
press/push sb's buttons
push/grope/inch etc your way somewhere
push/tip sb over the brink
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ In a push to capture more of the market, Conoco will start selling propane.
▪ Rebel forces are believed to be preparing a final push into the city.
▪ The President has renewed a push to get the hostages freed.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And the Democrats in Congress have bedeviled Dole with a push for a raise in the minimum wage.
▪ For now the railway operates a short push and pull service between Furnace Sidings and the Whistle Inn.
▪ When push came to shove, the Northern California hospitality came through.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Push

Push \Push\, n.

  1. A thrust with a pointed instrument, or with the end of a thing.

  2. Any thrust. pressure, impulse, or force, or force applied; a shove; as, to give the ball the first push.

  3. An assault or attack; an effort; an attempt; hence, the time or occasion for action.

    Exact reformation is not perfected at the first push.
    --Milton.

    When it comes to the push, 'tis no more than talk.
    --L' Estrange.

  4. The faculty of overcoming obstacles; aggressive energy; as, he has push, or he has no push.

    Syn: See Thrust.

Push

Push \Push\, v. i.

  1. To make a thrust; to shove; as, to push with the horns or with a sword.
    --Shak.

  2. To make an advance, attack, or effort; to be energetic; as, a man must push in order to succeed.

    At the time of the end shall the kind of the south push at him and the king of the north shall come against him.
    --Dan. xi. 40.

    War seemed asleep for nine long years; at length Both sides resolved to push, we tried our strength.
    --Dryden.

  3. To burst pot, as a bud or shoot.

    To push on, to drive or urge forward; to hasten.

    The rider pushed on at a rapid pace.
    --Sir W. Scott.

Push

Push \Push\, n. [Probably F. poche. See Pouch.] A pustule; a pimple. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
--Bacon.

Push

Push \Push\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pushed; p. pr. & vb. n. Pushing.] [OE. possen, pussen, F. pousser, fr. L. pulsare, v. intens. fr. pellere, pulsum, to beat, knock, push. See Pulse a beating, and cf. Pursy.]

  1. To press against with force; to drive or impel by pressure; to endeavor to drive by steady pressure, without striking; -- opposed to draw.

    Sidelong had pushed a mountain from his seat.
    --Milton.

  2. To thrust the points of the horns against; to gore.

    If the ox shall push a manservant or maidservant, . . . the ox shall be stoned.
    --Ex. xxi. 32.

  3. To press or urge forward; to drive; to push an objection too far. `` To push his fortune.''
    --Dryden.

    Ambition pushes the soul to such actions as are apt to procure honor to the actor.
    --Spectator.

    We are pushed for an answer.
    --Swift.

  4. To bear hard upon; to perplex; to embarrass.

  5. To importune; to press with solicitation; to tease.

    To push down, to overthrow by pushing or impulse.

Push

Push \Push\, n. A crowd; a company or clique of associates; a gang. [Slang]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
push

1560s, from push (v.). Phrase push comes to shove is from 1936.

push

early 14c., from Old French poulser (Modern French pousser), from Latin pulsare "to beat, strike, push," frequentative of pellere (past participle pulsus) "to push, drive, beat" (see pulse (n.1)). Meaning "promote" is from 1714; meaning "approach a certain age" is from 1937. For palatization of -s-, OED compares brush (n.1); quash. Related: Pushed; pushing.\n\n"Pushing up the daisies now," said a soldier of his dead comrade.

["The American Florist," vol. XLVIII, No. 1504, March 31, 1917]

\nTo push (someone) around is from 1923. To push (one's) luck is from 1754. To push the envelope in figurative sense is late 1980s. To push up daisies "be dead and buried" is from World War I.
Wiktionary
push

Etymology 1 n. 1 A short, directed application of force; an act of pushing. 2 An act of tensing the muscles of the abdomen in order to expel its contents. 3 A great effort (to do something). 4 (context military English) A marching or drill maneuver/manoeuvre performed by moving a formation (especially a company front) forward or toward the audience, usually to accompany a dramatic climax or crescendo in the music. 5 A wager that results in no loss or gain for the bettor as a result of a tie or even score 6 (context computing English) The addition of a data item to the top of a stack. 7 (context Internet uncountable English) The situation where a server sends data to a client without waiting for a request, as in ''server push'', ''push technology''. 8 (context dated English) A crowd or throng or people vb. 1 (context transitive intransitive English) To apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force. 2 (context transitive English) To continually attempt to persuade (a person) into a particular course of action. 3 (context transitive English) To press or urge forward; to drive. 4 (context transitive English) To continually promote (a point of view, a product for sale, etc.). 5 (context informal transitive English) To approach; to come close to. 6 (context intransitive English) To tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents. 7 (context intransitive English) To continue to attempt to persuade a person into a particular course of action. 8 To make a higher bid at an auction. 9 (context poker English) To make an all-in bet. 10 (context chess transitive English) To move (a pawn) directly forward. 11 (context computing English) To add (a data item) to the top of a stack. 12 (context obsolete English) To thrust the points of the horns against; to gore. 13 To burst out of its pot, as a bud or shoot. Etymology 2

n. (context obsolete UK dialect English) A pustule; a pimple.

WordNet
push
  1. n. the act of applying force in order to move something away; "he gave the door a hard push"; "the pushing is good exercise" [syn: pushing]

  2. the force used in pushing; "the push of the water on the walls of the tank"; "the thrust of the jet engines" [syn: thrust]

  3. enterprising or ambitious drive; "Europeans often laugh at American energy" [syn: energy, get-up-and-go]

  4. an electrical switch operated by pressing a button; "the elevator was operated by push buttons"; "the push beside the bed operated a buzzer at the desk" [syn: push button, button]

  5. an effort to advance; "the army made a push toward the sea"

push
  1. v. move with force, "He pushed the table into a corner" [syn: force] [ant: pull]

  2. press, drive, or impel (someone) to action or completion of an action; "He pushed her to finish her doctorate" [syn: bear on]

  3. make publicity for; try to sell (a product); "The salesman is aggressively pushing the new computer model"; "The company is heavily advertizing their new laptops" [syn: advertise, advertize, promote]

  4. strive and make an effort to reach a goal; "She tugged for years to make a decent living"; "We have to push a little to make the deadline!"; "She is driving away at her doctoral thesis" [syn: tug, labor, labour, drive]

  5. press against forcefully without being able to move; "she pushed against the wall with all her strength"

  6. approach a certain age or speed; "She is pushing fifty" [syn: crowd]

  7. exert oneself continuously, vigorously, or obtrusively to gain an end or engage in a crusade for a certain cause or person; be an advocate for; "The liberal party pushed for reforms"; "She is crusading for women's rights"; "The Dean is pushing for his favorite candidate" [syn: crusade, fight, press, campaign, agitate]

  8. sell or promote the sale of (illegal goods such as drugs); "The guy hanging around the school is pushing drugs"

  9. move strenuously and with effort; "The crowd pushed forward"

  10. make strenuous pushing movements during birth to expel the baby; "`Now push hard,' said the doctor to the woman" [syn: press]

Wikipedia
Push

A push is an applied force typically intended to drive or impel. In contrast to a pull it acts in a direction away from person or thing causing the force.

Push (Matchbox Twenty song)

"Push" is a song by American rock band Matchbox Twenty. It was released in May 1997 as the second single from their debut album, Yourself or Someone Like You. After landing " Long Day" on several rock radio stations paving the way, "Push" hit the top of the Modern Rock Tracks and became one of the band's most successful singles.

Push (Gruntruck album)

Push is the second album by the American grunge band Gruntruck. It was released in 1992 by Roadrunner Records. The album features "Tribe", "Crazy Love", and "Above Me", which were released as singles. The band received moderate mainstream attention around the time of the release; with several magazines such as Rolling Stone praising the album, as well as Gruntruck's music videos being occasionally played on VH1 and MTV. "Tribe" was the highest charting single of the band's career.

Push (professional wrestling)

In professional wrestling, a push is an attempt by the booker to make a wrestler win more matches and become more popular or more reviled with the fans depending on whether they are a heel or a face. A push can also be based on a single major win against a major star (for example, Shelton Benjamin's 2004 winning streak over Triple H), and it is not uncommon for a push to be accompanied by a turn or a change in the wrestler's gimmick. Pushing is usually done for new wrestlers. This is essentially the opposite of a burial (or depush), which in contrast to the high profile of a push is typically done with little or no fanfare. Sometimes the fans generate the push for a wrestler themselves when their approval for the wrestler's work generates a positive reaction from them that is not anticipated.

A push can also be attributed to a political shift in the promotion's offices. Cowboy Bill Watts, whose promotions always consisted of an African-American main event babyface, began pushing Ron Simmons, a midcarder, to main event status and eventually to the WCW World Heavyweight Championship upon being put in charge of World Championship Wrestling (WCW). In WWE, following the fallout from the Signature Pharmacy Scandal, smaller and less muscular wrestlers such as CM Punk and Jeff Hardy began to get pushed and Vince McMahon confirmed the paradigm shift by mentioning that today's fans are drawn by charisma and not size.

Push (Bros album)

Push is the debut album by British pop band Bros and was released on 28 March 1988. The album spawned five hit singles, including the reissue of " I Owe You Nothing" which reached No. 1 in the UK Singles Chart in June 1988. The album reached No. 2 in the UK Albums Chart and spent 54 weeks in the Top 75. The album went 4× Platinum in the UK. In late 2013, a 25th Anniversary 3 CD remastered and expanded edition of the album was released on the Cherry Red record label. The song " Silent Night", originally released as a double A-side single with "Cat Among the Pigeons", featured for the very first time on the Push expanded edition.

Push (Enrique Iglesias song)

"Push" is a song from the Enrique Iglesias album Insomniac. The song features the artist Lil Wayne and is Iglesias's first collaboration with a rap artist.

Push (comics)

Push, in comics, may refer to:

  • Push (Marvel Comics), an alias used by the Marvel Comics character Nancy Lu
  • Push (Wildstorm), a series from Wildstorm
Push (novel)

Push is the 1996 debut novel of American author Sapphire. Twelve years after its release, it was made into Precious: Based on the Novel "Push" by Sapphire, a film that won two Academy Awards and was produced by Lee Daniels and Gary Magness.

Push (TV series)

Push (also rendered PUSH) is an American primetime soap opera that aired on ABC. The series was about a group of young Olympic hopefuls in training at California Southern University. It aired two episodes in April 1998 before being pulled from the air due to low ratings; a third episode aired on August 6, 1998. It was cancelled after 3 episodes, leaving 5 unaired, two of which, the fourth and fifth episodes, were originally planned to air.

The show is produced by Starboard Home Productions in association with Great Guns Films and Stu Segall Productions, and was distributed by Perry Pictures.

Push (2009 film)

Push is a 2009 American science fiction action- thriller film directed by Paul McGuigan and written by David Bourla. Starring Chris Evans, Dakota Fanning, Camilla Belle, and Djimon Hounsou, the film centers on a group of people born with various superhuman abilities who band together in order to take down a government agency that is using a dangerous drug to enhance their powers in hopes of creating an army of super soldiers.

The film was released on February 6, 2009 by Summit Entertainment and Icon Productions. It was a moderate box office success, though critical reception was mostly negative.

Push (Pharoahe Monch song)

"Push" is the first single from Pharoahe Monch's 2007 album Desire. The single was released September 11, 2006 as a 12" vinyl, but was later released as a CD single and a digital download. Produced by Pharoahe Monch, the song features an upbeat sound and a prominent use of horns played by Tower of Power. It features encouraging raps provided by Pharoahe Monch as well as background vocals sung by MeLa Machinko and Showtyme. The song contains an interpolation from Joe Zawinul's "Country Preacher." Its music video, directed by Paul Minor, features Monch rapping during the New York City blackout of 1977. The song is also featured in the NBA series 2007 video game NBA Street Homecourt.

The song failed to chart, yet it received generally positive critical attention. According to Dave Maher of Pitchfork Media, "the song is an effective throwback to 70s funk" despite the fact that it "could be two or three times longer." John Murphy of musicOMH.com labels "Push" a "typically articulate and intense number," while hailing its overlooked "dark, dramatic" lyrics. Spin also hails "Push" citing Monch's powerful vocals and lyrics.

PUSH (university guide)

Push is a British media organisation that offers information to university applicants and students in the United Kingdom.

Its flagship is now the website Push.co.uk, which features profiles of every UK university, advice about choosing a university and student finance, and a tool called the 'Uni Chooser' which allows users to create a shortlist of suitable universities sorted according to a large variety of criteria. Push describes itself as "the ruthlessly independent guide to UK universities" and uses the tagline "Push… like it is".

Previously, Push published a range of books including The Push Guide to Which University, The Push Guide to Money and The Push Guide to Choosing a University, but these are now out of print and their content has been updated, extended and incorporated into the Push website. In association with various sponsors, Push also conducts an annual tour of schools and sixth-form colleges, delivering guidance talks and reaching around 200 institutions each year.

Push (Moist song)

"Push" is the debut single by Canadian alternative rock group Moist from the band's first studio album, Silver. The song was very successful in Canada, peaking at #32 on Canada's Singles Chart. The song was also nominated for " Single of the Year" at the 1995 Juno Awards. It is considered to be one of the band's signature songs.

The song has been featured on the compilationsOh What a Feeling: A Vital Collection of Canadian Music and Big Shiny 90s. In 2000, a re-recorded version of the song was included on the U.S. version of Mercedes 5 and Dime.

Push (Avril Lavigne song)

"Push" is a song by Canadian singer-songwriter Avril Lavigne, recorded for her fourth studio album, Goodbye Lullaby. It was written by Lavigne and Evan Taubenfeld, and its producer was Deryck Whibley. It was released as the promotional single in Japan on February 13, 2012, peaking at number 35 on the Billboard Japan Hot 100 chart. The song has received positive reviews.

Usage examples of "push".

She pushed herself up and returned to the parapet in time to see the abseiling rope snap and the cradle it had been restraining catapulted back across the facade of the Gridiron.

Then Fagin pushed hard for some sort of gas attack, which Banish rejected as well, saying that the Abies family might have gas masks themselves and, if so, the agents and marshals going in would be facing a slaughter.

Vuitton clutch hung from her elbow and she pushed an expensive Bertini stroller accessorized with an infant whose blond hair matched her own.

The vaccine you took, the poisons, the adjuvants, they would have kept away, pushed down, your need for sex.

French, with his cavalry, pushed out feelers, and coasted along the edge of the advancing host.

During this action Lyttelton had held the Boers in their trenches opposite to him by advancing to within 1500 yards of them, but the attack was not pushed further.

People afoot pushing out of the tunnel behind him shoved them aside, but he just stared, too.

Keebes pushed through the door leading aft into a room the full forty-two-foot width of the submarine.

Pacino waited for the deck to vibrate with the energy of 52,000-shaft horsepower back aft pushing them through the ocean.

A hundred feet aft, the outer door of the signal ejector opened, and twenty seconds later a solenoid valve in a branch pipe from the auxiliary seawater system popped open, sending high-pressure seawater into the bottom of the signal ejector tube that pushed out the radio buoy.

Several of the beings pushed the agate gravel into new patterns, new contours.

So she sat beside Rillao and watched the boneless beings lounge and spout and push agates into new swirls and patterns.

Sis and old Si and Shep Hodgden and Gimmy Biddle and Charles Fifield was there and father said this will make jest the horse you want for your store and old Si said she aint biger than a rat and father said i gess she is big enuf to carry out all your lodes unless you put down your price, and then they all laffed at Si, and then Si said she was a puller and father said what do you want Josiar one that you have to push, and then they laffed agen and when father called him Josiar i know Si had better look out for when father calls me Henry i know i am in for a liking.

Some individuals urged that the reform agenda be pushed more vigorously at the local level.

He had one hand below him and managed to push the hatch back as they descended, Avelyn rolling right over the hatchway, the deceivingly agile powrie hopping to its feet atop the now-closed portal.