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Crossword clues for late

late
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
late
I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a late frost (=one that happens in late spring)
▪ There’s always the danger of a late frost killing the buds.
a late night (=when you go to bed late)
▪ We had a late night last night.
a later version
▪ a later version of the software
a new/latest range
▪ Body Blitz is a new range of toiletries specially designed for teenagers.
an early/late breakfast
▪ We had an early breakfast and left before 7.30.
an early/late shift
▪ Nobody wants to do the late shift.
an early/late start
▪ It was long trip so we had planned an early start.
an hour/three hours etc later
▪ An hour later she arrived home.
arrive early/late
▪ I don’t think we should arrive early.
at a later stage
▪ These points will be dealt with at a later stage.
at an early/late stage
▪ I can’t change my plans at this late stage.
be late for class
▪ David was late for class again.
be on the late/early/night etc shift (=be working a particular shift)
▪ She’s on the late shift.
early/late afternoon
▪ I arrived in Boston in the early afternoon.
early/late childhood
▪ Experiences in early childhood are very important.
early/late onset (=happening earlier or later than commonly happens – used especially about serious illnesses)
▪ The patient had a family history of early onset Alzheimer's disease.
early/late summer
▪ In the late summer of 1931, Joe returned to Oxford.
early/late teens
▪ We moved to York when I was in my early teens.
early/mid/late eighties
▪ Hilda Simpson was a woman in her early eighties.
early/mid/late fifties
▪ He must be in his early fifties by now.
early/mid/late forties
▪ The woman was probably in her mid forties.
early/mid/late nineties
▪ My grandfather was in his early nineties when he died.
early/mid/late seventies
▪ Bill must be in his mid seventies now.
early/mid/late sixties
▪ I’d say she was in her late sixties.
early/mid/late thirties
▪ She must be in her early thirties by now.
early/mid/late twenties
▪ She was in her early twenties when I met her.
in later years
▪ In later years he regretted their argument.
It is never too late
It is never too late to give up smoking.
Late arrivals
Late arrivals will not be admitted to the theatre.
late at night
▪ We often get to bed very late at night.
late booking
▪ There are cash penalties for late booking.
late evening (=the later part of the evening )
▪ By the time we arrived, it was late evening.
late middle age (=around age 60)
▪ a well-dressed man in late middle age
late morning
▪ By the time he woke, it was late morning.
late/early spring
▪ It was a cold, sunny day in early spring.
late/far into the night (=until very late at night)
▪ Staff worked late into the night to make necessary repairs.
later chapters (=the ones after this one)
▪ These points will be explored in more detail in later chapters.
later generations
▪ For later generations, however, the chances of getting work on leaving school were much lower.
latest craze
▪ At that time, scooters were the latest craze.
latest model (=newest design)
▪ Our dishwasher is the latest model .
latest/new/recent addition
▪ the latest addition to our designer range
leave (sth/sb) soon/now/later etc
▪ If he left immediately, he’d catch the 7.30 train.
left it too late
▪ I’m afraid you’ve left it too late to change your ticket.
marry late (=when they are older than is usual)
▪ People in higher social classes are more likely to marry late.
see you later (=see you soon, or later in the same day)
sleep late (=not wake up until late in the morning)
▪ She had slept late; it was already eleven.
stay up late
▪ I let the kids stay up late on Fridays.
stayed late
▪ She stayed late to finish the report.
staying out late
▪ He started staying out late, drinking.
the current/latest trend
▪ If current trends continue, the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will double by the year 2030.
the early/late sixties
▪ the student riots in Paris in the late sixties
the early/mid/late 18th etc century
▪ the industrial towns of the early 19th century
the early/mid/late eighties
▪ Their troubles began in the mid eighties.
the early/mid/late fifties
▪ The play was written in the late fifties.
the early/mid/late forties
▪ He spent several years in Paris in the late forties.
the early/mid/late nineties
▪ The industry received a lot of bad publicity in the early nineties.
the early/mid/late seventies
▪ In the early seventies, Sag Harbor was still a peaceful village.
the early/mid/late thirties
▪ The family sold the house in the early thirties.
the early/mid/late twenties
▪ The photograph was taken in the late twenties.
the later part (=the part towards the end of a period of time )
▪ in the later part of the twentieth century
the later/final/closing stages
▪ She was well cared for during the final stages of her life.
the latest estimates (=the most recent ones)
▪ The latest estimates are that sea levels could rise by about 20 cm by 2050.
the latest events
▪ We will be bringing you news of all the latest events.
the latest fashion
▪ They sell all the latest fashions.
the latest figures
▪ The latest figures show that crimes are down by 0.2 percent.
the latest gossip
▪ Annie usually has all the latest gossip.
the latest incident (=the most recent one)
▪ In the latest incident a post office was broken into.
the latest information (=information that has been discovered very recently)
▪ We have access to all the latest information.
the latest news
▪ Mom sent a letter with all the latest news.
the latest technology
▪ The boat is equipped with the latest technology.
the latest version
▪ The company will soon release the latest version of its network operating system.
the very best/latest/worst etc
▪ We only use the very best ingredients.
turn up late/early/on time etc
▪ Steve turned up late, as usual.
working late (=working after the time you usually finish)
▪ Are you working late again tonight?
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
too
▪ Much too late for other people.
▪ It was a constitutional issue and would be tossed up through the courts, yet by then it would be too late.
▪ She spun around to watch the coin splash, but it was too late.
▪ It is too late, far too late, for that.
▪ Give it up before it is too late.
▪ It was a revelation, political or not, that came too late.
▪ While there is breath in your body, it is never too late to change.
▪ You have sinned, Jimbo, I told myself out loud, but it is never too late to repent.
■ NOUN
afternoon
▪ Now, it was late afternoon.
▪ A votive candle is placed on the dozen or so tables, part of the ritual of late afternoon tea.
▪ It was late afternoon, and the students had finished the day's classes.
▪ By late afternoon the sky was completely opaque and a thick gloom hung over the ocean as if night had fallen prematurely.
▪ He was still in bed in the late afternoon when Mary called in to see him.
▪ Does she fall asleep in the late afternoon or early evening?
▪ There, spread out below her in the late afternoon sun, was Florence.
▪ He was barefoot, and still in his pajamas and a bathrobe, though it was late afternoon.
arrival
▪ Continue your journey south for a late arrival at your hotel accommodation.
▪ Now Raymond Campbell is set to become the latest arrival.
▪ Their relatively late arrival in the quarter coupled with their costs and the narrow margins on the surprise Model 20 impacted earnings.
▪ They were not helped, however, by the unflattering acoustics of the hall, nor by the late arrivals.
▪ The latest arrival, Pixie the 8 week old puppy.
▪ But it was not until the late arrival of the railway a century ago that Swanage really woke up.
▪ The sun, as if ashamed of its late arrival, shone its hardest and hottest.
▪ I am sorry about the late arrival of our response which is partly due the time involved in consulting member organisations.
date
▪ The total would be capped at a later date.
▪ You are able to input new and popular patterns to be stored at a later date for use again and again.
▪ This means that the sea in which the Bright Angel was deposited flooded the land in the east at a later date.
▪ On the later date, he received the Certificate of Airworthiness for the newly-flown C-GEVS.
▪ Secondary sources, in contrast, are interpretations of the past produced at a later date.
▪ Trial was fixed for a later date.
▪ Her former boyfriend David Odey from Penhill pleaded not guilty to the same charge and will be tried at a later date.
development
▪ Two other points, given their importance in later developments, must be abstracted from the argument.
▪ Peer social interactions pave the way for potential mutual respect relations with adults in later development.
▪ We hope that this Update will keep you abreast of the latest developments in assessment and related issues.
▪ Rather, they are the latest developments in the true story of Clancy and the man who authorities say defrauded him.
▪ It was postulated that prior infection with adenovirus 12 might predispose genetically susceptible individuals to the later development of coeliac disease.
▪ Triumphant in this latest development in his career has bought a manor house in the area.
▪ The other officers had remained at the table with Karl, discussing the latest developments in the war.
▪ A later development introduced a press to compress the hops in each pocket which was held in a pocket sling.
life
▪ Let us begin with the economic aspects of later life.
▪ Sometimes much painful emotion must be discharged in the later life areas before basic-basic dis-closes itself.
▪ Research also suggests that individuals can adjust to, and offset, the changes affecting them in middle and later life.
▪ This reflects the emotional and psychological connection of early feeding experiences which provide security in later life.
▪ For these serious psychiatric conditions the onset of new cases in later life appears to be very rare.
▪ A second influence has been the developing interest in the differences in later life experience between men and women.
▪ Inevitably I was destined to become a zoologist in later life.
▪ It has been estimated that childhood protection from the sun ban reduce the risk of skin cancer in later life by 78%.
night
▪ The show runs until Saturday, with late night shows tomorrow and Saturday.
▪ All these late nights with Omar were as exhilarating as they were tiring.
▪ One late night they all returned to their homes but Trevor was missing.
▪ They met for lunch in Washington Park, smoked dope with her newspaper friends, were invited together to late night parties.
▪ It was in the railway carriage as Earle had been coming back from the late night rally in the North West.
▪ I stayed late nights and came in on weekends.
▪ The boozy cook got the trots after a late night meal of undercooked seafood washed down by lashings of wine.
▪ I spent six weeks on it, working late nights and weekends.
spring
▪ Fortunately, the weather remained warm, and as late spring moved into summer, there was little rain.
▪ Cram wallflowers into containers now to be moved to centre stage in late spring.
▪ The first browser boxes, expected to cost about $ 300, are due in late spring.
▪ Overwinter under cover and plant out in late spring.
▪ Additionally, an open house for those interested in participating in the training class is planned for sometime in late spring.
▪ White blue-edged leaves, late spring.
▪ The breeding season lasts from late spring until late summer, depending to some degree upon temperature.
stage
▪ The lawyer's time will add to costs and is unlikely to result in time savings at a later stage.
▪ It is almost impossible to amend the bill and remove the provision at this late stage, lawmakers say.
▪ Too much is at stake to play politics with the policing of Northern Ireland at this late stage.
▪ But it invited the rivals to come back at a later stage.
▪ Congenital syphilis is arbitrarily divided into early and late stages with the dividing line at two years of age.
▪ The similarity continues if people or animals are examined at a later stage.
▪ But, unlike the wind, Quakers blew themselves out and Torquay took command in the late stages.
▪ In the later stages of cooling however both the inside and the outside behave elastically and thus their contractions get out of step.
summer
▪ Adults grow to varying sizes, depending on food available, and lay eggs in late summer.
▪ The £27m development is due to open in late summer with C&A the main anchor store.
▪ In the late summer, however, the leaves disappear and the plant does not resume growth until the beginning of spring.
▪ In the late summer of 1986 I was told the answer was a transplant.
▪ I feel a kind of reverence in late summer when I visit that abandoned butterfly garden.
▪ This late summer would be brief enough, the warm unseasonable days of mellow sunshine couldn't last.
▪ A 24-week program will start in late summer.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(have a) late/early night
at a later/future date
▪ Or how about a vital organ being removed and the opt-out card being found at a later date?
▪ Peter Novick dismisses the Freudian theory of repression of trauma leading to problems at a later date.
▪ Secondary sources, in contrast, are interpretations of the past produced at a later date.
▪ Some firms are very flexible on this issue and where possible, allow them to relocate at a later date.
▪ The total would be capped at a later date.
▪ They feared further repercussions at a later date because their participation in the boycott would almost certainly go into their files.
▪ This is particularly helpful if your school's organisation seeks to register as a charity at a later date.
▪ This means that the sea in which the Bright Angel was deposited flooded the land in the east at a later date.
at the latest
▪ I want you home by 11 at the latest.
▪ But I definitely want some live dates set up by the new year at the latest.
▪ By half past six at the latest he reached the place where he died.
▪ Let's continue this look at the marine aquarium scene by looking at the latest thinking regarding the nutritional requirements of marine fish.
▪ On this principle write all initial letters together on the day you receive instructions, or at the latest the following day.
▪ That meant flying out at 10.30 at the latest.
▪ The story was that trainees had to pass the exam on the third attempt at the latest, or leave.
▪ They should arrive for ten past at the latest.
▪ With only 11 declared at the latest acceptance stage, the Doncaster Classic looked somewhat below par.
catch you later
▪ Okay, Randy, catch you later.
early/late riser
▪ A red squirrel was another early riser.
▪ At 0630 hours the first of the early risers entered the cookhouse for breakfast.
▪ By the evening they are still full of energy when the early risers wilt.
▪ Graduate students in most institutions are notoriously late risers, who work way past conventional bedtime.
▪ It will be particularly useful for early risers who once had to endure deafening music from Benidorm bars until the small hours.
▪ The restaurants are late risers as well.
▪ There was the possibility of kingfisher and water rail for early risers on the morrow.
▪ We were early risers on the first morning.
late starter
▪ In the event the only other contender was Enoch Powell- and he was a late starter.
▪ Yet, from that terrible experience, hope is born - the late starter rises to new life.
later on
Later on, I'll be interviewing the Prime Minister, but first here is a summary of the news.
▪ Label the pipes you will be working on to avoid confusion later on.
▪ She took notes so she could remember it all later on.
long/regular/late etc hours
▪ A junior hospital doctor was telling Virginia Bottomley of the long hours he worked in casualty.
▪ During the decline of hand-loom weaving, more and more families were brought under the necessity of working longer hours.
▪ He had gone to Peterborough and worked long hours in a canning factory only so that he could own this bike.
▪ Instead he spent long hours alone, reading memoranda, and making check marks to indicate the recommendations that he ap-proved.
▪ It meant long hours for the pilots, flight deck crews, repair crews and cooks.
▪ It provides leisure time, one of the prime goals for which most men work long hours and years.
▪ These data are there for the asking, and they can provide a shortcut to long hours of interviews and observations.
▪ We have acted to reduce the long hours worked by junior doctors in hospitals.
not later than sth
▪ Bookings made less than four days in advance must be paid for not later than fifteen minutes before the performance.
▪ Copy for inclusion should reach the Editor not later than 14 February 1994.
▪ I have circulated the request to the various Regional Council service departments asking them to respond not later than 18 December 1992.
▪ Nominations must be supported by three members of the National Trust and must reach the Secretary not later than 15 June.
▪ Nominations should be sent to the Director-General to arrive not later than 30 November.
▪ The missed approach procedure must be commenced not later than this time. 6.
▪ This must happen once in each Parliament, usually not later than thirty-six months after the last general election.
run late/early/on time
▪ Don called - he's running late, so we'll start without him.
▪ He makes our trains run on time.
▪ In other words: - Keep the job running on time.
▪ Maybe she could get the London Underground to run on time?
▪ Passenger trains never ran on time now.
▪ Station refurbishment seems a mere insult when the trains don't run on time.
sooner or later
Sooner or later this would end up in the papers, and I would be out of a job.
▪ He is worried that sooner or later his business will fail.
▪ I'm sure Brian will turn up sooner or later.
▪ She's bound to find out sooner or later.
the (latest) thing
▪ Twenty years ago, "Pong" was the latest thing in video games.
▪ I began to go over the things that needed to be done after he had left for the office.
▪ It turned illusory even the things on which she had fixed in the attempt to make the strange world real.
▪ On the other hand, one of the things that marks an emerging market as attractive is access to large markets.
▪ People have a tendency to forget the things that happened that are good.
▪ Those are some of the things unions need to do to put the fight back in people.
▪ Those were the things that seemed real and that she clung to.
▪ Together they run a store that could have sold Grandma all the things she needed.
▪ We love the way everyone joins in the spirit of the thing.
the latest
▪ Every hospital wants the latest in high-tech equipment.
▪ Have you heard the latest? Phil's going out with Judy!
▪ Oh, I haven't told you the latest about my car!
▪ She assured me that big sweaters were the latest fashion.
▪ The latest model can print 15 pages every minute.
▪ The car is equipped with all the latest gadgets.
▪ The operation will be performed using the very latest microsurgery techniques.
▪ They stock the latest in designer footwear.
▪ What's the latest on the election?
▪ You'll have a chance to try out the latest in kitchen equipment.
too little, too late
▪ A 3 percent funding increase is too little, too late to save the tutoring program.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a house built in the late 19th century
▪ He is a big fan of reggae music and the late Bob Marley.
▪ I watched the late show on TV.
▪ Mrs. Moody's late husband
▪ Oh, no, my library books are late.
▪ She set up the fund in memory of her late husband.
▪ The bus is late again.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Rover began life in the late 1800s, producing first bicycles and then motorbikes.
▪ Severiano Ballesteros was disqualified for late arrival on the 1st tee.
▪ This phase of religious intensification began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when church membership began to grow across all denominations.
II.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
arrive
▪ She could hardly keep her patience if the train was delayed and she arrived late.
▪ I arrive late at an auditorium filled with row upon row of molded-plastic lecture-chairs.
▪ From there a delayed flight took us on to Punta Arenas where we arrived late in the evening.
▪ About my tendency to repeat things ... kids arriving late in class and how they affected it.
▪ Once Hopkinson arrived late for breakfast to find the Colonel by himself reading a newspaper.
▪ However, experience around the country suggests that materials arrive late in the school term or not at all.
▪ Any which arrive late will result in the student being refused admission to the Examination Centre.
▪ He had arrived late, which was unlike him, and seemed tense and irritable.
come
▪ The requests come late in the spring recruiting process.
▪ Evidence for the easing of overcrowding comes late in the century.
▪ The call came late at night.
▪ The sun came late in December if it came at all.
▪ I usually come late at night, after the crowds.
▪ The next day Edward came late to the library in an untypically gloomy mood.
▪ The snow glared dully; spring was always late coming to this farm.
sleep
▪ Chapter Twelve Melissa slept late and awoke with a splitting headache.
▪ Flavia herself that morning had slept late.
▪ On Sundays they would sleep late.
▪ Mornings, she'd sleep late.
▪ He slept late, and when he awoke the wind was rising in the rafters.
stay
▪ Occasionally he will get in early to see the morning shift or stay late for the night shift.
▪ Employees stayed late every night to drink from the open bar and banter about advertising concepts with their mentor.
▪ Edward made himself a cup of tea and vanished to the Britches, where he stayed late into the dusk.
▪ And who had told him that she'd stayed late at the office?
▪ Julia resolved to double-check everything she typed today and stay late, if need be, to get up to date.
▪ Uncle Ewan and Auntie Ursula had come round and they stayed late.
work
▪ I don't mind working late when it's necessary.
▪ The Huskies would be advised to stay up late working on showing up early.
▪ You work late, don't you.
▪ Who generally comes to work late?
▪ Sue Small was sitting in the offices, sorting through files, working late.
▪ Kenny Stewart continued his daytime construction job and worked late every evening and all weekend to get his business off the ground.
▪ He often worked late and most of the Lab staff knew that he proposed to do so last night.
▪ We were always at our desks by nine, taking short breaks only for meals and often working late into the night.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(have a) late/early night
at a later/future date
▪ Or how about a vital organ being removed and the opt-out card being found at a later date?
▪ Peter Novick dismisses the Freudian theory of repression of trauma leading to problems at a later date.
▪ Secondary sources, in contrast, are interpretations of the past produced at a later date.
▪ Some firms are very flexible on this issue and where possible, allow them to relocate at a later date.
▪ The total would be capped at a later date.
▪ They feared further repercussions at a later date because their participation in the boycott would almost certainly go into their files.
▪ This is particularly helpful if your school's organisation seeks to register as a charity at a later date.
▪ This means that the sea in which the Bright Angel was deposited flooded the land in the east at a later date.
at the latest
▪ I want you home by 11 at the latest.
▪ But I definitely want some live dates set up by the new year at the latest.
▪ By half past six at the latest he reached the place where he died.
▪ Let's continue this look at the marine aquarium scene by looking at the latest thinking regarding the nutritional requirements of marine fish.
▪ On this principle write all initial letters together on the day you receive instructions, or at the latest the following day.
▪ That meant flying out at 10.30 at the latest.
▪ The story was that trainees had to pass the exam on the third attempt at the latest, or leave.
▪ They should arrive for ten past at the latest.
▪ With only 11 declared at the latest acceptance stage, the Doncaster Classic looked somewhat below par.
better late than never
▪ "The pictures have finally arrived.'' "Well, better late than never.''
▪ While ongoing self-monitoring is urged, it is always better late than never.
catch you later
▪ Okay, Randy, catch you later.
early/late riser
▪ A red squirrel was another early riser.
▪ At 0630 hours the first of the early risers entered the cookhouse for breakfast.
▪ By the evening they are still full of energy when the early risers wilt.
▪ Graduate students in most institutions are notoriously late risers, who work way past conventional bedtime.
▪ It will be particularly useful for early risers who once had to endure deafening music from Benidorm bars until the small hours.
▪ The restaurants are late risers as well.
▪ There was the possibility of kingfisher and water rail for early risers on the morrow.
▪ We were early risers on the first morning.
in later years/life
▪ As a result, the performance in later years could very easily be enhanced.
▪ But, though large, the book is not, like Welles in later life, overweight.
▪ Buying two wooden spoons can be more fun at this time than purchasing an expensive set of china in later years.
▪ For these serious psychiatric conditions the onset of new cases in later life appears to be very rare.
▪ Nor is there any relief from this pattern of underrepresentation in the statistics for the regular admissions program in later years.
▪ Secure attachments early on in life provide inner resources to manage stressful and threatening situations in later years.
▪ The direct impact of improving health in later life has been relatively recent.
▪ Your young daughter's bossy attitude in later life may be channelled into quite acceptable leadership qualities.
late starter
▪ In the event the only other contender was Enoch Powell- and he was a late starter.
▪ Yet, from that terrible experience, hope is born - the late starter rises to new life.
later on
Later on, I'll be interviewing the Prime Minister, but first here is a summary of the news.
▪ Label the pipes you will be working on to avoid confusion later on.
▪ She took notes so she could remember it all later on.
long/regular/late etc hours
▪ A junior hospital doctor was telling Virginia Bottomley of the long hours he worked in casualty.
▪ During the decline of hand-loom weaving, more and more families were brought under the necessity of working longer hours.
▪ He had gone to Peterborough and worked long hours in a canning factory only so that he could own this bike.
▪ Instead he spent long hours alone, reading memoranda, and making check marks to indicate the recommendations that he ap-proved.
▪ It meant long hours for the pilots, flight deck crews, repair crews and cooks.
▪ It provides leisure time, one of the prime goals for which most men work long hours and years.
▪ These data are there for the asking, and they can provide a shortcut to long hours of interviews and observations.
▪ We have acted to reduce the long hours worked by junior doctors in hospitals.
not later than sth
▪ Bookings made less than four days in advance must be paid for not later than fifteen minutes before the performance.
▪ Copy for inclusion should reach the Editor not later than 14 February 1994.
▪ I have circulated the request to the various Regional Council service departments asking them to respond not later than 18 December 1992.
▪ Nominations must be supported by three members of the National Trust and must reach the Secretary not later than 15 June.
▪ Nominations should be sent to the Director-General to arrive not later than 30 November.
▪ The missed approach procedure must be commenced not later than this time. 6.
▪ This must happen once in each Parliament, usually not later than thirty-six months after the last general election.
run late/early/on time
▪ Don called - he's running late, so we'll start without him.
▪ He makes our trains run on time.
▪ In other words: - Keep the job running on time.
▪ Maybe she could get the London Underground to run on time?
▪ Passenger trains never ran on time now.
▪ Station refurbishment seems a mere insult when the trains don't run on time.
sooner or later
Sooner or later this would end up in the papers, and I would be out of a job.
▪ He is worried that sooner or later his business will fail.
▪ I'm sure Brian will turn up sooner or later.
▪ She's bound to find out sooner or later.
the (latest) thing
▪ Twenty years ago, "Pong" was the latest thing in video games.
▪ I began to go over the things that needed to be done after he had left for the office.
▪ It turned illusory even the things on which she had fixed in the attempt to make the strange world real.
▪ On the other hand, one of the things that marks an emerging market as attractive is access to large markets.
▪ People have a tendency to forget the things that happened that are good.
▪ Those are some of the things unions need to do to put the fight back in people.
▪ Those were the things that seemed real and that she clung to.
▪ Together they run a store that could have sold Grandma all the things she needed.
▪ We love the way everyone joins in the spirit of the thing.
the latest
▪ Every hospital wants the latest in high-tech equipment.
▪ Have you heard the latest? Phil's going out with Judy!
▪ Oh, I haven't told you the latest about my car!
▪ She assured me that big sweaters were the latest fashion.
▪ The latest model can print 15 pages every minute.
▪ The car is equipped with all the latest gadgets.
▪ The operation will be performed using the very latest microsurgery techniques.
▪ They stock the latest in designer footwear.
▪ What's the latest on the election?
▪ You'll have a chance to try out the latest in kitchen equipment.
too little, too late
▪ A 3 percent funding increase is too little, too late to save the tutoring program.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ All the stores in the mall are open late for the sale.
▪ I stayed late at work last night.
▪ The bus came ten minutes late.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Come late to-morrow I must explain to you.
▪ Days began early and ended late so that maximum distances could be travelled.
▪ Deteriorating snow conditions late in the day cause most problems on alpine descents.
▪ She was surprised to find how late she'd slept in.
▪ They were going to be out late and their help was away.
▪ Trains out of Waverley were running fifteen minutes late by the time she got there, but she didn't care.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Late

Late \Late\ (l[=a]t), a. [Compar. Later (l[=a]t"[~e]r), or latter (l[a^]t"t[~e]r); superl. Latest (l[=a]t"[e^]st) or Last (l[.a]st).] [OE. lat slow, slack, AS. l[ae]t; akin to OS. lat, D. laat late, G. lass weary, lazy, slack, Icel. latr, Sw. lat, Dan. lad, Goth. lats, and to E. let, v. See Let to permit, and cf. Alas, Lassitude.]

  1. Coming after the time when due, or after the usual or proper time; not early; slow; tardy; long delayed; as, a late spring.

  2. Far advanced toward the end or close; as, a late hour of the day; a late period of life.

  3. Existing or holding some position not long ago, but not now; recently deceased, departed, or gone out of office; as, the late bishop of London; the late administration.

  4. Not long past; happening not long ago; recent; as, the late rains; we have received late intelligence.

  5. Continuing or doing until an advanced hour of the night; as, late revels; a late watcher.

Late

Late \Late\, adv. [AS. late. See Late, a.]

  1. After the usual or proper time, or the time appointed; after delay; as, he arrived late; -- opposed to early.

  2. Not long ago; lately.

  3. Far in the night, day, week, or other particular period; as, to lie abed late; to sit up late at night.

    Of late, in time not long past, or near the present; lately; as, the practice is of late uncommon.

    Too late, after the proper or available time; when the time or opportunity is past.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
late

Old English læt "occurring after the customary or expected time," originally "slow, sluggish," from Proto-Germanic *lata- (cognates: Old Norse latr "sluggish, lazy," Middle Dutch, Old Saxon lat, German laß "idle, weary," Gothic lats "weary, sluggish, lazy," latjan "to hinder"), from PIE *led- "slow, weary" (cognates: Latin lassus "faint, weary, languid, exhausted," Greek ledein "to be weary"), from root *le- "to let go, slacken" (see let (v.)).\n

\nThe sense of "deceased" (as in the late Mrs. Smith) is from late 15c., from an adverbial sense of "recently." Of women's menstrual periods, attested colloquially from 1962. Related: Lateness. As an adverb, from Old English late.

Wiktionary
late

a. 1 Near the end of a period of time. 2 Specifically, near the end of the day. 3 (context usually not used comparatively English) Associated with the end of a period. 4 Not arriving until after an expected time. 5 Not having had an expected menstrual period. 6 (anchor: deceased)(context not comparable euphemistic English) deceased, dead: (non-gloss definition: used particularly when speaking of the dead person's actions while alive.) {{qualifier|Often used with "(m en the)"; see usage notes.}} adv. 1 after a deadline has passed, past a designated time. 2 formerly, especially in the context of service in a military unit. n. (context informal English) A shift (scheduled work period) that takes place late in the day or at night.

WordNet
late
  1. adj. being or occurring at an advanced period of time or after a usual or expected time; "late evening"; "late 18th century"; "a late movie"; "took a late flight"; "had a late breakfast" [ant: early, middle]

  2. after the expected or usual time; delayed; "a belated birthday card"; "I'm late for the plane"; "the train is late"; "tardy children are sent to the principal"; "always tardy in making dental appointments" [syn: belated, tardy]

  3. of the immediate past or just previous to the present time; "a late development"; "their late quarrel"; "his recent trip to Africa"; "in recent months"; "a recent issue of the journal" [syn: late(a), recent]

  4. having died recently; "her late husband" [syn: late(a)]

  5. of a later stage in the development of a language or literature; used especially of dead languages; "Late Greek" [ant: early, middle]

  6. at or toward an end or late period or stage of development; "the late phase of feudalism"; "a later symptom of the disease"; "later medical science could have saved the child" [syn: later(a)] [ant: early]

  7. (used especially of persons) of the immediate past; "the former president"; "our late President is still very active"; "the previous occupant of the White House" [syn: former(a), late(a), previous(a)]

late
  1. adv. later than usual or than expected; "the train arrived late"; "we awoke late"; "the children came late to school"; "notice came so tardily that we almost missed the deadline"; "I belatedly wished her a happy birthday" [syn: belatedly, tardily] [ant: early]

  2. to an advanced time; "deep into the night"; "talked late into the evening" [syn: deep]

  3. at an advanced age or stage; "she married late"; "undertook the project late in her career"

  4. in the recent past; "he was in Paris recently"; "lately the rules have been enforced"; "as late as yesterday she was fine"; "feeling better of late"; "the spelling was first affected, but latterly the meaning also" [syn: recently, lately, of late, latterly]

Wikipedia
Late (song)

"Late" was an obscure single released in very limited numbers by the band Blue Angel, taken from their 1980 album also called Blue Angel. Lee Brovitz was the primary songwriter, sharing co-writing credits with Lauper and Turi. The single attained chart success in Australia and was also released in Spain.

Late

Late may refer to:

  • A deceased person or thing
  • Late (album), a 2000 album by The 77s
  • Late!, a pseudonym used by Dave Grohl on his Pocketwatch album
  • Late (rapper), an underground rapper from Wolverhampton
  • "Late" (song), a song by Blue Angel
  • Late (Tonga), an uninhabited volcanic island southwest of Vavau in the kingdom of Tonga
  • "Late", a song by Kanye West from Late Registration
Late (album)

Late is the title of The 77s' eleventh album, released in 2000 on the band's own Fools of the World label.

Late (rapper)

Late is an underground rapper from Wolverhampton. He is a co-founder of Wolftown Recordings (with Tricksta, in 1999) and a member of the rap groups Villains and Wolftown Committee. He has collaborated with numerous acts worldwide, including Willie D from the Geto Boys and K-Rino.

Late (Tonga)

Late Island is an uninhabited volcanic island southwest of Vavaʻu in the kingdom of Tonga. The small, 6-km-wide circular island of Late, lying along the Tofua volcanic arc about 55 km WSW of the island of Vavau, contains a 400-m-wide, 150-m-deep summit crater with an ephemeral lake. The largely submerged basaltic andesite to andesitic volcano rises 1500 m from the sea floor, with its conical summit reaching 540 m above sea level. Cinder cones are found north of the summit crater, west and north of a semicircular plateau 100–150 m below the summit, and on the NW coast. A graben-like structure on the NE flank contains two large pit craters, the lower of which is partially filled by a saltwater lake. Only two eruptions have occurred in historical time, both from NE-flank craters, which produced explosive activity and possible lava flows in 1790 and 1854.

It was discovered by Spanish naval officer Francisco Mourelle de la Rúa on 27 February 1781, on board of the frigatePrincesa. Six years later it was explored by French explorer Jean-François de La Pérouse. It was again visited by British naval officer Edward Edwards in 1791 that named it Bickerston.

Usage examples of "late".

The name of his partially duped accomplice and abettor in this last marvelous assault, is no other than PHILIP LYNCH, Editor and Proprietor of the Gold Hill News.

Yet I know that thou wilt abide here till some one else come, whether that be early or late.

It was now late in the afternoon, and Ralph pondered whether he should abide the night where he was and sleep the night there, or whether he should press on in hope of winning to some clear place before dark.

But his thought stayed not there, but carried him into the days when he was abiding in desire of the love that he won at last, and lost so speedily.

After seeing Abie Singleton at the club last night, he suspected sleep was to become but a bitter memory.

B-39 Peacemaker force has been tasked by SIOP with maintaining an XK-Pluto capability directed at ablating the ability of the Russians to activate Project Koschei, the dormant alien entity they captured from the Nazis at the end of the last war.

Children who at the babbling stage are not exposed to the sounds of actual speech may not develop the ability to speak later, or do so to an abnormally limited extent.

I just sat back on my heels and let her tongue lash over me, until at last it dawned on me that the old abo must have gone running to her and she thought we were responsible for scaring him out of what wits he had.

Then at last scraps of weed appeared to him, and then pieces of wood, abob in the water.

Thus then they abode a-feasting till the sun was westering and the shadows waxed about them, and then at last Ralph rose up and called to horse, and the other wayfarers arose also, and the horses were led up to them.

The standards of Ishterebinth, last of the Nonmen Mansions, charged deep into a sea of abominations, leaving black-blooded ruin in their wake.

I knew he usually aborted only married women, in their late twenties and thirties.

It was Sandy Wan, the woman who would later help me track down the truth about the abortus vendors.

I can assure you I have quite a lot at my disposal all kinds of different spells fee faw fums, mumbo jumbos, abraxas, love potions, he glanced quickly at the queen here and added, though I see you have no need of the last of those, having a very beautiful wife whom you love to distraction.

Five minutes later the Lackawanna, Captain Marchand, going at full speed, delivered her blow also at right angles on the port side, abreast the after end of the armored superstructure.