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Crossword clues for gain

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
gain
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
achieve/obtain/gain statehood
▪ Utah obtained statehood in 1896.
acquire/achieve/gain/develop competence
▪ First you have to acquire competence in methods of research.
capital gains tax
capital gains
efficiency gains (=increases in efficiency)
▪ New technology introduced by the company has brought efficiency gains.
gain a seat (also take a seat from sb) (= win a seat from another party)
▪ At the next election the Republicans gained 12 seats in the Senate.
▪ Labour took over fifty seats from the Conservatives.
gain confidence (also grow/gain in confidence) (= become more confident)
▪ Paul did well in the job and gained a lot of confidence.
gain credence (=to become more widely accepted or believed)
▪ His ideas quickly gained credence among economists.
gain credibility
▪ It took many years for these ideas to gain credibility in the science community.
gain entry
▪ Burglars use various methods to gain entry to houses.
gain entry (=be allowed to take part)
▪ You need good exam results to gain entry to the best universities.
gain publicity
▪ Appearing on a chat show means you gain publicity.
gain strength
▪ After the operation, he spent several weeks relaxing and gaining strength.
gain/achieve mastery of sth
▪ He has definitely achieved mastery of this very difficult subject.
gain/achieve/win independence (=get independence)
▪ Our aim was to achieve full independence.
gain/draw strength from sb/sth
▪ He gained strength from being back with the people and things he loved.
gained admission
▪ Women gained admission to the club only recently.
gained ascendancy
▪ He slowly gained ascendancy in the group.
gained control of
▪ China gained control of the island in 1683.
gained...prestige
▪ This little-known British firm has now gained considerable prestige.
gained...toehold
▪ The company has gained a toehold in the competitive computer market.
gain/establish a foothold
▪ Extreme right-wing parties gained a foothold in the latest European elections.
gain/find acceptance
▪ This management style gained acceptance in the 1980s.
gain/gather/build up momentum (=become more and more successful)
▪ The show gathered momentum over the next few months and became a huge hit.
gain/gather/pick up speed (=go faster)
▪ The Mercedes was gradually picking up speed.
gain/get a purchase on sth
▪ The ice made it impossible to get a purchase on the road.
gain/get/develop an understanding
▪ Scientists continued to gain a greater understanding of the effects of radiation.
gain/grow/increase in popularity
▪ Extreme sports are growing in popularity.
Gaining admittance
Gaining admittance to the club was no easy matter.
gain/lose height (=move higher or lower in the sky)
▪ The plane was rapidly losing height.
gain/win sb’s confidence
▪ As team captain, he soon won the confidence of the players.
gain/win/achieve notoriety (for sth)
▪ The local church has gained notoriety for being different.
get/gain a degree
▪ She worked hard and got a good degree.
get/gain an advantage
▪ Both teams tried to get an advantage.
get/gain an edge over sb/sth (=gain a small advantage over someone or something else)
▪ A well trained workforce is a key factor in gaining a competitive edge over our rivals.
get/gain experience
▪ He suggested that I should gain some experience in a related industry like travel.
get/gain power
▪ Women were trying to gain power in a male-dominated world.
get/gain/obtain a licence
▪ New private pilots must fly for at least fifty hours before getting their licences.
get/gain/receive a majority
▪ If no one gets an overall majority, the vote is repeated.
ill-gotten gains
stand to gain/lose/win/make
▪ What do firms think they stand to gain by merging?
weight gain
▪ The medication can cause rapid weight gain.
windfall gain/profit etc (=high profit that you did not expect to make)
win/earn/gain respect (=start to be respected)
▪ Morris eventually won the respect of his fellow workers.
win/gain fame
▪ He won fame when he appeared in the film ‘The Graduate’.
win/gain recognition
▪ The company has won recognition for its customer service.
win/gain/attract support
▪ Try to win the support of local shopkeepers.
win/obtain/gain/secure a concession
▪ In the end, the strikers returned to work having won few concessions.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
acceptance
▪ Even so, the idea gained complete acceptance only early this century.
▪ Unions, factory Inspection, the regulation of the hours of women and children had gained acceptance.
▪ It is the latter definition that is gaining the widest acceptance.
▪ What he said in 1 714, perhaps in jest, later gained acceptance as the perfect moniker for the marine timekeeper.
▪ In addition to this, every vision is surrounded by a kind of halo designed to gain its acceptance.
▪ He eventually gains acceptance, even though he never truly fits in.
▪ Its reputation in encouraging a variety of worthwhile activities will then gain increasing acceptance in the community.
▪ Birth control advocates began to think they could gain more public acceptance on their own.
access
▪ The firm may be market-seeking, in the sense that it wishes to gain access to more customers and consumers.
▪ Network programs that involve remote file transfer are especially susceptible to eavesdroppers gaining access to the contents of files.
▪ To destroy the cottage in order to gain access to the road was desirable.
▪ To gain access to Clinton, you have to give him hundreds of thousands of dollars and drink lousy Yuban.
▪ There is no evidence that the intruder gained access to the source code for Office or any Windows products.
▪ You gain access to those 4 million square miles, and you gain access to tremendous natural resources.
▪ It was under the old law if done in pursuance of the ulterior intent, not if done simply to gain access.
▪ Soviet leaders unsuccessfully attempted to gain greater access to Yugoslav facilities in 1976.
advantage
▪ Salary caps are imposed to prevent richer clubs gaining an unfair advantage over poorer rivals by offering players vastly inflated salaries.
▪ At first capital only gained advantage in relation to labor and may even have lost some ground to the state.
▪ Large numbers of people have gained the advantages of acquiring different forms of capital, be they houses or shares.
▪ Swift action is needed, not just to gain the advantage, but as a necessity.
▪ We may be fed up with the machinations of elected officials who are obsessed with gaining political advantage over one another.
▪ Those firms within the Community which employ labour illicitly will reduce their labour costs and gain a competitive advantage in production.
▪ Neither was ever able to gain any decided advantage.
approval
▪ Dartington had to change its course considerably in order to gain approval.
▪ Crop Revenue Coverage is the first privately developed alternative crop insurance to gain approval from the Agriculture Department, the company said.
▪ In its earlier years it was extremely outspoken in its condemnation of anything that failed to gain its approval.
▪ He or she must gain approval from others, outside formal authority channels, to implement a staff project.
▪ A proposal by the opposition Labour Party for a more extensive package failed to gain parliamentary approval.
▪ It seemed speaking when you felt like it was a way to gain approval.
▪ Or how is he to submit to pain or exhaustion to gain their approval?
▪ The procedure has not gained formal approval by the International Olympic Committee because it does not give conclusive proof of drug use.
attention
▪ Gradually he had started to reject food which had increased her level of anxiety and gained him more attention.
▪ The morass in Washington has gained even greater attention as bond investors have little economic news on which to focus.
▪ To gain attention and recognition we need to be able to attend to and recognise others.
▪ Since then it has gained more and more attention as astronomers worldwide watch its progress en route to the sun.
▪ His works were slow to gain wide attention in the United States.
▪ This gives an opportunity for your message to gain more attention from the reader and perhaps to make a deeper impression.
▪ Lucky had wanted to gain his attention in some way.
benefit
▪ On top of the recovery in demand, Forte stands to gain the full benefit of cost reductions of £40m made last year.
▪ Study these carefully to ensure you gain maximum benefit from every interview you attend.
▪ He became close friends with the Pipers and gained great benefits from their taste, experience and enthusiasm.
▪ How will you measure when it is time to start gaining financial benefit?
▪ Staff would have new opportunities to gain additional skills and benefit from greater flexibility.
▪ So Swannson-on-Wheels will gain considerable benefit from the purchase of a relatively local garage facility on the outskirts of Tetbury.
▪ In this manner the fish gain the benefits of both food sources.
▪ Small farms in the public sector have been grouped together in cooperatives to gain all the benefits possible from size and concentration.
confidence
▪ Realizing this will gradually help you to gain confidence to go deeper and deeper into relaxation and experience full benefit from it.
▪ Remember that progress will speed up as he masters the first few steps of a particular challenge and gains some confidence.
▪ She touched this totem carefully, gaining confidence as it quivered and tautened.
▪ Abused women can gain new confidence when they realize they have political leverage against their abusive spouses.
▪ With remarkable speed this novel organization gained the confidence of the capital's work-force.
▪ People have gained confidence in sending substantial sums off to unseen institutions and working with them long-distance.
▪ She will gain confidence in communication and management skills, and her own knowledge will be tested.
▪ Even if he had not gained her confidence by constant restimulation of late-life areas he would have provoked her tears.
control
▪ It ran across my chest, and over my shoulder, and I leaned into it to gain control.
▪ I started to return well and I gained control of the match.
▪ But these tiny acts helped women gain some measure of control over our lives.
▪ Fortunately, the investment banks have managed to gain control of the dividends of only big and new companies.
▪ The attack recovered the lost guns and gained control of a good part of the plateau.
▪ Meanwhile both groups began infiltrating the city in an attempt to gain control of key locations.
▪ Soon he would gain control of himself and the role, Logan said.
currency
▪ It was in these conditions that Marxist ideas began to gain currency.
▪ But then, of course, I knew how that idea had gained currency.
▪ During the 1880s Marxism began to gain currency among the revolutionary intelligentsia.
▪ Two misconceptions about the Treaty of Maastricht have been allowed to gain currency.
▪ This belief gained wide currency among Sinhalese of all social strata in the twentieth century.
▪ It gained currency during the period of national reawakening in the nineteenth century.
▪ Oral tradition was written down and gained a wider currency than ever before.
degree
▪ These more favoured subcontractors, however, gain a greater degree of continuity at the expense of wider variations in profits.
▪ Wirral-born Mike joined the company in 1979 from Newcastle University where he gained a chemical engineering degree.
▪ If you wish, you can go on from there to gain an Honours degree.
▪ However for AEs the figures were virtually identical with those of standard entrants. 2% more SEs gained good degrees than NSEs.
▪ After leaving Richmond School, he gained a degree in sports studies at Newcastle Polytechnic.
▪ She gained a degree in both languages and subsequently enroled in our course.
▪ Only 25.4% gained a good degree compared with 32.1% of the SEs and 30.1% of the NSEs as a whole.
▪ Jones International, a for-profit university, recently caused controversy by gaining full degree accreditation.
experience
▪ In my opinion it is very doubtful whether all this disruption to so many people was justified by the experience I gained.
▪ When women start to examine and share their experiences, they gain knowledge of politics.
▪ An accurate record of her progress needs to be kept and a check made on the experience she has gained.
▪ At the present time, with the considerable experience gained and with additional personnel available, this initial effort should be axiomatic.
▪ But as experience is gained through constant repetition, each movement of the form begins to flow smoothly into the next.
▪ Guidance was first published in 1973, and it has been periodically revised in the light of experience gained.
▪ Obviously this utilises the experience I have gained to date and also allows me to develop further within my chosen field.
▪ As a by-product, with the experience gained they are now in a strong position to enter paid advice work.
foothold
▪ Spreadsheets have typically adopted these commands in order to gain some foothold in the market.
▪ These opportunistic diseases would not otherwise gain a foothold in the body.
▪ Already her knitwear had gained a small foothold on the Continent.
▪ Keeping hydrated improves the body's ability to trap and neutralize those microbes before they can gain a foothold.
ground
▪ Nationalism has gained ground to the extent that it has begun to claim mainstream status.
▪ Having gained the high moral ground, I was reluctant to quit it right away.
▪ It is by no means certain that the Tory tax offensive has gained much ground.
▪ Martin also gained ground on Gordon, finishing sixth and moving within 87 points.
▪ Although still carrying the hallmarks of a true fishing port, Padstow is fast gaining ground in the popularity stakes.
▪ These companies appear to have gained some ground on Packard Bell.
▪ The secular temper of the times, however, ensured that the more extreme theories connected with evolution continued to gain ground.
▪ The trend gained ground in the United States, where early symphony audiences ached to exude social refinement.
impression
▪ In particular, you may gain the impression that you are being victimised because of what you are, rather than because of who you are.
▪ Lest her neighbours gain the impression that no-one ever wrote to her, she wrote and mailed letters to herself.
▪ Walking amongst the ruins of an ancient city, for example, it is impossible to gain an overall impression of the layout.
▪ Even today it is easy to gain a lopsided impression.
▪ If you can satisfy these three requirements the reader should gain a good first impression of both the essay and the writer.
▪ So attempt to gain an impression of paper, and a feel for the movement, rather than painting details.
▪ Visitors to the studio could gain an impression of his work as a whole and grasp the cumulative effect.
independence
▪ Further education colleges will gain new independence from April 1993, and will be responsible for their own budgets.
▪ Prosecutors claim the brothers killed for their parents' $ 14 million fortune, and to gain their independence.
▪ By the 1930s Storni had gained sufficient independence to allow her poetic vision to encompass the world of objects around her.
▪ Gandhi had risen above his acts, he had gained considerable independence of their success or failure.
information
▪ Some of the more sensational reports claimed that Misrati had used his attractive young daughter to gain access to information.
▪ Do not forget the benefits you will gain from career information interviewing and job location interviewing.
▪ Additional aims included gaining further information about the timing and frequency of recurrence and learning how often this was associated with symptoms.
▪ Ability to gain access to information, and to desire information from a variety of points of view.
▪ I hope that from this feature, readers will want to gain more information about Killifish.
▪ Further evidence of the disadvantaged position of older women in relation to men can be gained from information on the distribution of income.
▪ As well as acting as a support for the patient she will be gaining additional information relevant to her understanding of patient care.
▪ A central zone leads to other areas where you can test yourself, gain information, do puzzles and so on.
insight
▪ Since then he had gained insight into himself, and into a woman's heart.
▪ She may talk with attorneys and other observers during the breaks to gain further insights.
▪ To visit them is to gain an insight into what many of our own wetlands must have been like.
▪ We also felt that they might gain some insight into why it is they are so often in trouble with us.
▪ The trust wants to gain an insight into the county's butterfly population.
▪ This guidance helped them gain insight into the characteristics that inhibited their own ability to persist and to complete schoolwork.
▪ Pupils use drama to gain insights into moral and social issues in works of literature.
▪ Perhaps they hope to heighten their appreciation of nature by gaining insight into its ways.
knowledge
▪ The book is based on his knowledge of Wychwood gained then, but for his story he went back even further in time.
▪ Reflective abstraction is the abstraction of new knowledge from editing knowledge gained by reflection or thought.
▪ Using inside knowledge gained from twenty years in the industry she shows how recent scandals could have been avoided.
▪ Mistakes unfortunately are inevitable while knowledge is gained.
▪ While they adhere to some uniform practices, these are not systematically informed and shaped by pertinent experience and knowledge gained elsewhere.
▪ When the knowledge gained by genomics comes on line, the power of genetic engineering will truly become evident.
▪ To a large extent, success in this area has reflected knowledge gained from nature.
momentum
▪ The Axiam judders and shakes like a very early classic bike then slowly gains momentum rather than actually accelerating.
▪ If he could emerge triumphant from those events, he believed he would gain the momentum to win the White House.
▪ The back of my car began to gain momentum.
▪ Biological and entomological studies gained momentum through the photographic record.
▪ If a punch is aimed at the face, the defender steps out to intercept it before it gains momentum.
▪ While critics of his decision gained momentum Thursday, the record shows they face an uphill battle.
▪ It's a subject that has gained momentum across the country in recent years.
opportunity
▪ She would treat this as an unexpected opportunity to gain experience in mass-production fashion.
▪ The initiation and implementation of economic development projects also provides government with opportunities to gain political support from a diverse constituency.
▪ Established in 1978, this group has grown rapidly, and there is considerable opportunity for you to gain management experience.
▪ They missed the opportunity, but they gained what some would later consider to be a legitimate claim to intervention.
▪ In particular, they should give pupils the opportunity to gain some experience of the works of Shakespeare.
▪ And within that, we must have a strong, equal and unfettered opportunity to compete and gain access.
▪ Staff would have new opportunities to gain additional skills and benefit from greater flexibility.
▪ Seizing the opportunity to gain better qualifications actually puts you in charge and gives you a self-confidence charge.
party
▪ One poll suggests that the party has gained 1 %, another says support has fallen by the same amount.
▪ The Green Party aims to gain concessions on environmental safeguards for nuclear power and on the ingredients of unleaded petrol.
▪ A bipartisan tax bill will have to bridge big differences between the parties on capital gains tax cuts.
▪ In elections in 1921 Mussolini won a seat in Milan, and his party gained 35 of 535 seats in the country.
▪ This effort has escalated sharply since the 1994 election when the Republican Party gained control of both houses of Congress.
▪ The Labour Party gains its most consistent successes in London and the other major cities.
▪ Muhamad Salikh, chair of the ErK democratic party, gained 12 percent.
percent
▪ Labour scored its biggest successes in London, where it gained a dozen seats on an above-average swing of 3.4 percent.
▪ Simsmetal had previously reported a 10. 1 percent gain to A $ 14. 6 million in first quarter profit.
▪ Economists had anticipated around a 1. 2 percent gain in June.
▪ Forecasters had expected roughly a 0. 6 percent gain in December retail sales.
▪ Invesco Strategic Gold ranked second with a 46. 2 percent gain.
▪ Amgen Inc. reported a 23 percent increase in comparable earnings and an 18 percent gain in revenues for fiscal year 1995.
popularity
▪ But it has gained amazingly in popularity.
▪ Another, newer type of yeast is gaining in popularity.
▪ So why is complementary medicine gaining popularity?
▪ A strategy rapidly gaining popularity is to use three of them at once.
▪ Although still carrying the hallmarks of a true fishing port, Padstow is fast gaining ground in the popularity stakes.
▪ His fortunes slip as competing styles gain popularity.
▪ The desire to cut taxes Governments gain popularity by cutting taxes, not by increasing them.
▪ Talk radio and talk television hosts, mostly but by no means all conservative, are proliferating and gaining influence and popularity.
power
▪ This helped them to gain height and get power when heading the ball.
▪ Tobaccocontrol advocates agree, saying their lack of vigilance in decades past had allowed the Tobacco Institute to gain power and influence.
▪ The only trouble with gaining power over our lives is that it is people like us who have the power.
▪ Although the balance of power is shifting against the commission, in absolute terms it will gain power.
▪ For decades, politicians have been trying to gain power in Washington by separating themselves from Washington.
▪ Nor was it through magic alone that the impulse arose to gain power over nature.
▪ Quite suddenly, they had gained the power to confer respectability.
qualification
▪ She began her career as a child care officer in Dorset after gaining her social work qualification at Liverpool University.
▪ In 1989-90, 16,000 people entered the Programme, and 10,700 gained a qualification.
▪ Women are much more likely to gain arts qualifications, while men are more likely to gain scientific ones.
▪ People are given the chance to gain a vocational qualification in areas as diverse as catering, working with horses and machinery.
▪ Students can count on company help to gain qualifications Tidy the desk, flick off the lights, and leave the building.
▪ Ponyboy hopes he will finish school and go on to university, so that he can gain qualifications and lead a better life.
▪ Students will have to produce a portfolio of work and successfully complete a written exam to gain a unit qualification.
▪ Seizing the opportunity to gain better qualifications actually puts you in charge and gives you a self-confidence charge.
recognition
▪ He has given the nurses every support in their efforts to gain recognition, and will speak at their conference.
▪ The brothers' work continued to stir interest and gain recognition.
▪ The importance of this enabling approach is, happily, gaining greater recognition.
▪ M that he began to gain recognition as an offensive coordinator with an effective wide-open attack and the ability to groom quarterbacks.
▪ To gain attention and recognition we need to be able to attend to and recognise others.
▪ Some remained essentially local, some gained a widespread popular recognition, and certain deities rose to national significance.
▪ To gain recognition unions had to accept the logic and rules of the capitalist system.
reputation
▪ It was now that she gained her reputation for eccentricity.
▪ Loeb, the newspaper publisher, gained a national reputation as a spiteful manipulator of politics.
▪ He gained a reputation as a practical joker, yet at the same time could be quite morose.
▪ Both were gaining reputations as the key entrepreneurs of their time.
▪ Vindicated by events, she gained a reputation for courage and devotion to principle.
▪ What they needed, they decided, was to set up a nursery themselves to gain a corporate reputation.
▪ Joe quickly gained a reputation as a Washington host of verve and style.
respect
▪ But more than 80 % of people thought it was harder for women to gain respect in some foreign cultures.
▪ He also knew that this was Lennie's chance to gain some respect from the other men, especially Curley.
▪ He gained their respect and they his.
▪ Both had been ridiculed, struggled for sponsors and money and both had gained respect for their efforts.
▪ It is difficult to gain their respect as an adult.
▪ Get yourself somewhere to live and gain her respect again.
▪ Adam quickly gained the respect of the soldiers and popularity with those officers whose currency was not to deal in rumour.
▪ To gain respect in this infuriating but somehow compelling man's eyes?
seat
▪ Labour had gained over 130 seats, and for the first time in history it was the strongest party in the state.
▪ Since Sanders generally votes Democratic, the Democrats need to gain an additional 20 seats to win control of the House.
▪ Labour scored its biggest successes in London, where it gained a dozen seats on an above-average swing of 3.4 percent.
▪ The winner would gain a seat on the City Council and would automatically be named mayor.
▪ Labour gained one seat but lost two in the by-election following appointment of aldermen.
▪ Republicans gained two seats in the Senate and now enjoy a 55-45 majority in the Senate.
▪ In elections in 1921 Mussolini won a seat in Milan, and his party gained 35 of 535 seats in the country.
▪ It gained an additional eight seats in the North West, but the swing there was only 2.0 percent.
share
▪ Each has been trying to outbid the rest in an attempt to gain market share and so exploit economies of scale.
▪ Mr Petty is hoping to gain market share by lowering prices on popular menu combinations under a new three-tiered pricing program.
▪ Telephones, photocopiers, word processors and computers are all there at our fingertips, allowing us to gain and share information.
▪ Some groups, such as the farmers and the labor unions, now gained a greater share in power and its benefits.
▪ Premiumpriced wines have also gained share, while the generic table wines have grown much more slowly.
▪ Only one in four cable channels managed to gain market share in prime time last year.
▪ Human Genome Sciences gain boosted shares of other biotechnology companies, many of which are based in southern Maryland.
support
▪ A man better placed to gain the support of the Visigoths was Avitus, praetorian prefect of Gaul from 439.
▪ But gaining that support was not a foregone conclusion.
▪ This group must put across its views and gain popular support and understanding for its campaign.
▪ We have swallowed our anger, presented a respectable front, in our bid to gain public support.
▪ It would not be surprising if, to gain popular support for emancipationist petitions, reformers had to work very hard.
▪ To do this it had to gain the support, both of the judiciary and the public, for its new measures.
▪ Twenty years ago when both these causes were beginning to gain wide support, many people saw them as clashing.
▪ After giving testimony in 1997 and 1998, Levar had tried several times to gain financial support and asylum in another country.
understanding
▪ To gain an understanding of the persistence and excellence of black sportsmen, the analysis has to begin in the eighteenth century.
▪ The principal aim of this exploratory research is to gain a better understanding of franchising and the franchising decision.
▪ To gain a thorough understanding of the concepts presented, the reader is referred to the bibliography.
▪ To gain a richer understanding of the problem of holism we must therefore distinguish it from the problem of determinism.
▪ It is difficult to see how avoiding teaching about what is distinctive of religion can help people gain an understanding of it!
▪ We are gaining greater knowledge, understanding, sensitivity, and appreciation.
▪ They can give the same information as the text, giving the reader two opportunities of gaining clear understanding.
weight
▪ They gained weight, and may have stayed at that weight for some time.
▪ Although a few are thin, most have been gaining weight.
▪ Although he ate nothing afterwards he continued to gain weight thanks to the presence of the Troll flesh.
▪ Several studies have shown that the physical stresses of repeatedly gaining and losing weight are linked with earl, deaths.
▪ Until then, the poor rule may even gain weight.
▪ Of the eight whose measurements did change, three had fatter thighs, partly because they gained weight.
▪ Those women who need to gain weight are treated like a rare breed.
▪ In the 1870s, after all, when plumpness was in vogue, physicians had encouraged people to gain weight.
yards
▪ Greer gained 74 yards on 18 carries, including 43 yards on 12 attempts after Streets went down.
▪ Minnesota gained 74 yards rushing in its three previous games combined.
▪ Denson also gained 92 yards rushing.
▪ He goes on to become the first rookie since 1986 to gain 1, 000 yards receiving.
▪ Williams and Kaufman each gained 54 yards....
▪ He was backed up by true freshman Marcus Fields, who gained 90 yards on 19 carries.
▪ They chewed up the clock, gained some yards on the ground, even handled the safety blitz.
▪ Kaufman gained just 13 yards on 11 carries.
■ VERB
lose
▪ So ask your building society what you could lose or gain from a remortgage.
▪ As the underdog here, they have nothing to lose and everything to gain.
▪ At Oxford he lost his faith but gained a first at Balliol, in Law.
▪ San Diego, of course, lost everything that Tucson gained, and jobs were simply moved from one pocket to another.
▪ He has lost everything and gained a faith, and he knows that in the chapel a flame burns for him.
▪ The attack recovered the lost guns and gained control of a good part of the plateau.
▪ Nevertheless, modern nomenclature loses more than it gains.
▪ Some one else invested your profit-sharing for you, and made sure that you never lost and almost always gained.
stand
▪ On top of the recovery in demand, Forte stands to gain the full benefit of cost reductions of £40m made last year.
▪ If the government acted upon this report the Raika stood to gain certain privileges.
▪ What do you stand to gain in a wrongful dismissal case?
▪ Kitty probably stands to gain a couple mill.
▪ And finally, who stood to gain?
▪ Consumers, often preyed on during times of grief, stand to gain.
▪ Was it possible that Short was part of the conspiracy, that he stood to gain from his own horse being beaten?
▪ A gene in a splurge-weed cell stands to gain by promoting the reproduction of its cell.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
gain ground
▪ Dole feels that Forbes is gaining ground.
▪ For once, the index gained ground despite a decline in shares of Vodafone, the market's biggest stock.
▪ He was gaining ground on all of them, he had the beating of them yet.
▪ Martin also gained ground on Gordon, finishing sixth and moving within 87 points.
▪ Nationalism has gained ground to the extent that it has begun to claim mainstream status.
▪ The fierce campaign by several anti-Maastricht movements has been gaining ground.
▪ The trend gained ground in the United States, where early symphony audiences ached to exude social refinement.
gain/get access (to sth)
▪ The police managed to gain access through an upstairs window.
▪ Dietary calcium gains access to the organism mostly by transport in the small intestine.
▪ Environmentalists fear that many citizens will simply forge documents in order to gain access to the city centre.
▪ Joe quickly gained access to the upper reaches of both Washingtons.
▪ Once you realise that some blocks need to be matched early, in order to gain access to others, things get tougher.
▪ Security is maintained by terminal operators using unique identification and password codes to gain access to the system.
▪ There is no evidence that the intruder gained access to the source code for Office or any Windows products.
▪ What Renaissance culture was and how we gain access to it increasingly became seen as problematic.
▪ You gain access to your data by typing in a user name and password.
have/gain the upper hand
▪ Police have gained the upper hand over the drug dealers in the area.
▪ But slowly and surely the followers of Chaos gained the upper hand.
▪ If the two had been introduced simultaneously, the larger one would invariably have the upper hand.
▪ Now White gains the upper hand.
▪ Officials said they might reopen the freeway at 5 p. m. today, perhaps sooner if firefighters gain the upper hand overnight.
▪ The world can only pray that they do not gain the upper hand.
▪ Under the proposed law, she would have the upper hand.
▪ We must destroy them now, while we yet have the upper hand.
▪ When you have a gun you have the upper hand, it makes you feel big, bad.
no pain, no gain
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A new-born baby will gain weight at around one ounce per day.
▪ Detroit gained a spot in the finals with a 4-0 victory over Toronto.
▪ Hawaii gained statehood in 1959.
▪ His ideas are gaining a lot of support.
▪ It took her a long time to gain enough confidence to speak in public.
▪ She stayed in the job for give years, gaining valuable experience.
▪ The four men told the inquiry they did not know why the plane failed to gain height after it took off.
▪ The train rolled forward, gaining speed rapidly.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But she never uses her personality to gain a career advantage.
▪ In the trite words of many a wedding speech, they have gained a son or daughter.
▪ Labour gained one seat but lost two in the by-election following appointment of aldermen.
▪ Perhaps it would be best to defeat the Foundation and gain the power Wienis spoke of.
▪ Royal Insurance Holdings continued to ignore the drip of the John Spalvin share sales, gaining at one time 20p.
▪ Seeing this, finally suspecting, the auditor was able to gain her confidence and locate the despair charges.
▪ The Bloomberg Minnesota Index gained 1. 04 to 131. 11.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
average
▪ The pros remain comfortably ahead in this series of overlapping six-month contests, measured both in overall score and average investment gain.
▪ During the 5 1 / 2-year period, the professionals have posted an average six-month investment gain of 10. 5 %.
▪ The average weight gain after lunch was about 2.5 pounds, which is appropriate in normal cases.
big
▪ His remarks, in a television interview, followed big electoral gains by the anti-immigrant far-right National Front. -Reuter.
▪ Sizzling sectors like the Internet brought big gains to buyers of Netscape.
▪ But privatisation offers the best hope of producing even bigger gains in the years ahead.
▪ The biggest monthly job gain during the year for Virginia was 29, 000 in April.
▪ On 26 May the left made big gains in local elections in Dijon.
▪ Shares of small Contractors, especially, have posted big gains since the announcement.
▪ Donnie Anderson had several big gains.
▪ The biggest gains and the most bitter disputes arise over trades between north and south.
capital
▪ Such an argument relies on the capital gains being unanticipated.
▪ The capital gains on the transactions are deferred until they complete the transaction at a future date by replacing the borrowed shares.
▪ The assumption made is that the capital gain or loss occurs evenly over the remaining life of the bond.
▪ President Clinton has said he may be willing to accept some kind of capital gains cut.
▪ Whatever some fiscal economists may say, capital gains are not the same as income.
▪ By eliminating this technique to raise cash without realizing a capital gain, the Treasury proposes to force investors to pay up.
▪ And, as gilt prices rise when interest rates fall, you should also be sure of a capital gain.
▪ A flat tax, he wrote in December 1994, would eliminate taxes on capital gains, dividends, interest and estates.
early
▪ Sun Life Assurance lost much of an early gain but managed to close 10p higher at 1,123p.
▪ The early gains from the stock market rally begot a feeling of invincibility.
▪ Stocks lost early gains after the Nationalist change in tactics.
▪ But stocks and bonds lost all their early gains by the end of the day.
▪ The market lost its earlier gains on perceptions the coldest temperatures came in areas where previous frost damage forced an early harvest.
economic
▪ Never was economic gain, as well as the consideration of military security which we mentioned earlier, more clearly in evidence.
▪ Moreover, many of the economic gains were created by government intervention and monitoring.
▪ Rising unemployment in the countryside has cancelled out the economic gains of the early-1980s reforms.
▪ The increase in the incomes of elite workers is only relative; it does not result from their own stellar economic gains.
▪ Although inequality has increased, the economic gains have not generally been by the rich at the expense of the poor.
▪ Many officials in Hanoi had hoped the lifting of the trade embargo in February 1994 would lead to quicker economic gain.
▪ The economic gain from foreign contracts is not worth the risk to national property.
▪ Formerly enthusiastic, Saigon businessmen now called for caution, preferring to consolidate their economic gains in Cochinchina.
financial
▪ Moreover, many nonconformists achieved considerable professional reputations and financial gain through private patronage from the native intelligentsia and the foreign community.
▪ These people were entrepreneurs who undertook challenge not for financial gain, but for human service.
▪ The point about a woman using her uterus for financial gain poses two problems.
▪ They may exchange short term financial gain for longterm strategic disadvantage.
▪ They are using it - milking it for their own financial gain.
▪ It would not be considered a serious loss by the company and the financial gain to the robbers was not necessarily substantial.
▪ There is little support for the idea that Shipman killed for financial gain.
great
▪ If the loss if greater than the gain then the job holder should leave.
▪ The greatest gains in in-come and wealth have come to the top one-half of one percent of the population.
▪ That is a great gain from the reforms.
▪ As these examples indicate, there have been great environmental gains in traffic restraint areas, quite apart from the traffic improvements.
▪ Lancaster was also responsible for his marriage, which took place about 1308 and led to still greater gains.
huge
▪ Whenever I come across it now, I think of the huge commercial gain awaiting the person who can provide it.
▪ They are funds known for churning out huge gains one year, only to slide off the cliff the next.
▪ The Republicans also made huge gains in Congress.
▪ The midterm elections brought huge Republican gains.
▪ Any minor problems that exist are much more noticeable when the guitar is used with huge amounts of gain.
▪ Historically, the emergence of parliament as the source of legal authority was a huge gain for humanity.
▪ Attainment of such huge signal power gain is of the greatest electronic significance.
large
▪ In 1995 the Dow Jones industrial average rose 33 percent, the largest gain since 1975 and the fourth biggest ever.
▪ The Nikkei index rose 1,252.51 points, to close at 17,850.66, recording the fifth largest single-day gain on record.
▪ The largest gains were made during the past 20 years of affirmative action policies, Herrera and others say.
▪ In fact, quite large amounts of gain reduction can be applied before the signal starts to show signs of being squashed.
▪ That followed much larger gains in November and December when the legislated increase in the federal minimum wage was a factor.
▪ The broader market posted a larger gain, with the Standard&038;.
▪ The last larger gain occurred in 1988.
modest
▪ The prospect of good wages and modest gains provided ample inducement to serve; but there were no doubt other motives as well.
▪ But even such modest gains were expensive.
▪ Still, the fact that closing Napster may bring only modest gains makes the case a closer call.
▪ Growing concerns about profit margins sent technology stocks sharply lower, overshadowing modest gains for blue-chip stocks.
▪ The sterling-denominated funds have recorded relatively modest gains across a narrow spread of returns.
net
▪ A closed system is a system in which there is no net gain or loss of matter in the system.
▪ Between 1989 and 1991, large companies with 500 or more employees contributed a net gain of only 122, 000 jobs.
▪ Society would make a net gain by producing more films.
▪ Florida had a net gain of 127, 180, followed by California with about 61, 000.
▪ So the net welfare gains of allowing free movement of capital are equal to area 8 plus half the shaded area.
▪ Total inflows minus total outflows results in the predicted net cash gain or loss during the month.
▪ In the 1990s, the South had a net gain of 326,000 adult blacks from the rest of the country.
▪ But the Democratic Party needs a net gain of only 20 seats.
personal
▪ One was said to have sold dozens of military engines for personal gain.
▪ Forsyth set out to monopolize the best view of the Falls for his personal gain.
▪ Equally important was the existence of a ruling class willing to put commercial considerations before personal gain.
▪ She denies any suggestion that she used her official position for personal gain.
▪ He suggested that people's interests are best served by pursuing personal gains.
▪ Several of the leading journals published articles directed against ambitious politicians who thought more of personal gain than of national welfare.
▪ He led a rather monastic, reclusive lifestyle and displayed a complete disregard for personal gain.
▪ High slack systems, then, are often hotbed of deceptive activities that cover up the exercise of power for personal gain.
political
▪ Gore could not afford to run the risk of seeing his hard-won political gains evaporate in a populist revolt over fuel costs.
▪ Where's the political gain for such pain?
▪ Some say the governor is simply pandering to the populace for political gain.
▪ In other words the incident is exploited for personal, political, etc. gain.
▪ But its political gains have been slow in coming.
potential
▪ The potential gain from rail privatization would be a more commercial railway and a better service for the public.
▪ At no time can I remember ever being stopped from pursuing an objective which was of ultimate potential gain to the company.
▪ Similarly, a fall in the rate of interest means a potential capital gain for investors.
▪ An opportunity should never be judged by the size of the potential gains but by the likelihood of those gains.
▪ Do not be tempted to start a harder routine at the beginning as this will almost certainly detract from the potential gains.
private
▪ He castigated those who had become wealthy by exploiting their political standing for private gain.
▪ In this view, men starved amid abundance because goods were produced for private gain and not for public good.
▪ These private gains are also social gains, since society can use less resources to achieve the same output.
▪ It is not clear whether Fanglin's children were being mobilised to pay school bills or were exploited for private gain.
real
▪ However in commercial bargaining or in interchanges between departments or divisions both sides may emerge with a real gain.
▪ Yet the real energy gain in fuels does not come from burning the carbon component of hydrocarbons, but the hydrogen portion.
▪ You will need to do the sums carefully to see whether there is any real gain.
▪ Nevertheless, some real gains came out of it.
▪ With inflation expected to run at about 5 percent, these boosts represent real gains.
▪ So does frustration over the absence of any real change or any real performance gains.
▪ That real gain matched that of December and was above the 0.1 percent increases in both October and November.
significant
▪ The Greens Vihret made significant gains, increasing their seats from four to 10.
▪ Nicholson inherits a party that has made significant gains across the country the past four years.
▪ This produced a significant efficiency gain with negligible, if any, loss of accuracy.
▪ ProSieben showed the most significant gain of the three, rising 5.4 per cent to Euros 33.10.
▪ Tests will be derived by checking whether generalisations of a model under scrutiny lead to significant gains.
▪ The men of Second Army, pushing either side of the Menin Road, made significant gains.
small
▪ Such small gains were incentive enough for many.
▪ This was the smallest gain in seven months.
▪ That was no small gain to set in the balance against the more obvious Erastianism of the new system.
▪ As small as these gains seem, they infuriated the Klan.
▪ For example, when sodium chloride dissolves in water, there is a small net gain in energy.
▪ Such were the small gains to be made from a playing career at the very top.
strong
▪ With the economy behaving in almost perfect fashion, stock prices enjoyed some of their strongest gains in years.
▪ Last spring he began selling short some of the same technology stocks that had earlier generated strong gains for Crabbe Huson Special.
▪ High technology stocks fared unexpectedly well, however, with most of them suffering only moderate losses while some made strong gains.
substantial
▪ But despite those substantial gains, bold statements about fighting every seat in the next general election were no longer heard.
▪ There seemed to be so few substantial gains in his own country.
▪ Both Central and Carlton shares have made substantial gains following today's announcement.
▪ Certainly this is desirable if the Target shares have accrued a substantial gain.
▪ As most of the privatisation issues are sold at a discount, there is usually a substantial capital gain to be made.
▪ Only where the multinationals' power has been harnessed have substantial gains in income-elastic goods been achieved.
territorial
▪ After the war Stalin did not wish to give up these territorial gains.
▪ Other territorial gains had been short-lived.
total
▪ If each stage has a gain of a hundred, that's a total gain of a million.
■ NOUN
control
▪ Recurrent networks can perform functions such as automatic gain control or energy normalization and selecting a maximum in complex systems.
▪ Also note that the gyro gain control is similarly limited by the mechanical linkage and this too can only reduce the response.
productivity
▪ The only productivity gain that he can show for it is in the courts.
▪ Meanwhile, the problems of stagnant wages, low savings and sluggish productivity gains will remain unsolved.
tax
▪ Instead, you can use your annual capital gains tax exemption-currently £7,200-to shelter the returns from the taxman.
▪ The present capital-gains tax maximum is 28 percent for individuals and 35 percent for corporations.
▪ Capital gains tax has been slashed.
▪ Such a transaction, instead of a sale, would avoid about $ 1 billion in capital-gains taxes.
▪ Any prizes are free of income tax and capital gains tax.
▪ The debate is over and the verdict is in on capital gains taxes.
▪ The capital gains tax controversy coincides with another heated national debate affecting white people.
▪ To conservatives, it means abolishing the capital gains tax, lowering the top rate on millionaires.
weight
▪ The effect of overeating is weight gain, which in itself is an added stress.
▪ In a vicious cycle, weight gain increases insulin resistance increases weight gain.
▪ Body weight gain was checked every week.
▪ And other studies show exercise plays a major role in both prevention of weight gain and maintenance of weight loss.
▪ Parents may also need some advice and discussion about the types of high-calorie food that are important for weight gain and growth.
▪ The average weight gain after lunch was about 2.5 pounds, which is appropriate in normal cases.
▪ Measurements of dry weight gain showed a marked decline in relative growth rate below 5°C.
▪ And eating more than you expend ends up in weight gain.
■ VERB
achieve
▪ Again, without this design for integration it will be very difficult to achieve the expected gains of databases and information systems.
▪ Hence it would be possible to achieve a Pareto gain, making some people better off without making anyone else worse off.
expect
▪ The stockholders' expected rate of return has two components-an expected dividend yield and an expected capital gain.
▪ In the fall, many analysts and retailers had expected sales gains in the mid-to high-single digits.
lose
▪ How does a donor lose and a recipient gain?
▪ If the winners actually compensated the losers, the winners could lose most of their gains.
▪ The years pass; he loses his hair, gains weight.
▪ Stocks lost early gains after the Nationalist change in tactics.
▪ Do men lose as well as gain from dominant discourses of gender?
▪ But stocks and bonds lost all their early gains by the end of the day.
▪ Subcontracting part of the project is likely to lose time rather than gain it.
▪ The market lost its earlier gains on perceptions the coldest temperatures came in areas where previous frost damage forced an early harvest.
make
▪ You do not invest in the equity market to make capital gains!
▪ Netscape held the early lead in the category, but Microsoft has made considerable gains more recently.
▪ The lowest quartile made gains 30 percent greater than their counterparts.
▪ Capital gains tax Here a tax is imposed when individuals part with an asset and make a capital gain on it.
▪ Meanwhile, Digital made gains in the market for Intel-based personal computers.
▪ The Holbrooke deal has made some important gains.
▪ How, then, can the company calculate whether or not his group has made a gain?
offset
▪ What is less certain is whether they have been, or will be, offset by corresponding gains.
▪ Earnings fell short of analysts' expectations, however, as increased problem loans partly offset revenue gains.
▪ Loss of Exchequer revenue has been considerable and has not been offset by any gain in total expenditure on health care.
post
▪ Stores posted healthy gains after reporting lively post-Christmas sales.
▪ Osborn said it would post a fourth-quarter pretax gain of $ 8. 1 million as a result of the sale.
▪ Shares of small Contractors, especially, have posted big gains since the announcement.
▪ The Dow Jones Industrial Average posted its best gain in two weeks.
▪ The broader market posted a larger gain, with the Standard&038;.
▪ Brady bonds may have already posted most of the gains they will achieve in 1996, Blessing said.
produce
▪ But privatisation offers the best hope of producing even bigger gains in the years ahead.
▪ In this view, men starved amid abundance because goods were produced for private gain and not for public good.
▪ Surely it is time that the pain produced some gain.
▪ The quarter just ended was the second in a row in which a tiny, aggressive fund produced the biggest gain.
▪ This exercise produces quite startling gains in a short time.
report
▪ Now, the company needs to report that gain or loss in its next earnings statement.
▪ Under the proposed rule, the company would only report the gain or loss when it is applied to the final sale.
▪ The company also reported sizable gains at the Jacksonville airport.
result
▪ The rate of tax on chargeable gains is that which results from adding the gain to the individual's total income.
▪ The exchange should result in a capital gain for Axa.
show
▪ Last weekend's small sample manual count, which showed marked Gore gains, shows that.
▪ The insurance sector was also showing healthy gains following its sharp return to profit.
▪ ProSieben showed the most significant gain of the three, rising 5.4 per cent to Euros 33.10.
▪ It would be surprising if the remaining model areas did not also show gains for the soft modes.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
gain ground
▪ Dole feels that Forbes is gaining ground.
▪ For once, the index gained ground despite a decline in shares of Vodafone, the market's biggest stock.
▪ He was gaining ground on all of them, he had the beating of them yet.
▪ Martin also gained ground on Gordon, finishing sixth and moving within 87 points.
▪ Nationalism has gained ground to the extent that it has begun to claim mainstream status.
▪ The fierce campaign by several anti-Maastricht movements has been gaining ground.
▪ The trend gained ground in the United States, where early symphony audiences ached to exude social refinement.
gain/get access (to sth)
▪ The police managed to gain access through an upstairs window.
▪ Dietary calcium gains access to the organism mostly by transport in the small intestine.
▪ Environmentalists fear that many citizens will simply forge documents in order to gain access to the city centre.
▪ Joe quickly gained access to the upper reaches of both Washingtons.
▪ Once you realise that some blocks need to be matched early, in order to gain access to others, things get tougher.
▪ Security is maintained by terminal operators using unique identification and password codes to gain access to the system.
▪ There is no evidence that the intruder gained access to the source code for Office or any Windows products.
▪ What Renaissance culture was and how we gain access to it increasingly became seen as problematic.
▪ You gain access to your data by typing in a user name and password.
have/gain the upper hand
▪ Police have gained the upper hand over the drug dealers in the area.
▪ But slowly and surely the followers of Chaos gained the upper hand.
▪ If the two had been introduced simultaneously, the larger one would invariably have the upper hand.
▪ Now White gains the upper hand.
▪ Officials said they might reopen the freeway at 5 p. m. today, perhaps sooner if firefighters gain the upper hand overnight.
▪ The world can only pray that they do not gain the upper hand.
▪ Under the proposed law, she would have the upper hand.
▪ We must destroy them now, while we yet have the upper hand.
▪ When you have a gun you have the upper hand, it makes you feel big, bad.
no pain, no gain
nothing ventured, nothing gained
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Companies just don't invest enough -- short-term gain is all they think about.
▪ He hopes the economic reforms will bring the country gain.
▪ If private hospitals are operating purely for gain, how can we be sure they have the patient's best interests at heart?
▪ Many stocks showed gains in heavy trading.
▪ Older children should be on a low-fat diet to prevent weight gain.
▪ Since World War II, there have been significant gains in medical technology.
▪ The morning's gains in US stocks fell sharply.
▪ The Nikkei average experienced a gain of 140.19 points on Friday.
▪ The share price ended the year with a 60% gain.
▪ Unfortunately, many companies are only concerned about short-term gains.
▪ Women have made economic, legal, and social gains.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Bass shift is already in, so all we need to look at are the gains and tones etc.
▪ He suggested that people's interests are best served by pursuing personal gains.
▪ Signal voltage gain is always accompanied by greater signal current attenuation and viceversa with a transformer.
▪ The strategic and other planning considerations relate to the volume and timing of development and also more recent matters such as planning gain.
▪ Those gains were made by the bottom 90 percent of households.
▪ White emphasizes the gains to be made from interaction be-tween each approach.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Gain

Gain \Gain\ (g[=a]n), n. [OE. gain, gein, ga[yogh]hen, gain, advantage, Icel. gagn; akin to Sw. gagn, Dan. gavn, cf. Goth. gageigan to gain. The word was prob. influenced by F. gain gain, OF. gaain. Cf. Gain, v. t.]

  1. That which is gained, obtained, or acquired, as increase, profit, advantage, or benefit; -- opposed to loss.

    But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ.
    --Phil. iii. 7.

    Godliness with contentment is great gain.
    --1 Tim. vi. 6.

    Every one shall share in the gains.
    --Shak.

  2. The obtaining or amassing of profit or valuable possessions; acquisition; accumulation. ``The lust of gain.''
    --Tennyson.

Gain

Gain \Gain\, n. [Cf. W. gan a mortise.] (Arch.) A square or beveled notch cut out of a girder, binding joist, or other timber which supports a floor beam, so as to receive the end of the floor beam.

Gain

Gain \Gain\, a. [OE. gein, gain, good, near, quick; cf. Icel. gegn ready, serviceable, and gegn, adv., against, opposite. Cf. Ahain.] Convenient; suitable; direct; near; handy; dexterous; easy; profitable; cheap; respectable. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]

Gain

Gain \Gain\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gained (g[=a]nd); p. pr. & vb. n. Gaining.] [From gain, n. but. prob. influenced by F. gagner to earn, gain, OF. gaaignier to cultivate, OHG. weidin[=o]n, weidinen to pasture, hunt, fr. weida pasturage, G. weide, akin to Icel. vei[eth]r hunting, AS. w[=a][eth]u, cf. L. venari to hunt, E. venison. See Gain, n., profit.]

  1. To get, as profit or advantage; to obtain or acquire by effort or labor; as, to gain a good living.

    What is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?
    --Matt. xvi. 26.

    To gain dominion, or to keep it gained.
    --Milton.

    For fame with toil we gain, but lose with ease.
    --Pope.

  2. To come off winner or victor in; to be successful in; to obtain by competition; as, to gain a battle; to gain a case at law; to gain a prize.

  3. To draw into any interest or party; to win to one's side; to conciliate.

    If he shall hear thee, thou hast gained thy brother.
    --Matt. xviii. 15.

    To gratify the queen, and gained the court.
    --Dryden.

  4. To reach; to attain to; to arrive at; as, to gain the top of a mountain; to gain a good harbor.

    Forded Usk and gained the wood.
    --Tennyson.

  5. To get, incur, or receive, as loss, harm, or damage. [Obs. or Ironical]

    Ye should . . . not have loosed from Crete, and to have gained this harm and loss.
    --Acts xxvii. 21.

    Gained day, the calendar day gained in sailing eastward around the earth.

    To gain ground, to make progress; to advance in any undertaking; to prevail; to acquire strength or extent.

    To gain over, to draw to one's party or interest; to win over.

    To gain the wind (Naut.), to reach the windward side of another ship.

    Syn: To obtain; acquire; get; procure; win; earn; attain; achieve.

    Usage: See Obtain. -- To Gain, Win. Gain implies only that we get something by exertion; win, that we do it in competition with others. A person gains knowledge, or gains a prize, simply by striving for it; he wins a victory, or wins a prize, by taking it in a struggle with others.

Gain

Gain \Gain\, v. i. To have or receive advantage or profit; to acquire gain; to grow rich; to advance in interest, health, or happiness; to make progress; as, the sick man gains daily. Thou hast greedily gained of thy neighbors by extortion. --Ezek. xxii. 12. Gaining twist, in rifled firearms, a twist of the grooves, which increases regularly from the breech to the muzzle. To gain on or To gain upon.

  1. To encroach on; as, the ocean gains on the land.

  2. To obtain influence with.

  3. To win ground upon; to move faster than, as in a race or contest.

  4. To get the better of; to have the advantage of.

    The English have not only gained upon the Venetians in the Levant, but have their cloth in Venice itself.
    --Addison.

    My good behavior had so far gained on the emperor, that I began to conceive hopes of liberty.
    --Swift.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
gain

late 15c., "that which has been acquired" (possessions, resources, wealth), from Middle French gain, from Old French gaaigne "gain, profit, advantage; work, business; booty; arable land" (12c.), from gaaignier "to gain, earn; capture, win" (see gain (v.)). Meaning "any incremental increase" (in weight, etc.) is by 1851. Related: Gains.\n

\nThe original French word enfolded the notions of "profit from agriculture" and "booty, prey." Neither the verb nor the noun gain is in Middle English, which however had gainage "profit derived from agriculture" (late 14c., from Old French gaaignage); gaineier "farmer" (late 13c. as a surname); gainerie "a farm" (mid-15c.).

gain

1520s, "obtain as profit," from Middle French gagner, from Old French gaaignier "to earn, gain; trade; capture, win," also "work in the fields, cultivate land," from Frankish *waidanjan "hunt, forage," also "graze, pasture," from Proto-Germanic *waithanjan "to hunt, plunder," from *waithjo- "pursuit, hunting" (cognates: Old English waþ "hunting," German Weide "pasture, pasturage," Old Norse veiðr "hunting, fishing, catch of fish"), from PIE *weie- "to strive after, pursue with vigor, desire" (see venison). Meaning "obtain by effort or striving" is from 1540s; intransitive sense of "profit, make gain" is from 1570s. Meaning "arrive at" is from c.1600. Of timepieces by 1861. Related: Gained; gaining. To gain on "advance nearer" is from 1719. To gain ground (1620s) was originally military.

Wiktionary
gain

Etymology 1 prep. (context obsolete English) against. Etymology 2

  1. 1 (context obsolete English) straight, direct; near; short. 2 (context obsolete English) suitable; convenient; ready. 3 (context dialectal English) easy; tolerable; handy, dexterous. 4 (context dialectal English) honest; respectable; moderate; cheap. adv. 1 (context obsolete English) straightly; quickly; by the nearest way or means. 2 (context dialectal English) suitably; conveniently; dexterously; moderately. 3 (context dialectal English) tolerably; fairly. Etymology 3

    n. 1 The act of gaining. 2 What is gained. 3 (context electronics English) The factor by which a signal is multiplied. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To acquire possession of what one did not have before. 2 (context intransitive English) To have or receive advantage or profit; to acquire gain; to grow rich; to advance in interest, health, or happiness; to make progress. 3 (context transitive dated English) To come off winner or victor in; to be successful in; to obtain by competition. 4 (context transitive English) To increase. 5 (context intransitive English) To be more likely to catch or overtake an individual. 6 (context transitive English) To reach. 7 To draw into any interest or party; to win to one's side; to conciliate. 8 (context intransitive English) To put on weight. 9 (context of a clock or watch English) To run fast. Etymology 4

    n. (context architecture English) A square or bevelled notch cut out of a girder, binding joist, or other timber which supports a floor beam, so as to receive the end of the floor beam.

WordNet
gain
  1. n. a quantity that is added; "there was an addition to property taxes this year"; "they recorded the cattle's gain in weight over a period of weeks" [syn: addition, increase]

  2. the advantageous quality of being beneficial [syn: profit]

  3. the amount of increase in signal power or voltage or current expressed as the ratio of output to input [syn: amplification]

  4. the amount by which the revenue of a business exceeds its cost of operating [ant: loss]

gain
  1. v. obtain; "derive pleasure from one's garden" [syn: derive]

  2. win something through one's efforts; "I acquired a passing knowledge of Chinese"; "Gain an understanding of international finance" [syn: acquire, win] [ant: lose]

  3. derive a benefit from; "She profited from his vast experience" [syn: profit, benefit]

  4. reach a destination, either real or abstract; "We hit Detroit by noon"; "The water reached the doorstep"; "We barely made it to the finish line"; "I have to hit the MAC machine before the weekend starts" [syn: reach, make, attain, hit, arrive at]

  5. obtain advantages, such as points, etc.; "The home team was gaining ground"; "After defeating the Knicks, the Blazers pulled ahead of the Lakers in the battle for the number-one playoff berth in the Western Conference" [syn: advance, win, pull ahead, make headway, get ahead, gain ground] [ant: fall back]

  6. rise in rate or price; "The stock market gained 24 points today" [syn: advance]

  7. increase in; "gain momentum"; "gain nerve"

  8. earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages; "How much do you make a month in your new job?"; "She earns a lot in her new job"; "this merger brought in lots of money"; "He clears $5,000 each month" [syn: take in, clear, make, earn, realize, realise, pull in, bring in]

  9. increase (one's body weight); "She gained 20 pounds when she stopped exercising" [syn: put on] [ant: reduce]

Wikipedia
Gain (accounting)

In financial accounting, a gain is the increase in owner's equity resulting from something other than the day to day earnings from recurrent operations, and are not associated with investments or withdrawals. Typical gains refer to nontypical and nonrecurring transactions, for instance, gain on sale of land, change in a stock’s market price, a gift or a chance discovery.

Gain (electronics)

In electronics, gain is a measure of the ability of a two port circuit (often an amplifier) to increase the power or amplitude of a signal from the input to the output port by adding energy converted from some power supply to the signal. It is usually defined as the mean ratio of the signal amplitude or power at the output port to the amplitude or power at the input port. It is often expressed using the logarithmic decibel (dB) units ("dB gain"). A gain greater than one (zero dB), that is amplification, is the defining property of an active component or circuit, while a passive circuit will have a gain of less than one.

The term gain alone is ambiguous, and can refer to the ratio of output to input voltage (voltage gain), current (current gain) or electric power (power gain). In the field of audio and general purpose amplifiers, especially operational amplifiers, the term usually refers to voltage gain, but in radio frequency amplifiers it usually refers to power gain. Furthermore, the term gain is also applied in systems such as sensors where the input and output have different units; in such cases the gain units must be specified, as in "5 microvolts per photon" for the responsivity of a photosensor. The "gain" of a bipolar transistor normally refers to forward current transfer ratio, either h ("Beta", the static ratio of I divided by I at some operating point), or sometimes h (the small-signal current gain, the slope of the graph of I against I at a point).

The gain of an electronic device or circuit generally varies with the frequency of the applied signal. Unless otherwise stated, the term refers to the gain for frequencies in the passband, the intended operating frequency range, of the equipment. The term gain has a different meaning in antenna design; antenna gain is the ratio of radiation intensity from a directional antenna to P/4π (mean radiation intensity from a lossless antenna).

Gain

Gain may refer to:

Gain (novel)

Gain (ISBN 0-374-15996-3) is a novel by Richard Powers published by in 1998. It intertwines two stories: the first is the history of Clare International, a chemical conglomerate with origins in soap manufacturing in the early 18th century; the second is of Laura Bodey, a 42-year-old divorcée living near Clare International's headquarters who develops ovarian cancer. It won the James Fenimore Cooper Prize for Best Historical Fiction in 1999.

Gain (projection screens)

Gain is a property of a projection screen, and is one of the specifications quoted by projection screen manufacturers.

Gain (detergent)

Gain is a brand of detergent made by Procter & Gamble.

Gain (laser)

In laser physics, gain or amplification is a process where the medium transfers part of its energy to the emitted electromagnetic radiation, resulting in an increase in optical power. This is the basic principle of all lasers. Quantitatively, gain is a measure of the ability of a laser medium to increase optical power.

Gain (EP)

Gain is an EP released by Sadie on December 30, 2009. It was released in 2 editions, a regular edition with the bonus track 'Regret' and a limited edition with a DVD containing the music video for 'ever' and also a slipcase.

Gain (singer)

Son Ga-in (born September 20, 1987), better known mononymously as Gain, is a South Korean singer, actress and entertainer. She is best known as a member of the South Korean girl group Brown Eyed Girls and for her appearances alongside Jo Kwon from 2AM for TV shows We Got Married and All My Love. As a solo artist she has released five EPs.

Usage examples of "gain".

But, as it was, he ably supported the exposed flank that Johnston so skillfully attacked, won the battle, inflicted losses a good deal larger than his own, and gained his ulterior objective as well as if there had not been a fight at all.

In high school, one of my all-time favorite pranks was gaining unauthorized access to the telephone switch and changing the class of service of a fellow phone phreak.

An experienced social engineer is able to gain access to virtually any targeted information by using the strategies and tactics of his craft.

SECURITY Security that relies on knowing where desired information is, and using a word or name to gain access to that information or computer system.

All he would need to gain access would be the standard user ID and password.

The direct actionists by their inflammatory speeches and writings are especially successful in gaining recruits from among the more disorderly elements of society, whereas the political actionists appeal rather to those persons who are opposed to the destruction of life and property.

We could not, I adjudged, shifting my knees lower on his barrel, gain the trees before true day.

But to do this, somebody must gain admittance to his cell, and who was to be taken into their confidence?

Little Court, to gain admittance if you may, with a request for audience with Prince Benedicte.

Lutea had found for her, they gained admittance to dump their burden, but then all of us were brusquely turned away.

And so the devil was not satisfied with instigating to a desire for riches and honors, but he went so far as to tempt Christ, for the sake of gaining possession of these things, to fall down and adore him, which is a very great crime, and against God.

I could offer them a way to be remembered forever in tales and gain an adulthood always honored: negotiate with the Jawas and me to secure the boundaries of their land and thus their nomadic way of life.

I am called Don Quixote of La Mancha, knight errant in search of adventures, and captive of the beauteous and peerless Dona Dulcinea of Toboso, and as recompense for the boon thou hast received from me, I desire only that thou turnest toward Toboso, and on my behalf appearest before this lady and sayest unto her what deeds I have done to gain thy liberty.

If your advertisement is in the business-to-business arena, it should gain inquiries and leads for the sales force by offering an incentive for a response.

The best illustration of this is outdoor advertising, where we literally have a few seconds to gain or lose the reader.