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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
ratio
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
average
▪ A comparison of the benefit with the cost produces an average benefit-cost ratio of 1.2: 1.
▪ Jefferies surveyed 122 REITs recently and found that the average estimated payout ratio for this year was 78 percent.
▪ Even at 26,230, the average p/e ratio was still 45.
▪ The average branching ratios of these grammars were reasonably high, compared with HARPY1.
branching
▪ The typical number of children of each internal node in a tree is called its branching ratio.
▪ The average branching ratios of these grammars were reasonably high, compared with HARPY1.
▪ Such a tree is called a binary tree, and of course its branching ratio is 2.
▪ The rules are beautifully simple, but its branching ratio is 300 or more and it is more subtle than chess.
▪ Hence, if all goals are deep or the branching ratio is large, it will be very slow.
▪ Also, an unexpressive language permits few operators, so the search's branching ratio is small.
▪ In addition, the branching ratio at the start is 64, and it never falls below 57.
▪ Since the branching ratio is so great, search at the lower level is a poor playing strategy.
capital
▪ The company also plans to improve its debt to capital ratio further, to 0.5.
▪ Under Czech banking law, all banks must meet a capital adequacy ratio of 8 percent.
▪ Although such ploys help to boost banks' capital ratios, they do not bring in new cash.
▪ The analysis has therefore concentrated on the effect on the capital labour ratio and on competitive factor returns.
▪ But concern mounted that the fall in the stock market may start to undermine banks' capital adequacy ratios.
high
▪ Our results suggest that the second is true: women with high waist-hip ratio have difficulty in becoming pregnant.
▪ The butt part has a higher ratio of lean to bone than the shank part and is often priced higher.
▪ A high ratio value implies that the band 7 value of that the band 5 and band 7 values were equal.
▪ Many sausage afficionados prefer an even higher ratio of fatback to meat.
▪ These men also had the highest standardised mortality ratio for all causes of death.
▪ Eventually, the economy comes back into balance with a higher savings ratio and a lower trade deficit.
▪ One of the major problems with electric vehicles has been the lack of a battery with a high power-to-weight ratio.
▪ The highest ratio was retail at 84. 1 percent compared to 86. 5 percent in 1996.
low
▪ They may simply go ahead and expand credit, and accept a lower liquidity ratio.
▪ Its 26. 6 employees per 10, 000 phone lines is one of the lowest ratios in the industry.
▪ Four observations were excluded because of low signal-to-noise ratio or background subtraction problems.
▪ The banks have tended to choose a lower liquidity ratio over the years, and certainly a lower cash ratio.
▪ Banks, being prepared to operate with a lower liquidity ratio, were only too pleased to supply the credit being demanded.
▪ Not surprisingly, there is generally a low ratio of members per volunteer-typically less than 5: 1.
standardised
▪ It is therefore crucial to include standardised mortality ratios alongside age weightings to correct for variations in life expectancy.
▪ These men also had the highest standardised mortality ratio for all causes of death.
▪ We also calculated standardised mortality ratios for all hypertensive patients.
▪ The sum of each subject's cumulative hazard of death was compared with observed deaths to find the standardised mortality ratio.
▪ There were no trends in standardised mortality ratios from cardiovascular disease or other causes with the number of previous pregnancies.
▪ Death rates were expressed as standardised mortality ratios, with the national average as 100.
▪ The overall death rate from cardiovascular disease was close to the national average, the standardised mortality ratio being 94.
▪ However, because deprivation is also associated with excess mortality some of this is already picked up by including standardised mortality ratio.
■ NOUN
aspect
▪ In fact aspect ratios of 40 or more are needed for such uniformity to exist.
▪ Therefore, we can use the aspect ratio of Spacing between the boats.
▪ Some programs maintain the aspect ratio between width and height whilst scaling, thereby avoiding distortion.
▪ Observations with apparatuses of relatively small aspect ratio have led to interesting comparisons with theories to be discussed in Chapter 24.
▪ The shallower angle meant that the aspect ratio of chord to span was higher.
cash
▪ All banks need to maintain a cash ratio large enough to meet the cash requirements of their depositors.
▪ These cash ratio deposits are non-operational: in other words, the banks can not withdraw them.
▪ The banks have tended to choose a lower liquidity ratio over the years, and certainly a lower cash ratio.
▪ The bankers' deposits item in the balance sheet refers to the cash ratio and operational balances of the banks.
compression
▪ How do I tell the compression ratio and therefore which spark plugs to use?
▪ The compression ratio is a high 12.7: 1.
debt
▪ The debt ratio fell to 65.9 per cent, down 19.4 percentage points from 85.3 per cent last year.
▪ Belt-tightening would allow the debt ratio to fall faster or income-tax rates to be cut.
decidendi
▪ The relevant passages formed part of the Court of Appeal's ratio decidendi and the case can not sensibly be distinguished.
▪ What was the ratio decidendi of Pinnel's Case?
▪ The question arose after Donoghue v. Stevenson as to how broadly the ratio decidendi could be interpreted.
▪ The ratio decidendi of Donoghue v. Stevenson is open to two interpretations.
▪ It is 2 which amounts to the ratio decidendi of the case.
▪ Not every statement made in the course of a judgment is binding as part of the ratio decidendi of the case.
▪ It is not always easy to identify the ratio decidendi of a given case.
▪ Too much emphasis on the search for the ratio decidendi of cases can be misleading.
dependency
▪ Consequently dependency ratios for future decades are again only best estimates and not real facts.
▪ The bond-#dependency ratio peaked this fiscal year, he said.
▪ I shall discuss the implications of the dependency ratio for the construction of family obligations in more detail in chapter 3.
▪ The dependency ratio is expected to top 28 percent next year for the second year in a row, economists said.
▪ There has been an increase in the dependency ratio because of several factors.
▪ Second, the typical dependency ratio assumes that all those aged 16 - 64 are gainfully employed.
▪ The nature of employment is also being affected by the increase in the dependency ratio.
▪ Calculating dependency ratios retrospectively or for current circumstances is not problematic.
isotope
▪ Measurements of the resulting isotope ratios closely approximated those found in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites.
likelihood
▪ The likelihood ratio test statistic shown above is a formalization of this.
▪ The Wald test is equivalent to the likelihood ratio test in large samples.
▪ The crucial difference with the likelihood ratio test is that the models that provide the's and's can be highly non-linear.
liquidity
▪ Banks' liquidity ratio may vary Banks may choose a different liquidity ratio.
▪ They may simply go ahead and expand credit, and accept a lower liquidity ratio.
▪ An example of a statutory liquidity ratio was the minimum 121/2 percent reserve assets ratio imposed on banks from 1971 to 1981.
▪ The ratio of an institution's liquid assets to illiquid assets is known as its liquidity ratio.
▪ If a financial institution's liquidity ratio is too high, it will make too little profit.
▪ Profitability High liquidity ratios indicate short-term financial strength but do not measure efficiency of utilization of resources.
▪ In other words, the banks operate a 10 percent liquidity ratio.
mortality
▪ It is therefore crucial to include standardised mortality ratios alongside age weightings to correct for variations in life expectancy.
▪ Thus the perinatal mortality ratio is the sum of the late fetal death ratio and the under-7-day mortality rate.
▪ These men also had the highest standardised mortality ratio for all causes of death.
▪ We also calculated standardised mortality ratios for all hypertensive patients.
▪ The sum of each subject's cumulative hazard of death was compared with observed deaths to find the standardised mortality ratio.
▪ There were no trends in standardised mortality ratios from cardiovascular disease or other causes with the number of previous pregnancies.
▪ Death rates were expressed as standardised mortality ratios, with the national average as 100.
▪ The overall death rate from cardiovascular disease was close to the national average, the standardised mortality ratio being 94.
payout
▪ Most firms appear to have a target payout ratio of dividends to long-run reported earnings.
▪ Stocks with higher yields are more likely to have higher payout ratios.
▪ Given this measure, dividends per share are determined by where is the target dividend payout ratio.
▪ Apartments had an estimated 78. 1 percent payout ratio compared to 82. 8 percent last year.
▪ The management have confidence in future earnings growth and the maintenance of the target payout ratio. 2.
▪ The important result is that in an uncertain world companies like to maintain a stable payout ratio over the long run.
weight
▪ It was claimed that this gives an improved warmth to weight ratio of around 25 percent and decreased bulk.
▪ The hydrogen to carbon weight ratio Provides another simple quantitative argument favoring the use of natural gas and coal to replace oil.
▪ Down: The soft plumage of water fowl, minimum weight ratio 85% down, 15% feathers.
▪ The hydrogen to carbon weight ratio of residual oil is approximately 1 to 9.
▪ Down and Feather: A mixture of the two, minimum weight ratio 51% down, 49% feathers.
▪ Percentage may be expressed either as volume or weight ratios.
■ VERB
calculate
▪ Holmes calculated a ratio of approximately 2.4:1.
▪ The labelling index was calculated as the ratio of Ki-67 positive to negative cells per crypt.
▪ Sharpe calculated a benchmark ratio using the Dow Jones Industrial Average as a proxy for the market portfolio.
▪ We also calculated standardised mortality ratios for all hypertensive patients.
▪ A total labelling index was calculated as the ratio of labelled cell to total cell numbers for each column.
express
▪ In these conditions serum pepsinogen C provides additional diagnostic information, especially when expressed as pepsinogen A:C ratio.
▪ Comparisons between ions are then expressed as a radius ratio, the ratio of the cation radius to the anion radius.
▪ This amount may be expressed as a ratio of the amount of useful information compared to the amount of redundant information.
▪ Death rates were expressed as standardised mortality ratios, with the national average as 100.
increase
▪ This is where the government increases the ratio of bonds to bills.
▪ His recovery of survival potential increased in ratio to the amount of energy freed from the engram bank.
▪ The percentage of women who became pregnant fell with increasing waist-hip ratio from 63% to 32%.
show
▪ Table 3.1 below shows the ratio of females to males convicted for certain crimes and makes clear the male domination of criminality.
▪ Table 8-8 shows the ratio of personal debt to disposable personal income.
▪ Three of the first five runs showed ratios between 1.5 and 2, implying excess neutrons of between 50 and 100 percent.
▪ A formula of an ion shows the ratio of atoms of each element present in the ion.
▪ The empirical formula shows the simplest ratio of the number of atoms or ions in a substance.
▪ Even so, by 1987, the Sinfield and Fraser estimate shows an overall ratio of eighteen unemployed to every job vacancy.
▪ Right axis shows the ratio of dissociation constants for a mutant and wild-type receptor.
▪ Even concordant Crohn's disease twins affected by the disease usually showed very dissimilar subclass ratios.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a school where the ratio of students to teachers is about 5:1
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Relative risks were estimated as matched odds ratios by conditional maximum likelihood methods.
▪ The ratio is similar to Rainbird.
▪ The ratio means that for every $ 100 of orders shipped by chipmakers, $ 109 in new orders were received.
▪ The butt part has a higher ratio of lean to bone than the shank part and is often priced higher.
▪ The inventory-to-shipment ratio in November was revised to 116. 2 from an initial 116. 4.
▪ The significant difference is that our interpretation of the capital-output ratio includes variable capital, not merely fixed capital stock.
▪ This will help with recommendations such as the ratio between sheet thickness, width and the distances between glazing bar centres.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
ratio

Geometric \Ge`o*met"ric\, Geometrical \Ge`o*met"ric*al\, a. [L. geometricus; Gr. ?: cf. F. g['e]om['e]trique.]

  1. Pertaining to, or according to the rules or principles of, geometry; determined by geometry; as, a geometrical solution of a problem.

  2. (Art) characterized by simple geometric forms in design and decoration; as, a buffalo hide painted with red and black geometrical designs.

    Syn: geometric.

    Note: Geometric is often used, as opposed to algebraic, to include processes or solutions in which the propositions or principles of geometry are made use of rather than those of algebr

    1. Note: Geometrical is often used in a limited or strictly technical sense, as opposed to mechanical; thus, a construction or solution is geometrical which can be made by ruler and compasses, i. e., by means of right lines and circles. Every construction or solution which requires any other curve, or such motion of a line or circle as would generate any other curve, is not geometrical, but mechanical. By another distinction, a geometrical solution is one obtained by the rules of geometry, or processes of analysis, and hence is exact; while a mechanical solution is one obtained by trial, by actual measurements, with instruments, etc., and is only approximate and empirical.

      Geometrical curve. Same as Algebraic curve; -- so called because their different points may be constructed by the operations of elementary geometry.

      Geometric lathe, an instrument for engraving bank notes, etc., with complicated patterns of interlacing lines; -- called also cycloidal engine.

      Geometrical pace, a measure of five feet.

      Geometric pen, an instrument for drawing geometric curves, in which the movements of a pen or pencil attached to a revolving arm of adjustable length may be indefinitely varied by changing the toothed wheels which give motion to the arm.

      Geometrical plane (Persp.), the same as Ground plane .

      Geometrical progression, proportion, ratio. See under Progression, Proportion and Ratio.

      Geometrical radius, in gearing, the radius of the pitch circle of a cogwheel.
      --Knight.

      Geometric spider (Zo["o]l.), one of many species of spiders, which spin a geometrical we

    2. They mostly belong to Epeira and allied genera, as the garden spider. See Garden spider.

      Geometric square, a portable instrument in the form of a square frame for ascertaining distances and heights by measuring angles.

      Geometrical staircase, one in which the stairs are supported by the wall at one end only.

      Geometrical tracery, in architecture and decoration, tracery arranged in geometrical figures.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
ratio

1630s, "reason, rationale," from Latin ratio "reckoning, numbering, calculation; business affair, procedure," also "reason, reasoning, judgment, understanding," from rat-, past participle stem of reri "to reckon, calculate," also "think" (see reason (n.)). Mathematical sense "relationship between two numbers" is attested from 1650s.

Wiktionary
ratio

n. 1 A number representing a comparison between two things. 2 (context arithmetic English) The relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient). 3 (context legal English) Short for ratio decidendi.

WordNet
ratio

n. the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)

Wikipedia
Ratio

In mathematics, a ratio is a relationship between two numbers indicating how many times the first number contains the second. For example, if a bowl of fruit contains eight oranges and six lemons, then the ratio of oranges to lemons is eight to six (that is, 8:6, which is equivalent to the ratio 4:3). Thus, a ratio can be a fraction as opposed to a whole number. Also, in this example the ratio of lemons to oranges is 6:8 (or 3:4), and the ratio of oranges to the total amount of fruit is 8:14 (or 4:7).

The numbers compared in a ratio can be any quantities of a comparable kind, such as objects, persons, lengths, or spoonfuls. A ratio is written "a to b" or a:b, or sometimes expressed arithmetically as a quotient of the two. When the two quantities have the same units, as is often the case, their ratio is a dimensionless number. A rate is a quotient of variables having different units. But in many applications, the word ratio is often used instead for this more general notion as well.

Ratio (journal)

Ratio is a peer-reviewed academic journal of analytic philosophy, edited by David S. Oderberg ( Reading University) and published by Wiley-Blackwell. Although emphasising work predominantly from analytic philosophy, it does not exclusively publish in one tradition and includes a variety of philosophical topics. Ratio is published quarterly and in December publishes a special issue that is focused specifically on one area, calling on specialists in that field of study to contribute.

Ratio (disambiguation)

A ratio is a relationship between numbers or quantities.

Ratio may also refer to:

  • Ratio scale, a statistical level of measurement
  • Ratio Institute, a Swedish institute
  • Ratio (journal)
  • Ratio, Arkansas, a community in the United States
  • Ratio or reason, a philosophical concept

Usage examples of "ratio".

But I thought we ought also to declare our willingness, if the great commercial nations of the earth would agree, to establish a bimetallic system on a ratio to be agreed upon.

Wiedenfeld, De Exorcismi Origine, Mutatione, deque hujus Actus peragendi Ratione Neander, Church History, vol.

Craters with slumped walls, with modest depth-to-diameter ratios, with fine particles accumulated in their interiors tend to be more ancient, because they had to be around long enough for these erosive processes to come into play.

By the same token, the validity of a franchise tax, imposed on a domestic corporation engaged in foreign maritime commerce and assessed upon a proportion of the total franchise value equal to the ratio of local business done to total business, is not impaired by the fact that the total value of the franchise was enhanced by property and operations carried on beyond the limits of the State.

If physicians who are living in the neighborhood of the present residences of these graduates have been consulted by them in the same proportion with him, the inference is inevitable, that the ratio of invalidism among female college graduates is greater than even among the graduates of our common, high, and normal schools.

These ratios are intrinsically pitch translation invariant, so the significance of consonant ratios explains both how pitch translation invariance is achieved, and also why it exists as a precise frequency scaling.

The crew deserved a rest, and the locals would reduce the three-to-two male-female ratio that sometimes made a shoreside luau a little tense.

He and Aguilera, along with Mrat and Nath and Kralik, retreated off to the side to study diagrams and figures, arguing stress ratios with gestures and in a patois neither wholly Jao nor English.

Conclamat omnis multitudo et suo more armis concrepat, quod facere in eo consuerunt cuius orationem approbant: summum esse Vercingetorigem ducem, nec de eius fide dubitandum, nec maiore ratione bellum administrari posse.

I get requests for strontium and neodymium isotope ratios, and wish lists that get ridiculous.

Tanzanian Peaberry every time my blood-to-caffeine ratio exceeds a certain value.

It used to be that the largest shipboard confinement was just about big enough for one person, and the power demand for it was just about as high for a million to one confinement ratio as it was for a piddly little ten thousand to one rate.

In this form it states that a ray of light in transition between two media of different densities is refracted at their boundary surface so that the ratio of the angle which is formed by the ray in either medium with a line at right angles to the boundary surface is such that the quotient of the sines of both angles is for these media a constant factor.

This kind of spoliation, and popular enlightenment, are always in an inverse ratio to one another, for it is in the nature of abuses to go as far as possible.

The spreadsheet programs were easy to use once she learned what the various terms meant, like weight gain ratio and birth weight.