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cola
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Cola

Cola \Co"la\, n., L. pl. of Colon. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] ||

Cola

Cola \Co"la\, n. [NL., fr. a native name.] (Bot.) (a)

  1. A genus of sterculiaceous trees, natives of tropical Africa, esp. Guinea, but now naturalized in tropical America, esp. in the West Indies and Brazil. (b) Same as Cola nut, below.

  2. a dark-colored carbonated soft drink flavored with extract of the cola nut, and often colored with caramel; also, any soft drink similar in color and flavor to a cola-flavored drink. The name was predominantly derived from the popular soft drink Coca-Cola.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
cola

1795, genus of trees native to west Africa and introduced in New World tropics, Latinized form of a West African name of the tree (compare Temne kola, Mandingo kolo). Meaning "carbonated soft drink" is 1920, short for Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola.

Wiktionary
cola

n. (acronym of cost of living allowance English) n. (context internet acronym English) comp.os.linux.advocacy (a Usenet newsgroup)

WordNet
cola

See colon

colon
  1. n. the part of the large intestine between the cecum and the rectum; it extracts moisture from food residues before they are excreted

  2. the basic unit of money in El Salvador; equal to 100 centavos [syn: El Salvadoran colon]

  3. the basic unit of money in Costa Rica; equal to 100 centimos [syn: Costa Rican colon]

  4. a port city at the Caribbean entrance to the Panama Canal [syn: Aspinwall]

  5. a punctuation mark (:) used after a word introducing a series or an example or an explanation (or after the salutation of a business letter)

  6. [also: colones (pl), cola (pl)]

Wikipedia
Cola

Cola is a sweetened, carbonated soft drink, derived from drinks that contain contained caffeine from the kola nut and non- cocaine derivatives from coca leaves, flavored with vanilla and other ingredients. Most colas now use other flavoring (and caffeinating) ingredients with a similar taste. Colas became popular worldwide after pharmacist John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola in 1886. His non-alcoholic recipe was inspired by the coca wine of pharmacist Angelo Mariani, created in 1863.

Modern colas usually contain caramel color, caffeine and sweeteners such as sugar or high fructose corn syrup.

Cola (disambiguation)

Cola is a type of soft drink.

Cola may also refer to:

COLA (software architecture)

COLA stands for Combined Object Lambda Architecture, and is a system for experimenting with software design currently being investigated by the Viewpoints Research Institute. A COLA is a self-describing language in two parts, an object system which is implemented in terms of objects, and a functional language to describe the computation to perform.

Since a COLA is written in itself, the whole environment (when bootstrapped) can be rewritten and extended by programming with the COLA; in other words, it does not require more knowledge to rewrite a COLA than it does to write a program to run in it (as opposed to running Python code in CPython for example, which requires knowledge of C in order to reprogram the language).

This flexibility has led to the work-in-progress COLA called 'idst' becoming the implementation vehicle of choice for the Viewpoints Research Institute's research into 'reinventing programming', since it allows rapid creation and modification of new programming languages for study.

Cola (moth)

'Cola ' is a genus of moths of the Noctuidae family. It tends to extricate lots of malicious feces.

Cola (plant)

Cola is a genus of trees native to the tropical rainforests of Africa, classified in the family Malvaceae, subfamily Sterculioideae (or treated in the separate family Sterculiaceae). Species in this genus are sometimes referred to as Kola tree or Kola nut for the caffeine-containing fruit produced by the trees that is often used as a flavoring ingredient in beverages. The genus is related to the South American genus Theobroma, or cocoa. They are evergreen trees, growing up to 20 m tall (about 60 feet), with glossy ovoid leaves up to 30 cm long and star shaped fruit.

Cola (song)

"Cola" is a song by American singer and songwriter Lana Del Rey, taken from her third extended play, Paradise (2012), and the reissue of her debut studio album, Born to Die: The Paradise Edition (2012). "Cola" first appeared in a teaser trailer posted to her official YouTube account as a snippet. The lyrics were considered controversial, causing major media outlets to respond.

Usage examples of "cola".

Benardy, Berryer, de Berset, Basse, Betting de Lancastel, Blavoyer, Bocher, Boissie, de Botmillan, Bouvatier, le Duc de Broglie, de la Broise, de Bryas, Buffet, Caillet du Tertre, Callet, Camus de la Guibourgere, Canet, de Castillon, de Cazalis, Admiral Cecile, Chambolle, Chamiot, Champannet, Chaper, Chapot, de Charencey, Chasseigne, Chauvin, Chazant, de Chazelles, Chegaray, Comte de Coislin, Colfavru, Colas de la Motte, Coquerel, de Corcelles, Cordier, Corne, Creton, Daguilhon, Pujol, Dahirel, Vicomte Dambray, Marquis de Dampierre, de Brotonne, de Fontaine, de Fontenay, Vicomte de Seze, Desmars, de la Devansaye, Didier, Dieuleveult, Druet-Desvaux, A.

Sitting on the coffee table along with a couple open two-liter bottles of generic cola and some Dixie cups was a pitiful torn bag of stick pretzels and a small plastic container of cold supermarket guacamole dip.

To kill the morning taste in his mouth, he grabbed a can of diet cola from the refrigerator and popped the tab, then guzzled half of the disgusting stuff.

Sitting on her unrolled mat in the subaqueous light of a shuttered window which refused to give, she ate from her pack of food snacks and drank cola.

Cola di Rienzi that plunged Rome into anarchy, the plague came as the peak of successive calamities.

Cola, if I should die tomorrow, you have my full permission to anatomize me.

The red-haired man cursed roundly and pounded his fist on the table, knocking over the empty can of cola and causing the glass to bounce, sloshing soda on the tabletop.

The sim waiter brought out my cola and a bottle of Bardolino with two wine glasses.

Benardy, Berryer, de Berset, Basse, Betting de Lancastel, Blavoyer, Bocher, Boissie, de Botmillan, Bouvatier, le Duc de Broglie, de la Broise, de Bryas, Buffet, Caillet du Tertre, Callet, Camus de la Guibourgere, Canet, de Castillon, de Cazalis, Admiral Cecile, Chambolle, Chamiot, Champannet, Chaper, Chapot, de Charencey, Chasseigne, Chauvin, Chazant, de Chazelles, Chegaray, Comte de Coislin, Colfavru, Colas de la Motte, Coquerel, de Corcelles, Cordier, Corne, Creton, Daguilhon, Pujol, Dahirel, Vicomte Dambray, Marquis de Dampierre, de Brotonne, de Fontaine, de Fontenay, Vicomte de Seze, Desmars, de la Devansaye, Didier, Dieuleveult, Druet-Desvaux, A.

Birthday, the frequently-used black microwave that can be found in most college dorms, a counter with bread crumbs, cheese bits, and cola stains, a sink of dirty plastic dishes, two pastel green love-seats, and one square wooden coffee-table that also serves as a foot-stool.

She reached out and ordered her selections, cola, salad with the spiciest Thai dinner on the menu.

The path intersected the Margherita Bridge, Via Cola di Riezo, and passed through Piazza del Risorgimento, hitting no churches at all until it dead-ended abruptly at the center of St.

Nancy bought several large bottles of RC Cola, a six-pack of toilet paper, a pack of evil-looking black cigarillos, a bunch of bananas, and a pack of Doublemint chewing gum.

All had a very limited menu of quickly prepared, broiled or fried foods, and most always offered a choice of colas and root beer.

Far more threatening to a hamburger chain than shortages of sugar, cola, or coffee was the dwindling supply of meat.